ore vs awe vs or vs oar

ore awe or oar

Definitions

  • 1) Rock that contains utilitarian materials; primarily a rock containing metals or gems which -- at the time of the rock's evaluation and proposal for extraction -- are able to be separated from its neighboring minerals and processed at a cost that does not exceed those materials' present-day economic values.
  • 2) A mineral or an aggregate of minerals from which a valuable constituent, especially a metal, can be profitably mined or extracted.
  • 3) obsolete Honor; grace; favor; mercy; clemency; happy augury.
  • 4) rare Metal.
  • 5) (Mining) A native metal or its compound with the rock in which it occurs, after it has been picked over to throw out what is worthless.
  • 6) a low furnace in which rich lead ore is reduced; -- also called Scotch hearth.
  • 7) The native form of a metal, whether free and uncombined, as gold, copper, etc., or combined, as iron, lead, etc. Usually the ores contain the metals combined with oxygen, sulphur, arsenic, etc. (called mineralizers).
  • 8) a monetary subunit in Denmark and Norway and Sweden; 100 ore equal 1 krona
  • 9) a mineral that contains metal that is valuable enough to be mined
  • 10) A kind of fine wool.
  • 11) One of the walls which surround the hearth of a Catalan forge.
  • 12) Honor; glory.
  • 13) A seaweed, especially Fucus vesiculosus or Laminaria digitata. Compare ore-weed.
  • 14) A Middle English form of oar.
  • 15) In the metallurgical treatment of the residue from burning off the sulphur of pyrites in the manufacture of sulphuric acid this material is mixed with common salt, roasted in a suitable furnace with free access of air, and, after cooling, leached with water to extract salts of copper. The dark-red oxid of iron which is left from the leaching is known as purple ore or blue billy. It is reduced to pulverulent metallic iron and used to precipitate copper from the solution obtained in the leaching.
  • 16) A metalliferous mineral of rock, especially one which is of sufficient value to be mined.
  • 17) Favor; grace; mercy; clemency; protection.
  • 18) Metal; sometimes, specifically, a precious metal, as gold.
  • 19) Abbreviations of Oregon.

Definitions

  • 1) A feeling of fear and reverence.
  • 2) A feeling of amazement.
  • 3) The power to inspire dread.
  • 4) Dread.
  • 5) A feeling of respect or reverence mixed with dread and wonder, often inspired by something majestic or powerful.
  • 6) to fear greatly; to reverence profoundly.
  • 7) Obs. or Obsolescent Dread; great fear mingled with respect.
  • 8) The emotion inspired by something dreadful and sublime; an undefined sense of the dreadful and the sublime; reverential fear, or solemn wonder; profound reverence.
  • 9) an overwhelming feeling of wonder or admiration
  • 10) Synonyms Reverence, Veneration, etc. See reverence, n.
  • 11) Dread; fear, as of something evil.
  • 12) Fear mingled with admiration or reverence; reverential fear; feeling inspired by something sublime, not necessarily partaking of the nature of fear or dread.
  • 13) One of the float-boards of an undershot water-wheel, on which the water acts.
  • 14) One of the sails of a windmill.
  • 15) Overawing influence.
  • 16) transitive To inspire fear and reverence.
  • 17) transitive To control by inspiring dread.
  • 18) inspire awe in
  • 19) To owe.
  • 20) To inspire with fear or dread; terrify; control or restrain by the influence of fear.
  • 21) To strike with awe, reverence, or respect; influence by exciting profound respect or reverential fear.
  • 22) Toowe.
  • 23) To fill with awe.
  • 24) To strike with fear and reverence; to inspire with awe; to control by inspiring dread.

Definitions

  • 1) heraldry The gold or yellow tincture on a coat of arms.
  • 2) Gold, represented in heraldic engraving by a white field sprinkled with small dots.
  • 3) (Her.) Yellow or gold color, -- represented in drawing or engraving by small dots.
  • 4) a state in northwestern United States on the Pacific
  • 5) In heraldry, one of the tinctures — the metal gold, often represented by a yellow color, and in engraving conventionally by dots upon a white ground. See tincture, and cuts under counter-changed and counter-compony.
  • 6) heraldry Of gold or yellow tincture on a coat of arms.
  • 7) obsolete Earlier, previously.
  • 8) obsolete Early (on).
  • 9) Before;ere.
  • 10) Than.
  • 11) Lest.
  • 12) Connects two equivalent names.
  • 13) Connects at least two alternative words, phrases, clauses, sentences, etc. each of which could make a passage true. In English, this is the "inclusive or." The "exclusive or" is formed by "either...or".
  • 14) otherwise; a consequence of the condition that the previous is false
  • 15) Logical union of two sets of values. There are two forms, an exclusive or and an inclusive or.
  • 16) Counts the elements before and after as two possibilities.
  • 17) Before. Followed by ever or ere:
  • 18) A particle that marks an alternative. It corresponds to either. It often connects a series of words or propositions, presenting a choice of either.
  • 19) Before; ere.
  • 20) See under Ever, and Ere.
  • 21) obsolete Ere; before; sooner than.

Definitions

  • 1) An implement used to propel a boat or a ship in the water, having a flat blade at one end, being rowed from the other end and being normally fastened to the vessel.
  • 2) A person who rows a boat, especially in a race.
  • 3) A long, thin, usually wooden pole with a blade at one end, used to row or steer a boat.
  • 4) to cease pulling, raising the oars out of water, but not boating them; to cease from work of any kind; to be idle; to rest.
  • 5) [Prov. Eng.] the water rail.
  • 6) to take them out of the rowlocks.
  • 7) to allow them to trail in the water alongside of the boat.
  • 8) An oarsman; a rower.
  • 9) to place them in the rowlocks.
  • 10) to put something round that part which rests in the rowlock, to prevent noise in rowing.
  • 11) (Zoöl.) An oarlike swimming organ of various invertebrates.
  • 12) An implement for impelling a boat, being a slender piece of timber, usually ash or spruce, with a grip or handle at one end and a broad blade at the other. The part which rests in the rowlock is called the loom.
  • 13) To peak the oars, to lift them from the rowlocks and hold them perpendicularly, the handle resting on the bottom of the boat.
  • 14) See under Feather.
  • 15) to give aid or advice; -- commonly used of a person who obtrudes aid or counsel not invited.
  • 16) an oar having the blade so curved as to afford a better hold upon the water in rowing.
  • 17) to cease rowing, and lay the oars in the boat.
  • 18) an implement used to propel or steer a boat
  • 19) A long wooden implement used for propelling a boat, barge, or galley.
  • 20) In zoöl., an oar-like appendage of an animal used for swimming, as the leg or antenna of an insect or crustacean, one of the parapodia of annelids, etc.
  • 21) An obsolete spelling of ore.
  • 22) In brewing, a blade or paddle with which the mash is stirred.
  • 23) One who uses an oar; an oarsman; also, a waterman.
  • 24) To row; to propel with oars.
  • 25) To row.
  • 26) Tomoveoruseasanoar.
  • 27) To propel with or as if with oars or an oar.
  • 28) To traverse with or as if with oars or an oar.
  • 29) To move forward by or as if by rowing.

Examples

  • 1) Industry experts put the turnaround down to the strong rebound in coal and iron ore prices.
  • 2) His father was a furnace man who would arrive home covered with the fine red dust of iron ore.
  • 3) We ramped up production as planned at our aluminium, power and iron ore businesses.
  • 4) Rio Tinto reported an 8 per cent jump in iron ore shipments yesterday as commodities prices continue to recover.
  • 5) In leaked emails, the executives said that the payment was necessary to make progress on mining iron ore at Simandou.
  • 6) There is a surplus of ore for many metals.
  • 7) The company said there was not sufficient space to simply store the mined ore.
  • 8) The outlook for iron ore and coal looks less promising.
  • 9) Spain is rich in minerals and has played an historic role as an ore producer in Europe.
  • 10) In the past three weeks, three iron ore producers have received takeover bids.
  • 11) Base metals, iron ore and coal operations are in its sights.
  • 12) Her resignation came amid investor fury after she overpaid wildly for a Brazilian iron ore mine.
  • 13) For iron ore producers, these have been a torrid few months.
  • 14) Prices for iron ore have risen as much as 71 per cent annually in the past two years.
  • 15) A conveyor belt has been built to take uranium ore from its mine to processing facilities.
  • 16) Good news for western companies selling consumer goods there; less favourable for miners supplying iron ore and copper.
  • 17) How can Britain be a bulk commodity producer when it does not have the coal and iron ore to make the commodity?
  • 18) I know of no one who expects any bounce in oil or the price of commodities such as copper and iron ore.
  • 19) By the end of the decade the four big Australian iron ore producers will command comfortably more than half of globally traded iron ore.
  • 20) But once its flagship iron ore project in Russia gets going, it will be worth it.
  • 21) The president needs more copper, iron ore, zinc and natural gas.
  • 22) Wool no longer held first place as an export earner during the last quarter of the century; coal and iron ore brought in more dollars.
  • 23) The iron ore mine in Brazil has become a symbol of the company's ills.
  • 24) This ore is the foundation material for our blast furnace operations at Sydney, Nova Scotia, and is also exported for use in the steel plants of the British Isles and of Germany.
  • 25) The supply of this ore is apparently inexhaustible, but no veins have as yet been found.
  • 26) Strong demand from China and other parts of Asia for Australia 's major commodity exports of coking coal and iron ore is also reshaping the economy, fueling a shift to record monthly trade surpluses, swelling government revenue and powering the economy at above-average growth rates.
  • 27) It seems like our second highest export besides the ore is beautiful teenagers.
  • 28) The Pilbara has boomed in recent years as China's voracious demand for iron ore to feed its construction-driven economy has put a premium on ore from the region, the country's nearest overseas source of high-quality ore.
  • 29) Congo has diamonds, gold, copper, cobalt, cassiterite (tin ore) and coltan as well as timber, coffee and oil, little of which has benefited the Congolese, since the brutal rule of Belgium during colonial times.
  • 30) The country lacks the technology to convert the titanium ore into metal and therefore the ore is used mostly in dyes and paints after processing.
  • 31) ‘The biggest deposits of the metal ore in the world are to be found in the eastern Congo.’
  • 32) ‘Mercury is now extracted from its ores by a method that has been used for hundreds of years.’
  • 33) ‘The mountain massifs to the east of the Rhône, however, were less rich in metal ores.’
  • 34) ‘Iron, in contrast, combines with elements such as oxygen and sulphur to make mineral ores.’
  • 35) ‘Indium is obtained by extracting it from zinc ores while they are being processed to produce zinc metal.’
  • 36) ‘Its compounds tend to be found with ores of other metals, such as lead, silver, gold, and cobalt.’
  • 37) ‘They live in mountainous regions, and mine ores and metal to craft weapons.’
  • 38) ‘The study of rocks, ores and minerals is an integral part of Geology class in school.’
  • 39) ‘These metals are typically won from polymetallic ores rich in sulfosalts.’
  • 40) ‘Students are taught how to make their own pigments from mineral sources such as ores, soils and carbon black.’
  • 41) ‘The most important single application of oxygen is in metallurgy where it is used to extract metals from their ores.’
  • 42) ‘This deposit is the biggest in Bulgaria and in Europe for underground extract of gold-copper ores.’
  • 43) ‘In my view, the commodity boom is a reminder that the supply of ores, minerals and metals is not infinitely flexible.’
  • 44) ‘Activities such as mining and manufacturing greatly increase the release of heavy metals from rocks and ores.’
  • 45) ‘In an exhibition of mineral ores those of copper first attract the attention, providing a joy to the eye as do those of no other metal.’
  • 46) ‘Water entrapped by molten metal or slag may generate explosive forces that launch hot metal or material ores over a wide area.’
  • 47) ‘Specimens of minerals, ores, and gemstones began to be saved for their scientific value and as natural curiosities.’
  • 48) ‘It was also used in the production of metals from their ores.’
  • 49) ‘Magnesium is extracted from its ores by one of two processes.’
  • 50) ‘Microbial mining reactions can, on the other hand, be turned to commercial advantage to extract metals from low-grade ores.’

Examples

  • 1) The act is expertly crafted to take spectators on a rollercoaster ride of fear and awe.
  • 2) I was probably in shock or awe of him.
  • 3) We could not help feeling a certain mixture of awe and admiration.
  • 4) But you still feel awed by the enormity of what is going on here.
  • 5) This goal leaves me laughing and gawping with amazement and awe.
  • 6) They are less about winning hearts and minds than inflicting shock and awe.
  • 7) You are supposed to share his sense of awe.
  • 8) They lived in awe and fear of the man at the same time.
  • 9) Yet they evoked awe and wonder and many were canonized.
  • 10) We all approached the remix with respect and awe.
  • 11) What was more surprising was the awe she inspired in her political rivals.
  • 12) But we must not have too much admiration and awe.
  • 13) Buildings designed to shock and awe fail as places of human occupation and business.
  • 14) The heat and the smell filled me with a strange sense of awe and wonder.
  • 15) But how far should we be swayed by this envy or the awe we feel for their feats on the pitch?
  • 16) He wanted us to gaze up at his Sistine ceiling and be awed by the power of divinity.
  • 17) Reading the stories of political dissidents, it is impossible not to be awed by their courage and their inner strength.
  • 18) I watched in awe at his courage as he completed six steps, which left him exhausted.
  • 19) Its bearer stood waiting in respectful awe as Lady Maria uncovered its face.
  • 20) The five claimed the recordings were only made to 'shock and awe' people.
  • 21) And he adds: 'The crowd were in awe.
  • 22) He is said to be 'in awe' of her.
  • 23) For many decisions about what to eat are not based on a personal sense of awe do plants or animals care if we are “in awe” of them anyway?
  • 24) The one that just has me in awe, is the Sugared Walnut ...
  • 25) Today the word awe gets thrown around like a dishrag.
  • 26) “All these sentiments blend together in the soul,” becoming “a single phenomenon which we call awe” (loc. cit.).
  • 27) In a preview of the special Comerford, who has been cooking for presidents since the Clinton administration, said the chefs were in "awe" of everything they saw at the White House.
  • 28) Way to go Fox ... at least one station isn't so in "awe" of him that they are not afraid to call him out of certain things.
  • 29) Publicly, the Europeans have been following the script – "a good night's kip and then go out there and give it to them," said the normally mild-mannered Ross Fisher, sounding more like Paulie Gualtieri from the Sopranos than Clark Kent – but behind the scenes they have been in awe of the way Montgomerie has comported himself this week.
  • 30) I was in awe of you, thinking you were going to be the next Dylan Thomas!
  • 31) ‘No doubt they were in awe of her wonderful creation, not that she could blame them.’
  • 32) ‘I am thinking of awe, reverence, respect and emotions too deep for words.’
  • 33) ‘She wondered what it felt like to have that kind of passion and was in awe of their desire to get the job done.’
  • 34) ‘No doubt I was in awe of him, but in any case I didn't really get to connect with him as a person.’
  • 35) ‘Solitude: the word brings forth both hope and expectation of joy, fear and awe.’
  • 36) ‘How easy is it to lose yourself and what's important to you when you meet someone who impresses you, or someone who fills you with awe, or fear?’
  • 37) ‘Just maybe we can confront our place with awe and admiration, respect and veneration.’
  • 38) ‘Antarctica is indifferent to humans, but we humans are in awe of Antarctica.’
  • 39) ‘Everyone was filled with awe, and many wonders and miraculous signs were done by the apostles.’
  • 40) ‘They were in awe of Brazil - or at least in awe of the myth of Brazilian football.’
  • 41) ‘All he said was how much he appreciated the comments and that he was in awe of being in the room with so many great players.’
  • 42) ‘I can only gaze with wonder and awe at the depths and heights of our psychic nature.’
  • 43) ‘My feelings of annoyance quickly faded away and were replaced with feelings of awe and respect.’
  • 44) ‘Colin was in awe of the city and loved the view of the life he wished to live.’
  • 45) ‘For all his confidence, in a strange way he was in awe of some of the senior players and their experiences.’
  • 46) ‘I was in the Dolomites with, you know, huge, soaring mountains and the locals were in awe of some of the famous routes in Scotland.’
  • 47) ‘Winning the award, he says, is a measure of how far he's come since those days when he was in awe of the building and the people in it.’
  • 48) ‘Yet he was in awe of the young soldiers, many of whom have suffered debilitating injuries.’
  • 49) ‘He was in awe of China and pleaded that if India should progress it should learn a lesson or two from the communist regime.’
  • 50) ‘Maybe there were times when we were in awe of them for a short while before realising we were in those games with a chance of winning.’
  • 51) ‘The ministry has lost its awe and power.’
  • 52) ‘The Metro has lost its awe, and I now feel like a true Muscovite as I monotonously ride the Metro without effort.’
  • 53) ‘The Home Run Derby has already lost some of its awe and eventually these new games and contests would grow old and boring as well.’
  • 54) ‘Dubai retains its awe for much of the area's people, offering the traveller a multitude of reasons to visit.’
  • 55) ‘As a struggling artist, this kind of thing inspires me and awes me.’
  • 56) ‘Be awed by the untouched vastness of some of the oldest mountains on the planet.’
  • 57) ‘Neither of those buildings could be described as traditional - the Empire State Building awes you with its mass, not its subtle detail.’
  • 58) ‘The huge bell with its gigantic crack always awes visitors.’
  • 59) ‘At the Metropolitan she awes nobody as the goddess of War.’
  • 60) ‘Inside the Abbey it was impossible not to feel awed by the history and the weight of what it means to be English.’
  • 61) ‘But I'm awed by their desire to chronicle these experiences in such detail.’
  • 62) ‘One of the things about Hal was you got a feeling he was awed by your talent.’
  • 63) ‘We inspect the deck cabin of newfound friends and are awed by its spaciousness.’
  • 64) ‘I didn't remember them being so vast, but was awed by the beauty of the fields of green and gentle rolling hills.’
  • 65) ‘During the dream, I felt awed by how powerful the plot of my film was, but when I woke up I could not remember anything about it.’
  • 66) ‘I am as always slightly awed by the sheer tragedy and futility of it all.’
  • 67) ‘Everyone was awed by the moral implications of mass murder on such a grand scale.’
  • 68) ‘This led her back to the start of the circle, to the blue-and-yellow macaws that had awed her when she was a child.’
  • 69) ‘I was awed by it when it was a dump, and now that it's been buffed and spiffed it's even better.’
  • 70) ‘Once inside the park, you will be awed by the sheer scale and beauty of your surroundings.’
  • 71) ‘Made of the local red sandstone, set on raised ground, and having the highest interior of all English cathedrals, it dominates the Merseyside skyline and awes worshippers.’

Examples

  • 1) She wandered about the kitchen restlessly, vaguely tidying up, putting things away more or less at random.
  • 2) I noticed that she'd marked every third or fourth entry with an asterisk.
  • 3) I don't work the phones any more for example, or at least not the way I used to.
  • 4) [CSA] _No slave or other_ person held to service or labor _in any State or Territory of the Confederate States_, under the laws thereof, escaping _or lawfully carried_ into another, shall, in consequence of any law or regulation therein, be discharged from such service or labor; but shall be delivered up on claim of the party _to whom such slave belongs, or_ to whom such service or labor may be due.
  • 5) Consumers who purchased any of the recalled OTC drugs are advised to stop using them and to contact McNeil Consumer Healthcare for instructions on a refund or replacement by logging onto the Web site or  by calling 1-888-222-6036.
  • 6) I think one could make a stronger argument that World or Warcraft, Farmville, the lottery, Rolex's ..or GWAPs are more exploitative because they utilize psychological tricks to extract money/labor from people who may not realize they are at some subconscious level being involuntarily manipulated.
  • 7) I think Fickr has the best format of adding a friend, more control more information, and through the persons choice of groups you know exactly what kind of contact you are adding it is your headache after that..at Flickr I dont add people without a profile or an avatar, I dont add people into porn or semi porn groups..or religious mindset of hate..even if he is from my community or faith.
  • 8) Of course, if you do say you have X skills which your other candidates don't have, there's the possibility you come off as either arrogant or over-qualified, unless you can justify the skill for the job and it really is a rare skill..or they may turn out to have other candidates with the skill that you think no-one else at that interview has.
  • 9) If this recall affects you, and you still need a medication to ease the symptoms of your arthritis, consider a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medicine such as ibuprofen (Advil or  generic) or naproxen (Aleve or generic), which may work as well or even better than acetaminophen (Tylenol or generic).
  • 10)         — Writing yourself a note and putting the note where you will see it when you leave the vehicle;         — Placing your purse, briefcase or something else you need in the back seat so that you will have to check the back seat when you leave the vehicle; or        — Keeping an object in the car seat, such as a stuffed toy.
  • 11) I had a tough time shooting this series , I dont have such a tough time during any event not even Moharam where I am a whisker away from swords and flying flagellating blades ..or the 18 feet sharp rods of the Maryamma disciples or when I walk on fire during Ag Ka Matam.
  • 12) Among the items that you cannot sell: Toys and other articles  intended  for  use  by  children, or any  furniture,   with  paint  or  other  surface  coatings  containing  lead  over  specified  amounts.
  • 13) According to the FDA, some of the products claim to be “natural,” or  “herbal,” but actually contain one or more potentially dangerous controlled substance not listed on the label.
  • 14) ‘The café is a great place for locals to meet up for a chat over a cup of tea or coffee.’
  • 15) ‘She never learned to read or write.’
  • 16) ‘School administrators should work to ensure that the majority of students can walk or bike to school.’
  • 17) ‘We are just interested in your honest opinions - there are no right or wrong answers.’
  • 18) ‘We don't mind if we have a boy or a girl, we just want a healthy, happy baby.’
  • 19) ‘In cities and towns most people wear Western clothing - pants or blue jeans and shirts.’
  • 20) ‘Research in New York showed men with cats or dogs had lower blood pressure.’
  • 21) ‘Joshua was born weighing just 18 ounces - half a kilo or just over a pound.’
  • 22) ‘Spain entered the twentieth century having lost its colonies in the New World and the Pacific in the Spanish-American War or, as it is known in Spain, the War of 1898.’
  • 23) ‘By early Tuesday he was dead - a victim of the most deadly of the world's culinary delicacies, the blowfish or fugu.’
  • 24) ‘Hurry up, or you'll be late for class.’
  • 25) ‘We do have to leave now or we won't be back until after sunset.’
  • 26) ‘I'd better tell him myself or I'll get in even more trouble.’
  • 27) ‘Do as you're told Beth or you'll get hurt.’
  • 28) ‘It was just an accident … or was it?’
  • 29) ‘Emily, unaware of the mental battle that was going on in his mind (or was she?), kept on walking towards him.’
  • 30) ‘Learn that to love is the one way to know or God or man.’

Examples

  • 1) Coaches often tell their rowers to use their weight at the end of the oars.
  • 2) They will row into and out of port pulling on two huge oars.
  • 3) But sticking the old oar in when the parents are physically present also counts as real bravery.
  • 4) He was rowing with two oars but going against the wind and tide.
  • 5) They attempt to paddle the boat back to shore but they are too weak to use the oar with any effectiveness.
  • 6) The boats were to be rowed with muffled oars, and the men were to wade ashore.
  • 7) It makes our teeth itch when the contestants' families stick their oars in.
  • 8) If your next holiday can make a difference, why not stick your oar in?
  • 9) He used his oars little, satisfied to go with the tide and be taken back by it.
  • 10) If there is more muscle pulling that oar, then the force is stronger and the boat gains a momentum of its own.
  • 11) He had tied a plastic sheet to a flimsy paddle to use as a sail, and was using another oar as a rudder.
  • 12) Set the sail; out oars; the helm!
  • 13) All we had to do now was work out a way to get back to it in the absence of oars, sails or an engine.
  • 14) He crammed his men into the boat and headed into the Channel, propelled by the two oars.
  • 15) Amazing what a few pulls on an oar and some guys on bikes in Star Wars helmets can do to swing the public mood.
  • 16) July 15, 2008 at 9:34 am excep teh wyte pantzes……..oar teh wyte shirtz…..oar oar oar
  • 17) Each droplet of water that passes over my oar is as easily identifiable as a person, and the voice of the water is the call of a multitude, giving and taking names.
  • 18) The singular form of retrices is rectrix which comes from the Latin word oar used to mean rower.
  • 19) Also, to secure the oar from the weather (for I used it in mild breezes as a flagstaff on top of my pyramid from which to fly a flag I made me from one of my precious shirts) I contrived for it a covering of well-cured sealskins.
  • 20) September 28th, 2005 at 9: 55 pm oar is great but on the show i think they did look nervous but thats pritty much how trhey always look when they are in concert what it kind of a bad so yea rock on
  • 21) Also, to secure the oar from the weather (for I used it in mild breezes as a flagstaff top of my pyramid from which to fly a flag I made me from one of my precious shirts), I contrived for it a covering of well-cured sealskins.
  • 22) A paddle, a sweep, or an oar, is called washee, and washee is also the verb.
  • 23) ‘As well as traditional rowing oars and sculls, they manufacture oars for surf boat rowing, and transatlantic teams.’
  • 24) ‘I love being on the water, I love the sound the water makes and the oars on the boat, all of those things.’
  • 25) ‘Organised by the Gauteng Dragon Boat Association, long boats and oars will be provided for participants who do not have their own team boat.’
  • 26) ‘She saw a small wooden dock, and a wooden rowboat with two oars floating in the water.’
  • 27) ‘Kaishek failed to notice the concealed motion and came at his opponent with both blades swirling like the oars of a seven man regatta rowing boat.’
  • 28) ‘In his opinion, it is very important to have on board: oars, oarlocks, a boat hook, a good knife, a sounder and the mobile phone.’
  • 29) ‘We docked by a port with several other boats in, most of them small rowing boats with oars.’
  • 30) ‘They pull hard at the oars until the boat is abreast of the island, and then they ram the bow against its icy littoral.’
  • 31) ‘The eight occupants of the boat take to the oars, pulling hard against the wind and waves.’
  • 32) ‘The starboard oars dipped into the water and were held fast and the great ship slowed and stopped.’
  • 33) ‘Slowly, she got into the rowing boat, shipped the oars and made her way across to the centre of the river.’
  • 34) ‘Sailors pushed up and down on the oars like a water pump to manoeuvre the boat.’
  • 35) ‘Sitting high in the water their oars were clearing the waves and the crew looked polished and clean.’
  • 36) ‘Smith got his oar stuck in the water and had to stop rowing with 600 metres to go.’
  • 37) ‘After dark, we could hear the sound of oars of an approaching dinghy.’
  • 38) ‘Each boat contains a crew of two and each crew rows an identical 7.1 metre boat that includes two sliding seats and the same sculling oars as used in standard rowing boats.’
  • 39) ‘He relates the importance of the thole, which secures the oar to the boat, and notes that towing was the expedition's worst job assignment.’
  • 40) ‘The canoe slowed down to a stop and Pierce set the oars back in the boat.’
  • 41) ‘The ship can be easily steered with just the oars doing all the work when the sail is down.’
  • 42) ‘The fine owner of a lodge at the shoreline was gracious enough to offer an aluminum boat with oars for our use.’
  • 43) ‘The crew suddenly lost their stroke oar to eligibility issues, and Erickson was back to the drawing board to find a line-up.’
  • 44) ‘He is considered by many as the best ‘stroke’ oar in the long history of lightweight rowing at Harvard.’
  • 45) ‘The person on the port side all the way aft is the stroke oar, the rower who sets the pace that everyone else must match.’
  • 46) ‘They're oared to the docks where a Guild Estimator boards and examines the cargo, noting its quality and determining the number of lots that will go up for sale.’
  • 47) ‘In May, foods and prayers are offered to Tin Hau, the goddess of fishermen, and the following month the brightly decorated Dragon Boats are oared swiftly in races through Hong Kong's waters.’
  • 48) ‘But everything progressed smoothly and he oared his canopy slow and smooth on the calm river, along with many others, all dreaming to reach the pinnacle of success through self-actualization.’
  • 49) ‘The inhabitants of the area have long sailed, poled and oared their way along the delta's vast network of channels, which, in the pre-French era linked them to Southeast Asia's expanding markets.’
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