principal vs principle

principal principle

Definitions

  • 1) Architecture Either of a pair of inclined timbers forming the sides of a triangular truss for a pitched roof.
  • 2) The most significant part of an estate, as opposed to minor or incidental components.
  • 3) The main actor in the perpetration of a crime.
  • 4) One who holds a position of presiding rank, especially the head of an elementary school, middle school, or high school.
  • 5) A main participant in a situation, especially a financial transaction.
  • 6) The person on behalf of whom an agent acts.
  • 7) The person having prime responsibility for an obligation as distinguished from one who acts as surety or as an endorser.
  • 8) A person having a leading or starring role in a performance, such as the first player in a section of an orchestra.
  • 9) An amount of capital originally borrowed or invested, as opposed to the interest paid or accruing on it.
  • 10) A leader, chief, or head; one who takes the lead; one who acts independently, or who has controlling authority or influence; ; -- distinguished from a subordinate, abettor, auxiliary, or assistant.
  • 11) A chief obligor, promisor, or debtor, -- as distinguished from a surety.
  • 12) One who employs another to act for him, -- as distinguished from an agent.
  • 13) The chief actor in a crime, or an abettor who is present at it, -- as distinguished from an accessory.
  • 14) In com., money bearing interest; a capital sum lent on interest, due as a debt or used as a fund: so called in distinction to interest or profits.
  • 15) In music: The subject of a fugue: opposed to answer.
  • 16) In ornithology, one of the primaries.
  • 17) A governor or presiding officer; one who is Chief in authority. ; ; ;
  • 18) In organ-building, a stop of the open diapason group, usually giving tones an octave above the pitch of the digitals used, like the octave.
  • 19) In testamentary and administration law, the corpus or capital of the estate, in contradistinction to the income.
  • 20) A soloist or other leading performer.
  • 21) A main truss, as of a roof, where there may be many principals.
  • 22) A chief or head; one who takes a leading part; one primarily concerned in an action, and not an auxiliary, accessory, assistant, or agent: as, the principals in a duel.
  • 23) A person for whom another becomes surety; one who is liable for a debt in the first instance.
  • 24) In the fine arts, the chief motive in a work of art, to which the rest are to be subordinate; also, an original painting or other work of art.
  • 25) In the Philippine Islands, every member, present or past, of the council of a pueblo; also, a first-born son of a gobernadorcillo or of a cabeza de barangay. See barangay.
  • 26) In law: A person who, being sui juris, and competent to do an act on his own account, employs another person to do it; the person from whom an agent's authority is derived. Compare master, 2.
  • 27) In criminal law, the actor in the commission of a crime; a person concerned in the commission of a crime, whether he directly commits the act constituting the offense or instigates or aids and abets in its commission.
  • 28) Same as principal rafter. See rafter.
  • 29) One of the turrets or pinnacles of waxwork and tapers with which the posts and center of a hearse were formerly crowned.
  • 30) An important personal belonging; an heirloom.
  • 31) A musical instrument used in old orchestral music, especially that of Handel — a variety of trumpet, probably having a larger tube than the ordinary tromba.
  • 32) First or highest in rank or importance. synonym: chief.
  • 33) Of, relating to, or being financial principal, or a principal in a financial transaction.
  • 34) See Plane of projection (a), under Plane.
  • 35) (Geom.) three lines in which the principal planes of the solid intersect two and two, as in an ellipsoid.
  • 36) See Axis of a curve, under Axis.
  • 37) (Persp.) the line drawn through the point of sight perpendicular to the perspective plane.
  • 38) (Crystallog.) a plane passing through the optical axis of a crystal.
  • 39) (Persp.) the projection of the point of sight upon the plane of projection.
  • 40) (Law) See under Challenge.
  • 41) (Geom.) three planes each of which is at right angles to the other two, and bisects all chords of the quadric perpendicular to the plane, as in an ellipsoid.
  • 42) A Latinism, obsolete Of or pertaining to a prince; princely.
  • 43) Highest in rank, authority, character, importance, or degree; most considerable or important; chief; main

Definitions

  • 1) physics A rule or law of nature, or the basic idea on how the laws of nature are applied.
  • 2) A fundamental essence, particularly one producing a given quality.
  • 3) usually plural Moral rule or aspect.
  • 4) A rule used to choose among solutions to a problem.
  • 5) obsolete A beginning.
  • 6) A fundamental assumption.
  • 7) A rule or standard, especially of good behavior.
  • 8) A fixed or predetermined policy or mode of action.
  • 9) The collectivity of moral or ethical standards or judgments.
  • 10) A basic or essential quality or element determining intrinsic nature or characteristic behavior.
  • 11) A rule or law concerning the functioning of natural phenomena or mechanical processes.
  • 12) A basic source.
  • 13) A basic truth, law, or assumption.
  • 14) Chemistry One of the elements that compose a substance, especially one that gives some special quality or effect.
  • 15) A fundamental truth; a comprehensive law or doctrine, from which others are derived, or on which others are founded; a general truth; an elementary proposition; a maxim; an axiom; a postulate.
  • 16) obsolete Beginning; commencement.
  • 17) A source, or origin; that from which anything proceeds; fundamental substance or energy; primordial substance; ultimate element, or cause.
  • 18) A settled rule of action; a governing law of conduct; an opinion or belief which exercises a directing influence on the life and behavior; a rule (usually, a right rule) of conduct consistently directing one's actions.
  • 19) etc. See under Bitter, Contradiction, etc.
  • 20) (Chem.) Any original inherent constituent which characterizes a substance, or gives it its essential properties, and which can usually be separated by analysis; -- applied especially to drugs, plant extracts, etc.
  • 21) An original faculty or endowment.
  • 22) a basic generalization that is accepted as true and that can be used as a basis for reasoning or conduct
  • 23) a basic truth or law or assumption
  • 24) a rule or law concerning a natural phenomenon or the function of a complex system
  • 25) a rule or standard especially of good behavior
  • 26) rule of personal conduct
  • 27) a certain important proposition concerning the equation
  • 28) A truth which is evident and general; a truth comprehending many subordinate truths; a law on which others are founded, or from which others are derived: as, the principles of morality, of equity, of government, etc. In mathematical physics a principle commonly means a very widely useful theorem.
  • 29) An original faculty or endowment of the mind: as, the principle of observation and comparison.
  • 30) That which is professed or accepted as a law of action or a rule of conduct; one of the fundamental doctrines or tenets of a system: as, the principles of the Stoics or of the Epicureans; hence, a right rule of conduct; in general, equity; uprightness: as, a man of principle.
  • 31) Cause, in the widest sense; that by which anything is in any way ultimately determined or regulated.
  • 32) Beginning; commencement.
  • 33) In chem.: A component part; an element: as, the constituent principles of bodies.
  • 34) In patent law, a law of nature, or a general property of matter, a rule of abstract science.
  • 35) A substance on the presence of which certain qualities, common to a number of bodies, depend. See proximate principles, under proximate.
  • 36) transitive To equip with principles; to establish, or fix, in certain principles; to impress with any tenet or rule of conduct.
  • 37) To equip with principles; to establish, or fix, in certain principles; to impress with any tenet, or rule of conduct, good or ill.
  • 38) (on principle) According to or because of principle.
  • 39) (in principle) With regard to the basics.

Examples

  • 1) For him darkness was the principal dramatic agent in a work, and the underlying aim was supernatural.
  • 2) Few in the crime field have matched her consistently high standard, and she has done so without having to rely mainly on one principal series hero.
  • 3) He has now told us that he has changed his mind, citing the Brexit vote as the principal reason.
  • 4) And they shared their concerns with the school principal.
  • 5) She became deputy chief executive and principal legal adviser.
  • 6) Those seeking to invest in the sector should first establish their principal aim.
  • 7) There are two principal reasons for this.
  • 8) It also acts as a principal investor in the energy and infrastructure sectors.
  • 9) What was the principal debt instrument used?
  • 10) These are aimed at those whose principal concern is not waiting for treatment.
  • 11) He has been suspended by the two schools where he is executive principal.
  • 12) Her blue pencil seemed to have had two principal concerns.
  • 13) One of the principal reasons is its big push into tablets.
  • 14) In overseas trade the merchant had acted as a principal all along.
  • 15) It means failing to meet obligations to pay back interest and principal on their debts on time.
  • 16) The liquidity drought was one of the principal reasons the crisis was quite as bad as it was.
  • 17) We will want to move around the world which is our home and our principal source of wonder.
  • 18) Its principal interest is economic theory.
  • 19) College principals welcomed the case for extra funding but said this should come from a new financial settlement rather than a levy.
  • 20) We have seen that a company 's principal current asset consists of unpaid bills from other companies.
  • 21) And yet for all the similarities, it is the one principal difference that is most telling.
  • 22) That has been a principal source of the rise in the polls of the Yes campaign.
  • 23) I would detail your concerns and request an urgent meeting with the college principal.
  • 24) After half a term she was called back to Kiev to join their ballet company as a principal dancer.
  • 25) For example, the first principal repayment might be delayed for a year pending completion of a new factory.
  • 26) ‘Otherwise, Tozeur's main business lay in its 40,000 date palms, and the principal activity around the main square was waiting in the shade for time to pass.’
  • 27) ‘For example, a capital city or principal centre can be inferred from its size, and from signs of central organization such as an archive, a mint, a palace and major religious buildings, or fortifications.’
  • 28) ‘As every resident of central Massachusetts would have understood, that road continued to Boston, the capital city and principal port of the state.’
  • 29) ‘Disagreement among the circuits isn't uncommon, and is a principal reason that the Supreme Court will take a case for review.’
  • 30) ‘The Harris family also built a new detached kitchen directly behind the rear piazza and converted the fireplaces in the principal rooms of the main floor to coal.’
  • 31) ‘Adam's most ambitious interiors at Home House were the main staircase and the principal reception rooms on the second floor.’
  • 32) ‘The tabloid revelations were, according to sources within Goodison Park, the principal reason why Rooney was so anxious to leave Merseyside before the transfer window closed.’
  • 33) ‘The company blamed a growing trend towards home consumption as the principal reason for falling sales, although it also acknowledged the smoking ban was having an impact on draught beer sales.’
  • 34) ‘In a recent VisitScotland survey, German, US and English visitors all cited Scotland's stunning scenery as their principal reason for holidaying in the country.’
  • 35) ‘Those living in the region's principal cities - Leeds, Bradford, Hull and Sheffield - will see their councils raise taxes by less than five per cent.’
  • 36) ‘The rail work to be completed by the end of 2005 will enable travel between Turkey's two principal cities in just over three hours, cutting in half the current time of six hours or more.’
  • 37) ‘The principal reason that individuals, couples and ‘hard working families’ struggle to purchase a home is not Stamp Duty, but spiralling house prices.’
  • 38) ‘With the advent of jet travel, you don't need port cities as your principal contacts with the outside world: the ‘coast’ can move inland.’
  • 39) ‘Philadelphia was the new country's, principal city.’
  • 40) ‘In my view, the principal reason for its closure is that it is much more readily sold for building land and, being a larger site and unencumbered by green belt restrictions, was more likely to produce a tidy sum.’
  • 41) ‘Many riders point to the adrenaline rush as the principal reason behind their fascination with the Harley; it's a feeling they describe as inexplicable.’
  • 42) ‘New York city remains the principal port of entry and site of settlement for new Jewish immigrants and this includes the Iranian, the Israeli and the Russian Jews.’
  • 43) ‘Campaigners have launched a £3m appeal to save Manchester's John Rylands Library - and turn it into one of the city's principal attractions.’
  • 44) ‘The principal reason behind the healthy upturn in membership has been mainly due to the club's resolve to ensure an amiable environment in which women golfers of all abilities can thrive.’
  • 45) ‘The station is one of the city's principal transport interchanges, with rail services, numerous bus routes and York's busiest taxi ranks.’
  • 46) ‘An investor who does not want to take risks with the principal amount invested should go in for fixed income investments (debt schemes).’
  • 47) ‘Corporate bonds usually pay annual interest on the bond and do not repay the principal amount until the bond's maturity.’
  • 48) ‘Rio Algom issued units consisting of 25 common shares and a Debenture in the principal amount of $2,000.’
  • 49) ‘An investor invests in the issuer the principal amount of the structured note component.’
  • 50) ‘Bondholders will also receive a redemption bonus of up to 16 per cent of the principal amount at maturity, depending on the 100 firms' credit performance.’
  • 51) ‘If you buy a bond and hold it until maturity, market risk is not a factor because your principal investment will be returned in full at maturity.’
  • 52) ‘As the defendants chose to resist payment rather than to tender payment in the manner described above, they remain liable to pay interest on the outstanding principal amount of the Promissory Note.’
  • 53) ‘They do this by offering investors a debt security that delivers interest payments and the security of principal repayment.’
  • 54) ‘The Board gave its approval for the sale of $150,000,000 principal amount of accounts receivable.’
  • 55) ‘It refers to the premium that must be paid by the borrower to the lender along with the principal amount as a condition for the loan or an extension in its maturity.’
  • 56) ‘The principal amount of all other debt is negotiable under the conditions of a world crisis as disastrous as the present one.’
  • 57) ‘Our goal is to begin making such awards by next year, when the required principal amount has been reached.’
  • 58) ‘However, the plaintiff was successful on obtaining judgment on the principal amount.’
  • 59) ‘Inflation will erode the value of future coupon dollars and principal repayments; the real interest rate is the return after deducting inflation.’
  • 60) ‘When they returned to their headquarters in Welcome, N.C., Childress and the principals in his organization brainstormed.’
  • 61) ‘While Aurik leads A T Kearney's Benelux unit, Jonk and Willen are principals at the consultancy firm.’
  • 62) ‘Jim Loehr and Tony Schwartz are senior partners and principals at LGE Performance Systems.’
  • 63) ‘Paul Levesque, a principal at the management consulting firm MedStar Partners, identifies some key aspects of medical product development.’
  • 64) ‘She said: ‘Huntley gave a very, very specific reply that he would be reporting it to myself as his line manager or to the principal if anything was untoward.’’
  • 65) ‘Stephen B. Wilcox, PhD, is founder and principal of Design Science Consulting Inc.’
  • 66) ‘Marcus McCormack is the principal of many businesses in the Carlow area in the fields of auctioneering, insurance and financial services.’
  • 67) ‘But at the end of the day he wasn't a principal in the administration.’
  • 68) ‘It may be necessary to explain that under a franchising system, a franchised business and the principal belong to different owners.’
  • 69) ‘"It was a praiseworthy idea, " says Peter Buckland, principal in charge for Buckland & Taylor.’
  • 70) ‘From 1818 to 1820 he is not listed alone but as a principal in the firm of Munroe and Whiting.’
  • 71) ‘The company has three principals, none of whom have strong accounting or financial backgrounds.’
  • 72) ‘In discussing the political and policy-making roles of the Civil Service we are primarily involved with the higher civil servants, that is, those at the level of principal or above.’
  • 73) ‘Through it all, the principals involved have kept more than profit margins at heart, they have kept both the community and charity within their sights.’
  • 74) ‘College principals, head teachers and parents in Hampshire will today find out the details of the biggest shake-up to the country's education system in 60 years.’
  • 75) ‘Low-performing schools need better principals and teachers.’
  • 76) ‘Recently, efforts also have been made to assess teachers, principals, and schools, although not systematically.’
  • 77) ‘The school principal nominates cooperating teachers, who then supervise and mentor the preservice bilingual teacher.’
  • 78) ‘Then the principals and four educators from each school met with the program developers to discuss details about the program and set intervention dates.’
  • 79) ‘The authors analyze the data gathered in interviews with district officials, principals, and teachers in the same five largest school districts in the state.’
  • 80) ‘Many charter principals still teach, while principals at traditional public schools are a decade or more out of the classroom.’
  • 81) ‘Like teachers, principals can also use critical reflection and journaling to assess their expectations of first-year teachers and for the school community.’
  • 82) ‘In the end, principals and teachers should leave these experiences with a renewed sense of faith in the transformative power of schools in children's lives.’
  • 83) ‘Both the principals and the teachers need to see the value of including special needs students.’
  • 84) ‘The authors wish to thank the teachers and principals who participated in this study.’
  • 85) ‘Communities often have articulated that what they want is their people trained as teachers and educators and eventually as principals to work in their schools.’
  • 86) ‘The proposed study was approved by the school superintendents, the school board, school nurses, principals, and teachers.’
  • 87) ‘They are grateful to the various school principals, teachers and pupils who made the programme a success.’
  • 88) ‘School principals and instructional facilitators were also interviewed in-depth to understand the impact of the program on the school as a whole.’
  • 89) ‘She is a distinguished educator and the principal of a women's college.’
  • 90) ‘Teachers and principals at this school continue to be influenced by certain socio-political factors.’
  • 91) ‘The college will appoint an acting principal before filling the position full time.’
  • 92) ‘The dip in applications this year will be a further blow to principals, many of whom are struggling to fill vacancies caused by teachers retiring, bowing out early and leaving the job to go into other careers.’
  • 93) ‘But principals are concerned at delays in a review of the staffing system proposed last year, as they want to know their allocations in time to make appointments for September.’
  • 94) ‘The maturity of the voices among the principals was amazing for performers all under 18, over fifty in number.’
  • 95) ‘The only thing that carries the film is the performances by the principals.’
  • 96) ‘What you see is essentially the stage production, but it's full of color and energy, and the principals all deliver creditable performances.’
  • 97) ‘He is a beloved principal in The Royal Ballet and returns this month as a guest artist with American Ballet Theatre for its spring season.’
  • 98) ‘Two principal performers in this year's Keighley Amateurs' pantomime were recruited after being seen in productions elsewhere.’
  • 99) ‘In 1971 she joined the Matsuyama Ballet Company in Tokyo as a principal, eventually becoming prima ballerina.’
  • 100) ‘Born in Poland, the Czech twin dancers have been principals at the Hamburg State Ballet since 1997.’
  • 101) ‘So many principals and chorus members shone that it's impossible to mention everyone: for me the best were Sam Parry, Adriana Gentile, Daniela Laughlin and Vahan Salorian.’
  • 102) ‘The arrival of the Mercy girls greatly enhanced the shows and since 1970, all the female roles, principals and chorus, have been taken by students from Mercy, Tuam.’
  • 103) ‘The chorus was well drilled and performed well under severe space restrictions - at various times there were 30-plus principals and chorus on stage.’
  • 104) ‘At the time he was still, impatiently, waiting to be promoted to principal at the Royal Ballet, but already he was being cast in the sort of roles that would limber him up for this sort of challenge.’
  • 105) ‘She is the last home-grown female principal at the Royal Ballet, and considers herself a guardian of the lyrical national style.’
  • 106) ‘Rehearsals are well underway at the moment with chorus and principals rehearsing in Kilmacowen Drama Centre and Ransboro school.’
  • 107) ‘The traditional family panto, with adult principals and the children's chorus, will be presented in Sutton Village Hall, from December 1-4.’
  • 108) ‘Aside from the principals, the supporting cast is extraordinary.’
  • 109) ‘Each episode is a marvellous dance through any number of narrative spaces, as a company of principals, supporting characters and guest artists perform each complex manoeuvre.’
  • 110) ‘At most periods in the history of opera, composers have valued and exploited the scope of the chorus for complementing and heightening the functions of principals and orchestra.’
  • 111) ‘It is astonishing to think that the same opera house recorded the same work twice in the course of six months, but with a completely different cast of principals and a different conductor.’
  • 112) ‘But the other principals in the cast are convincing, too: Gregory Kunde as Éneé and Renata Pokupic as Anna in particular stand out.’
  • 113) ‘In these three videos, by contrast to the other two in the ensemble, Manu is the principal or solo player.’
  • 114) ‘Nearly every section principal had at least one solo, some longer than others, with several exceptional performances.’
  • 115) ‘He hired fine section principals, many of whom were hired away by bigger, better financed bands.’
  • 116) ‘Ravel's Boléro is an obvious encore because it gives many principals a moment in the spotlight as the theme is passed from one instrument to the next.’
  • 117) ‘Clarence is the ultra-professional second bassoonist, always backing his principal, never complaining, even though he is twice as good a musician.’
  • 118) ‘There was some impressive solo playing from the woodwind principals in this performance and the orchestra produced a beautifully controlled pianissimo ending.’
  • 119) ‘During May to September 1997 we sent a brief questionnaire to all 419 general practice principals in the area administered by Leeds Health Authority.’
  • 120) ‘All 33 000 general practitioner principals in England will receive paper copies of issue 4 of Clinical Evidence in early March and issue 5 in the summer.’
  • 121) ‘We defined singlehanded general practitioners as general practitioner principals who were not in partnership with other general practitioner principals.’
  • 122) ‘After some years as a principal in general practice I joined the pharmaceutical industry.’
  • 123) ‘To do so, the students are required to submit assessment reports signed by qualified psychologists and principals.’
  • 124) ‘After house appointments and training in obstetrics and gynaecology she became a principal in general practice in Putney in 1955.’
  • 125) ‘He became an assistant in general practice in 1953, and later a singlehanded principal in the same practice.’
  • 126) ‘According to Gary Lawlor, the principals of the new practice have between them the skills necessary to meet the demands of all projects they might undertake.’
  • 127) ‘After house jobs he was a general practitioner principal for eight years, but was attracted to return to the cut and thrust of academic hospital practice and enrolled as a trainee in diagnostic radiology in Bristol.’
  • 128) ‘He is a general practice principal in Glasgow and serves on several council committees, including the governance working group, of which he is the chairman.’
  • 129) ‘The principals stated overwhelmingly that government funds were inadequate.’
  • 130) ‘He vowed the department would not sit back and fold its arms, but would appoint an acting principal.’
  • 131) ‘It is hard to speculate about what York might have looked like today if there had never been a green belt, says Martin Grainger, principal development officer with City of York Council.’
  • 132) ‘What his account does necessarily impugn is the judgment and decision-making abilities of the administration principals.’
  • 133) ‘He demonstrated that a person hypothetically could buy a bond and end up repaying the interest and principal through tax payments.’
  • 134) ‘A general obligation bond uses tax revenue to guarantee payment of interest and principal.’
  • 135) ‘If your lender violated state laws, regulators can force the lender to forgive the entire principal and interest on the home loan.’
  • 136) ‘The payment of principal and interest on these instrument stems from the cash flows collected on the underlying assets in the pool.’
  • 137) ‘Cash flows at highly leveraged firms tend to be committed to principal and interest payments, and lenders may see the firm as having reached its maximum debt capacity.’
  • 138) ‘Like the monthly payments of a mortgage, monthly car payments are divided between paying principal and interest, and the amounts dedicated to each vary from payment to payment.’
  • 139) ‘In cases when the state provides financing for a loan to third parties, they are required to put up security covering the principal and interest owed by them.’
  • 140) ‘As homeowners make monthly mortgage payments to reduce the principal owed on the house, they slowly increase the equity, or value, of that home.’
  • 141) ‘Each mortgage payment lowers the principal, increasing the home's equity.’
  • 142) ‘Interest-only mortgages allow borrowers to pay interest, but no principal, throughout the life of the loan, which is usually 15 years.’
  • 143) ‘Creditors set the conditions for reducing debt payments and principal, just as they set the conditions for granting new loans.’
  • 144) ‘The agreement also defines the way of announcing financial information for small clients and the total expenditure on loans, such as principal, interest rate, fees and commissions.’
  • 145) ‘The insurance policy ensures full and timely payment of interest and ultimate payment of principal by the legal final distribution date of each class.’
  • 146) ‘The debt-service ratio measures the share of income devoted by households for paying interest and principal on their debt.’
  • 147) ‘This calculation is done using standard loan payment formulas that differentiate between each period's principal and interest payments.’
  • 148) ‘The funds are sufficient to provide for a safe clearance of principal and interest rate payments for the next three and a half to four years.’
  • 149) ‘It used to be that homeowners would in effect be forced to save as they paid back the principal on their mortgage loan.’
  • 150) ‘Each payment should include an allocation of principal and interest amounts.’
  • 151) ‘Monthly payments to the lender go only towards the interest, not the principal.’
  • 152) ‘Extra principal paid at the beginning of a mortgage will save thousands of dollars in interest as well as knock several years off the loan.’
  • 153) ‘The agent of an undisclosed principal may also sue and be sued on the contract.’
  • 154) ‘Nothing in that agreement seems to me to prevent Plantiflor acting as agent for principals undisclosed at the time the agreement was made but known from the addressee's name on the packet by the time the parcel was dispatched.’
  • 155) ‘Moreover, the use of disclaimers to insulate estate agents and their principals from responsibility for representations was commonplace and the normal basis on which house sales were carried out.’
  • 156) ‘An action for an account brought by a principal against his agent is barred by the statutes of limitation unless the agent is more than a mere agent but is a trustee of the money which he received.’
  • 157) ‘Occasionally, this amount is reduced to take into account the efforts of the principal's other agents located outside the UK, but who have an influence on the purchasing decision.’
  • 158) ‘In his relations with his commercial agent a principal must act dutifully and in good faith.’
  • 159) ‘It does not affect, in our submission, the notion that the person who is the agent may well be acting as agent for an undisclosed principal.’
  • 160) ‘The respondents accept that the authority of an agent may be revoked by express notice given by the principal to the agent.’
  • 161) ‘Is it not possible that the agent and the principal were both participants in the importation?’
  • 162) ‘Collections of prints have been disposed of through dealers, who have acted as agents rather than as principals.’
  • 163) ‘If the relationship was solely a contractual principal and agent relationship, was it governed by the terms of the 1995 agency agreement?’
  • 164) ‘The power to disqualify agents also extends to those who are ethically incompetent in that they cannot be relied upon to conduct their principal's representation in an honest and ethical manner.’
  • 165) ‘Corporate managers act as the agent representing the shareholders, who are the firm's principals.’
  • 166) ‘The defendant was a principal, not a guarantor.’
  • 167) ‘It has been argued, for example, that the relationship between a central bank and government should be conceived of in terms of an agent-principal contract.’
  • 168) ‘Today's topic was the fiduciary responsibilities of agents to their principals.’
  • 169) ‘No one at the company had asked the First Defendant for any deposit because they were aware he was only acting as agent and the deposit would be provided by his principal.’
  • 170) ‘The difficulties with agents include conflicts of interest when the same agent acts for competing principals or is simply inert.’
  • 171) ‘Moreover, various consequences flow because in this situation it is acting as principal, rather than as agent of the issuer.’
  • 172) ‘It is accepted that an authorised publication by an agent attracts the same qualified privilege as would the same publication by the principal.’
  • 173) ‘Complicity often involves the accomplice in words or deeds prior to the principal's crime.’
  • 174) ‘Here criminal responsibility arises if the aider and abettor knows that his action will assist the commission of a specific crime by the principal.’
  • 175) ‘If a person is determined to be a principal in a crime, the jurors had wanted to know, is that person guilty of the crime?’
  • 176) ‘I had a feeling that Caysee would help the principal commit any crime he wished so long as it kept her in her elevated position.’
  • 177) ‘I don't want the cops to haul me and the gang back to face our principal for crimes years in the past.’
  • 178) ‘The action is brought against the company as well as the two principals and sole shareholders, officers and directors of the company.’
  • 179) ‘The plein jeu together with the 8-ft. principal and 4-ft. prestant, which are also from the old great organ, produce a principal chorus which contrasts remarkably with those in the other divisions of the organ.’
  • 180) ‘The distinctive pipe organ sound which cannot be duplicated by any other instrument is produced by ranks designated as the principal.’

Examples

  • 1) Waddington let him talk, acting on the old principle that one should never commit too soon.
  • 2) I just feel this is a good time to be suspicious on principle.
  • 3) He fumbled after a principle, some general notion of decency to support his instinctive certainty.
  • 4) ‘And yet, of course, our principles of fairness and justice must be upheld.’
  • 5) ‘Although its application was inevitably uneven, the Code Napoléon was intended to serve as a universal set of principles founded on reason.’
  • 6) ‘Following the enlightenment principle of truth through reason alone, it was thought that history cannot be determined until theology has been removed.’
  • 7) ‘The assumption is that these principles of justice underlie any conception of the good.’
  • 8) ‘What are some of the basic principles and beliefs of Catholicism?’
  • 9) ‘It is a fundamental principle in our system of justice that people are treated the same, regardless of their income or status in life, and it is important to uphold that.’
  • 10) ‘It is a fraternal order whose basic principles are philanthropy, truth and brotherly love.’
  • 11) ‘But it was only with the publication of Filangieri's great work that a comprehensive reformulation of the nature and underlying principles of the state and of society finally emerged.’
  • 12) ‘One of the basic principles of a democratic, liberal country is the decentralization of power.’
  • 13) ‘The freedom to make a choice is the basic principle of our democratic world.’
  • 14) ‘There's sense here in going back to some of the basic principles of liberal political philosophy.’
  • 15) ‘The basic principle for a democratic republic is the independence of the three branches of government executive, legislature and judiciary.’
  • 16) ‘Draconian provisions which alter the principles and foundation of our legal system may serve in the long run to undermine that system and give rise to perfidies not initially contemplated.’
  • 17) ‘This is a foundation principle of western justice and a basic human right.’
  • 18) ‘It is simply not possible to negotiate a political settlement with people who do not understand, or who refuse to accept, basic democratic principles.’
  • 19) ‘The challenge to their leadership is to have the courage to support basic democratic principles, only excluding those, who by their actions exclude themselves.’
  • 20) ‘In this introductory article, we lay out some basic principles for understanding complex systems.’
  • 21) ‘In my tale, I set out the metaphysical principles, i.e. principles outside the closed system of the ethics being discussed, on which the ethics are based.’
  • 22) ‘The evenly balanced scales of blind justice derive from this principle.’
  • 23) ‘The principles of natural law gained ground, and accompanying them came a growing belief in the equality of all human beings.’
  • 24) ‘If you can forsake your fundamental principles for any reason then you are not the kind of person who can take the country forward.’
  • 25) ‘Rarely have I encountered anyone as passionate and determined in his principles as Donald Bruce, a true patriot and a man who led a remarkable life.’
  • 26) ‘There are three key defining experiences in my life that form the foundation of my principles and beliefs.’
  • 27) ‘But I'm going to speak directly from the heart based on the principles that I believe in.’
  • 28) ‘Commonly, the codes will address certain principles, and these will be governed by written rules.’
  • 29) ‘Law, in the sense of rules and principles that govern human conduct, is a blunt instrument.’
  • 30) ‘Doing what's right appears to be more of a concern for him than for the average person; his platform is strongly governed by his personal principles.’
  • 31) ‘These principles have governed Snow's approach in growing the family business tenfold since he took the reins in the mid 1980s.’
  • 32) ‘Although some aspects of suicidal behaviour might be interpreted as rational, the behaviour is contrary to basic biological principles of survival.’
  • 33) ‘It seems that in situations such as this, politics become incompatible with conscience, principle, decency and self-respect.’
  • 34) ‘How in one walk of life a person can have such a rigid sense of right and wrong - and in another he can operate with a total disregard for principle, integrity and fair play.’
  • 35) ‘But he's clearly a man of principle and unbending honesty - who, at times, can be cruelly insensitive, as when he tells a man he has casually examined that he has a tumour.’
  • 36) ‘I admire and respect him for his repeated and unsung - even derided - demonstrations of integrity and principle.’
  • 37) ‘‘I want to bring principle and honour back into politics’ said Jim as he addressed the meeting.’
  • 38) ‘However, in the attempt to unite, there must be no compromise of principle and professional integrity must reign supreme.’
  • 39) ‘While people may be sceptical about politicians who moralise, they are anxious to see them display integrity and principle.’
  • 40) ‘Prof Southall is a man of great principle and he won't change his mind if he does not think his mind should be changed.’
  • 41) ‘Bafflingly, a knighthood still awaits, but this present accolade will surely not be the last that comes the way of a musician of unswerving integrity and principle.’
  • 42) ‘Seinfeld exposes the human destructiveness and lack of principle and morality that exist to some degree in all people.’
  • 43) ‘At six, he is too young to determine what his own principles are in this regard.’
  • 44) ‘For nothing indicates a failure to understand the nature of a moral principle better than to believe that it is capable of enforcing itself.’
  • 45) ‘We worked out a position we could adhere to throughout the campaign, one based on principle as well as convenience.’
  • 46) ‘Legislation based on principle and evidence will have our support.’
  • 47) ‘However, you should not lose heart or compromise over an issue based on principle.’
  • 48) ‘As well as being wrong in principle, it is wrong in terms of club competition.’
  • 49) ‘To do so is foolish and ill-mannered, invites scorn, and is contrary to the whole principle of the clan system.’
  • 50) ‘Therefore, ethical action is equated with following rules, principles, laws, maxims, and codes.’
  • 51) ‘Money had replaced principles in determining policy.’
  • 52) ‘He should be a man of principles, a source of good.’
  • 53) ‘Physics has a big advantage here, since the ability to derive interesting conclusions from general principles comes earlier in physics than in other sciences.’
  • 54) ‘Guitar pickups work by the principles of magnetic induction.’
  • 55) ‘One line of evidence for the holographic principle comes from black hole physics.’
  • 56) ‘A physical principle called the diffraction limit says that light cannot be used to see or inscribe features that are smaller than half its wavelength.’
  • 57) ‘A working understanding of basic mathematical principles is ideal, but mostly you just need a calculator and the desire to play the stocks and bonds game.’
  • 58) ‘Engineering involves the application of scientific and mathematical principles.’
  • 59) ‘Quantum chemistry involves the application of the principles of quantum theory to chemistry.’
  • 60) ‘Simple physics principles might explain the mysterious magnetic fields that seem to permeate the cosmos.’
  • 61) ‘In 1748 Maupertuis showed that Newton's laws of motion could be derived by the application of a teleological principle.’
  • 62) ‘For example, there's a short film of Dr. Richard Feynman explaining a principle of quantum mechanics called Bell's inequality.’
  • 63) ‘The application of scientific principles eventually leads to a fair evaluation of the benefits, disadvantages and true effects of every compound.’
  • 64) ‘Einstein believed that Maxwells theory should, like all other laws of nature obey the principle of relativity.’
  • 65) ‘Accordingly, atomic physics relies on the principles of quantum mechanics to describe the discrete nature of matter at the atomic and subatomic levels.’
  • 66) ‘These connections allowed a broad dissemination not only of principles but especially the application of the methods of scientific management.’
  • 67) ‘Now the general principles on which quantum field theory are based actually allow for many different consistent theories to be constructed.’
  • 68) ‘When Dirac developed the general principles of quantum theory, this democratic equality between different points of view was maintained in the new dynamics that resulted.’
  • 69) ‘Angular momentum, like all other forms of motion, follows the general principle stated in Newton's third law.’
  • 70) ‘The code uses so called Bayesian networks, a combination of statistical principles, including Bayes Theorem, hence the name.’
  • 71) ‘The Heisenberg uncertainty principle dictates that he can measure the bits in only one mode, not both.’
  • 72) ‘The uncertainty principle has been successfully used as a key eligibility criterion for large, simple trials.’
  • 73) ‘Yet, that was the age of levers and pulleys, and machines based on mechanical principles were being used as analog computers in many different ways.’
  • 74) ‘The principles underlying steam power, machine tools, and mass production were less familiar, hence less transparent.’
  • 75) ‘However, back then, explanations that were given to the general public regarding the actual principle of the flying machine appeared to be quite vague.’
  • 76) ‘He might have used mechanical aids such as Alberti's veil, the various gadgets illustrated by Durer, or other machines following similar principles.’
  • 77) ‘Mbemba designed the machine around the mathematical principle of the sinuskurve, or sine wave.’
  • 78) ‘He adopted a new basis for hydrostatics, using two principles from his mechanics, and explained for the first time how a heavy beam can be floated in very little water.’
  • 79) ‘Just as the male and female principles complement each other, our views of history also much combine to give a holistic view of the past.’
  • 80) ‘As sun and moon represent the male and female principles, once again we see the potential for a happy union between you.’
  • 81) ‘Holding the rapt attention of the audience, the duo exemplified the concept of the male and female principles working in harmony and balance in the Universe, unique to Hindu mythology.’
  • 82) ‘In this close relationship the artist occupies a pivotal position, since he is gifted with the ability to recognize divine principles in nature and recreate these in his works.’
  • 83) ‘Keeping any part of the surplus is simply theft and thus violates the moral principle of justice.’
  • 84) ‘Various studies on the active principles of the manchineel tree have shown tigliane phorbol esters to be the likely cause of the severe reactions.’
  • 85) ‘The pungency of pepper is due to the active principles it contains - the volatile oil, piperine, and resin.’
  • 86) ‘The active principles were identified as baicalein from the first and methyl gallate from the last two plants.’
  • 87) ‘The active principle is extracted and purified from plant material for as long as that process remains economically viable compared with chemical synthesis.’
  • 88) ‘The development of purified cardiac glycosides, the active principles of digitalis, has been a distinct step forward in the treatment of diseases of the heart.’
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