sulphur vs sulfur

sulphur sulfur

Definitions

  • 1) (Old Chem.) See Hepar.
  • 2) (Bot.) lycopodium powder. See under Lycopodium.
  • 3) (Chem.), [Archaic] an alkaline sulphide capable of acting as a base in the formation of sulphur salts according to the old dual theory of salts.
  • 4) (Zoöl.) Any one of numerous species of yellow or orange butterflies of the subfamily Pierinæ.
  • 5) (Chem.) a white crystalline solid, SO3, obtained by oxidation of sulphur dioxide. It dissolves in water with a hissing noise and the production of heat, forming sulphuric acid, and is employed as a dehydrating agent. Called also sulphuric anhydride, and formerly sulphuric acid.
  • 6) (Chem.) See Sulphacid.
  • 7) (Zoöl.) See Sulphur-bottom.
  • 8) (Chem.) an elastic variety of sulphur of a resinous appearance, obtained by pouring melted sulphur into water. On standing, it passes back into a brittle crystalline modification.
  • 9) (Chem.) See Mercaptan.
  • 10) (Old Chem.) a golden yellow powder, consisting of antimonic sulphide, Sb2S5, -- formerly a famous nostrum.
  • 11) (Chem.) A nonmetallic element occurring naturally in large quantities, either combined as in the sulphides (as pyrites) and sulphates (as gypsum), or native in volcanic regions, in vast beds mixed with gypsum and various earthy materials, from which it is melted out. Symbol S. Atomic weight 32. The specific gravity of ordinary octohedral sulphur is 2.05; of prismatic sulphur, 1.96.
  • 12) (Chem.) a sulphide of hydrocarbon radicals, formed like the ordinary ethers, which are oxides, but with sulphur in the place of oxygen.
  • 13) (Chem.) a colorless gas, SO2, of a pungent, suffocating odor, produced by the burning of sulphur. It is employed chiefly in the production of sulphuric acid, and as a reagent in bleaching; -- called also sulphurous anhydride, and formerly sulphurous acid.
  • 14) showers of yellow pollen, resembling sulphur in appearance, often carried from pine forests by the wind to a great distance.
  • 15) (Chem.) a salt of a sulphacid; a sulphosalt.
  • 16) an abundant tasteless odorless multivalent nonmetallic element; best known in yellow crystals; occurs in many sulphide and sulphate minerals and even in native form (especially in volcanic regions)
  • 17) In zoology, one of many different pieridine butterflies: a yellow pierian.
  • 18) The supposed substance of lightning.
  • 19) Chemical symbol, S; atomic weight, 31.98. An elementary substance which occurs in nature as a brittle crystalline solid, with resinous luster, almost tasteless, and emitting when rubbed or warmed a peculiar characteristic odor.
  • 20) Alternative spelling of sulfur.
  • 21) treat with sulphur in order to preserve

Definitions

  • 1) countable, uncountable A yellowish green colour, like that of sulfur.
  • 2) uncountable A chemical element (symbol S) with an atomic number of 16.
  • 3) A pale yellow nonmetallic element occurring widely in nature in several free, allotropic and crystal forms and combined in numerous sulfates and sulfides. It is used in black gunpowder, rubber vulcanization, the manufacture of insecticides and pharmaceuticals, and in the preparation of sulfur compounds such as hydrogen sulfide and sulfuric acid. Atomic number 16; atomic weight 32.066; melting point 115.21°C; boiling point 444.61°C; specific gravity at 20°C (rhombic) 2.07, (monoclinic) 2.00; valence 2, 4, 6. cross-reference: Periodic Table.
  • 4) Any of various butterflies of the subfamily Coliadinae of the family Pieridae, having yellow or orange wings often marked with black.
  • 5) Of a yellowish green colour, like that of sulfur.
  • 6) transitive To treat with sulfur, or a sulfur compound, especially to preserve or to counter agricultural pests.
  • 7) To treat with sulfur or a compound of sulfur.

Examples

  • 1) It also wants limits on sulphur dioxide to be increased.
  • 2) How do you know if you are sensitive to sulphur dioxide?
  • 3) The bacteria coating your teeth and gums release sulphur compounds which give off an unpleasant odour.
  • 4) You can really smell the sulphur from the smoke.
  • 5) They were said to give off smoke and smell of sulphur.
  • 6) It has been scientifically shown sprouts contain sulphur compounds that are more or less guaranteed to make them deadly.
  • 7) The eruption also shot a plume of sulphur dioxide gas and ash so high that it punched into the stratosphere.
  • 8) And the sulphur compounds that are shipped from ocean to continent in this way play a crucial climatic role in the process.
  • 9) Contains 11 per cent of sulphur amino acids.
  • 10) Learning is also disturbed when sulphur dioxide is released, sometimes windows have to be closed.
  • 11) The smell of sulphur rose into the sky, as stars appeared above.
  • 12) Although sulphur dioxide has been the biggest threat so far, the eruption could produce more big surprises.
  • 13) I could smell a strong sulphur smell.
  • 14) This having been said, sulphur dioxide is permitted in the production of organic wines in very restricted amounts.
  • 15) It shot sulphur dioxide gas into the upper atmosphere, shrouded the globe and dimmed sunlight for years afterwards.
  • 16) The mysterious lake was close, and when the wind changed you could smell the sulphur blowing from a range of bubbling vents.
  • 17) She said: 'I could smell a strong sulphur smell.
  • 18) Matches strike, the smell of sulphur rises, there is talk of petrol.
  • 19) The eruption is also spewing invisible sulphur dioxide gas, which is notorious for causing respiratory problems, smog and acid rain.
  • 20) Stripped naked of additives and processes, save a pinch of stabilising sulphur dioxide for all but the purists, the finished product is surprising and fractious.
  • 21) As the condensing chamber becomes warm, the sulphur collects as a liquid in it, and is drawn off into cylindrical molds, the product being called _roll sulphur_ or _brimstone_.
  • 22) Is not this effect nearly similar to that produced by the combination of phosphorus and sulphur, or, more properly speaking, the _phosphuret of sulphur_?
  • 23) At such times I could see his villanous face plainly, and, when the sulphur from the matches irritated his lungs, between the raspy cough that followed and the clammy mud in which I was lying, I confess I shivered harder than ever.
  • 24) Don't you love those creatures that live at the bottom of the ocean, under incredible pressures and temperatures, feeding on the sulphur from a volcanic outflow?
  • 25) The oil that Iran produces is very low grade (high in sulphur), which is why they import quite a bit of what they use.
  • 26) The US and Europe are both moving to low sulphur fuels for emissions reasons, but sulphur is a beneficial ingredient for the engine.
  • 27) The rocks at the Yukaton are very very rich in sulphur and close to the surface.
  • 28) Over the long term sulphur emissions decline in both scenarios throughout the world, but the timing and magnitude vary.
  • 29) For, if we first use perhydrol as oxidizing agent in alkaline solution and then acidify with nitric acid, sulphur is not precipitated and fully correct results are obtained.
  • 30) The proteins are built up from so-called amino acids, and their sulphur is due to the presence of one or two sulphur-containing amino acids: cystine and methionine.
  • 31) ‘Potassium also reacts readily with all acids and with many nonmetals, such as sulfur, fluorine, chlorine, phosphorus, and nitrogen.’
  • 32) ‘Other elements added to improve characteristics include nickel, molybdenum, copper, titanium, aluminum, silicon, niobium, nitrogen, sulfur, and selenium.’
  • 33) ‘Along with carbon, they include elements such as hydrogen, oxygen, fluorine, chlorine, bromine, sulphur or nitrogen.’
  • 34) ‘The first is the ‘bulk’ elements, which include calcium, phosphorus, sulfur, potassium, chlorine, sodium, and magnesium.’
  • 35) ‘Life in the Universe - as we know it - began with the synthesis of some key elements: hydrogen, carbon, oxygen, nitrogen, sulphur, and phosphorus.’
  • 36) ‘Potassium, a macronutrient for plants, is present in plant dry matter next to carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, and nitrogen and before sulphur and phosphorus.’
  • 37) ‘Most of your mass is carbon, oxygen, hydrogen, sulfur, plus some nitrogen and phosphorous.’
  • 38) ‘Coal is a solid organic material made up of large, complex molecules containing mostly carbon, plus small amounts of hydrogen, sulfur, nitrogen and oxygen.’
  • 39) ‘Boron, silicon, nitrogen, phosphorus and sulfur are among the most prevalent of the elements other than carbon that form covalent compounds.’
  • 40) ‘Nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium, sulphur and boron have been found to be important in Zambia.’
  • 41) ‘It combines easily with many non-metals, including nitrogen, sulfur, phosphorus, and the halogens.’
  • 42) ‘In the burning process most carbon, nitrogen and sulphur are lost in gaseous form, whereas phosphorus, potassium and calcium are retained in the ash.’
  • 43) ‘Oxygen is a particularly strong embrittling agent for molybdenum and tungsten; nitrogen and sulfur are particularly harmful in wrought chromium.’
  • 44) ‘Calcium, sulphur, magnesium, aluminium, iron, copper, zinc and manganese were measured by atomic absorption spectrophotometry.’
  • 45) ‘Stainless steel is an alloy composed of various percentages of iron, nickel, sulfur, carbon, silicon, manganese, and chromium.’
  • 46) ‘Chlorosis is a common symptom of deficiencies of other nutrients such as nitrogen, sulphur, and magnesium.’
  • 47) ‘Aluminum was named for one of its most important compounds, alum, a compound of potassium, aluminum, sulfur and oxygen.’
  • 48) ‘These include iron, calcium, sulfur, manganese, molybdenum, zinc, boron, and copper.’
  • 49) ‘Acid rain results when sulfur and nitrogen compounds - products of fossil fuel combustion - rise into the atmosphere and combine with water.’
  • 50) ‘Because iron has an affinity electronegative atoms such as oxygen, nitrogen and sulfur, these atoms are found at the heart of the iron-binding centers of macromolecules.’
  • 51) ‘Among aromatic double-flowered tulips we have the sulphur yellow ‘Monte Carlo’ and the golden ‘Hoangho’.’
  • 52) ‘What they have in common are ball-like clusters of flowers of a bright sulfur yellow that fades to a softer orange-yellow as the seeds form.’
  • 53) ‘Each stem carries up to 10 nodding sulphur coloured flared bell shaped flowers, growing from a base of deep green foliage that has attractive mottled markings.’
  • 54) ‘Create a shallow puddle to attract swallowtails, blues, sulfurs and other butterflies that enjoy drinking at mud puddles.’
  • 55) ‘Swallowtails, cabbage whites, skippers, and orange sulphurs follow scent trails to the tiny patches of flowers blooming furiously in the middle of the city.’
  • 56) ‘The coyote approached a patch of wet earth where a dozen or more butterflies - monarchs and sulphurs - were getting a morning drink, and the insects scattered.’
  • 57) ‘There are certain minerals that some butterflies, such as swallowtails, sulfurs, and blues need that are not provided in a diet of nectar alone.’
  • 58) ‘The sulfur butterflies, Colias philodice and C. eurytheme, are economic pests of alfalfa and clover crops.’
  • 59) ‘Recent experiments suggest that sulphuring an inverted barrel but not bunging up results in a much lower level of volatile acids since bunging up creates a humid environment, ideal for the growth of bacteria.’
  • 60) ‘The wine was then handled like a white wine, cool fermented and sulphured once dry.’
  • 61) ‘Fruits may be pretreated by sulfuring, salt solution, ascorbic acid solution, or steam blanching.’
  • 62) ‘Of course just as with candied fruit, ‘sulphuring’ can leave a chemical taste behind, which is why it's nearly impossible to find ‘sulphured’ molasses in grocery stores today, even if you wanted to.’
  • 63) ‘By far the best method of sulphuring is by using liquid sulphur dioxide from a cylinder, also called bottled sulphur dioxide.’

Examples

  • 1) A sulfur butterfly danced a clumsy circle around Diego's head.
  • 2) ‘Potassium also reacts readily with all acids and with many nonmetals, such as sulfur, fluorine, chlorine, phosphorus, and nitrogen.’
  • 3) ‘Other elements added to improve characteristics include nickel, molybdenum, copper, titanium, aluminum, silicon, niobium, nitrogen, sulfur, and selenium.’
  • 4) ‘Along with carbon, they include elements such as hydrogen, oxygen, fluorine, chlorine, bromine, sulphur or nitrogen.’
  • 5) ‘The first is the ‘bulk’ elements, which include calcium, phosphorus, sulfur, potassium, chlorine, sodium, and magnesium.’
  • 6) ‘Life in the Universe - as we know it - began with the synthesis of some key elements: hydrogen, carbon, oxygen, nitrogen, sulphur, and phosphorus.’
  • 7) ‘Potassium, a macronutrient for plants, is present in plant dry matter next to carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, and nitrogen and before sulphur and phosphorus.’
  • 8) ‘Most of your mass is carbon, oxygen, hydrogen, sulfur, plus some nitrogen and phosphorous.’
  • 9) ‘Coal is a solid organic material made up of large, complex molecules containing mostly carbon, plus small amounts of hydrogen, sulfur, nitrogen and oxygen.’
  • 10) ‘Boron, silicon, nitrogen, phosphorus and sulfur are among the most prevalent of the elements other than carbon that form covalent compounds.’
  • 11) ‘Nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium, sulphur and boron have been found to be important in Zambia.’
  • 12) ‘It combines easily with many non-metals, including nitrogen, sulfur, phosphorus, and the halogens.’
  • 13) ‘In the burning process most carbon, nitrogen and sulphur are lost in gaseous form, whereas phosphorus, potassium and calcium are retained in the ash.’
  • 14) ‘Oxygen is a particularly strong embrittling agent for molybdenum and tungsten; nitrogen and sulfur are particularly harmful in wrought chromium.’
  • 15) ‘Calcium, sulphur, magnesium, aluminium, iron, copper, zinc and manganese were measured by atomic absorption spectrophotometry.’
  • 16) ‘Stainless steel is an alloy composed of various percentages of iron, nickel, sulfur, carbon, silicon, manganese, and chromium.’
  • 17) ‘Chlorosis is a common symptom of deficiencies of other nutrients such as nitrogen, sulphur, and magnesium.’
  • 18) ‘Aluminum was named for one of its most important compounds, alum, a compound of potassium, aluminum, sulfur and oxygen.’
  • 19) ‘These include iron, calcium, sulfur, manganese, molybdenum, zinc, boron, and copper.’
  • 20) ‘Acid rain results when sulfur and nitrogen compounds - products of fossil fuel combustion - rise into the atmosphere and combine with water.’
  • 21) ‘Because iron has an affinity electronegative atoms such as oxygen, nitrogen and sulfur, these atoms are found at the heart of the iron-binding centers of macromolecules.’
  • 22) ‘Among aromatic double-flowered tulips we have the sulphur yellow ‘Monte Carlo’ and the golden ‘Hoangho’.’
  • 23) ‘What they have in common are ball-like clusters of flowers of a bright sulfur yellow that fades to a softer orange-yellow as the seeds form.’
  • 24) ‘Each stem carries up to 10 nodding sulphur coloured flared bell shaped flowers, growing from a base of deep green foliage that has attractive mottled markings.’
  • 25) ‘Create a shallow puddle to attract swallowtails, blues, sulfurs and other butterflies that enjoy drinking at mud puddles.’
  • 26) ‘Swallowtails, cabbage whites, skippers, and orange sulphurs follow scent trails to the tiny patches of flowers blooming furiously in the middle of the city.’
  • 27) ‘The coyote approached a patch of wet earth where a dozen or more butterflies - monarchs and sulphurs - were getting a morning drink, and the insects scattered.’
  • 28) ‘There are certain minerals that some butterflies, such as swallowtails, sulfurs, and blues need that are not provided in a diet of nectar alone.’
  • 29) ‘The sulfur butterflies, Colias philodice and C. eurytheme, are economic pests of alfalfa and clover crops.’
  • 30) ‘Recent experiments suggest that sulphuring an inverted barrel but not bunging up results in a much lower level of volatile acids since bunging up creates a humid environment, ideal for the growth of bacteria.’
  • 31) ‘The wine was then handled like a white wine, cool fermented and sulphured once dry.’
  • 32) ‘Fruits may be pretreated by sulfuring, salt solution, ascorbic acid solution, or steam blanching.’
  • 33) ‘Of course just as with candied fruit, ‘sulphuring’ can leave a chemical taste behind, which is why it's nearly impossible to find ‘sulphured’ molasses in grocery stores today, even if you wanted to.’
  • 34) ‘By far the best method of sulphuring is by using liquid sulphur dioxide from a cylinder, also called bottled sulphur dioxide.’
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