raven vs crow

raven crow

Definitions

  • 1) A common name for several, generally large and lustrous black species of birds in the genus Corvus, especially the common raven, Corvus corax.
  • 2) Prey; plunder; food obtained by violence.
  • 3) Rapine; rapacity.
  • 4) (Zoöl.) the cormorant.
  • 5) (Zoöl.) A large black passerine bird (Corvus corax), similar to the crow, but larger, and has a harsh, loud call. It is native of the northern parts of Europe, Asia and America, and is noted for its sagacity.
  • 6) large black bird with a straight bill and long wedge-shaped tail
  • 7) A bird of the larger species of the genus Corvus, having the feathers of the throat lanceolate and distinct from one another.
  • 8) Applied in Australia to one of the larger crows, Corvus coronoides.
  • 9) Plunder; prey; food obtained with rapacity.
  • 10) A kind of fish. See sea-raven and Hemitripteridæ.
  • 11) Plunder; rapine; robbery; rapacity; furious violence.
  • 12) Of the color of the raven; jet-black
  • 13) Of the color of the raven; jet black
  • 14) To devour with great eagerness.
  • 15) To prey with rapacity; to be greedy; to show rapacity.
  • 16) archaic To obtain or seize by violence.
  • 17) obtain or seize by violence
  • 18) prey on or hunt for
  • 19) feed greedily
  • 20) eat greedily
  • 21) To obtain or seize by violence.

Definitions

  • 1) A bird, usually black, of the genus Corvus, having a strong conical beak, with projecting bristles; it has a harsh, croaking call.
  • 2) The cry of the rooster.
  • 3) A bar of iron with a beak, crook, or claw; a bar of iron used as a lever; a crowbar.
  • 4) An inarticulate sound expressive of pleasure or delight.
  • 5) The shrill cry of a rooster.
  • 6) Any of several large glossy black birds of the genus Corvus, having a characteristic raucous call, especially C. brachyrhynchos of North America.
  • 7) (Zoöl.) an American bird (Quiscalus quiscula); -- called also purple grackle.
  • 8) The mesentery of a beast; -- so called by butchers.
  • 9) to state and adjust a difference or grievance (with any one).
  • 10) See under Carrion.
  • 11) (Zoöl.) an Indian cuckoo; the common coucal. It is believed by the natives to give omens. See Coucal.
  • 12) (Zoöl.) A bird, usually black, of the genus Corvus, having a strong conical beak, with projecting bristles. It has a harsh, croaking note. See Caw.
  • 13) The cry of the cock. See Crow, v. i., 1.
  • 14) in a direct line.
  • 15) (Zoöl.) any bird of the genera Gymnorhina, Craticus, or Strepera, mostly from Australia.
  • 16) See Crough.
  • 17) a small quadrilateral constellation in the southern hemisphere near Virgo
  • 18) a Siouan language spoken by the Crow
  • 19) the cry of a cock (or an imitation of it)
  • 20) a member of the Siouan people formerly living in eastern Montana
  • 21) A device for holding a gas- or water-main in position while it is tapped for a service-pipe.
  • 22) In the West Indies, particularly in Jamaica, the black vulture, Catharista atrata.
  • 23) The constellation Corvus.
  • 24) One who watches or stands guard while another commits a theft; a confederate in a robbery.
  • 25) The mesentery or ruffle of a beast: so called by butchers.
  • 26) A name of several birds of other families. See the phrases below.
  • 27) A general name including most birds of the genus Corrus and of the family Corvidæ; especially, one of the Corvinæ. See these three words.
  • 28) The characteristic cry of the cock: sometimes applied to a similar cry of some other bird.
  • 29) To shout in exultation or defiance; to brag.
  • 30) To make the shrill sound characteristic of a rooster; to make a sound in this manner, either in joy, gaiety, or defiance.
  • 31) To utter a sound expressive of joy or pleasure.
  • 32) utter shrill sounds
  • 33) express pleasure ally
  • 34) To boast in triumph; vaunt; vapor; swagger: absolutely, or with over or about.
  • 35) To announce by crowing.
  • 36) To utter a shouting sound expressive of pleasure, as an infant.
  • 37) To cry as a cock; utter the characteristic cry of a cock.
  • 38) Toannouncebycrowing.
  • 39) To utter the shrill cry characteristic of a rooster.
  • 40) To make a sound expressive of pleasure or well-being, characteristic of an infant.
  • 41) To exult over an accomplishment or piece of good fortune; boast. synonym: boast.
  • 42) to exult over a vanquished antagonist.
  • 43) To make the shrill sound characteristic of a cock, either in joy, gayety, or defiance.
  • 44) (as the crow flies) In a straight line.

Examples

  • 1) Her raven hair and high cheekbones gave her a striking look.
  • 2) ravens were unclean birds in the Bible.
  • 3) An ancient Egyptian would not be recognisable as such without a swath of luxuriant, raven hair.
  • 4) ‘Well-adapted to urban environments, grackles, crows, ravens, blackbirds, and jays thrive everywhere we do.’
  • 5) ‘Long-eared Owls usually nest in abandoned stick nests, often the nests of magpies, crows, ravens, or hawks.’
  • 6) ‘Put bluntly, these birds, which include crows, ravens, magpies, and jays, can be real jerks.’
  • 7) ‘The brain-to-body ratio of crows, ravens and magpies equals that of dolphins and nearly matches humans.’
  • 8) ‘Crows belong to the family of corvids, which also includes rooks, jays, ravens and jackdaws.’
  • 9) ‘Their island-home always seemed to be inhabited by great black birds - ravens, crows, scavengers of all sorts.’
  • 10) ‘Many were bats as large as cormorants; others were crows and ravens, and all were as black as night.’
  • 11) ‘In the Bible, wasn't it crows and ravens that fed Elijah while he hid in the wilderness?’
  • 12) ‘And out of the trees came great black ravens, hundreds of them, croaking like peals of doom.’
  • 13) ‘The two black ravens perching on the bushes in the center foreground were symbols of death.’
  • 14) ‘The similarity between a night-heron and a raven is purely vocal.’
  • 15) ‘We might even be able to give the crows, ravens and swallows a little competition.’
  • 16) ‘The black ravens which you find in the Tower of London have their wings clipped.’
  • 17) ‘The little faeries dived from the ceiling like a cloud of black ravens.’
  • 18) ‘His hair was the color of a raven's wing, and just as shiny.’
  • 19) ‘He looks straight at me, with eyes as shadowy as a raven's wing.’
  • 20) ‘His hair was black, but its sheen was like a raven's feather.’
  • 21) ‘Her long, dark hair flew out behind her like a raven's feathers.’
  • 22) ‘Common ravens were seen removing whole eggs from five nests attended by female Steller's eiders.’
  • 23) ‘The common raven is larger than the American crow.’
  • 24) ‘She had a long sheet of glossy raven hair and graceful neck.’
  • 25) ‘She was a tall woman, slim and delicate, with a wealth of glossy raven hair.’
  • 26) ‘Her hood had been left back and her glossy raven hair had been tied up with a deep lilac ribbon.’
  • 27) ‘With an astonished look she walked towards him, black eyes and raven hair surrounding her face.’
  • 28) ‘Misa had her long, raven black hair up in a bun, where it was neat.’
  • 29) ‘He had brown hair, not raven black like the two Vals.’
  • 30) ‘His hair was raven black, and swayed lightly in the wind, reaching his shoulders and cut in a slight upward curve.’
  • 31) ‘She had medium length, raven hair, deep purple eyes, and fair skin.’
  • 32) ‘Her once beautifully alive raven hair now hung down lifelessly.’
  • 33) ‘His chocolate-colored eyes darkened, and a wisp of raven hair escaped its gelled hold and fell across his forehead.’
  • 34) ‘His long raven hair had been pulled back into a ponytail, revealing light green eyes.’
  • 35) ‘His wide smile grew even more at the thought of the boy with long raven hair.’
  • 36) ‘Her wavy raven tresses were streaked with white, and looked gray.’
  • 37) ‘Unfortunately, all he could see was the top of a very familiar head of raven tresses.’
  • 38) ‘Do you remember when I was young and pretty, Kant, and had long raven tresses?’
  • 39) ‘A tension drained out of him at the sight of those tousled raven locks.’
  • 40) ‘At the man's right was another woman with raven locks and a crimson stare.’
  • 41) ‘Her raven locks were plastered to her head in sweat, and she was sleeping soundly.’
  • 42) ‘His hair was a raven black, brushed back away from his forehead.’
  • 43) ‘His raven mane was kept short on the sides and in the back.’
  • 44) ‘He and the hounds ravening him are amalgamated in one precipitate upsweep of pigments.’
  • 45) ‘One is the very fierce passage in The Origin of Species where he talks about ‘the face of nature, bright with gladness’ and yet if you look beneath, you will see things ravening, devouring, consuming.’
  • 46) ‘Your sword has devoured your prophets like a ravening lion.’
  • 47) ‘But after a while that didn't stop you from ravening down the poison.’

Examples

  • 1) "They're having what they call a crow caucus," explained Jack.
  • 2) I really feel that jim crow is alive and well. charles pettway
  • 3) The crow is piping hot, and seasoned with just a hint of schaudenfreud …
  • 4) I had the inside of the crow from the stencil, so I adhered it to the cover, hoping it would serve as a focal point.
  • 5) At the far end of the room, I can just about make out a vision in crow-black and oversized sunglasses sitting behind a huge white desk.
  • 6) Attaining an altitude of ten feet for a crow is not on the list for tests for athleticism.
  • 7) Link that old crow is gonna rise up soon and peck out the eyes of the moon
  • 8) I hope crow is low-calorie, as I seem to have been served a dish.
  • 9) ‘He said the proliferation of Corvids birds like grey crows, magpies and rooks could be directly linked to the decline in songbirds in the area.’
  • 10) ‘Large black birds like crows and grackles are often referred to as trash birds.’
  • 11) ‘We mostly saw the usual sparrows, doves, crows, chickadees, and titmice. Tons of Blue Jay are in flight right now as they are involved in a migration of their own.’
  • 12) ‘The corvids of North America consist of one species of jackdaw, four crows, two ravens, one nutcracker, two magpies, and ten species of jays.’
  • 13) ‘Great Horned Owls do not build their own nests, but use nests built by hawks, crows, magpies, herons, or other large birds.’
  • 14) ‘The airport attracts corvids, rooks, crows, lapwings and wood pigeons among others.’
  • 15) ‘The corvines - crows, rooks, jays, magpies and jackdaws - are relentless stealers of other birds' eggs and chicks.’
  • 16) ‘Birds - blackbirds and thrushes, robins, starlings, rooks and crows, jays, ducks, seagulls and owls will eat slugs’
  • 17) ‘Eagles, vultures, penguins, ravens, crows, doves, and ostriches are just a few of the birds that do double time as species and symbols.’
  • 18) ‘The brain-to-body ratio of crows, ravens and magpies equals that of dolphins and nearly matches humans.’
  • 19) ‘At nesting time the parents become bold and pugnacious attacking crows, magpies, cuckoos and kestrels crossing their territory.’
  • 20) ‘But periods of high heat and drought send such common urban-dwelling species as crows, blue jays and robins out of the city in search of fresh water.’
  • 21) ‘Birds such as grouse, crows, quail, partridge, nightjars, cuckoos, shrikes, larks, pipits, merlins, harriers, kestrels and buzzards would all have been seen.’
  • 22) ‘The virus is primarily a disease of wild birds, particularly crows, blue jays, and birds of prey, and is transmitted by mosquitoes to horses and humans.’
  • 23) ‘It had long been used in Europe to kill predators and ‘noxious’ birds such as crows and magpies.’
  • 24) ‘It is the habit of crows to perch like sentinels on the tops of isolated trees, where they can see what is going on in all directions.’
  • 25) ‘Indeed, just now there are too many acorns for even such greedy birds as crows and magpies.’
  • 26) ‘Losses occur, however, when the unattended eggs are taken by crows or ravens, or when nesting birds are disturbed by humans.’
  • 27) ‘Blue jays and crows rob smaller birds' nests, often those of robins and catbirds, of both eggs and young, while hawks may steal the same from the crows and jays!’
  • 28) ‘Just now the skies are busy with birds; rooks and crows grouping and re-grouping in ragged formation, starlings showing off their flock skills, and swifts silver-arrowing round and round.’
  • 29) ‘At other booths, the photographers allowed participants to reject their first photo in favor of a more flattering one, but the old crow and her minion hurried me off the set.’
  • 30) ‘‘I'll phone our favourite old crow Edith then,’ Grandma relented.’
  • 31) ‘Hah, that old crow could forbid me all she wants, but I won't give up my archery.’
  • 32) ‘I still remember about him actually agreeing to go on a date with that bald, old crow, and I definitely still remembered that I was angry.’
  • 33) ‘The doors opened and two aged citizens emerged, a withered old crow and a thin old duffer.’
  • 34) ‘Funny, I thought normal roosters crowed in the morning.’
  • 35) ‘When the rooster crowed to greet the morning, Ben thought he sounded awfully close by but to find the fowl on the foot of his bed was closer than he thought!’
  • 36) ‘Here you can see women washing clothes in the river, children chasing each other in narrow lanes, chickens crowing and dogs barking at strangers.’
  • 37) ‘Flies buzzed, cockerels crowed, goats bleated and a chorus of dogs was howling furiously.’
  • 38) ‘The cold wind swept the dawn, and the roosters crowed at a distance.’
  • 39) ‘By dawn, mysterious roosters would crow but never show themselves.’
  • 40) ‘At the ranch the roosters started crowing at 4am just a few feet from my head, shocking me to consciousness.’
  • 41) ‘She could hear about two, no, three different roosters crowing, sunlight just barely peeking through her window.’
  • 42) ‘The morning greeted us with an early sun rise, the village rooster crowing and the swish of a broom sweeping the sand court yard outside.’
  • 43) ‘Instead of alarm clocks, there is a rooster crowing on a rooftop nearby.’
  • 44) ‘‘This is a village that never sleeps,’ she said, as a rooster crowed in the background.’
  • 45) ‘Every once in a while a dog barked or a rooster crowed.’
  • 46) ‘As dawn approaches and the light level rises, you will hear roosters crowing and the night ambient sounds will die away.’
  • 47) ‘We always awoke to the sound of a cock crowing or a bird chirping and when we looked outside, we saw nature in all of her morning glory!’
  • 48) ‘There are dozens of young hares running about aimlessly in the fields while young cock pheasants are crowing their heads off in every garden and potato patch.’
  • 49) ‘In both traditions the white rooster, which crows at dawn to dispel the darkness of night, is highly esteemed.’
  • 50) ‘When we first got them, Bill and I spent many a morning lying in bed, laughing after having been awakened by our young rooster's attempts at crowing.’
  • 51) ‘The loony rooster next door insists on crowing at all hours.’
  • 52) ‘Finally a rooster flew to the top and decided to crow around midnight.’
  • 53) ‘The rooster crowed, as if it wanted more scraps of food to eat.’
  • 54) ‘She will crow in delight when she spots either one of them.’
  • 55) ‘In fact, he's crowing and preening in the spotlight that he's brought to bear on his actions.’
  • 56) ‘You had to dig nuggets out from him about his career because he hated it to seem as if he was crowing but this was one incident he would talk about.’
  • 57) ‘He was crowing with joy because he had run 8 miles yesterday as opposed to my paltry one quarter.’
  • 58) ‘My normal, nice, reserved Captain and partner was crowing.’
  • 59) ‘She literally crowed with pleasure, declaring that now she understood my political blindness.’
  • 60) ‘William crowed as he jumped and caught the flying Frisbee before Becky's teammate.’
  • 61) ‘Perhaps you'll even crow when his shoelaces get caught in the escalator.’
  • 62) ‘Beware of the bark of a dog or crow of a cock at night, for they signify death.’
  • 63) ‘I am up like the cock's crow on Wednesdays to get ready for the bus, which picks me up at my door.’
  • 64) ‘Following sunrise comes the clanging sound of scores of church bells, coupled with the crow of roosters from the adjacent Moslem Quarter.’
  • 65) ‘They cut past their rival by mere feet and she took one hand off the wheel long enough to doff her hat and wave it with a crow of triumph.’
  • 66) ‘He crows in triumph, and both of us pull as hard as we can and the pipe gives way as half the toilet breaks off and lands on the floor.’
  • 67) ‘I let out a mental crow of delight as I discover that I can control where I'm going.’
  • 68) ‘She is frisky and good humoured like a bouncy Labrador, gushing with anecdotes punctuated by a laugh, which is a cross between a joyous cackle and a happy crow.’
  • 69) ‘We arrived at Fort Peck and learned that our Indian visitors were a war party of crows going to fight the Sioux.’
  • 70) ‘The crows were an offshoot of the Hidatsas, and they made summer journeys east to trade with the descendants of their forebears.’
  • 71) ‘Another mulatto trapper to achieve distinction among the crows, at least in his own telling, was James P. Beckwourth.’
  • 72) ‘In 1833 the American Fur Company traded with the crows at Fort Cass, located at the mouth of the Bighorn River.’
  • 73) ‘The crows welcomed American traders and tolerated American trappers.’
  • 74) ‘For more than half a century, the land that the Bozemen Trail would cross was made busy by crows and white trappers and traders, not by Lakotas.’
  • 75) ‘Food was plentiful, the weather was comfortable, horses were regaining their fat, and spirits were high among the crows.’
  • 76) ‘The crows sold the purloined furs to Samuel Tulloch at Fort Cass.’
  • 77) ‘Men from other camps even searched out the White Temple camp just to witness his routine, which was now the talk of all the crows.’
  • 78) ‘For crows the process of relating a narrative is always interactive.’
  • 79) ‘The word traveled fast from camp to camp, from band to band until it seemed that all that the crows talked about was Rabbit.’
  • 80) ‘These groups included the Blackfoot, Cheyenne, crow, Kiowa, Pawnee and the Sioux Nations.’
  • 81) ‘In September 1833 he led his brigade of thirty men and one hundred horses southeast along the foot of the Bighorns, intending to hunt up a crow village to obtain permission to trap beaver on the Tongue and Powder Rivers.’
  • 82) ‘‘The New and Old Testaments in the Absaroki or crow Indian Language by a Missionary of the Society of Jesus’ came into the possession of the Montana Historical Society in August 2004.’
  • 83) ‘A Lieutenant Luther Hare had ridden ahead of the column with some crow scouts.’
  • 84) ‘As Clark and his party explored the Yellowstone, a crow raiding party stole the horses belonging to a detail led by Sgt. Pryor.’
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