Definition of 'crystal'

crystal

Word Frequency
In Top 1000 words

Definitions

1. countable A piece of glimmering, shining mineral resembling ice or glass.

2. countable A solid composed of an array of atoms or molecules possessing long-range order and arranged in a pattern which is periodic in three dimensions.

3. countable A piece of glimmering, shining mineral resembling ice or glass.

4. uncountable, slang crystal meth: methamphetamine hydrochloride.

5. countable A solid composed of an array of atoms or molecules possessing long-range order and arranged in a pattern which is periodic in three dimensions.

6. uncountable, slang crystal meth: methamphetamine hydrochloride.

7. uncountable A fine type of glassware, or the material used to make it.

8. uncountable A fine type of glassware, or the material used to make it.

9. Slang A stimulant drug, usually methamphetamine, in its powdered form.

10. A clear glass or plastic protective cover for the face of a watch or clock.

11. A homogenous solid formed by a repeating, three-dimensional pattern of atoms, ions, or molecules and having fixed distances between constituent parts.

12. Such objects considered as a group.

13. A natural or synthetic crystalline material having piezoelectric or semiconducting properties.

14. A high-quality, clear, colorless glass.

15. The unit cell of such a pattern.

16. An object, especially a vessel or ornament, made of such glass.

17. A mineral, especially a transparent form of quartz, having a crystalline structure, often characterized by external planar faces.

18. An electronic device containing such a material, as one that provides access to a radio frequency.

19. Slang A stimulant drug, usually methamphetamine, in its powdered form.

20. (Chem. & Min.) The regular form which a substance tends to assume in solidifying, through the inherent power of cohesive attraction. It is bounded by plane surfaces, symmetrically arranged, and each species of crystal has fixed axial ratios. See crystallization.

21. a transparent variety of calcite, or crystallized calcium carbonate, brought from Iceland, and used in certain optical instruments, as the polariscope.

22. A species of glass, more perfect in its composition and manufacture than common glass, and often cut into ornamental forms. See Flint glass.

23. (Chem. & Min.) The regular form which a substance tends to assume in solidifying, through the inherent power of cohesive attraction. It is bounded by plane surfaces, symmetrically arranged, and each species of crystal has fixed axial ratios. See crystallization.

24. Anything resembling crystal, as clear water, etc.

25. See under Blood.

26. The glass over the dial of a watch case.

27. any transparent crystal of quartz, particularly of limpid or colorless quartz.

28. See under Compound.

29. The material of quartz, in crystallization transparent or nearly so, and either colorless or slightly tinged with gray, or the like; -- called also rock crystal. Ornamental vessels are made of it. Cf. Smoky quartz, Pebble; also Brazilian pebble, under Brazilian.

30. a rock formed by the solidification of a substance; has regularly repeating internal structure; external plane faces

31. a protective cover that protects the face of a watch

32. a crystalline element used as a component in various electronic devices

33. a solid formed by the solidification of a chemical and having a highly regular atomic structure

34. glassware made of quartz

35. colorless glass made of almost pure silica

36. Fine glass used for table-vessels or other table-service, or for ornamental pieces. The term is sometimes used as synonymous with cut glass.

37. A substance resembling rock-crystal or glass in its properties, especially in transparency and clearness.

38. In optics. See refraction.

39. Glass. Glass of a high degree of transparency and freedom from color. It is heavier than ordinary glass, because containing much oxid of lead.

40. In chem. and mineralogy, a body which, by the operation of molecular attraction, has assumed a definite internal structure with the form of a regular solid inclosed by a certain number of plane surfaces arranged according to the laws of symmetry.

41. In heraldry, the color white: said of that color when described in blazoning a nobleman's escutcheon, according to the system of blazoning by precious stones; pearl, however, is more commonly used.

42. A very fine wide white durant, once used for making nuns' veils.

43. An English trade-name for a fine quality of white sugar.

44. The glass cover of a watch-case.

45. Clear or transparent: synonym: clear.

46. Clear or transparent: synonym: clear.

47. Consisting of, or like, crystal; clear; transparent; lucid; pellucid; crystalline.

48. Consisting of crystal, or like crystal; clear; transparent; pellucid.

Examples

1. The first commercially available liquid crystal lenses are expected to take between six and ten years.

2. The skin is also peeled with acid or blasted with tiny crystals to smooth it.

3. For this he received a crystal glass bowl.

4. Also seen were ice crystals actually tumbling out of the fog.

5. Inside are a shiny new penny and a small crystal.

6. They could see salt crystals in the flesh.

7. He was a world leader in quartz crystals.

8. Its advantage over a liquid crystal display at the present time is its superior brightness.

9. Is grinding whole peppercorns and chunky sea salt crystals the most satisfying of cooking rituals?

10. Let us make our position crystal clear: we are against this weather.

11. Another has a crystal chandelier sparkling above a wide double bed, as if in a palazzo.

12. The china and crystal were so clean, they sparkled.

13. Laser heating of single crystals in the rock showed the fragment to be 2.4 million years old.

14. It's more like crystal meth addiction.

15. To ramp up the glam, iron on tiny crystals to your hair with your straighteners.

16. crystal martini glasses probably aren't us.

17. As the bottle is opened, bubbles appear that the ice crystals latch on to.

18. Quick freezing methods form small ice crystals in the food which helps to reduce damage to the texture and flavour of the food.

19. But old habits die hard and having knocked a few chips off the rock crystal he began opening and closing the brooch a thousand times.

20. You need to make it crystal clear to your players that they must give 100 per cent and be absolutely up for the fight.

21. The villa comes with its own chef, swimming pool, marble staircase and crystal chandelier.

22. From time to time one comes across a turn of phrase, a descriptive passage, a metaphor so apt that it rings like lead crystal.

23. Q: Am I the only passenger whose primary reference for the term crystal ship is the song about heroin by the Doors?

24. In short the crystal is all about the exterior form, not about the displays or the experience inside the building.

25. Neither he nor the Titans are sharing those details from what he called his crystal ball.

26. Another commercial has a dumb office worker with a glass snow globe, which he calls his crystal ball.

27. She does this in crystal-clear syntax, where every clause demands our attention.

28. ‘Where possible, flawed sections are removed and larger crystals cut into smaller pieces with minimal wastage by splitting the crystal along natural cleavage planes.’

29. ‘In fact, it is easy to spot the planes of large ice crystals when you bite into the lolly.’

30. ‘Natural crystals, by contrast, all bear repeating patterns like those commonly found in the tiling of a bathroom floor.’

31. ‘Depending on the plane of section, crystals may appear as triangles or other shapes in thin section.’

32. ‘But because of their fivefold symmetry, icosahedral clusters can't combine to form a regular crystal.’

33. ‘Most ices and sorbets require beating or whisking regularly as they freeze, to break up the ice crystals.’

34. ‘It was still beautiful, brushed in white with ice crystals wrapping themselves around every branch and twig, but the vineyards and resorts I'd known were gone of course.’

35. ‘This month, NASA is conducting a field campaign in southern Florida to investigate high tropical cirrus clouds composed of tiny ice crystals.’

36. ‘Wiggling through fractured ice and snow crystals, they burrow as deep as three to six feet (one to two meters) beneath the surface of the ice.’

37. ‘These were at first unsuccessful; the fruits were mushy when thawed, since they had been frozen too slowly so that large ice crystals formed which disrupted their delicate tissues.’

38. ‘But scientists have long known that the freezing process creates ice crystals, which destroy cells and cellular structures.’

39. ‘Most plant cells rupture when jagged ice crystals form inside them, and if enough damage takes place, plants die.’

40. ‘Cirrus cloud usually forms above 16,000 feet where the temperature is below freezing, and the resultant cloud consists of many millions of ice crystals.’

41. ‘The pattern of diffracted rays and their intensity are determined from the arrangement of atoms and number of electrons on each atom in the crystal.’

42. ‘Scientists soon learned that they could use X-ray diffraction to learn how atoms and molecules were arranged in crystals.’

43. ‘Thus, the crystals have cleavage planes for the necessary migration aptitude.’

44. ‘The cleavage planes between prismatic stibnite crystals have been infilled by sphalerite.’

45. ‘If these photons are reflected back into the junction, by a cleavage plane in the crystal, for example, a standing wave can be established.’

46. ‘This peak is then used to make the slight correction necessary to bring the crystal oscillator and hence the microwave field exactly on frequency.’

47. ‘The crystal oscillator is suitable for any fundamental mode crystals in the 5 to 30MHz range.’

48. ‘A crystal connected to an alternating voltage source will vibrate, generating an alternating voltage.’

49. ‘Because atoms in a semiconductor crystal are adjacent, their action on one another causes electrons to pass energy continuously.’

50. ‘More accurate clocks based on the regular vibrations of a quartz crystal superseded them.’

51. ‘Somewhat darker, but no less impressive, is a similarly large crystal of smoky quartz from the Ural Mountains.’

52. ‘Simultaneously, large quartz crystal groups were formed on the ceiling and walls of the cavern.’

53. ‘Some are made of pure quartz crystal, but many are made of other types of stone found in abundance on Earth.’

54. ‘Certain crystals will split incoming light into two separate rays; Iceland spar is one such crystal, as are calcite and quartz.’

55. ‘Many of these calcite crystals and crystal groups are partially or completely covered with an overgrowth of pyrite.’

56. ‘Smoky Quartz is a powerful healing crystal and a grounder of excess energy.’

57. ‘Steward claims she would not have been able to compete in the marathon without the crystal to awaken her dormant mind power.’

58. ‘This opaque crystal is a powerful aura cleanser and can be used to clear sacred spaces.’

59. ‘Starting from the top of the body, hold one crystal in front and one behind the back and gently work your way down.’

60. ‘New Age practices such as occultism, crystal power and astrology are examples of spiritual but not religious pursuits of enlightenment.’

61. ‘Lifting up his glass of water, and noting the way the pure crystal glass glinted in the harsh light, he took a small sip from it.’

62. ‘There are over 40 varieties made from clay, marble, granite, brass, panchaloka, aluminium, papier-mâché rosewood, sandalwood, crystal glass etc.’

63. ‘There will also be a show of local crafts including fretwork, crystal glass, embroidery, dancing costumes, placemats, potted plants, flowers, and taxidermy.’

64. ‘The inside of the restaurant is splendid and elegant, decorated with green crystal glass screens dividing it into different dining areas with dazzling dragon wall sculptures.’

65. ‘The place was a mess; all the tables were either broken or burnt to cinders, crystal glass and china fragments littered the floor along with shattered cutlery and shredded table cloths.’

66. ‘‘There will be six pottery stalls, two selling stainless steel saucepans and one selling crystal glass,’ he said.’

67. ‘High-grade crystal glass has its own delicate sound.’

68. ‘Canoe camps range from fully catered varieties with luxury tents and crystal glass down to more basic operations where you put up your own mosquito net and join in with the cooking.’

69. ‘Alexander shouted impatiently, banging his crystal glass of whisky down on the desk and spilling it slightly.’

70. ‘Goods valued at thousands of euro, including crystal glass, have been taken by shoplifters, believed to be from Cork and Waterford, from a number of stores.’

71. ‘The other terms that confuse many are the words crystal, cut crystal, or crystal glass.’

72. ‘Chorusing male red-ruffed fruit crows sound like breath blown across a bottle, followed by a finger spun along the wet rim of a crystal glass.’

73. ‘Cut glass crystal was the mainstay and it took the intervention of fashion designers into the glass industry to turn the thinking around.’

74. ‘Whether it's made of glass or brass, cutglass crystal or ceramics, a vase is a thing of beauty, writes SURABHI KHOSLA.’

75. ‘But she remembered one dream in detail and knew it to be a dream: She was at a party in a mansion with large mirrored rooms and crystal chandeliers.’

76. ‘For instance, one room is completely walled in mirrors with huge crystal chandeliers hanging from the ceiling.’

77. ‘Although the magical scenery filled with priceless glass and crystal furnishings was spectacular and worth a closer look, the two had no time to marvel at it.’

78. ‘Expect the best crystal wine glasses, such as Schott or Riedel, in the correct shape for each wine, be it a Tempranillo or a Sauvignon Blanc.’

79. ‘To wash it all down, we stuck with the house white - an Australian wine, which is drunk from some new exquisite long stem crystal glasses.’

80. ‘I used the best china, crystal, and silver for the table.’

81. ‘The company is cutting jobs and closing plants to save money as demand ebbs for its china dinner services, glassware and crystal because consumers are spending less.’

82. ‘Lace tablecloth, lace napkins, her mother's best china and Waterford crystal, and real silver silverware.’

83. ‘But the real highlight of the trip was dinner, served in the opulent dining cars by candlelight on linen, with crystal, flowers and silverware.’

84. ‘Tables seating two to 10 are set with fine linen, china, silver, and crystal.’

85. ‘The table is set as usual, with great attention to detail, with glimmering silver and shining crystal, but today I cannot find any delight in it.’

86. ‘Many little crystal and silver figures were placed on the ledge.’

87. ‘Take larger valuables such as the family crystal, silverware, and china, and pack them away.’

88. ‘I held my breath until he set the glass down on the counter envisioning what would happen to us if we broke a piece of Mother's crystal.’

89. ‘I returned his smile, moving off to investigate a small glass case of crystal figurines sitting beside one of the cash registers.’

90. ‘The cornea is the clear part of the eye much like a watch crystal.’

91. ‘Sapphire crystal is the cover of choice for premium watches.’

92. ‘The only description I can equate is when the watch crystal catches a beam of sun and dances around the walls/ceilings.’

93. ‘He peered into the pool of clear, crystal water.’

94. ‘It was full of green slime and muck instead of crystal clean water.’

95. ‘It is a great place for little trout as they dart about in the crystal water and feed on the fat flies that unwittingly drop from the branches.’

96. ‘He looked at the water again, clear and crystal blue.’

97. ‘The crystal light of a clear winter morning, dramatic stormy skies and the golden warmth of an autumn day: all find a place in this splendid evocation of the Lake District.’

98. ‘This lives up to its name for a hundred yards where it runs with crystal spring water, then we get dry track, a meadow or two, and the final climb back, all the way under the intimidating command of the castle.’

99. ‘Here crystal water, accompanied by brisk birds, carefree fish and ancient trees, flows through rocks, silent one moment and murmuring the next.’

100. ‘For this is a beautiful city, surrounded by waters of crystal purity and with a myriad of historic buildings to boot.’

101. ‘The water was crystal green, reflecting the green mountains along the river.’

102. ‘The crystal blue sea and clean blue sky over the horizon varied occasionally from sunrise to sunset.’

103. ‘Inside the thick envelope was a card showing a school of dolphins from above, surfacing through crystal water.’

104. ‘But wading out into the crystal water, I had to remind myself that only 50m away was the largest accessible shipwreck in the world of recreational diving.’

105. ‘Geese soared through air, and came to rest on the crystal water.’

106. ‘The pool is motionless and so clear it gives a magnified look to what is underneath the crystal sheet of water.’

107. ‘More accurately, he found himself unable to hear anything above the intense rage that clouded his mind, or rather, cleaned it to crystal clarity.’

108. ‘Those who demand crystal water on every dive best stay at home, but on the positive side, it is this occasional green soup that draws in the mantas and the other vast profusion of life.’

109. crystals are beautiful to look at

Other users have misspelling crystal as:

1. krystall 24.33%

2. cristal 6.21%

3. crisstal 4.66%

4. crestal 2.24%

5. kristal 2.16%

6. Other 60.4%

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