subjective vs objective

subjective objective

Definitions

  • 1) philosophy, psychology Experienced by a person mentally and not directly verifiable by others
  • 2) Resulting from or pertaining to personal mindsets or experience, arising from perceptive mental conditions within the brain and not necessarily from external stimuli.
  • 3) Pertaining to subjects as opposed to objects (A subject is one who perceives or is aware; an object is the thing perceived or the thing that the subject is aware of.)
  • 4) As used by Carl Jung the innate worldview orientation of the introverted personality types.
  • 5) Lacking in reality or substance.
  • 6) Formed, as in opinions, based upon a person's feelings or intuition, not upon observation or reasoning; coming more from within the observer than from observations of the external environment.
  • 7) Based on a given person's experience, understanding, and feelings; personal or individual.
  • 8) Relating to the real nature of something; essential.
  • 9) Grammar Relating to or being the nominative case.
  • 10) Dependent on or taking place in a person's mind rather than the external world.
  • 11) Psychology Not caused by external stimuli.
  • 12) Expressing or bringing into prominence the individuality of the artist or author.
  • 13) Medicine Of, relating to, or designating a symptom or complaint perceived by a patient.
  • 14) Of or pertaining to a subject.
  • 15) (Physiol.) one of the sensations occurring when stimuli due to internal causes excite the nervous apparatus of the sense organs, as when a person imagines he sees figures which have no objective reality.
  • 16) (Lit. & Art) Modified by, or making prominent, the individuality of a writer or an artist.
  • 17) Especially, pertaining to, or derived from, one's own consciousness, in distinction from external observation; ralating to the mind, or intellectual world, in distinction from the outward or material excessively occupied with, or brooding over, one's own internal states.
  • 18) taking place within the mind and modified by individual bias
  • 19) of a mental act performed entirely within the mind

Definitions

  • 1) grammar The objective case; a or pro in that case.
  • 2) A goal that is striven for.
  • 3) A material object that physically exists.
  • 4) The lens or lenses of a camera, microscope, or other optical device closest to the object being examined.
  • 5) Something worked toward or striven for; a goal. synonym: intention.
  • 6) The objective case.
  • 7) A thing or group of things existing independent of the mind.
  • 8) A or pro in the objective case.
  • 9) The primary optical element, such as a lens or mirror, in a microscope, camera, telescope, or other optical instrument, that first receives light rays from the object and forms the image.
  • 10) An object glass; called also objective lens. See under Object, n.
  • 11) (Gram.) The objective case.
  • 12) Same as Objective point, under Objective, a.
  • 13) the lens or system of lenses in a telescope or microscope that is nearest the object being viewed
  • 14) the goal intended to be attained (and which is believed to be attainable)
  • 15) The lens, or practically the combination of lenses, which forms the object-glass of an optical instrument, more particularly of the microscope (see object-glass).
  • 16) In Eng. gram., the objective case; the case used to express the object of a verb or a preposition.
  • 17) An objective point; especially, the object, point, or place to or toward which a military force is directing its march or its operations.
  • 18) Not influenced by the emotions or prejudices.
  • 19) grammar Of, or relating to a noun or pronoun used as the object of a verb.
  • 20) Of or relating to a material object, actual existence or reality.
  • 21) Based on observed facts.
  • 22) Of or relating to a noun or pronoun used in this case.
  • 23) Existing independent of or external to the mind; actual or real.
  • 24) Of, relating to, or being the case of a noun or pronoun that serves as the object of a verb.
  • 25) Uninfluenced by emotions or personal prejudices: synonym: fair.
  • 26) Based on observable phenomena; empirical.
  • 27) Medicine Relating to or being an indicator of disease, such as a physical sign, laboratory test, or x-ray that can be observed or verified by someone other than the person being evaluated.
  • 28) (Metaph.) Of or pertaining to an object; contained in, or having the nature or position of, an object; outward; external; extrinsic; -- an epithet applied to whatever is exterior to the mind, or which is simply an object of thought or feeling, as opposed to being related to thoughts of feelings, and opposed to subjective.
  • 29) (Perspective) any plane in the horizontal plane that is represented.
  • 30) (Gram.) Pertaining to, or designating, the case which follows a transitive verb or a preposition, being that case in which the direct object of the verb is placed. See Accusative, n.
  • 31) Of or pertaining to an object.
  • 32) (Perspective) a line drawn on the geometrical plane which is represented or sought to be represented.
  • 33) the point or result to which the operations of an army are directed. By extension, the point or purpose to which anything, as a journey or an argument, is directed.
  • 34) Unbiased; unprejudiced; fair; uninfluenced by personal feelings or personal interests; considering only the facts of a situation unrelated to the observer; -- of judgments, opinions, evaluations, conclusions, reasoning processes.
  • 35) emphasizing or expressing things as perceived without distortion of personal feelings, insertion of fictional matter, or interpretation
  • 36) belonging to immediate experience of actual things or events
  • 37) undistorted by emotion or personal bias; based on observable phenomena
  • 38) serving as or indicating the object of a verb or of certain prepositions and used for certain other purposes
  • 39) Ingrammar:

Examples

  • 1) But these questions are personal and subjective.
  • 2) Perhaps there is no accounting for subjective taste.
  • 3) Judging these two factors involves a substantial subjective element.
  • 4) There is also the fact that luxury is highly subjective.
  • 5) Whether the organic premium represents value is a subjective opinion.
  • 6) It is highly subjective and there is no fixed formula for success.
  • 7) But another problem with ethical investing is that ethics are a very subjective matter.
  • 8) The answers given to normative questions are subjective opinions.
  • 9) She scarcely touches on real and interesting questions about subjective identity and objective identification and the relationship between them.
  • 10) Style and taste are very subjective.
  • 11) Hmm: its geography must make any measurement rather subjective.
  • 12) It is'very subjective in its nature.
  • 13) You might fail, but failure is an entirely subjective thing.
  • 14) It's a personal and subjective history of pop culture.
  • 15) One reason for this is intellectual fashion, which highlights subjective interpretation over objective reality.
  • 16) Our opinions on the value of a mother's life and happiness are ethical in nature and subjective.
  • 17) The fact that there is a subjective element does not disqualify an activity from being a sport, then.
  • 18) In the end, a selection is always an awkward cross of subjective taste and compromise to the group.
  • 19) The Nobel prize for literature often throws up controversy because artistic excellence is a more subjective criterion than scientific discovery.
  • 20) It hinges on whether this person has the capacity to give informed consent, and this is rather a subjective judgment.
  • 21) These things are highly subjective.
  • 22) In football terms, value has always been subjective, rather than intrinsic.
  • 23) Laurence Urdang The phenomenon for which D.S. Bland proposes the term subjective onomatopoeia [XII, 2] has been examined and discussed for decades by a number of linguists and critics, including Otto Jespersen (with examples such as those of the - ump family cited by Bland), Edward S.pir (the ici and lá vowel contrast that Bland picks up from French), R.ssell Ultan (size and distance symbolism in general), J.R. Firth, Fred W. Householder, Jr.,
  • 24) In view of this usage we are confronted with the passages in which the Latin word subjective must be translated as “objectively.”
  • 25) There are, however, what we call subjective factors.
  • 26) Do we mean to ... affirm, in language savouring strongly of scholasticism, that beneath the phenomena which we call subjective there is an occult substratum Mind, and beneath the phenomena which we call objective there is an occult substratum Matter?
  • 27) Hofstadter is advocating no such thing as the objective view of history, only that some viewpoints can be verified while others will forever remain subjective, as they are not bound by rationality.
  • 28) How effective is the Burgess proposal - almost all elements of it result in subjective determination: abusive language; so the ticket scalper who asks me three times in a loud voice for my extra; does that fall under the abusive part of the ordinance.
  • 29) It is thus possible through Dewey's conception of aesthetic experience to affirm that "appreciation" of a work of art arises in subjective experience but is also directed toward an object of which it can be said that such qualities as "form" and "style" and even "meaning" objectively exist, although no particular aesthetic experience is likely to fully encompass all of the relevant elements of each.
  • 30) This allowed me to benchmark my organization in subjective and personal ways that otherwise would have been difficult.
  • 31) ‘Even the Cabinet Office's own research shows that this is discriminatory, because it is based on subjective judgements carried out by managers.’
  • 32) ‘Best is a subjective judgement, my taste against yours.’
  • 33) ‘Where this minimum lies, however, is based on management's subjective judgment.’
  • 34) ‘Of course, as my grown-up child who is obviously no longer a child pointed out, it is important to understand other people's subjective experience.’
  • 35) ‘Whether it is ‘good’ or ‘bad’ could be a very subjective matter of opinion.’
  • 36) ‘Editorial comment is the subjective view of one person, and as such not expected to be ‘balanced’ to the extent of pleasing all shades.’
  • 37) ‘Over a period of years a sympathetic observer notices marked changes, although such personal reflections are notoriously subjective.’
  • 38) ‘There is no pretense of objectivity; this is a subjective film, a personal film.’
  • 39) ‘The farther to the right the writing slants the more subjective the person is.’
  • 40) ‘Admissions decisions are subjective because they are based on human beings that inherently possess a great deal of variability.’
  • 41) ‘Whatever else it may be, authority is a subjective disposition in people to regard something else as a reliable guide in thinking and doing.’
  • 42) ‘Although a relatively objective metalanguage can be devised to describe and discuss poetry, individual response to it is necessarily subjective.’
  • 43) ‘Essays will be scored on a six-point scale for such subjective elements as voice, style, flow, and deployment of the language.’
  • 44) ‘I remain surprised by how subjective this stuff seems to be.’
  • 45) ‘Ultimately loss and gain I suppose are ultimately subjective, because each reader that reads a poem will have a different reaction to it.’
  • 46) ‘I no longer trust my own subjective impressions, or those of other linguists, no matter how reputable.’
  • 47) ‘The value of the items on each side of the sheet are dependent upon individual subjective valuations.’
  • 48) ‘Instead, participants used rating scales that assessed their own subjective perception of conflict in their friendship relationships.’
  • 49) ‘It is not to be judged by the quality of the reasons advanced in support of it in the course of Parliamentary debate, nor by the subjective state of mind of individual ministers or other members.’
  • 50) ‘The accuracy score for the medium is completely dependent on the subjective decisions of the sitter.’
  • 51) ‘Things are even more difficult when probabilities are subjective and individual beliefs may differ.’
  • 52) ‘Consciousness is commensurate with being; all existence has a subjective aspect.’
  • 53) ‘How do physical processes in the brain give rise to the subjective life the conscious mind?’
  • 54) ‘There is a difference between my existence and the existence of a chair, which is that my existence has this subjective side - or, as you might say, inside.’
  • 55) ‘Maternal evaluations may reflect subjective perceptions rather than the child's actual behavior.’
  • 56) ‘That is, reported differences in perceived stress may be due to differences in subjective perceptions or in differences in the amount of objective stressors.’
  • 57) ‘A lot of magic and NLP plays in this area of the individual's subjective experience.’
  • 58) ‘It's an alternative view of the individual's subjective reality.’
  • 59) ‘Milan's inner world is one that mixes hallucination with reality, subjective reverie with objective perception.’
  • 60) ‘One of the few good ideas about consciousness that has gained some measure of agreement is that subjective feelings depend very much on the kind of body you have.’
  • 61) ‘There is nothing subjective about perceptual experience.’
  • 62) ‘Intentions are influenced by attitudes toward the behavior, subjective norms and perceptions of behavioral control.’
  • 63) ‘You can follow the software instructions to adjust your computer screen controls manually, but as you can guess, human perception is usually subjective.’
  • 64) ‘As Beckett dramatizes, the ultimate reality of the subjective mind is beyond the spatio-temporal limits of logical meaning.’
  • 65) ‘In this sense their condition is epistemologically objective but ontologically subjective.’
  • 66) ‘Consciousness is about first-person, subjective experience, and there's a fundamental gap there.’
  • 67) ‘The scientific literature has noted some gender differences in both subjective and objective responses to cocaine.’
  • 68) ‘Drama is a genre which is heavily oriented to the first person present, a narrative form associated with subjective experience and inner feelings.’
  • 69) ‘The basic mechanism is subsequently extended by an abductive reasoning system which is guided by subjective probability.’
  • 70) ‘In concrete terms it poses difficulties - because it also makes Theism subjective.’

Examples

  • 1) But to come away from the two games top of our qualifying group was the main objective.
  • 2) But we have got six points, which was our main objective.
  • 3) This was a highly innovative, exceptionally well managed project with very clear objectives and benefits.
  • 4) Good health is dependent on rather more objective factors, one of which is not being overweight.
  • 5) Belief and conviction brings energy and drive because there is a clear objective set out before the players and they know where they are going.
  • 6) But those 12 objectives are just part of my plan for Britain.
  • 7) Obviously the aims and objectives that you have will affect the group and your activities.
  • 8) We are reading to discover more about objective reality.
  • 9) What is the difference between goals and objectives?
  • 10) Growth objectives have to be economic objectives rather than volume objectives.
  • 11) The military have also been set insufficiently clear objectives.
  • 12) Time for a brutally objective scientific view.
  • 13) We need to identify objectives and back them to the hilt.
  • 14) This has allowed him to think exclusively about his personal objectives.
  • 15) The final part of the objective gives any information about the conditions of performance.
  • 16) The trick is to target key objectives together.
  • 17) The first step is to seek an objective opinion.
  • 18) The main objective was to bring prices down.
  • 19) There must be multiple objectives rather than a single objective.
  • 20) We first take a look at learning and then consider the identification of training needs and the formulation of learning objectives.
  • 21) As there is an objective moral standard of equality, there is also an objective moral standard of marriage.
  • 22) I write as an objective journalist, not as a cycling fanatic.
  • 23) All in all, the image objectives envisaged for the Golf were reached to a large extent.
  • 24) ‘This is anti - foundationalism, where the foundations were the hard facts of objective judgement and absolute truth.’
  • 25) ‘Second, I am stating my opinions and hopefully I am more objective than judgemental.’
  • 26) ‘I was determined to remain a disinterested, objective observer in order to respond to student questions or problems.’
  • 27) ‘This contrasts with the common image of scientists being objective and impartial analysts who allow the empirical facts to speak for themselves.’
  • 28) ‘The only positive aspect that has emerged from the meeting is the fact that more objective members have started questioning the sudden conversion of Zuma into a friend of the workers and the masses.’
  • 29) ‘Just to establish the ground rules, I know I am neither neutral nor the most objective observer on the subject I'm about to discuss in this space.’
  • 30) ‘Secondly, becoming professionals has sometimes made historians pretend to an Olympian detachment from, and objective judgement on, the present and the past.’
  • 31) ‘Neutral parties, objective people who would not ask, and would only obey.’
  • 32) ‘Sometimes, we can overlook this fact and describe ourselves as objective scientists, but this understates the role of the economist in modern society.’
  • 33) ‘Nevertheless, the accumulation of evidence in a wide range of areas must surely force any reasonably objective observer to the conclusion that urgent policy action is required on a global level.’
  • 34) ‘But when you're in the room with him, I believe that any trying to be objective person would come away with the impression, one, this is not a dumb person.’
  • 35) ‘Cornwallis fumed, and later historians have echoed his frustration, but should that be accepted as an objective judgement of the behaviour of Halifax's pioneers?’
  • 36) ‘As an objective observer, as you turn on the news every night, and you see what's going on in the Gulf Coast down there, so many people have lost so much.’
  • 37) ‘The moral relativism that pollutes what remain of the rules of war - the good guys never do bad things - has entirely eradicated objective judgement.’
  • 38) ‘Any objective person would have to say that over the last four years we have invested more particularly in cancer services than we did in the past twenty years.’
  • 39) ‘Barely a day goes by without news of a terrorist incident, and speak to any objective observer and they will tell you that, for all the progress, big problems remain.’
  • 40) ‘In the absence of an infallible and objective observer, judging competence from within a hierarchy is always likely to be a hit and miss affair.’
  • 41) ‘Although the media can be reluctant to analyse or even accept that its own role is any more than that of an objective observer, its networks are formidable.’
  • 42) ‘His behaviour may not be technically wrong, but to outside, objective observers it just seems wrong.’
  • 43) ‘The psychological contract is an attempt by a worker to impose order and responsibility to a situation where that person may have little objective power.’
  • 44) ‘No, I'm saying there is no ultimate reality, no objective existence, no ontology at all.’
  • 45) ‘The operational definitions that we adopt here are: Real objects are any objects that have an actual objective existence.’
  • 46) ‘Controversial, yes, but I'm saying those physical laws don't have an objective existence, they're categories we apply to experiences.’
  • 47) ‘It describes the test as ‘willingness’ and ‘ability’ as being relevant to the existence of an objective basis.’
  • 48) ‘You posit an external, objective reality whose solidity allows an objective mind to perceive it fully and without cultural bias or observational tint.’
  • 49) ‘But it was conditional upon the objective existence of the factual circumstance, that is, that the termination was unfair, harsh or unjust.’
  • 50) ‘There is authentic meaning, a reason for existence that is objective and real, not invented.’
  • 51) ‘With Hegel's concept of objective spirit, the object domain of modern social science, that is, individuality and society, make their appearance.’
  • 52) ‘Like after the statements have had their desired effect to sway opinion and to make subjective assertions become, in the public mind, objective fact.’
  • 53) ‘This is what threatens materialism, since according to that doctrine, every fact about every human mind is ultimately a public, objective fact.’
  • 54) ‘Frege ascribes to senses and thoughts objective existence.’
  • 55) ‘In this sense their condition is epistemologically objective but ontologically subjective.’
  • 56) ‘She argues that ontological realism about a type of entity is justified if the objective existence of the entities is part of our best explanation of the world.’
  • 57) ‘But there is no longer any objective justification for the existence of competing small groups.’
  • 58) ‘We can therefore say at the very least that there is no objective proof of the existence of a suicide tidal wave.’
  • 59) ‘Time is the form of inner sense, that is, of all states of mind, whether or not they are referred to an objective reality.’
  • 60) ‘Even a seemingly neutral description of the offence itself can be action-oriented in terms of constructing the objective, factual basis of the crime.’
  • 61) ‘In much the same way, arguments about the existence of God are only useful if you accept the notion that petitionary prayer can result in an objective effect in the phenomenal world.’
  • 62) ‘If television could be relied upon to provide an objective rendering of actual events (we'll call it news) then I might be in.’
  • 63) ‘One reason why these studies are so important for the false memory controversy is that an objective record of the actual events is available.’
  • 64) ‘It is a mechanism through which societies seek to achieve political objectives.’
  • 65) ‘To help us achieve our objective of scoring goals, we have brought in Prince Nkosi.’
  • 66) ‘It is possible to set learning objectives and plan activities that the teacher hopes will achieve the objective, but the outcome will be different for different students.’
  • 67) ‘The process is the means through which they seek to attain their objectives.’
  • 68) ‘It remains our objective to seek commercial development of our lands that are non-core to our bloodstock auctioneering business, stated Mr Osborne.’
  • 69) ‘Is the proposed law or regulation the least intrusive way [i.e. least impact on rights] that the desired objective can be achieved?’
  • 70) ‘I also regularly have meetings with them to discuss objectives and goals.’
  • 71) ‘The report outlines a number of goals and objectives, all of which are no doubt very laudable.’
  • 72) ‘The key is to make players realise that the common goal can help them achieve individual objectives.’
  • 73) ‘You have goals and objectives, but there are many different ways of going about achieving them.’
  • 74) ‘Overall, sustained efforts will be required in order to achieve the ambitious objective of the Strategy, which is to have a qualified and efficient civil service in place in the medium term.’
  • 75) ‘Whenever we use cryptography it is important that we check that it is helping us achieve our desired objectives.’
  • 76) ‘Only by uniting under one banner will pensioners ever achieve their objectives.’
  • 77) ‘We just did not seem able to recruit the staff at York in the required numbers to achieve our objectives.’
  • 78) ‘The proposals achieve our basic objectives and it is a major first step forward.’
  • 79) ‘If one life is saved as a result of this campaign, we will achieve our objective.’
  • 80) ‘In war, the balance of protection lies squarely on one's own forces, whose security is not only important in human terms but in the context of achieving a military objective.’
  • 81) ‘A £4,500 payment in compensation is a big enough deterrent, we believe, to achieve our main objective of discouraging illegal filesharing.’
  • 82) ‘But the premier stressed that achieving the objective of drastically streamlining rural administration would take time.’
  • 83) ‘This shaped beam profile is imaged through the telescope system onto the back focal plane of the microscope objective.’
  • 84) ‘He had introduced a field lens, a third lens between the objective lens and the eye-piece, which served to increase the field of view.’
  • 85) ‘Laser power before entering the microscope objective was 120 W and the wavelength was 495 nm for all experiments shown.’
  • 86) ‘The pattern passes through the microscope objective onto the sample.’
  • 87) ‘Small holes were made in the film for the microscope objective lens and the micropipette.’
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