acute vs chronic

acute chronic

Definitions

  • 1) orthography An acute accent.
  • 2) medicine Of an abnormal condition of recent or sudden onset, in contrast to delayed onset; this sense does not imply severity (unlike the common usage).
  • 3) botany, of leaves With the sides meeting directly to form a pointed acute angle at the apex, base, or both.
  • 4) geometry Of a triangle, having all three interior angles measuring less than 90 degrees.
  • 5) medicine Of a short-lived condition, in contrast to a chronic condition; this sense also does not imply severity.
  • 6) Short, quick.
  • 7) geometry Of an angle, less than 90 degrees.
  • 8) sensitive
  • 9) orthography, after a letter Having an acute accent.
  • 10) Extremely sharp or severe; intense.
  • 11) Reacting readily to stimuli or impressions; sensitive.
  • 12) Having an acute angle.
  • 13) Afflicted by a disease exhibiting a rapid onset followed by a short, severe course.
  • 14) Of great importance or consequence; critical.
  • 15) Narrowly pointed; sharp.
  • 16) Having a rapid onset and following a short but severe course.
  • 17) Keenly perceptive or discerning: synonym: sharp.
  • 18) Having nice or quick sensibility; susceptible to slight impressions; acting keenly on the senses; sharp; keen; intense
  • 19) (Geom.) an angle less than a right angle.
  • 20) (Med.) Attended with symptoms of some degree of severity, and coming speedily to a crisis; -- opposed to chronic.
  • 21) High, or shrill, in respect to some other sound; -- opposed to grave or low.
  • 22) Having nice discernment; perceiving or using minute distinctions; penetrating; clever; shrewd; -- opposed to dull or stupid
  • 23) Sharp at the end; ending in a sharp point; pointed; -- opposed to blunt or obtuse
  • 24) of critical importance and consequence
  • 25) having or experiencing a rapid onset and short but severe course
  • 26) of an angle; less than 90 degrees
  • 27) phonetics To give an acute sound to.
  • 28) Having nice or quick sensibility; susceptible of slight impressions; having power to feel or perceive small or distant objects or effects: as, a man of acute eyesight, hearing, or feeling.
  • 29) Keen may be the most objective of these words. An acute answer is one that shows penetration into the subject; a keen answer unites with acuteness a certain amount of sarcasm, or antagonism to the person addressed; a shrewd answer is one that combines remarkable acuteness with wisdom as to what it is practically best to say.
  • 30) Manifesting intellectual keenness or penetration; marked or characterized by quickness of perception or nice discernment: applied to mental endowments and operations: as, acute faculties or arguments.
  • 31) Torenderacuteintone.
  • 32) Shrewd differs from acute and keen by having an element of practical sagacity or astuteness. Only keen has the idea of eagerness: as, he was keen in pursuit. See astute and sharp.
  • 33) High in pitch; shrill: said of sound: opposed to grave. See acute accent, below.
  • 34) Sharp at the end; ending in a sharp point or angle: opposed to blunt or obtuse.
  • 35) Sharp or penetrating in intellect; possessing keenness of insight or perception; exercising nice discernment or discrimination: opposed to dull or stupid: as, “the acute and ingenious author,” Locke.
  • 36) Keen; sharp; intense; poignant: said of pain, pleasure, etc.
  • 37) In pathology, attended with more or less violent symptoms and coming speedily to a crisis: applied to a disease: as, an acute pleurisy: distinguished from subacute and chronic.
  • 38) A mark (′ ) used to denote accentual stress, and also for other purposes. To denote stress in English, it is now generally placed after the accented syllable, as in this dictionary, but sometimes over the vowel of that syllable. The latter is done regularly in such Greek words as take this accent, and in all Spanish words the accentuation of which varies from the standard rule. In some languages it is used only to determine the quality or length of vowel-sounds, as on e in French (as in été), and on all the vowels in Hungarian; and in Polish and other Slavic languages it is also placed over some of the consonants to mark variations of their sounds. For other uses, see accent, n.
  • 39) To render acute in tone.
  • 40) rare To give an acute sound to.

Definitions

  • 1) medicine A condition of extended duration, either continuous or marked by frequent recurrence. Sometimes implies a condition which worsens with each recurrence, though that is not inherent in the term.
  • 2) A chronic one
  • 3) slang Marijuana, typically of high quality.
  • 4) A chronicle.
  • 5) Inveterate or habitual.
  • 6) medicine Prolonged or slow to heal.
  • 7) informal Good, great, as in "wicked"
  • 8) informal Very bad, awful.
  • 9) informal Extremely serious.
  • 10) Of a person, suffering from an affliction that is prolonged or slow to heal.
  • 11) Of a problem, that continues over an extended period of time.
  • 12) Lasting for a long period of time or marked by frequent recurrence, as certain diseases.
  • 13) Of long duration; continuing.
  • 14) Subject to a habit or pattern of behavior for a long time.
  • 15) Relating to time; according to time.
  • 16) Continuing for a long time; lingering; habitual.
  • 17) one which is inveterate, of long continuance, or progresses slowly, in distinction from an acute disease, which speedly terminates.
  • 18) being long-lasting and recurrent or characterized by long suffering
  • 19) Also, rarely, chronical.
  • 20) Pertaining or relating to time; having reference to time. Specifically
  • 21) Continuing a long time; inveterate or of long continuance, as a disease; hence, mild as to intensity and slow as to progress: in pathology, opposed to acute.

Examples

  • 1) He had died from acute kidney failure.
  • 2) Some acute care can be offered at home.
  • 3) Sleep deprivation is one of the most acute problems in the armed forces.
  • 4) With the arrival of the internet, the problem of distinguishing factual from fake has become far more acute.
  • 5) He was no less inspiring as a conductor, with a great hand technique and an acute sense of rhythm.
  • 6) Recruitment problems are particularly acute in maths, physics, computer science and design and technology.
  • 7) My 88-year-old father was admitted to an acute medical ward in November last year and has since died.
  • 8) Finishing this splendid and intelligent story, as with all great fiction, brings an acute sense of loss.
  • 9) The practice at which I am a patient devotes one eighth of its doctors' time to acute care.
  • 10) His goal from that acute angle was like a short corner in hockey!
  • 11) Yet the imbalances afflicting the eurozone are no less acute than those addressing the broader global economy.
  • 12) This is a masterclass from an acute political intelligence.
  • 13) The trusts at risk are specialist or acute hospitals.
  • 14) Only a few people possess such an acute mind for such profound investigations.
  • 15) The alternative is acute embarrassment and a sport on the brink of disaster.
  • 16) We know right from wrong and have an acute sense of justice.
  • 17) My acute exercise phase had many positive points.
  • 18) This problem has become particularly acute in our own country.
  • 19) The problems are particularly acute where holidays have been booked independently.
  • 20) Pain has myriad causes but can be broadly divided into acute and chronic.
  • 21) The acute economic crisis may have passed but the chronic challenges remain.
  • 22) We were told she had acute liver failure.
  • 23) These alternative sites for acute care have been successful because they are efficient and cost effective.
  • 24) Today the fear of being left behind is no less acute.
  • 25) The single most coherent theme that emerges is the desire to keep patients out of acute hospitals.
  • 26) His acute political sense was a significant asset when dealing with government departments and with the public.
  • 27) His absence led to a lack of cover on an acute mental health ward and put colleagues at risk.
  • 28) Their hearing is so acute that they can hear the pulsing sound of a quartz crystal in a digital clock.
  • 29) We recognise that to excel in these fields, you have to possess acute intelligence.
  • 30) He has such an acute mind, and his intelligence is effortless.
  • 31) They are more agile, faster over short distances and their hearing is more acute.
  • 32) Yes, you may escape that moment of acute social embarrassment.
  • 33) And there is no finer exponent of acute angles than the man who has won a record 60 consecutive matches on clay.
  • 34) A trip round an acute ward would give some perspective to the self-obsessed celebrities whose only thought is to look younger.
  • 35) ‘An acute shortage of experienced staff is undermining growth, says Wong.’
  • 36) ‘One issue that all the various groups on East Riding of Yorkshire Council agree on is the acute shortage of affordable housing throughout the region.’
  • 37) ‘There is an acute shortage of housing in Colchester and a great need for first time buyers to get on the ladder.’
  • 38) ‘Plunged into darkness, practically all of Serbia has been dealing with an acute electricity shortage as generation plants under perform.’
  • 39) ‘The Simon Community, which runs a network of centres around the country for homeless people, is also experiencing acute shortages of volunteers.’
  • 40) ‘In London, the housing crisis is very acute, there is a desperate shortage of social housing and with house prices so unreachable for the majority, few people are able to buy.’
  • 41) ‘Although local doctors have been warning of an acute shortage of intensive care beds for children, the Department of Health said it did not believe there was a crisis.’
  • 42) ‘The situation is particularly acute given the region's 30% increase in births in the last two years.’
  • 43) ‘The situation is particularly acute in Dublin and in areas classified as disadvantaged.’
  • 44) ‘In some areas the situation is particularly acute and the problems are only going to get worse.’
  • 45) ‘Currently, American businesses are experiencing acute shortages of highly skilled IT professionals.’
  • 46) ‘It points out that stations where the situation is particularly acute include Crewe, Preston and Carlisle, but the situation is also serious at Oxenholme.’
  • 47) ‘The Army continues to suffer acute shortages of staff and experienced personnel, and that is where the problem is.’
  • 48) ‘Drought-like situation prevails in the district due to acute shortage of water and extended power cuts triggered by delay in the monsoon.’
  • 49) ‘An acute shortage of respite facilities for autistic children is forcing families to put children into residential care.’
  • 50) ‘The situation is particularly acute in certain cities - often the very ones that were a little slice of heaven in the 1990s.’
  • 51) ‘The situation is rather acute among blue-collar immigrants who migrate to the United States.’
  • 52) ‘In several villages and towns dotting the district, acute shortage of potable water has turned into an alarming situation.’
  • 53) ‘While the cut in interest rates should alleviate some of the most acute pressures facing the economy, the UK economic climate has worsened and we are facing new dangers.’
  • 54) ‘In the present scenario, where acute water shortage has become a reality, it is not right to pass the burden on to the people.’
  • 55) ‘Symptoms of acute disease resolve by one to three months, although some persons have prolonged fatigue.’
  • 56) ‘The most severe stages of acute asthma are respiratory failure, cardiopulmonary arrest, and death.’
  • 57) ‘Bacterial infection can cause acute arthritis with inflammation, which constitutes an emergency.’
  • 58) ‘This plant is useful for both acute and chronic respiratory diseases, including acute influenza, earache, sinusitis and sore throat.’
  • 59) ‘In 1965 the focus of care for elderly people was primarily on hospital care for acute illnesses and diseases.’
  • 60) ‘Kayser-Jones defined acute illness in the nursing home as a change in health, with specific signs and symptoms of recent onset.’
  • 61) ‘This bronchodilator inhaler is used at the discretion of the student for acute symptoms of asthma.’
  • 62) ‘Infections with bacteria or viruses can give rise to an acute inflammation of a joint (septic arthritis).’
  • 63) ‘acute dysentery, typhoid fever and acute hepatitis were the next three most frequently reported diseases.’
  • 64) ‘TB pleural effusion usually presents as an acute illness and the symptom duration ranges from a few days to few weeks.’
  • 65) ‘Therapy has two goals - to treat the acute disease flare-ups and to maintain remission.’
  • 66) ‘He said that since the disease broke out, the hospital had treated symptoms like acute diarrhoea, vomiting and dehydration.’
  • 67) ‘Multiple medications are available to stabilize acute symptoms of bipolar disorder.’
  • 68) ‘Appropriate treatment controls acute symptoms and reduces the risk of longer term complications.’
  • 69) ‘Heliox is a unique therapy for acute asthma because it decreases airway resistance without changing the diameter of the airway.’
  • 70) ‘None had acute disease such as other types of infection, heart failure or stroke during the study period.’
  • 71) ‘In recent years, there has been increased use of dipstick tests for rapid screening and diagnosis of acute malaria in rural endemic areas.’
  • 72) ‘The other more virulent form of the disease is found in Southern and Eastern Africa and causes a more acute infection, with symptoms showing after only a few weeks.’
  • 73) ‘This term indicates an acute disease of such severity that immediate surgical intervention must be considered.’
  • 74) ‘The discovery of antibiotic drugs has been helpful in treating acute infection associated with chronic bronchitis.’
  • 75) ‘She was kept in the acute patients' ward under observation.’
  • 76) ‘He highlighted that Waterford Regional is an acute hospital with patients often having an average stay of five or six days.’
  • 77) ‘Fines will be imposed on councils when a patient remains in an acute hospital bed after they have been deemed fit to be discharged to their own home or to a care home.’
  • 78) ‘It also said that nursing homes should be used to allow patients be discharged from acute hospitals.’
  • 79) ‘Above all the health service should operate in a way that keeps patients out of acute hospitals, thus minimising costs.’
  • 80) ‘Once the patient leaves the acute hospital, they may be transferred to a rehabilitation unit where they can get more intensive therapy.’
  • 81) ‘Twenty-four of the dead had been patients of a long-term acute care facility.’
  • 82) ‘Fewer beds are available to acute patients because the beds they have are taken up by patients who no longer need to be in hospital but are not fit enough yet to go back to their own environment.’
  • 83) ‘If the plans go ahead relatives and friends of acute patients from North Norfolk face a potential round trip of 60 miles to visit.’
  • 84) ‘The hospital is closing ward five, which deals with acute medical patients, until more nursing staff are recruited.’
  • 85) ‘Both inpatient costs and total costs were significantly higher for nurse led inpatient care compared with standard care of medical patients on an acute ward.’
  • 86) ‘However, there are no acute beds for those patients.’
  • 87) ‘There will be more beds, despite the staffing difficulties, but at the moment what is clogging up the system is long-term patients in acute beds.’
  • 88) ‘In the course of its review, one hospital said it was not uncommon for an acute medical patient to have to wait four or five days before treatment even began.’
  • 89) ‘Just after the operation, Mr Waters said he remembered lying on a bed next to Sam in the hospital's acute ward, then looking over and seeing a strange, weak smile on Sam's face.’
  • 90) ‘The report, expected to be officially launched next month, will see the controversial redistribution and slimming down of acute hospital services.’
  • 91) ‘Money is better off being spent to care for people in their own homes and in the community rather than being spent on hi-tech services and acute beds in hospitals.’
  • 92) ‘However, since then, patients needing urgent acute surgical care have had to travel 15 miles to the nearest hospital in Cashel.’
  • 93) ‘They said up to 20% of patients cannot be discharged from acute hospitals because there is nowhere to send them and this must be addressed.’
  • 94) ‘Managed clinical networks are in keeping with the increasingly important role primary care has in acute health care.’
  • 95) ‘Of all American presidents, Lincoln had the most acute religious insight.’
  • 96) ‘Tom Hamilton has produced an acute and insightful response to my post on euthanasia, of a kind with which it is a pleasure to engage.’
  • 97) ‘My students articulate an acute awareness, if not a full understanding, of academic labor issues.’
  • 98) ‘He has produced large number of booklets, souvenirs and brochures for many clubs, schools and the cricket board in this country, written with an acute insight of the game.’
  • 99) ‘Toibin writes with acute insight about James's relations with Alice and with Minny Temple, who was a model for several of his most important women characters.’
  • 100) ‘After all, he has rightfully gained renown for his prolific writing and acute insight into current affairs.’
  • 101) ‘Widely derided as being out of touch with the country, in fact the prime minister showed an acute awareness of the opposition's weaknesses and how best to exploit them.’
  • 102) ‘The Renaissance Italians also had an acute insight into the importance of the balance of power for maintaining international order among themselves.’
  • 103) ‘For a 16 year old, I had an acute awareness of the world outside of my own little high school/town.’
  • 104) ‘As we will see, his works display an acute awareness of human faults and frailties and his writing exhibits a vividness and an elegance that makes it a pleasure to read.’
  • 105) ‘But she did have an acute awareness of what people need in order to live.’
  • 106) ‘They have no rights, but an acute awareness of their responsibilities to the youngest and most vulnerable generation.’
  • 107) ‘It could be denial but I feel more likely it's an acute awareness of the stakes involved.’
  • 108) ‘They've shown initiative, intelligence and an acute awareness of what punters need as they traipse round the stands.’
  • 109) ‘Her valuable book offers the reader an acute insight into the origins of our present-day consumer culture.’
  • 110) ‘Hooker displays an acute awareness that the hermeneutical task is not simply the intellectual assent to truth.’
  • 111) ‘The staged contrast reveals an acute awareness of this double bind, this problem of representing mimetic desire while remaining insulated from it.’
  • 112) ‘Often, there is an acute awareness of the pain and hardship that accompanies life and many people with this aspect are well suited to working hard for the benefit of those that have suffered genuine hurt.’
  • 113) ‘The originality resides in an acute awareness of how little an artist can dare to do in the course of creating great art.’
  • 114) ‘It is reminiscent of Pessoa's poems on Spring in its acute awareness of the poet's mortality.’
  • 115) ‘They have a keen sense of smell, acute hearing, but poor eyesight.’
  • 116) ‘Its sight is marvellously keen, hearing exceedingly acute, and sense of smell wonderfully perfect.’
  • 117) ‘They use night vision and an acute sense of hearing to find prey in the dark.’
  • 118) ‘They are keen hunters with acute vision and feed primarily on small birds and mammals, waterfowl, and reportedly, even bats.’
  • 119) ‘Well, I have an acute sense of smell and hearing, which is sometimes good, sometimes bad.’
  • 120) ‘It has a very acute sense of smell, and it has a natural explorative behavior.’
  • 121) ‘They also have acute senses of smell, touch, and hearing.’
  • 122) ‘I have a quite acute sense of smell, even if it is a bit overwhelmed with bleach and antiseptics.’
  • 123) ‘For instance, a hunting dog that could smell prey reduced the need for humans to have an acute sense of smell for that purpose.’
  • 124) ‘The acute sense of smell is important, since the badger's eyes are quite small, and its eyesight is not particularly good.’
  • 125) ‘Polar bears have an acute sense of smell, and it is the most important sense for detecting prey on land.’
  • 126) ‘Whenever we see bats, we get quieter because they have an acute sense of hearing, and we don't want to scare them.’
  • 127) ‘Although suffering from poor vision, its sense of hearing and smell is acute and of primary importance in locating food.’
  • 128) ‘A crocodile's sense of smell is very acute, and its hearing is also excellent.’
  • 129) ‘Mrs Cook added that horses have acute hearing and can often hear a helicopter, and sense a disturbance in the air, from miles away.’
  • 130) ‘I am a sensitive, not in a supernatural sense, but my senses are very acute, my hearing is very acute.’
  • 131) ‘He still figured it out, although an acute sense of smell might have helped that one.’
  • 132) ‘This ability results from a well-developed, acute sense of hearing.’
  • 133) ‘Only Michael's acute sense of hearing saved him, allowing him just enough time to dive out of its path.’
  • 134) ‘In total darkness, the bird relies on its acute sense of hearing.’
  • 135) ‘It has a large posterior auricle that has a concave posterior margin meeting the hinge at an acute angle.’
  • 136) ‘An Adam Heyslip corner from the right was met by the unmarked Darren Flanagan at the back post and from an acute angle, he tucked the ball to the corner of the net giving the keeper little chance.’
  • 137) ‘As Pelonis describes it, many compression ceilings are set at an acute angle to the front wall and are typically very hard.’
  • 138) ‘In a split-second, Andre De Lisser hooked the ball away from the keeper and, from an acute angle, curled it into the far corner of an unguarded goal.’
  • 139) ‘But Paul Hartley, having sped down the right flank into the box, sensed glory and drove the ball straight at goal from an acute angle.’
  • 140) ‘The proposed layout would result in a vehicle crossing the footway at an acute angle and would therefore constitute a hazard to pedestrians on the public footway.’
  • 141) ‘These lines are usually represented diagrammatically as converging on the point to form an acute angle.’
  • 142) ‘In order to facilitate comparison among layers, all angles were measured as acute angles relative to the horizontal axis of the body.’
  • 143) ‘This would solve the problem of cutting the front bevels, with its fence set at an acute angle to the plane sole and guided by the back of the molded strip.’
  • 144) ‘At its widest point, the form is abruptly sliced and then twisted further still, at an acute angle, to face and frame a distant mountain on the horizon.’
  • 145) ‘It was because of the acute angle of the area over which he stepped, the acute angle at which the concrete went away from the bridge, that there was no room right there.’
  • 146) ‘Saccheri then studied the hypothesis of the acute angle and derived many theorems of non-Euclidean geometry without realising what he was doing.’
  • 147) ‘For the hard granite a chisel with a less acute angle is employed, and flat chisel is then used to smooth out the final surfaces of the stone and for undercutting.’
  • 148) ‘What looked like two scars were running down either side of Joe's back, forming a disconnected acute angle.’
  • 149) ‘The glazed sections of the facade are at acute angles to the ground plane and provide a range of views of the forest.’
  • 150) ‘I froze, my lips pursed above my drink, the mug tipped at a dangerously acute angle, not really believing what I was seeing.’
  • 151) ‘Raul hits a volley from an acute angle which hits the net support’
  • 152) ‘The drawers are side hung and dovetailed, and the moldings are applied to form acute angles.’
  • 153) ‘The building is a stepped linear form thrusting at an acute angle towards the sea.’
  • 154) ‘He takes it at a slightly too acute angle, and right there before my eyes, the whole car with its four occupants actually starts tipping onto its side.’

Examples

  • 1) Loneliness is at once a chronic social ill and a sign of our success.
  • 2) Could chronic back pain be cured with a simple course of antibiotics?
  • 3) The individuals with certain chronic diseases who lived the longest were the fattest.
  • 4) This growth was driven by a chronic shortage of homes for sale.
  • 5) For chronic conditions take three times a day between meals until you feel relief.
  • 6) He had three major operations to treat chronic lung disease.
  • 7) The country faces a crumbling economy and chronic shortages.
  • 8) chronic diseases and the flow from social care have the potential to bankrupt the service.
  • 9) It typically causes a chronic ache at the inner elbow and can lead to a weakened grip.
  • 10) chronic stress can cause chronic loose bowels and may be a major problem.
  • 11) All five victims were frail with chronic medical conditions who had been admitted to hospital after suffering hip fractures.
  • 12) He underwent surgery after a heart attack three years ago and has a chronic back condition from a polo injury.
  • 13) People who have suffered acute and chronic anxiety conditions have been to the darkest and most terrifying places in their minds.
  • 14) One was his chronic bad health.
  • 15) The chronic shortage in the capital is depriving thousands of young workers of the opportunity to have a place of their own.
  • 16) The chronic pain from back surgery has lifted, but she still suffers from spinal arthritis.
  • 17) Meditation eases chronic lower back pain, a study suggests.
  • 18) There was a chronic shortage of staff, particularly nurses and a tolerance of poor standards.
  • 19) A person with a chronic disease or terminal illness gets support from those around them.
  • 20) A chronic shortage of engineers is further hampering the industry.
  • 21) The drugs giant cleared the first regulatory hurdle to selling its new treatment for chronic lung disease in America.
  • 22) chronic back pain can be soul-destroying.
  • 23) LAST time we encountered the eccentric but endearing Texan he had chronic back pain.
  • 24) ‘People with chronic respiratory or cardiovascular illness or immune system diseases are also more susceptible than others to pollutants.’
  • 25) ‘The clinical infection is characterized by chronic fever and hepatosplenomegaly.’
  • 26) ‘They come seeking help for work-related stress, irregular sleeping hours, unhealthy food habits and chronic fatigue.’
  • 27) ‘These affect both the structure and vibration of the vocal cords and causes chronic changes in the quality of voice.’
  • 28) ‘I'm especially under pressure on this because of my dad's age and chronic poor health.’
  • 29) ‘The only thing we can say for certain is that we still have a lot to learn about the relation between cancer and chronic inflammation.’
  • 30) ‘We found that chronic bronchitis and current smoking were independent and additive risk factors for snoring.’
  • 31) ‘Leishmaniasis should be considered in any person from an endemic area who has chronic localized skin lesions.’
  • 32) ‘These included 105 patients who presented with persistent chronic diarrhoea and 48 patients without diarrhoea.’
  • 33) ‘Its people suffer from chronic malnutrition and a high annual population growth rate.’
  • 34) ‘Discoid lupus erythematosus is a chronic disease characterized by inflammatory, scarring lesions.’
  • 35) ‘Critics believe these irritants cause heart attacks, lung and bladder cancer, chronic asthma, bronchitis and even hay fever.’
  • 36) ‘For the most part, therapy of chronic asthma consisted of treating bronchospastic episodes as they arose by using medications intermittently.’
  • 37) ‘Living with an invisible chronic illness can mean constantly trying to redefine your condition.’
  • 38) ‘The states previously had reserved the vaccine for older adults, infants and people with chronic medical conditions.’
  • 39) ‘We randomised patients managed by general physicians and general practitioners, who care for most people with chronic heart failure.’
  • 40) ‘Studies show that hypnosis can treat everything from chronic pain to poor study habits.’
  • 41) ‘There are difficulties in managing communication with young people who have a chronic, life threatening illness.’
  • 42) ‘These drugs, and certain more powerful compounds such as piroxicam are important because they are used for the treatment of pain and inflammation in chronic diseases such as arthritis.’
  • 43) ‘Many students endured poor living conditions and chronic ill health, thanks to the prevalence of tuberculosis and other diseases.’
  • 44) ‘Funding restrictions mean chronic staff shortages and cuts to services, producing long waiting lists and public health breakdowns.’
  • 45) ‘The nurse or nurse practitioner will be able to see additional patients and follow up with chronic patients, which will free up the physician's time to see more new and complex patients.’
  • 46) ‘This lifestyle began to go badly wrong from the age of forty-four, when his horse rolled on him in a tournament, crippling one leg and leaving him a chronic invalid.’
  • 47) ‘In chronic patients, there are more acute phases, more ups and downs.’
  • 48) ‘The council was branded heartless at the time because Kay suffers from spina bifida and Pearson is a chronic asthmatic.’
  • 49) ‘I was a chronic patient with a ten-year history of back pain.’
  • 50) ‘For the artist, hailed on his death as ‘the greatest British painter since Turner’, was a chronic asthmatic, and the illness suffuses his paintings.’
  • 51) ‘These patients were chronic, relapsing patients who came to a known addiction evaluation and treatment setting.’
  • 52) ‘Richard Kramer, head of policy, told the British Medical Journal it might reduce the risk of overdose and could suit chronic users.’
  • 53) ‘The focus of the adult euthanasia program was on adult chronic patients, especially mental patients.’
  • 54) ‘Like a chronic patient fearing his final moment or wishing for a miracle to happen, Indian football lives on eternal hope.’
  • 55) ‘I see it frequently at work with my chronic patients.’
  • 56) ‘Sodium sulfites can be fatal to chronic asthmatics.’
  • 57) ‘Ms Brown said Jack is a chronic asthmatic and was stressed at the time.’
  • 58) ‘He was a chronic alcoholic and had severe problems in disciplining his work, which went through innumerable revisions.’
  • 59) ‘The vast majority of amnesic patients are chronic alcoholics, suffering from Korsakoff's syndrome.’
  • 60) ‘Because the job requires its workers to be away from home, there is a chronic driver shortage.’
  • 61) ‘Poor countries face chronic crises so dire that the world's sensibilities have been numbed to them.’
  • 62) ‘The problem is that there is a chronic need to address poor turnout.’
  • 63) ‘A terrible drought last year sparked chronic food shortages this year.’
  • 64) ‘He was interested in exploring the possibilities of having nuclear power to overcome the chronic energy deficit in his country.’
  • 65) ‘Britain's chronic teacher shortage forced a number of state schools to introduce a four-day week earlier this month.’
  • 66) ‘They have been a chronic problem in coastal areas in recent years, particularly in the New Forest, the Isle of Wight and Portsmouth.’
  • 67) ‘The new homes will be a world away from the 160,000 prefabs built to address the chronic housing shortage after the Second World War.’
  • 68) ‘Hospitals in Greater Manchester are spending millions of pounds hiring private doctors to help cope with chronic staff shortages.’
  • 69) ‘So the MTA, squeezed from both the cost and the revenue sides, runs chronic operating deficits that are about to become unsustainable.’
  • 70) ‘I'm more worried about what will happen to the Lions if they don't sort out their chronic problems at the breakdown in time for the first Test at Christchurch.’
  • 71) ‘Some of those children will find their way out of a cycle of poverty, poor education and chronic unemployment and eventually make satisfying lives and careers.’
  • 72) ‘But we have a chronic shortage of secondary school places which means that a huge number of Hackney children are travelling a quarter of the way round London every day.’
  • 73) ‘The country has been struggling with an economic crisis marked by chronic budget deficits and a national debt that is 116 percent of gross domestic product.’
  • 74) ‘Hundreds of children with severe psychological problems are not getting the help they urgently need because of a chronic staff shortage in Scotland's hospitals.’
  • 75) ‘Residents-only parking was introduced in 1996 to end the chronic problem of commuters parking their cars on residential street to avoid using car parks.’
  • 76) ‘Exasperated by the apparent chronic incompetence of the new Children and Family Court Advisory Service, he sacked the entire board.’
  • 77) ‘They insist that a pay rise is essential to attract new medical personnel and overcome chronic staff shortages.’
  • 78) ‘The Worcester House residence was rented by the university two years ago to ease chronic student accommodation shortages at the campus here.’
  • 79) ‘What is wrong with the system is chronic under-funding, largely of the fiscal service.’
  • 80) ‘That Moore is a chronic liar and twister of the truth obviously needs to be publicized as much as possible.’
  • 81) ‘Mike is a chronic liar, a Peter Pan figure who has trouble paying his bills and facing up to anything that whiffs of adult responsibility.’
  • 82) ‘How can you end a relationship with a chronic liar?’
  • 83) ‘Dennis had several siblings, but he was the only chronic liar.’
  • 84) ‘Several years ago, I was in a relationship with a chronic cheater.’
  • 85) ‘A generation ago over two thirds of chronic gamblers bet on the horses, only one in five played on the poker machines.’
  • 86) ‘These bus drivers have managed to amass a well-earned reputation as being the most aggressive and reckless drivers in a country of poor roads and chronic speeders.’
  • 87) ‘But a chronic victim owns it to herself or himself to seriously explore their own participation in a relationship of continuing abuse.’
  • 88) ‘He says with 300,000 Australians now considered chronic gamblers, it's time the Federal Government took some responsibility.’
  • 89) ‘One of the translations Andrew suggests is a chronically unlucky person, or perhaps walking disaster, chronic loser or even just loser if pressed for time.’
  • 90) ‘The Wests are not all that bad, as chronic criminals go.’
  • 91) ‘I had thought they were chronic gamblers.’
  • 92) ‘As a chronic crowd avoider, I was fairly inclined to that camp.’
  • 93) ‘He is also a chronic troublemaker and the father of a bunch of great kids.’
  • 94) ‘But at betting on the nags, as any regular reader will know, I am a chronic loser, a completely hopeless case.’
  • 95) ‘Is it a desire to draw attention away from his poor to chronic domestic policy record?’
  • 96) ‘The new big noise displayed a chronic lack of professionalism and failed hopelessly to live up to his billing.’
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