haul vs hall

haul hall

Definitions

  • 1) The act of pulling or dragging.
  • 2) A distance, especially the distance over which something is pulled or transported.
  • 3) The act of transporting or carting.
  • 4) Something that is pulled or transported; a load.
  • 5) Everything collected or acquired at a single time; the take.
  • 6) (Rope Making) A bundle of about four hundred threads, to be tarred.
  • 7) Transportation by hauling; the distance through which anything is hauled, as freight in a railroad car.
  • 8) A single draught of a net.
  • 9) (Rope Making) A bundle of about four hundred threads, to be tarred.
  • 10) A pulling with force; a violent pull.
  • 11) That which is caught, taken, or gained at once, as by hauling a net.
  • 12) The distance and route over which something is hauled.
  • 13) In fishing: The draft of a net: as, to catch so many fish at a haul.
  • 14) The place where a seine is hauled.
  • 15) Hence Any valuable acquisition; a “find.”
  • 16) A pulling with force; a pull; a tug.
  • 17) That which is taken or obtained by hauling; specifically, the number or quantity of fish taken in one haul of a seine; a catch.
  • 18) To carry something; to transport something, with a connotation that the item is heavy or otherwise difficult to move.
  • 19) nautical To steer a vessel closer to the wind.
  • 20) nautical, of the wind To shift fore (more towards the bow).
  • 21) nautical To steer a vessel closer to the wind.
  • 22) nautical, of the wind To shift fore (more towards the bow).
  • 23) To pull or draw something heavy.
  • 24) To pull or draw with force; move or transport by drawing; drag: as, to haul down the sails; to haul in the boom; to haul a load of wood.
  • 25) To draw off or away; withdraw, as from a movement or scheme.
  • 26) To pull or tug; endeavor to drag something: as, to haul at a heavy load.
  • 27) Synonyms Drag, Draw, etc. See draw.
  • 28) Nautical, to alter a ship's course; change the direction of sailing; move on a new course; hence, to sail, in general.
  • 29) To shift, veer, or change, as the wind.
  • 30) Nautical To change the course of a ship.
  • 31) To compel to go, especially for trial.
  • 32) To transport, as with a truck or cart.
  • 33) Nautical To change the course of (a ship), especially in order to sail closer into the wind.
  • 34) To cause (oneself) to move, especially slowly or laboriously.
  • 35) Nautical To change the course of (a ship), especially in order to sail closer into the wind.
  • 36) To shift direction.
  • 37) To pull or drag forcibly: synonym: pull.
  • 38) To pull or drag forcibly: synonym: pull.
  • 39) To provide transportation; cart.
  • 40) To pull or drag something forcibly.
  • 41) Nautical To change the course of a ship.
  • 42) (Naut.) to sail closer to the wind, in order to get farther away from anything; hence, to withdraw; to draw back.
  • 43) (Naut.) to sail closer to the wind, in order to get farther away from anything; hence, to withdraw; to draw back.
  • 44) (Naut.) to shift to any point of the compass; -- said of the wind.
  • 45) To pull apart, as oxen sometimes do when yoked.
  • 46) (Naut.) To change the direction of a ship by hauling the wind. See under haul, v. t.
  • 47) (Naut.) To change the direction of a ship by hauling the wind. See under haul, v. t.
  • 48) (Naut.) to shift to any point of the compass; -- said of the wind.
  • 49) See under Coal.
  • 50) (Naut.) to turn the head of the ship nearer to the point from which the wind blows.
  • 51) (Naut.) to turn the head of the ship nearer to the point from which the wind blows.
  • 52) To pull or draw with force; to drag.
  • 53) To transport by drawing, as with horses or oxen.
  • 54) (haul ass) To move quickly.
  • 55) (haul ass) To move quickly.

Definitions

  • 1) A building providing student accommodation at a university.
  • 2) A corridor; a hallway.
  • 3) A manor house.
  • 4) The principal room of a secular medieval building.
  • 5) A meeting room.
  • 6) A corridor or passageway in a building.
  • 7) A building belonging to a school, college, or university that provides classroom, dormitory, or dining facilities.
  • 8) The group of students using such a building.
  • 9) The main house on a landed estate.
  • 10) A large room in such a building.
  • 11) A large entrance room or vestibule in a building; a lobby.
  • 12) A building used for the meetings, entertainments, or living quarters of a fraternity, sorority, church, or other social or religious organization.
  • 13) The castle or house of a medieval monarch or noble.
  • 14) The large room in which such events are held.
  • 15) Chiefly British A meal served in such a building.
  • 16) Chiefly British A meal served in such a building.
  • 17) A building for public gatherings or entertainments.
  • 18) The principal room in such a castle or house, used for dining, entertaining, and sleeping.
  • 19) A name given to many manor houses because the magistrate's court was held in the hall of his mansion; a chief mansion house.
  • 20) The chief room in a castle or manor house, and in early times the only public room, serving as the place of gathering for the lord's family with the retainers and servants, also for cooking and eating. It was often contrasted with the bower, which was the private or sleeping apartment.
  • 21) obsolete Cleared passageway in a crowd; -- formerly an exclamation.
  • 22) The apartment in which English university students dine in common; hence, the dinner itself.
  • 23) Any corridor or passage in a building.
  • 24) obsolete Cleared passageway in a crowd; -- formerly an exclamation.
  • 25) A college in an English university (at Oxford, an unendowed college).
  • 26) A vestibule, entrance room, etc., in the more elaborated buildings of later times.
  • 27) A building or room of considerable size and stateliness, used for public purposes.
  • 28) English writer whose novel about a lesbian relationship was banned in Britain for many years (1883-1943)
  • 29) United States chemist who developed an economical method of producing aluminum from bauxite (1863-1914)
  • 30) a large building for meetings or entertainment
  • 31) an interior passage or corridor onto which rooms open
  • 32) the large room of a manor or castle
  • 33) a large entrance or reception room or area
  • 34) United States child psychologist whose theories of child psychology strongly influenced educational psychology (1844-1924)
  • 35) a college or university building containing living quarters for students
  • 36) United States explorer who led three expeditions to the Arctic (1821-1871)
  • 37) a large building used by a college or university for teaching or research
  • 38) Specifically — In medieval palaces and castles, the main room, often the only living-room. Besides the hall, in very early times, even in the greatest houses, there were only a few sleeping-rooms, and not always these. In such a hall the lord and his family, retainers, servants, and visitors were all accommodated, and all public and household affairs were carried on. Later rooms more retired were added, but throughout the feudal period the hall remained the common center of activity. Westminster Hall in London was originally a part of the royal palace, where all the common life of the royal court was conducted and the king dispensed justice. This great room continued to be the principal seat of justice in England till 1820.
  • 39) In American colleges: A room or building appropriated to the meetings of a literary or other society; also, the society itself.
  • 40) A room or building devoted to public business or entertainment, or to meetings of public or corporate bodies: as, a town hall; an association hall; a music-hall.
  • 41) Hence — In Great Britain: A manor-house; the proprietor's residence on a large landed estate: also to some extent an American use, especially in the South.
  • 42) The public or common room of a manor-house, serving as a general meeting-and reception-room, and in which justices' courts were formerly held. A mercantile building or room for the sale of particular articles or goods on account of their owners or producers; a place of sale or of business for a trade or gild: as, a hardware hall; Goldsmiths' Hall or Stationers' Hall in London.
  • 43) The main building of a college, and in some instances, as at Oxford and Cambridge in England, the specific name of a college. The number of colleges called halls (a term which, as well as house, was originally applied to the residence of the college scholars) in these universities, once considerable, is now small and diminishing.
  • 44) A building, or a large room or compartment in a building, devoted to some public or common use: in various special applications. See below.
  • 45) In English colleges: The large room in which the students dine in common. Hence— The students' dinner.
  • 46) An edifice in which courts of justice are held or legal archives are preserved: as, Westminster Hall; the Hall of Records in New York.
  • 47) One of the buildings in which students sleep; a dormitory.
  • 48) An entranceway or passageway in a house leading to or communicating with its different parts.

Examples

  • 1) The haul included gifts that had been bought for their grandchildren.
  • 2) We are in this for the long haul.
  • 3) The value of the haul which included vintage gaming machines is thought to be hundreds of thousands of pounds.
  • 4) The police haul in Debbie for questioning.
  • 5) Their haul included two phones and a 3.5million ring.
  • 6) So could he see himself at the Magpies for the long haul?
  • 7) The haul included four golds.
  • 8) It was exciting, but also scary and overwhelming - like picking up a haul of something illegal.
  • 9) It was a miracle he survived, but the long, slow haul back to recovery involved the amputation of both legs and his right arm.
  • 10) That surveillance has produced a rich haul of potential court evidence.
  • 11) Then she vowed to put another through hell by adding more trophies to her impressive haul.
  • 12) We always agreed which one of us would finally haul the fish aboard.
  • 13) Team officials had to haul him back upright to carry on playing.
  • 14) This may hold some appeal to those who are in for the long haul.
  • 15) Their tents were removed and other equipment was hauled away by cranes.
  • 16) Most of the haul is still missing.
  • 17) Jem was hauling up the back window next door.
  • 18) They are in it for the long haul.
  • 19) The huge haul of information includes facts about personal text messages, emails and phone calls.
  • 20) Last season, they did so with a record points haul.
  • 21) Expect a five-point haul from the next three.
  • 22) The pair were then hauled before the Board to answer disrepute charges.
  • 23) The haul included 8,000 bars of gold.
  • 24) They had won the previous three away games with an impressive haul of 10 goals.
  • 25) MPs want police chiefs hauled before the Commons.
  • 26) More than 30million of the haul has still to be recovered.
  • 27) That haul included a midweek brace at Brentford.
  • 28) The next thing he knew, he was being dragged from the car and hauled away to hospital.
  • 29) BRITAIN'S winter sports stars have been promised a funding boost after their joint record medal haul in Sochi.
  • 30) The cost of hauling goods by rail decreased dramatically because of improved track construction and the introduction of powerful locomotives that could haul more cars.
  • 31) What does a'long haul' mean?
  • 32) Boston Celtics on Tuesday morning, saying the sole reason he came to Boston was to try to add to his title haul and is willing to play any role Doc Rivers envisions for him.
  • 33) United captured their 18th league crown to equal Liverpool's record and Torres now fears their arch-rivals will increase their title haul unless Benitez signs someone with the genius of Rooney.
  • 34) Maybe some of us just don't want to accept that the mancs will equal our title haul this season.
  • 35) That's the only way you're going to win majors over the long haul is to give yourself chances.
  • 36) Recounting the Americans 'medal haul from the Games
  • 37) That pirated copies of X-Men Origins: Wolverine were discovered amongst the haul is especially disappointing.
  • 38) The Star Tribune calls the total "unprecedented," noting that the three-month haul is greater than any Minnesota congressional hopeful has ever raised in an entire election cycle.
  • 39) Short haul is better handled by well-located regional airports.
  • 40) LL, your book haul is a thing of beauty – and I know your thoughts on each one of them will blow out my own reading list into something much more wishful!
  • 41) * Brutal column from Jon Ralston, who argues that Angle's massive fundraising haul is being financed by "hatred."
  • 42) ‘By the end of this cycle I wind up with bins the Terminator would have trouble dragging down the driveway, but I dutifully haul them out in front of the wall and up onto the curb.’
  • 43) ‘We all hauled the bikes to the top of Mud Hill, mounted up, and raced for the bottom, the first past the tree being the winner.’
  • 44) ‘Upstairs in the offices above the injecting room, Nurse Andy hauls a suitcase out of the cupboard, heaves it onto the table, and opens it up.’
  • 45) ‘The worker hauls the animal out of the water and tosses it with a dull thud into a rotating drum like a table-top spin-dryer to remove the animal's coat.’
  • 46) ‘The friendly owner hauls water up on his back every day from the clear mountain stream.’
  • 47) ‘Not to be deterred, the kids were hauling their sleds up the 3m high slope by Victoria Road Bridge, and sledding down the wet grass.’
  • 48) ‘When he'd hauled the box to safety, I followed up the ladder.’
  • 49) ‘I've admired the fallen trees this morning, and the broken branches, and I've hauled many of them off the paths.’
  • 50) ‘While waiting for all this to occur, we'll haul our clothes to the neighbourhood laundrette.’
  • 51) ‘These big, burly men can then haul inconsiderate Singaporeans off the train.’
  • 52) ‘Like a cork after its bottle, she follows her raft downstream until her companions haul her back on board.’
  • 53) ‘Then every soldier hauled his own gear inside the crafts.’
  • 54) ‘Jessica hauled Frankie outside and immediately started in on her.’
  • 55) ‘Her father hauled her back on board and sailed for home.’
  • 56) ‘If they heard a dog bark, they'd haul it out and shoot it.’
  • 57) ‘Tomorrow I have to help the attorney's assistant haul all the files back in and make sure as many books and tchotchkes as we can remember are back in their proper places.’
  • 58) ‘The pair will each haul more than 100 kg in food, fuel and equipment from Ammassalik on the east coast to Sondre Strmfjord, 535 km to the west.’
  • 59) ‘The numbers are then passed on to transport officials who haul the offenders in for ‘consultation’.’
  • 60) ‘Jeremy glared at Bridget before being hauled away to the living room.’
  • 61) ‘They were both quiet as they hauled the luggage out into the spacious living room, and deposited it all next to the front door.’
  • 62) ‘He hauled himself back aboard and pulled the javelin out of the riverbed, allowing the vessel to float free again.’
  • 63) ‘One man hauls himself along on a three-wheeled skateboard, propelling himself with his one leg as his opposite hand uses a flat, iron contraption as a cane.’
  • 64) ‘I've found it much more difficult to haul myself out of bed in the morning.’
  • 65) ‘Steadily he pulled himself across, by the time he hauled himself up, onto the bank he was exhausted.’
  • 66) ‘He hauled himself up through a river of freezing mud, finally pulling his abused body onto level ground.’
  • 67) ‘The pensioner was hauled before York Crown Court after he struck concert chairman Peter Suter in the face as tempers flared at Burton Lane Working Men's Club in York.’
  • 68) ‘He began his 18 months sentence for dangerous driving after he was eventually hauled before the courts again.’
  • 69) ‘He was hauled before a court next morning which he claims was a shambles.’
  • 70) ‘Yet some band members were hauled before the courts on firearm offences and making threats to kill.’
  • 71) ‘You'll probably also recall that a few years ago, an American millionaire was hauled before the local courts on charges relating to the possession of cannabis.’
  • 72) ‘A top Navy Officer was hauled before a court martial yesterday after a laptop packed with military secrets was nicked from his car.’
  • 73) ‘Who should foot the legal bill when company directors are hauled before the courts?’
  • 74) ‘Every time he turns around, the cops tow his car, his girls are hauled before the courts, or he's busted on some phony armed robbery charge.’
  • 75) ‘He was hauled before Manchester magistrates who read our story in open court.’
  • 76) ‘He was hauled before the town jurists, and fined!’
  • 77) ‘In April 1929 ‘she was hauled before the customs office charged with being a prohibited immigrant’.’
  • 78) ‘Today he was hauled before immigration authorities in Dili.’
  • 79) ‘He'll get a sympathetic ‘Don't do it again’ if, by the remotest chance, he is hauled before their worships.’
  • 80) ‘He was hauled before his commanding officer, Lieutenant-Colonel James Stevenson, and summarily dismissed.’
  • 81) ‘To publish their comments in full would lead to all three individuals being hauled before the Croke Park authorities.’
  • 82) ‘Yet, she was hauled before Congress, charged, tried, and convicted within a couple of years.’
  • 83) ‘Eleven people were hauled before magistrates earlier this week charged with public nuisance offences.’
  • 84) ‘She was hauled before the Star Chamber and the houses ordered demolished.’
  • 85) ‘As teachers were hauled before Judge Fisher they denounced the school authorities for tyranny and deception and said they were willing to go to jail to defend their rights.’
  • 86) ‘Know the state's nursing law and follow regulations before you are hauled before the board on a licensure issue.’
  • 87) ‘My first streetcar trip had one other close call, a sport-utility vehicle hauling a trailer that made a U-turn right in front of us.’
  • 88) ‘Police reported that the truck hauling two trailers - with a length measuring 22m - was travelling from Umtata when the driver was believed to have lost control.’
  • 89) ‘A truck hauling two trailers - with a total length measuring 22 metres - was travelling from Umtata when the driver is believed to have lost control.’
  • 90) ‘There are plenty of critics with woeful tales of upturned or lost caravans, and how they were held up for hours by tiny cars hauling huge caravans.’
  • 91) ‘Ask if they will set your towing vehicle up to properly haul your new trailer and if they are willing to teach you how to drive one if you never have before.’
  • 92) ‘Carnegie needs at least five dump trucks to haul trash to the Imperial landfill.’
  • 93) ‘As the construction of the huge vessel approached completion, transport firms hauled the mountains of food to the site.’
  • 94) ‘They are usually used to haul heavy loads or carry cargoes.’
  • 95) ‘Utility ATVs are commonly used for loading and hauling things, which calls for a larger exterior to carry objects.’
  • 96) ‘Hedge got a job hauling coal for Sam Dean, who had a little mine near Sand Coulee.’
  • 97) ‘I haul coal, silica, gravel, grain - anything that will go into a dump.’
  • 98) ‘Who was he trying to impress, the Broward County Department of Sanitation workers who haul his trash away?’
  • 99) ‘Heavy horse carts with rubber tires haul sacks of corn, piles of fodder, and other freight.’
  • 100) ‘Young girls of eight or nine worked down the mines hauling coal just so the families could exist.’
  • 101) ‘The whole theme was accented by stuffed toy poodles carried by models on the catwalk, who held them as lovingly as yesterday's trash being hauled to the bin.’
  • 102) ‘If that was the case, then people who don't haul things on a regular basis wouldn't buy pickup trucks, and there is probably no good reason why anyone needs a Jaguar of any type.’
  • 103) ‘The asset is the future economic benefit, that is, the present value of the cash flows that will come from using the truck to haul lumber, or coal, or bread.’
  • 104) ‘In between, we hauled freight, carried troops and VIPs, and served as a hospital ship with wounded and nurses aboard.’
  • 105) ‘Meanwhile, the smaller compact track loader hauled the spoil to dump trucks and brought in the rock.’
  • 106) ‘The call came last summer, and he was using the truck to haul stuff for the yard.’
  • 107) ‘He had trained as an apprentice engineer at Dan Mitchells, later working as a lorry driver for Tunnicliffe's at Silsden, hauling timber.’
  • 108) ‘This means that the farmer is having to haul his own stock or arrange transport.’
  • 109) ‘Amid the truckloads of rubble being hauled away is forensic evidence about how and why the buildings collapsed.’
  • 110) ‘Goran Rakonjac, for instance, uses horse-drawn farm carts on back roads to haul the soft white cheese from his family farm in Serbia to market 15 miles away in Montenegro.’
  • 111) ‘One record-breaking day in 1864 saw the company haul three tons of silver bullion from the mines of Virginia City, Nevada alone.’
  • 112) ‘The waters of the Nile slipped beneath the hull and the boat hauled for the western shore.’
  • 113) ‘The ship hauled away from the dock and proceeded to Mare Island, California, in accordance with the orders of the Commander-in-Chief, Pacific Squadron.’
  • 114) ‘As the ship hauled out into the stream, her bow was swung by the tide downward, and her helm was put to the starboard.’
  • 115) ‘Officers were also criticised for not fully recording details of the weight or quantity of drug hauls or why they thought suspects possessed it.’
  • 116) ‘Thieves stole a huge haul of guitars and other instruments worth up to £6,000 from a Westcliff music store.’
  • 117) ‘GARDAÍ have seized more than €200,000 worth of illegal drugs in two hauls in counties Clare and Meath.’
  • 118) ‘The medals, including a CBE and DSO, were found in Harrow, north London, among a haul of items stolen by burglars.’
  • 119) ‘Det Con Graham Jones said the haul may have been stolen to order.’
  • 120) ‘Photographs of valuable rings, earrings and pendants - part of a huge haul stolen from her Buckinghamshire home - were issued in the hope of tracking the items down.’
  • 121) ‘The haul, stolen from a house in Rodbourne, also included army vehicles.’
  • 122) ‘Forensic experts were today combing through more than 100 items from a Skipton house where robbers escaped with a haul of thousands of pounds in cash and gems.’
  • 123) ‘Armed robbers escaped with a haul of cash after threatening the owner of a Bradford newsagent's at gunpoint.’
  • 124) ‘Burglars made off with a haul of antiques worth thousands of pounds in two raids in Broad Town.’
  • 125) ‘Police have uncovered a double haul of illegal guns and more than £250,000 of stolen property following two dawn raids in the Chelmsford area.’
  • 126) ‘I later heard on the radio of a large haul of confiscated illegal nets and spearguns being burnt as a warning to transgressors.’
  • 127) ‘A Croatian lorry driver caught with a haul of sub-machineguns in his truckload of frozen pizzas was cleared of all charges yesterday.’
  • 128) ‘The spokesperson said the recording industry called the haul the largest CD manufacturing seizure in the US.’
  • 129) ‘The individual was sentenced to six years in jail in July 2003 after being caught with a haul of heroin.’
  • 130) ‘This latest haul brings the total amount of drugs seized in the Limerick region over the last two years to €4 million.’
  • 131) ‘Gardaí suspect the haul was acquired in Dublin and was being delivered to a major drugs gang based in Southill.’
  • 132) ‘The Iraqi intelligence haul came on the sixth day of a nationwide sweep to seize weapons and insurgents.’
  • 133) ‘John Barber, Customs and Excise spokesman, said that the haul was the largest amount of heroin seized from Harwich port this year 75 kilos is a significant seizure.’
  • 134) ‘Saturday's haul is also connected with a major operation in Britain last weekend, which netted seven kilos of heroin and led to over 15 arrests.’
  • 135) ‘These were huge fishing craft capable of picking up a thousand tonnes of fish in a single haul.’
  • 136) ‘Prawn vessels continued to catch fairly large hauls of prawns.’
  • 137) ‘But Mormon use of advanced methods to net large hauls of fish for pickling and shipment elsewhere had impoverished the Utes and made them resentful and ready for war.’
  • 138) ‘The people of Manus Island in Papua New Guinea traditionally catch large hauls of tuna in October.’
  • 139) ‘Here's the rub - hauls of fish have declined sharply since the 1970s but total workforce numbers have not.’
  • 140) ‘Sure, if I so choose I could reel in a nice haul of little fish but if I wait things out just that little bit longer, I know a nice big juicy fish is going to come my way.’
  • 141) ‘Fishermen from the coastal villages of southern Hainan Island look forward to the occasional surprise catch in their daily haul that could net them a handsome reward.’
  • 142) ‘Reservoir trouters will have no problems at all, but short range stream fishers would do well to spend a few hours on the lawn, perfecting their double haul.’
  • 143) ‘Anglers on the River Tweed in southeast Scotland landed more than 14,000 salmon, one of the biggest hauls ever recorded in Britain.’
  • 144) ‘It is a top achievement to get fish of this size but even better to see a nice catch of good sized fish, such as a 14 blackfish haul caught on the Ballina North Wall in the recent swell.’
  • 145) ‘The seas around West Kerry have been throwing up some very unusual species of fish in recent days and the latest haul included three white albinos which were hooked by Irish fishermen.’
  • 146) ‘Under EU rules, trawlers which fish for so-called industrial species are permitted to catch up to 5% of white fish as part of their haul.’
  • 147) ‘Long after some fish stocks sank below their maximally productive sizes, fisheries' hauls continued to rise, says Pauly.’
  • 148) ‘The Moy Fishery, at Ballina, again produced the biggest haul with 120 salmon for the week.’
  • 149) ‘Then one year the fishermen began to notice a change in their daily haul.’
  • 150) ‘Their haul accounts for nearly 28 percent of the country's fish exports, Kee said.’
  • 151) ‘The Moy enjoyed its best week of the season, so far, with a huge haul of 1,252 salmon taken by anglers over the week.’
  • 152) ‘That they have increased their haul is a product of improved fishing methods, not a reflection of an increased number of fish in the sea.’
  • 153) ‘The Harrogate Angling Supplies-backed star won yet again with a fine haul of 72 lb 6oz.’
  • 154) ‘The first buffet area is a fisherman's haul of shrimp, sushi, sashimi and fish-egg rolls prepared fresh on the other side of the counter and laid in individual wicker baskets.’
  • 155) ‘The medal haul was completed by Naomi Boynton, 11, also in the 200m butterfly.’
  • 156) ‘It would be easy to be triumphant about Manchester as the medal haul headed towards the 30-point mark last night.’
  • 157) ‘Brailsford said ‘two or three medals’ would be a satisfactory haul in Athens.’
  • 158) ‘Eight bowlers had seven wicket returns during the month and there were a total of 23 six-wicket hauls recorded.’
  • 159) ‘Castlecomer Basketball Club can reflect with great pride on an excellent season that saw the club take a record haul of nine trophies.’
  • 160) ‘Ballesteros was crowned champion after his record haul of 23 birdies to the delight of Europe.’
  • 161) ‘Thirsk's bowling star, Barry Petty, recorded his 28th haul of five or more wickets in the premier league when he captured 5-73.’
  • 162) ‘Her gold medal was a sixth for Japan in Athens, a record haul for a single Games for one country in judo.’
  • 163) ‘England rugby legend Jason Leonard is set to extend his international career for one match only - without adding to his world record haul of 114 caps, writes Scott Amos.’
  • 164) ‘Prinz's goal haul was also a record for most goals scored by one player in a women's match at the Olympics.’
  • 165) ‘The club is now looking forward to the forthcoming Wharfedale Championships and is hoping to shatter last year's record trophy haul.’
  • 166) ‘Tiger Woods, only the second player to win all four majors more than once, paid a glowing tribute to Jack Nicklaus whose record haul of 18 is clearly his sights.’
  • 167) ‘Walsh, 38, the only fit fast bowler in the West Indian team following an injury to Mervyn Dillon, took his world record haul of Test wickets to 513.’
  • 168) ‘Ferrari could pass McLaren's record haul of 199 points in a season at the next race in three weeks' time in Hungary.’
  • 169) ‘If Phelps didn't quite match Mark Spitz's record haul of seven individual golds in 1972, he still ruled the pool.’
  • 170) ‘The now defunct Glasgow Club's record haul of 33 wins keeps them alive in name only in the history books ahead of their former rivals - though very much still in existence!’
  • 171) ‘For the record, among diverse contributions, Blackadder topped Edinburgh's tackle count with a personal haul of 20.’
  • 172) ‘That's an interesting one: it turns out that two unlucky bowlers have managed an eight-wicket haul in a Test their side lost by an innings.’
  • 173) ‘That haul, which remains a record for both men and women, included a Grand Slam in 1970.’
  • 174) ‘Lions centre Matt Nanyn was the chief benefactor from the 14-try rout as three tries and nine goals gave him a haul of 30 points to equal the club record for points in a match.’
  • 175) ‘Who among us hasn't come back from a shopping excursion, looked over the just-purchased haul, and wondered, What was I thinking?’
  • 176) ‘This, plus a couple dresses, was my haul for the morning.’
  • 177) ‘Recently I popped by Burlington to see what they had in store for the season and today I wanted to share my haul with all of you!’
  • 178) ‘My haul: a long sleeved thermal shirt (for the 4 days a year it gets a little chilly in Miami), 2 T shirts and about 20 pair of socks, $18.’
  • 179) ‘She emerged with an armload of designer black bags, requiring two shop assistants to carry her haul to her car.’
  • 180) ‘I did a bit of online shopping and bought some makeup, hair and skincare and I thought I'd show you my haul and give you a bit of a first impression.’
  • 181) ‘It was a long distance haul, not like a sprint, which is what we will be doing when we compete with our dogs in the Savoie Alps in January.’
  • 182) ‘What we have to do, is improve the railroads, to take the pressure off the air transport system, so short-haul, inter-city hauls, should be done by rail, not by air.’
  • 183) ‘Afterwards he loses his sight and from that day is plagued with hallucinations seeded with guilt and shame, the unspoken sense that his condition is a judgment, and his career a long, redemptive haul.’
  • 184) ‘Often the transport cost of English timber equaled the value of the wood itself, and twenty miles was considered the maximum profitable overland haul.’
  • 185) ‘It's a long haul from Vegas to Seattle.’

Examples

  • 1) The two concert halls are housed in giant concrete shells within the glass curtain above the plaza.
  • 2) My home is the southeast wing of a country hall.
  • 3) The hall or the bedroom should align with the design and decor of the bathroom.
  • 4) At the end of next month its accessories hall will open in the first of three phases.
  • 5) The next big concert hall project should be in the southwest.
  • 6) If you move into halls leave your door open with music on - you won't be alone for long.
  • 7) And they didn't want the bright front room off the hall to become a neglected space that the family bypassed on the way to a rear kitchen.
  • 8) With double bedrooms and spacious common areas fitted with designer furniture, the atmosphere is relaxed, reminiscent of a university hall of residence.
  • 9) In the conference hall where they waited was a table.
  • 10) Church halls and school buildings will be offered for use as well as churches.
  • 11) There is a huge chunk of metal still sticking out of the village hall door.
  • 12) Over the next two weeks he will hold public meetings in town halls across the country.
  • 13) Yet other academics are keen to see evolutionary theory challenged in university lecture halls.
  • 14) They lived in one part of the hall and rented out the rest.
  • 15) The hall is a place to wait.
  • 16) She added blues in the hall and bedrooms.
  • 17) This she dropped as she ran from the kitchen into the front hall.
  • 18) That was evident in the concerts to open the new hall.
  • 19) The kitchen was across the hall and the room was really just a bedroom and a desk.
  • 20) But they were absolutely insistent that the door between the hall and the kitchen must remain.
  • 21) This place is big enough to house an entire university halls of residence.
  • 22) Connecticut schools have been fitting yellow intruder alarms next to fire alarms in their corridors and dining halls.
  • 23) In the morning the tiled floor of the conference hall was cleared and scrubbed down by its temporary occupants.
  • 24) London has a new concert hall.
  • 25) But a search of her home by town hall officials led them to realise there was more to her than anyone thought.
  • 26) There are always two audiences - one in the hall and one at home.
  • 27) Formerly a church hall, the building is now used to store equipment for the village fête.
  • 28) As well as concerts, the hall had provided popular education.
  • 29) Romance had flourished when he was dragged along to an Islington dance hall.
  • 30) The hall is intended to feel like a country house hall, not a reception area.
  • 31) Somebody has defaced one of city hall's famous murals and it must be replaced.
  • 32) ‘Set on five acres, there is a reception hall, drawing room, anteroom, dining room, kitchen, pantry, four bedrooms and a bathroom.’
  • 33) ‘The walls in the reception hall and dining room are covered with glazed Egyptian cotton canvas.’
  • 34) ‘It has a reception hall, lounge cum dining room, kitchen, bathroom and bedroom.’
  • 35) ‘Three other reception rooms can all be reached from the drawing room or the reception hall.’
  • 36) ‘The property is entered through a large porch which leads into a reception hall.’
  • 37) ‘On both sides of the drop-off area is a large reception hall finished with a rich mix of Italian stone.’
  • 38) ‘Entrance to the accommodation is through a wide hall with a shelved cloakroom.’
  • 39) ‘Steps lead to the front door, and entrance is through a spacious hall with polished timber floorboards.’
  • 40) ‘An enclosed porch with double doors leads to a wide hall with maple flooring.’
  • 41) ‘Behind the panelled front door is a hall with plenty of character.’
  • 42) ‘She tiptoed quietly to her room down the hall and opened the door; she looked around.’
  • 43) ‘Just as they reached the door, the room across the hall opened up, and an older couple came out.’
  • 44) ‘I walked out of my room and down the hall, opening the door that was two doors down from his.’
  • 45) ‘Afterwards, she would lie in bed and listen as he crept down the hall and opened the door to my room.’
  • 46) ‘Trying to knock down the bedroom door with the skillet, I was able to see another door opening across the hall.’
  • 47) ‘I'd heard stories about them, I had to see more, so I walked down the hall and pushed open the door.’
  • 48) ‘She dashed down the hall and threw open the door to her room with a thud.’
  • 49) ‘Opening the door, Serenity tiptoed across the hall and opened the door to Haley's room.’
  • 50) ‘I run down the hall and open the door of the room, and see Rikki, collapsed on the floor.’
  • 51) ‘I walked down the hall and opened the door to the room where I saw a lot of other people.’
  • 52) ‘Immediately off the hallway is a kitchen, with a large open plan living and dining area further down the hall.’
  • 53) ‘I turned left down the hall and quietly opened the door to Spane's bedroom.’
  • 54) ‘Through her closed door, Bri heard her father's bedroom door from across the hall slowly squeak open.’
  • 55) ‘Halfway down the hall a door opened and Anthony stepped out of his suite into the hallway.’
  • 56) ‘Judging form the light, it was about mid afternoon when the door at the end of the hall rattled open and a man came walking up the corridor, heels clicking against concrete.’
  • 57) ‘The elevator was empty as she rose to the chief's level, making her way down the hall to the designated meeting room.’
  • 58) ‘I turned charismatic on the spot and began shouting around my office and up and down the hall at the University of New Mexico.’
  • 59) ‘It is as contemporary as today's headlines and as close as your colleague down the hall.’
  • 60) ‘Successfully completed, the students and I could hardly wait to put them on display in the hall.’
  • 61) ‘Students could be given the chance, for example, to regulate the tone of voice they use in the halls.’
  • 62) ‘Immediately he began touring the islands, putting notices up in village halls and organising community meetings.’
  • 63) ‘More than 45 people turned up for the meeting at the village hall last night to voice their concern at what has become a controversial issue.’
  • 64) ‘In pubs and clubs, halls and meeting rooms, Scots dressed in tartan for this, the most traditional night in their social calendar, and to stand while the Haggis was piped in.’
  • 65) ‘The pubs and the village hall all have big car parks.’
  • 66) ‘It would not necessarily have to be a new building but could be a hall or meeting place the Jewish community could use.’
  • 67) ‘As well as the temple, the Community Centre has a sports facility, a stage with a 600-seater auditorium and several meeting rooms and halls.’
  • 68) ‘On the west side, a trio of exhibition foyers connects with a 350 seat conference hall.’
  • 69) ‘Further round, over the entrance to the dark hall, is a well appointed lecture hall.’
  • 70) ‘Future phases will include a music and fine arts hall and a major performing arts center.’
  • 71) ‘One of the many unique aspects of this hall is the potential to adjust the reverberation time.’
  • 72) ‘From here, a long ramp winds up to a triple-height exhibition hall on the first floor.’
  • 73) ‘At the southeast corner of the site, a new lecture hall complements the research tower.’
  • 74) ‘The penultimate floor is given over to a circular exhibition hall clad in a scaly copper skin.’
  • 75) ‘One wall is covered with a few score study models of Disney's performance hall.’
  • 76) ‘The exterior design of the new addition was to provide a nearly seamless expansion of the original historic hall.’
  • 77) ‘A large new sports hall has been built to the east of the complex next to existing open-air sports facilities.’
  • 78) ‘The theatres and halls around this country that were dead and quiet are now ringing with a whole lot of activity, and that is no small thanks to a whole lot of effort from this Government.’
  • 79) ‘Once held in the bride's family home, the celebration is now often held at a local hall or country club.’
  • 80) ‘Managed by Seamus Cox from Aghamore, the band travelled the length and breath of the country playing to packed halls and marquees.’
  • 81) ‘The show has been packing halls around the country with its combination of top quality characters, high production and sheer entertainment.’
  • 82) ‘The upper floor was the great hall where guild members met.’
  • 83) ‘Barley hall was a former medieval hall which was acquired by York Archeological Trust in the 1980s when the site came up for redevelopment.’
  • 84) ‘He persuaded the council that the medieval hall must be saved.’
  • 85) ‘The medieval hall, in Coffee Yard, off Stonegate, in York, is also putting on special Viking activities for children.’
  • 86) ‘Beside the Patursson family home is the medieval hall, which is opened to the public during the summer months.’
  • 87) ‘He built palaces and banqueting halls on the hill and held meetings of the other provincial kings every three years at which time they made laws and held festivals of music and sport.’
  • 88) ‘The rest of the palace, Timon's room and the banquet halls, had collapsed in a head of dust and smoke.’
  • 89) ‘Finally, they fetched us from the room and brought us down through the kitchen to the banquet hall.’
  • 90) ‘According to these reports, the royal family gathered for an evening meal in the banquet hall of the palace.’
  • 91) ‘The first floor houses a reception room and a banquet hall.’
  • 92) ‘The King left the lavish room for the banquet hall, leaving Shyra and Gaiden to finish preparing.’
  • 93) ‘The palace banquet hall was lovely, as always, and the food, delicious.’
  • 94) ‘In Budapest, the dance was in a huge hall converted from a palace.’
  • 95) ‘The sight filled the Daghda with resolution and he and his three warriors stormed in through the door of the banquet hall.’
  • 96) ‘In the rear hall of Ganyu Palace, at the top, is the Rice Flowing Hole.’
  • 97) ‘He'd walked the various courtyards, banquet halls and audience rooms during the few times when the Inner Circle had been required to meet.’
  • 98) ‘The banquet hall had been full of the court dressed in their finery.’
  • 99) ‘It was the shapeless figure he had met in his dream, the man standing in the shadows of an ancient and dead coronation hall.’
  • 100) ‘The great big hall in the manor had been filled with vampires and a few of Emma's closest, more understanding friends.’
  • 101) ‘If that was not enough, nobles of both countries thronged the hall.’
  • 102) ‘These timber posts were revealed under the great hall of the present stone manor and the demolished north end solar.’
  • 103) ‘When businessman Bill Reidy ploughed his savings into renovating a derelict 17th Century hall he believed he had created his dream home.’
  • 104) ‘The original features of the hall's reception rooms, previously sub-divided into small offices, can now be seen again.’
  • 105) ‘In the living hall was a large central hearth and a raised wooden platform along each wall, which would have been used for seating, sleeping and as a working space.’
  • 106) ‘Svensholm is a small Viking homestead, comprising a large hall and a few outbuildings.’
  • 107) ‘Like most other farms in Anglo-Saxon England, Linstede consists of a hall and outbuildings, surrounded by fields and pastures.’
  • 108) ‘Thegns with fewer resources also established churches, often next to their own halls; and increasingly they were made from stone.’
  • 109) ‘It takes him 35 minutes to drive to his job managing the student the halls of residence at Leeds Metropolitan University.’
  • 110) ‘The Yorkshire Post understands she had signed up for two months' French study with the Alliance Francaise in Lyon and was living in a university hall of residence.’
  • 111) ‘It was the halls of residence at Scarborough University.’
  • 112) ‘I'm staying in a youth hostel which, for the other 11 months of the year when there's no major festival going on is a university hall of residence.’
  • 113) ‘I suppose at my advanced age I am more inclined to the comfortable surroundings of a posh city centre hotel, rather than a university hall of residence.’
  • 114) ‘I know they are in one of the bin liners I stuffed full of clothes when I was politely asked to vacate my hall of residence at the University of Westingshire.’
  • 115) ‘Students, who will live at the University's halls of residence, will also get the chance to meet current students from the School of Engineering, Design & Technology, as well as academic staff.’
  • 116) ‘Actually, maybe there was one time, when I threw up on the steps of the University of London post-grad hall of residence in Paddington in my second week in London in 1981.’
  • 117) ‘How it would help the tiny minority of students actually working at the GWH to be physically near to the halls of residence of the students studying English literature defeats me.’
  • 118) ‘It happened on Friday evening as players, many of them accompanied by their parents, were relaxing at the student hall of residence in south Manchester.’
  • 119) ‘Letters have also been sent to wardens of university halls of residence warning them to monitor students' health.’
  • 120) ‘30 students were wounded when police threw tear gas into their halls of residence.’
  • 121) ‘I have to be visible in the campus center and in the residence halls and at sporting events and at all these things that make up the lives of the people here.’
  • 122) ‘Some colleges are building residence halls with an emphasis on private, single rooms.’
  • 123) ‘The quad was abandoned; and the university halls sat, their pillared gates and walls silent and moss-covered in the evening.’
  • 124) ‘Some colleges even provide faculty with living quarters in the residence halls.’
  • 125) ‘Residence halls have not usually been considered critical components in community colleges.’
  • 126) ‘We reached the meal hall in scant enough time to have our names marked off on the role and find a place on the long, very conference like table and order our meal on the menu.’
  • 127) ‘It was really easy to learn how to hate meals in the dining hall.’
  • 128) ‘I could not understand why a meal in the hall should cause this alarm.’
  • 129) ‘We sat in hall silently when the news was announced, the College is just stunned.’
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