inn vs in

inn in

Definitions

  • 1) Any establishment where travellers can procure lodging, food, and drink.
  • 2) Chiefly British Formerly, a residence hall for students, especially law students, in London.
  • 3) A public lodging house serving food and drink to travelers; a hotel.
  • 4) A tavern or restaurant.
  • 5) One of the colleges (societies or buildings) in London, for students of the law barristers
  • 6) (Eng.) colleges in which young students formerly began their law studies, now occupied chiefly bp attorn`ys, solocitors, etc.
  • 7) engraving The town residence of a nobleman or distinguished person.
  • 8) obsolete A place of shelter; hence, dwelling; habitation; residence; abode.
  • 9) A house for the lodging and entertainment of travelers or wayfarers; a tavern; a public house; a hotel.
  • 10) (Eng.) the four societies of “students and practicers of the law of England” which in London exercise the exclusive right of admitting persons to practice at the bar; also, the buildings in which the law students and barristers have their chambers. They are the Inner Temple, the Middle Temple, Lincoln's Inn, and Gray's Inn.
  • 11) a hotel providing overnight lodging for travelers
  • 12) The precincts or premises occupied by these societies respectively. They are the Inner Temple, Middle Temple, Lincoln's Inn, and Gray's Inn. The first two originally belonged to the Knights Templars, whence the name Temple.
  • 13) Synonyms Hotel, House, etc. See tavern.
  • 14) A house; a dwelling; a dwelling-place; an abode.
  • 15) The town residence of a person of quality; a private hotel: as, Leicester Inn.
  • 16) A house for the lodging and entertainment of travelers; in law, a public house kept for the lodging and entertainment of such as may choose to visit it, and providing what is necessary for their subsistence, for compensation; a tavern; a public hotel.
  • 17) Habitation; abode; residence.
  • 18) A college or building in which students were lodged and taught: now retained only for the Inns of Court, in London. See below.
  • 19) obsolete To house; to lodge.
  • 20) An obsolete form of in.
  • 21) To furnish entertainment and lodging to; place in shelter.
  • 22) To take up lodging; lodge.
  • 23) Anobsoleteformofin.
  • 24) rare To take lodging; to lodge.
  • 25) To get in; to in. See In, v. t.

Definitions

  • 1) One that has position, influence, or power.
  • 2) Informal Influence; power.
  • 3) A suffix of Latin (or Greek) origin forming, in Latin, adjectives, and s thence derived, from s, many of which formations have come into or are imitated in modern Latin and English.
  • 4) An obsolete spelling of inn.
  • 5) An abbreviation of inch or inches.
  • 6) A prefix of Latin origin, being the Latin preposition in so used.
  • 7) A prefix of Anglo-Saxon origin, being the preposition and adverb in so used.
  • 8) A nook or corner; used chiefly in the phrase ins and outs.
  • 9) In chem., the symbol for indium.
  • 10) A prefix of Latin origin, having a negative or privative force, ‘not, -less, without.’
  • 11) Hence— All the details or intricacies of a matter: as, the ins and outs of a question.
  • 12) A person in office; specifically, in politics, a member of the party in power.
  • 13) Incoming; inward.
  • 14) Relating to, understandable to, or coming from an exclusive group.
  • 15) Holding office; having power.
  • 16) Concerned with or attuned to the latest fashions: synonym: fashionable.
  • 17) So as to include or incorporate.
  • 18) To or toward a destination or goal.
  • 19) So as to occupy a position of success or favor.
  • 20) To or toward the inside.
  • 21) Within a place, as of business or residence.
  • 22) So as to be available or under one's control.
  • 23) Sports So as to score, as by crossing home plate in baseball.
  • 24) In a particular relationship.
  • 25) inch
  • 26) A Latin preposition. cognate with English in.
  • 27) To get in; take or put in; house.
  • 28) After the style or form of.
  • 29) Made with or through the medium of.
  • 30) Used to indicate the second and larger term of a ratio or proportion.
  • 31) With the aim or purpose of.
  • 32) From the outside to a point within; into.
  • 33) To or at a situation or condition of.
  • 34) With the arrangement or order of.
  • 35) With reference to.
  • 36) During the act or process of.
  • 37) With the characteristic, attribute, or property of.
  • 38) Within the limits, bounds, or area of.
  • 39) Having the activity, occupation, or function of.
  • 40) (in on) Informed about; participating in.
  • 41) (in for) Guaranteed to get or have.
  • 42) (in that) For the reason that.

Examples

  • 1) It was originally used by staff to watch guests arrive at the 17th Century coaching inn.
  • 2) Except the inn and an old church.
  • 3) Country inn serving seasonal foods and local wines.
  • 4) There are some fantastic pubs and inns nearby but you should take advantage of the welcome pack you receive on arrival.
  • 5) The hotel is a nineteenth-century coaching inn converted to modern style.
  • 6) The former coaching inn claims to have had the smallest bar in England.
  • 7) Stay at this 18th-century coaching inn near by.
  • 8) In Victorian times this beautiful stone building was a coaching inn.
  • 9) The laundering operation included the purchase and management of a country inn in the Midlands.
  • 10) Or hop across to the inn for hearty pub grub, live music and the most happening bar on the loch.
  • 11) An old inn with open fires, that offers incredibly good-value food.
  • 12) It couldn't be that hard to be a chambermaid in a coaching inn, she decided.
  • 13) Go to the Lion for an old inn, but try down the road for something completely different.
  • 14) The rooms are in a series of small buildings that are beyond the main structure, an old coaching inn where the bar and restaurant are found.
  • 15) It is an old inn, which has kept its charm and hospitality, making this family house worth a visit.
  • 16) There were coaching inns and hostels, or you could lodge in monasteries, but no one did it for fun.
  • 17) I had a choice of inns there (if one used the term inn in its loosest sense), and I chose the place with the attempt at flowers near the entrance.
  • 18) Great hosts and the "inn" is just so perfect for a base of travel in and around Oaxaca.
  • 19) The inn is the pet project of Canadian construction magnate Cliff Lede (that's his eponymous winery directly below) and takes its name from his top red blend, also called Poetry.
  • 20) All the water throughout the inn is purified for safety.
  • 21) The inn is gone but the Beachwood Yacht Club still exists, although not in the original building.
  • 22) The inn is the best-looking place I have ever been to.
  • 23) The inn is in the village of Stretton, just off the A1 in that part of Rutland that is more like Lincolnshire in character.
  • 24) ‘The Dublin pub, inn or tavern has a history which is as old as the city itself.’
  • 25) ‘At night, luxuriate at charming inns, sampling Scotch whisky.’
  • 26) ‘Until the end of the nineteenth century the majority of darts thrown in inns and taverns in this country and utilised in fairgrounds were imported from France.’
  • 27) ‘It was used as an inn or tavern in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries.’
  • 28) ‘The game arrived in Britain in the late 18th Century from France (possibly via French prisoners of war) and quickly seems to have become popular in inns and taverns at the time.’
  • 29) ‘And so they worked in different inns and taverns.’
  • 30) ‘Most Dutch genre, however, depicted the life of the better-off, often in scenes of household life, but also in markets, barrack rooms, taverns, inns, and brothels.’
  • 31) ‘Of course, with so many people flowing through, taverns, inns, and local merchants made quite the profit from the very happy and generous visitors.’
  • 32) ‘There were inns and shops and taverns and stables on every side, everywhere she looked, and all her around her were the sounds of city life that she had not heard for nigh on ten years.’
  • 33) ‘It was the time of night when families would just be settling down for dinner, and just before the taverns and inns would become filled with their nightly guests.’
  • 34) ‘They also frequented the same inns and alehouses, and the numerous clubs and societies that thrived in the ‘Enlightenment’.’
  • 35) ‘Sarod was a ruddy, old town, made up of mostly taverns and inns.’
  • 36) ‘It was, of course, one of the many commonhouses they would pass by along the way - small inns with a tavern room or two.’
  • 37) ‘The shops were closed, but the taverns and inns were filled with people.’
  • 38) ‘After arriving in Britain in the late 18th century, it quickly became popular in inns and taverns.’
  • 39) ‘Like today, London had many inns and alehouses throughout it and drinking was as popular then as it is today!’
  • 40) ‘The licensing of alehouses and inns was the responsibility of justices of the peace.’
  • 41) ‘After they woke and dressed they went back to the tavern section of the inn to get some breakfast.’
  • 42) ‘We walked to the tavern and inn that we had passed when we first entered the town.’
  • 43) ‘We are fighting a rating and valuation system that discriminates against small businesses, privately owned hotels, inns and pubs.’
  • 44) ‘The grand resort hotels, smaller inns, and boarding houses were concentrated on the region's many lakes, nowhere more so than on the two large lakes on the region's eastern edge.’
  • 45) ‘We have our choice of lovely motels, hotels, and inns.’
  • 46) ‘Petitioners are therefore unlikely to be able to afford stay in hotels or inns while they do their rounds of visits.’
  • 47) ‘Some hotels and inns offered suites which guests could rent by the hour.’
  • 48) ‘There are no inns or hotels in the boundless grasslands, but one can always count on the Mongols for help.’

Examples

  • 1) To make matters worse, the other woman had moved straight in with Nick.
  • 2) He stood around uneasily, obviously not wanting to go back to his game of solitaire while I was still in the room.
  • 3) The rule as regards this is plain and simple: admit as much fresh air as you can; provided it does not _blow in_ upon you _in a stream_, and provided you are not in a state of profuse perspiration at the time; for in accordance with the
  • 4) Paulson, who has large positions in gold via the GLD ETF, bragged that “in addition to maneuvering our investment strategy based on where we are in the economic cycle, a large part of our success has been based on anticipating market events before they are generally recognized.
  • 5)            “About the moly mine in, under and around Bartlett mountain” But she hurried off to polish the white oak railing in front a of couple of bears dressed like men, or perhaps a couple of men disguised as bears in  brown plaid corduroy with axle grease on their paws.
  • 6) I stood in line to get a wristband and was not even asked for i. d.-in fact the young woman in charge didn't even make eye contact with me, probably for fear of laughing or showing her disdain.
  • 7) Marine base in the province until, one day soon, the American military can install him in an  “abandoned government building”  or simple  "a clump of ruins"  in that city.
  • 8) Problems in affording healthcare are well above levels seen in  2009.
  • 9) ‘What is in that box?’
  • 10) ‘He was well known in the area but was a quiet type of man who went about his way in a gentle manner.’
  • 11) ‘Nothing I did could make me an acceptable guest in that hotel without a credit card.’
  • 12) ‘He's standing in the street.’
  • 13) ‘A century ago, there was hardly an educated woman in this part of the world.’
  • 14) ‘The bride was in a striking off-white dress.’
  • 15) ‘There was black smoke and I could hardly see anything but there was no-one in the room.’
  • 16) ‘He's dressed in faded jeans and a navy T-shirt.’
  • 17) ‘As the days get longer and the sun warms the air we begin to see activity in our ponds.’
  • 18) ‘I'm from a very small town in Texas.’
  • 19) ‘Jose arrived last night about 9 p.m., but we were all in bed.’
  • 20) ‘Never soak brushes in water, commercial cleaners or even paint.’
  • 21) ‘I have lived in Bolton for four years now and I enjoy walking around the town.’
  • 22) ‘And while all of this is going on I'm having to move out of my flat - a place I've been in for 4 years.’
  • 23) ‘in the early part of the year staff in the department took nearly six days off sick each.’
  • 24) ‘They want to hear from anyone living inthe area who may have seen or heard anything.’
  • 25) ‘She arrived to be sentenced with her belongings packed in bags ready to take to jail.’
  • 26) ‘She also cannot manage the stairs or getting in and out of the bath so has a stairlift and a bathlift too.’
  • 27) ‘One of the great attractions of the traditional paddling pool is being able to jump in it.’
  • 28) ‘The surf was good, the waves big enough to make me keep a close eye on the dog as he ran in and out of the water.’
  • 29) ‘Upon inspection we discovered ants crawling in and out of every hole in the computer.’
  • 30) ‘The hordes of away fans were marshalled safely in and out of the ground by police.’
  • 31) ‘There's a flurry to get them unloaded so people can get in the building.’
  • 32) ‘He was given a security code by a member of staff who was fed up with letting them in and out of the building.’
  • 33) ‘She climbed in the car, and the man drove to the next street.’
  • 34) ‘Store the potatoes for short periods in a dark cupboard.’
  • 35) ‘From the cab's front view, we witness Iris get in the back.’
  • 36) ‘Cuttings, leaves, plants, and uncooked fruit and vegetables can all be put in the green bin.’
  • 37) ‘He dropped anchor in the bay that fronts San Sebastian, the island's capital.’
  • 38) ‘He cut her hair and then took her to a studio where he got some shots done to display in his salon.’
  • 39) ‘I drove to Reno with my son and all the things I could fit in my car.’
  • 40) ‘It doesn't take a highly trained director to tell a few actresses to run in the woods and pretend to be scared.’
  • 41) ‘There are people who walk in my office and see nothing but the dullest thing in the world.’
  • 42) ‘Mum should never have allowed me to be put in that situation, or at least given me some info on what to expect.’
  • 43) ‘Most people come to my farm in the afternoon and have traveled a good distance to get there.’
  • 44) ‘He hadn't had a girlfriend in ages.’
  • 45) ‘I began the book in the summer of 1995.’
  • 46) ‘Nothing else was happening in January.’
  • 47) ‘This scheme has done very well in the past.’
  • 48) ‘American courts in the nineteenth century demonstrated much broader standards of accountability than is the current practice.’
  • 49) ‘I helped teach the role to Jane and Beth: they learnt it in a month.’
  • 50) ‘It was around 4 o' clock in the afternoon and we wanted to have a snack before the show.’
  • 51) ‘We have seen, in recent years, ambulance crews stoned by yobs as they try to go about their work.’
  • 52) ‘Twice in the last few days I have been for walks on Dartmoor.’
  • 53) ‘Nobody who is associated with the bank in that period can come out with any credit.’
  • 54) ‘Five years have passed since Daly held up the trophy and in that time much has changed.’
  • 55) ‘He's getting married in a few days.’
  • 56) ‘I'll make my mind up in a week or two's time.’
  • 57) ‘Tessa will start school in three and a half years.’
  • 58) ‘That marriage contract said that in ten years, both of us could divorce and not have anything to do with each other.’
  • 59) ‘She returned in ten minutes after she made sure the girls were fast asleep.’
  • 60) ‘They promised to come back in 60 days if nothing had been done to redress their grievances.’
  • 61) ‘Experts agree that, with an election expected in less than a year's time, the Tories should be doing even better.’
  • 62) ‘Until the rose bushes are in bloom again, the earlier-flowering bulbs will provide a lively picture.’
  • 63) ‘I was madly in love with her and I was pretty sure she was in love with me.’
  • 64) ‘Many people lined up for hours to see the movie only to come running out in horror before it was over.’
  • 65) ‘I first read the book when I was in my twenties.’
  • 66) ‘He shook his head, in sadness and grief.’
  • 67) ‘Her affair with Duchamp continued in secrecy until 1950, when she returned to Brazil.’
  • 68) ‘He had been in good health apart from the angina and had not smoked for 17 years.’
  • 69) ‘Still, I live in hope that one day I might get my money.’
  • 70) ‘Alfalfa fields range in height from 8 to 18 inches and look very good.’
  • 71) ‘in reality, given human limitations, it can only be said we are doing the best we can.’
  • 72) ‘The content of the drawings, while generally clear and well-detailed, is variable in quality.’
  • 73) ‘While lacking in merit as a decision-maker, he was extremely adroit in working the congressional funding process.’
  • 74) ‘Because marriage figures so prominently in her novels, much has been made of Austen's decision not to marry.’
  • 75) ‘He was a huge hit in the comedy ‘Oh, God!’.’
  • 76) ‘Tom Hanks is set to star in the film.’
  • 77) ‘in the play, Herzen neither wins nor loses.’
  • 78) ‘However, there is no reason to think that the claims in that material are unjustified.’
  • 79) ‘Some expressions of opinion in that newspaper and elsewhere fall between the two.’
  • 80) ‘The picture used in that billboard was actually the photo of Ibrahim on the cover of his solo album.’
  • 81) ‘Williams has examined this literature in her book Ten Lectures on Theories of the Dance.’
  • 82) ‘Those who don't know him better could be forgiven for missing the irony in that expression.’
  • 83) ‘It is four years since I was in politics.’
  • 84) ‘He studied fine art at Nebraska University, completing his degree after service in the army in the First World War.’
  • 85) ‘Jeff is working in sales for Southwest Landmark, Ohio.’
  • 86) ‘I've been in computers for more than 15 years.’
  • 87) ‘The recent scandal at the paper has affected all of us in the journalism profession.’
  • 88) ‘After college I went to work in libraries, while I waited for the position I wanted in fashion.’
  • 89) ‘At that time I painted mostly in watercolor.’
  • 90) ‘The questionnaire, in Spanish, took approximately 45 min to administer.’
  • 91) ‘She thought that he was the greatest master of the art of telling a story in pictures without words.’
  • 92) ‘The website will offer information not only online but also in PDF format, which allows the user to access then print information.’
  • 93) ‘Create a job description, put it in writing and then discuss it with potential employees.’
  • 94) ‘The student could barely put a sentence together in English.’
  • 95) ‘A defamatory statement is libel if it is in permanent form such as writing or pictures.’
  • 96) ‘It begins in G minor but progresses to a different key, C major.’
  • 97) ‘This leads to an extended coda, also in C minor, which gradually works its way back to the G minor key.’
  • 98) ‘‘Eroica’ is the name of Beethoven's Symphony No. 3 in B Flat.’
  • 99) ‘in announcing the program, Computershare pointed out the environmental benefits of reducing the use of valuable resources such as trees.’
  • 100) ‘I was not prepared for the variety of approvals and difficulties that came about in building a golf course.’
  • 101) ‘in comparing the results of this study with the database, it was determined that two species previously undocumented had been collected.’
  • 102) ‘I sacrifice the old to make way for the new and in doing so, I gain spiritual wisdom.’
  • 103) ‘The organisation, in seeking to attract more male students to take up teaching, could have put their proposal forward as a special measure.’
  • 104) ‘It would seem that the professor, in attempting to explain politics and religion to us, has lost his hold on common sense.’
  • 105) ‘Anyone who is in that income bracket will pay tax at 19.5c in the dollar.’
  • 106) ‘The proposed scheme will involve writing off most of the company's £ 11.4 million debt and, if approved, unsecured creditors will lose 90p in the pound.’
  • 107) ‘Perhaps only one in twenty of the city's adult residents had been born there.’
  • 108) ‘He projects a success rate of one in five - twice the norm.’
  • 109) ‘Mr Gilburn, who failed to appear in court, is thought to have moved in with a friend who lives locally.’
  • 110) ‘He was in New York for the premiere of Tommy in 1975 and had decided to pop in on his admirer while he was in town.’
  • 111) ‘The phone line for the office was put in on time and later today I am hoping to set up my internet connection.’
  • 112) ‘Within the walls of the medina, the buildings close in on you, and you are taken into cool shadow.’
  • 113) ‘‘Anna! Are you alright?’ Evan asked, jumping in after me.’
  • 114) ‘The we went in and sat down and lots of other people were there.’
  • 115) ‘There he burst in on an astonished young American couple and ran past them into a bedroom.’
  • 116) ‘Apparently, we are going to be able to put plastic in with our cans and bottles.’
  • 117) ‘They were finally caught out when one brother got their shifts mixed up and walked in on a romantic meal for two.’
  • 118) ‘Two weeks later, I had another appointment in the city and I was supposed to go in with my son again.’
  • 119) ‘I think the child had been feeding the ducks when he fell in.’
  • 120) ‘The story goes that he was working in a café one night when a pop star popped in for some grub.’
  • 121) ‘I had no idea he was going to be there until he walked in with his girlfriend.’
  • 122) ‘I was the one who didn't want to get too serious, so I was surprised when he asked me to move in with him.’
  • 123) ‘If you'd been here an hour ago, you'd have seen the girl come in with her friend.’
  • 124) ‘Teams are reminded that bonus points are not awarded when the result card is not sent in on time.’
  • 125) ‘She had previously enjoyed food with nuts in, including breakfast cereals, and she had eaten chicken curries at other restaurants.’
  • 126) ‘Staying in on a day like this is criminal.’
  • 127) ‘She turned to the government for help and they found her an apartment for her to live in.’
  • 128) ‘Cases of domestic violence rose as families stayed in on New Year's Eve to avoid the bad weather.’
  • 129) ‘Shut in with his cronies, he sees the world as his enemy and opposition to his will as personal affront.’
  • 130) ‘Kathy gave me a cup of tea with sugar in to help calm me.’
  • 131) ‘We've had them for a good few years now - they were in with another box of books we bought.’
  • 132) ‘Sixth grade was handled by general instructors, and each class was locked in with one instructor all day long.’
  • 133) ‘Their first pieces of work would be due in on Wednesday or Thursday of first week.’
  • 134) ‘I'm a bit disappointed that my flight out is Friday afternoon, which allowing for time differences gets in at 8pm.’
  • 135) ‘Bearing in mind the flight is due in at 11.20 pm, you'll watch its progress on the internet up to 20 minutes before it's due to land.’
  • 136) ‘Entries must be in by 5pm.’
  • 137) ‘Becky's train actually managed to get in on time.’
  • 138) ‘The tide was in, and the breakers were a good twenty feet high when they hit the harbour wall.’
  • 139) ‘Night had fallen, and the tide was in.’
  • 140) ‘The tide came in and floated our canoes.’
  • 141) ‘The tide was coming in and people moved their blankets up the beach.’
  • 142) ‘It is now 10:00 am, and I've only been in for about 20 minutes.’
  • 143) ‘I've only been in for five minutes and I stumble across a wedding party.’
  • 144) ‘He does little else; his idea of a good time is a night in with some scouting reports.’
  • 145) ‘Suffice it to say that his press conferences have all the allure of a night in with the prime minister.’
  • 146) ‘The lads upstairs were having a sports night in with, I suspect, more than a few beers.’
  • 147) ‘I'm not in on Monday.’
  • 148) ‘Luigi's was a large and crowded restaurant that was clearly the in place for the in-crowd.’
  • 149) ‘The very in words are slammin' and rockin'.’
  • 150) ‘This year, monochromatic colors are the in thing.’
  • 151) ‘in addition to statement T-shirts, graphic T-shirts are in this year.’
  • 152) ‘Way back when beards were in, mawkish mystics brought forth the concept album.’
  • 153) ‘He even let his membership lapse at Au Bar, the in club.’
  • 154) ‘Before I even came off the pick, I felt the shot was in.’
  • 155) ‘As you can see, I held my finish and barely looked up even as the ball went in.’
  • 156) ‘I don't think I got any first serves in today.’
  • 157) ‘An analysis of his 53 centuries shows that in these innings he made 72% of the runs put on while he was in.’
  • 158) ‘For years, people have begged distant relatives concerning even the possibility of anyone knowing someone who has an in with owner Frank Sr.’
  • 159) ‘For him, an in with the Bush family is worth more than anything lottery players have in their hand’
  • 160) ‘The company has an in with the private club in Switzerland.’
  • 161) ‘Once you've got an in with the right guys, they don't need to see a full script before, in theory, they start giving you development cash.’
  • 162) ‘They knew, from endless meetings and conferences, which people they needed on their team, which people had an in with which interest groups, and who could help them in certain places.’
  • 163) ‘The notably venerated violinist who gave him an in at the National Theater, where he soon found a niche.’
  • 164) ‘I have never, never had an in at a bar before, where you can cut to the front of the line and get free tabs and stuff.’
  • 165) ‘He has an in to the presidential process.’
  • 166) ‘Tim might have an in with this agent or something because of his dad.’
  • 167) ‘It never hurts to have an in with your head coach.’
0

Use Linguix everywhere you write

Be productive and efficient, no matter where and what you write!

Linguix Apps

Get audience-specific corrections, access statistics, and view readability scores.

Browser Extensions

Get your writing checked on millions of websites, including Gmail, Facebook, and Google Docs.

Linguix Keyboard

Make your content read and look better on mobile.

MS Office add-ins

Download Linguix for Microsoft Word and Microsoft Outlook to check grammar, punctuation, and style instantly right in your documents.

This website uses cookies to make Linguix work for you. By using this site, you agree to our cookie policy