converge vs diverge

converge diverge

Definitions

  • 1) intransitive, computing Of an iterative process, to reach a stable end point.
  • 2) intransitive Of two or more entities, to approach each other; to get closer and closer.
  • 3) intransitive, mathematics Of a sequence, to have a limit.
  • 4) move or draw together at a certain location
  • 5) come together so as to form a single product
  • 6) approach a limit as the number of terms increases without limit
  • 7) be adjacent or come together
  • 8) In biology, to exhibit resemblances which are not inherited from a common ancestor.
  • 9) To tend to meet in a point or line; incline and approach nearer together, as two or more lines in the same plane which are not parallel, or two planes which are not parallel; tend to meet if prolonged or continued; figuratively, to tend or lead to a common result, conclusion, etc.: opposed to diverge.
  • 10) To cause to approach, or meet in a point.
  • 11) To come together from different directions; meet.
  • 12) To tend toward or achieve union or a common conclusion or result.
  • 13) To tend toward or approach an intersecting point.
  • 14) Mathematics To approach a limit.
  • 15) To cause to converge.
  • 16) To tend to one point; to incline and approach nearer together.
  • 17) To cause to tend to one point; to cause to incline and approach nearer together.

Definitions

  • 1) intransitive, literally To run apart; to separate; to tend into different directions.
  • 2) intransitive, figuratively To become different; to run apart; to separate; to tend into different directions.
  • 3) intransitive, mathematics, of a sequence Not to converge: to have no limit, or no finite limit.
  • 4) intransitive, figuratively To become different, to separate (from another line or path).
  • 5) intransitive, literally To separate, to tend into a different direction (from another line or path).
  • 6) extend in a different direction
  • 7) move or draw apart
  • 8) have no limits as a mathematical series
  • 9) In general, to become or be separated from another, or one from another; take different courses or directions: as, diverging trains of thought; lives that diverge one from the other.
  • 10) To move or lie in different directions from a common point; branch off: opposed to converge.
  • 11) To differ from a typical form; vary from a normal state or from the truth.
  • 12) In mathematics, to become larger (in modulus) without limit: said of an infinite series when, on adding the terms, beginning with the first, the sum increases indefinitely toward infinity. A series may be divergent without diverging. See divergent series, under divergent.
  • 13) To go or extend in different directions from a common point; branch out.
  • 14) To depart from an established pattern or norm; deviate.
  • 15) Mathematics To fail to approach a limit.
  • 16) To be different, as in opinion or manner; differ: synonym: swerve.
  • 17) To cause (light rays, for example) to diverge; deflect.
  • 18) To extend from a common point in different directions; to tend from one point and recede from each other; to tend to spread apart; to turn aside or deviate (as from a given direction); -- opposed to converge.
  • 19) To differ from a typical form; to vary from a normal condition; to dissent from a creed or position generally held or taken.

Examples

  • 1) The frenzy is being driven by the fear of being left alone in a converging world.
  • 2) Word spread and hundreds more converged on the site.
  • 3) Various factors converged to advance this idea.
  • 4) These factors converge to make nuclear the competitive solution.
  • 5) All these elements converge upon a city that is very much its own beast.
  • 6) Two paths that might have converged now head in opposite directions.
  • 7) There is little hope that the two tracks will converge this week.
  • 8) Do this year after year and spending in the two nations will converge.
  • 9) The relationship between the church and political power can also be corrupted if common good is not the only converging point.
  • 10) No doubt these various factors converged, and perhaps there were others.
  • 11) There are only six lines to choose from, all of which converge in the city centre.
  • 12) The two planets will converge to half a degree - the width of the moon.
  • 13) Only at Cheltenham will the track of the two comets converge.
  • 14) Like iron filings drawn to a magnet, the two armies converged.
  • 15) It tells two converging 18th-century stories combined with music played and sung in period clothes.
  • 16) At present, these two roles sometimes converge but sometimes diverge or conflict.
  • 17) As news of this chilled place gradually leaked out, backpackers from round the world began to converge.
  • 18) It was at its worst in the dip before the final hill - an area where the two courses converge.
  • 19) A whole set of factors converged.
  • 20) We should be extremely concerned that the UK has no creative enterprises of scale in the converged world.
  • 21) On this question I sense that from contrasting corners of the political spectrum, opinions are now converging upon the next step.
  • 22) In breaking from LEO-dominated strategies, Constellation has the opportunity to embrace multi-tasking and multi-role missions that could once again converge these two oft disparate priorities.
  • 23) His anticipation of cleavage lines within groups whose interests otherwise converge is fascinating and very, very useful.
  • 24) Government of Canada bonds should outperform Treasuries this year as 10 year yields converge from the current 30 basis point spread.
  • 25) We'll start out with doing pursuit drills and we have another drill in the pass game call the converge drill.
  • 26) Clearwire wants LTE and WiMax to "converge" - Clearwire CEO Bill Morrow has laid out his vision of how incompatible network technologies such as WiMax and Long Term Evolution (LTE) could eventually converge to form a common standard. read more Sprint CEO Thinks LTE 4G Will Be Bigger Than Sprint's WiMax Network
  • 27) Industries do not, he suggests, see progress in their productivity until all three of these factors "converge" -- until all are being used seamlessly in the daily work of the business.
  • 28) Dark Knight tries to blur the lines between pop-culture and high-culture, giving the audience something to chew on with a morally grey center to pounder, and at the same time give satisfaction to the climatic scene’ (s) when hero and villain converge by letting the writing and performances pay off.
  • 29) It was a rebellious, cosmopolitan quarter from the beginning—one of those places where fact and fantasy converge, which is probably why it has always attracted writers.
  • 30) This will be easily understood, if we reflect that here is the point where more muscles of expression converge than at any other.
  • 31) ‘The medium, whether air or water, flows smoothly over top and bottom, and the flow lines converge toward their initial spacing and position.’
  • 32) ‘While it seems self-apparent that parallel lines will never converge, later mathematicians were caught up in studying this particular axiom in more depth.’
  • 33) ‘It's where our main subway lines converge, where uptown meets downtown, where east meets west.’
  • 34) ‘Do this several times to different sets of receding lines in the picture and then draw a line connecting all the places where the lines converge.’
  • 35) ‘For beginners to this study, it sometimes gets confusing with all the lines converging and diverging to and from each other.’
  • 36) ‘The more often these lines converge at or near a single price level, the more significant and therefore reliable they become in determining potential pause or reversal points.’
  • 37) ‘Even the smallest amount of food left out after a meal would very quickly become the centre of a heaving mass of voracious brown bodies, with long lines of ants converging from all corners.’
  • 38) ‘Ahead, the two low lines of the estuary converged and were lost in the distance in a mist.’
  • 39) ‘Everything about New York's Madison Square Garden is unique, from the design of its circular ceiling to the fact that three railroad and seven subway lines converge beneath it.’
  • 40) ‘Longitude lines converge; latitude lines don't.’
  • 41) ‘And if you tilt your camera to take a picture of a building or a monument, vertical lines will converge and rectangles turn into trapezoids.’
  • 42) ‘The three lines converge in a single point, which presumably corresponds to the present moment.’
  • 43) ‘Where these lines converge, there is a tunnel that opens up and moves through space and time into other dimensions.’
  • 44) ‘With the shoreline coming to a point, currents from both the north and south converge and flow seaward resulting in clear water and a concentration of nutrients to initiate an abundant food chain.’
  • 45) ‘Another feature that one would expect of such a space is that lines that started off in the same direction would converge and eventually meet.’
  • 46) ‘The rostrum is longer than wide; its lateral borders slightly converge anteriorly.’
  • 47) ‘As it is, auroras on Earth follow magnetic lines of force that converge at the north and south magnetic poles.’
  • 48) ‘He also understood that horizontal lines appear to converge with distance (slope toward one another) in the direction of an eye-level.’
  • 49) ‘According to the principles of geometric perspective, parallel lines appear to converge at a single point in space, known as the vanishing point, as they recede from the viewer.’
  • 50) ‘Landing here there are two possible ways on, both routes eventually converging in the same place.’
  • 51) ‘At the breakdown our back row would then be converging from two different directions.’
  • 52) ‘Pre-existing winds, those not created by the storm, are relatively light, converging or coming together near the surface from different directions.’
  • 53) ‘Because of these concerns converging together in recent weeks, anxiety about the direction of the country has escalated.’
  • 54) ‘The key, however, is that on some level these different sounds must converge in the listener's mind and make sense together.’
  • 55) ‘And it really is kind of symbolic of how in life in one little moment so many different lives can be converging, can be affecting each other without knowing.’
  • 56) ‘The city is made of people who converge, coming from different parts of the State.’
  • 57) ‘Eventually all plot strands converge in a climax of mayhem and carnage and everything gets ‘sorted’.’
  • 58) ‘They exchange as many as 5 to 15 messages throughout the day that progressively narrows in on a time and place, two points eventually converging in a coordinated dance through the urban jungle.’
  • 59) ‘Until then, the area had been routinely clogged by traffic converging from five directions.’
  • 60) ‘All the waters will converge in one direction sweeping away all obstacles.’
  • 61) ‘The random walk eventually converges to a stationary distribution.’
  • 62) ‘The lake was developed to a rowing racing standard and on August 4, fifteen different nations converged for the opening heats.’
  • 63) ‘In truth, they were supposed to be stationed at every twenty metres along the wall, but they all converged together out of sheer boredom.’
  • 64) ‘One hundred and fifty people converged together to try to convert some creative initiatives into commercial reality.’
  • 65) ‘Instead, it is a collection of rules and practices employed by various partisans at different times that converge to shape the electorate in a single campaign.’
  • 66) ‘As the harvesting effort is increased, the two equilibrium points eventually converge to one point, at which there is a catastrophe.’
  • 67) ‘Forces and trends that will make capital punishment one of the defining issues of the coming year are converging from several directions.’
  • 68) ‘As the clock ticks towards midday, tour groups converge from every direction on St Mary's, the Church of the Assumption of the Virgin, to witness the opening of the high altar.’
  • 69) ‘In the first place, a large number of people, machines, and materials must converge and act together for it to come into existence at all.’
  • 70) ‘They quickly spread outwards into ten lights in each direction, and then converged into two lights as if lining up.’
  • 71) ‘You currently have all the blocks moving from different directions converging on the Arctic by large angles, yet the Arctic itself got bigger.’
  • 72) ‘Instead we spilled out of the coaches earlier and joined the throngs already converging on the city centre by foot.’
  • 73) ‘Masses of people converged on the city centre to a feast of entertainment and fun.’
  • 74) ‘Supporters had converged on the centre from every corner of Greater Manchester.’
  • 75) ‘It was one of those rare moments of my life when people I knew from completely different spheres somehow managed to all converge on one spot.’
  • 76) ‘When they meet, tens of thousands of fevered supporters converge on an intimidating stadium believing it to be the greatest derby on earth.’
  • 77) ‘This will involve three separate marches converging on the city centre.’
  • 78) ‘Yet as the party faithful and more than 200,000 protestors converge on the city, the President will arrive in New York needing a triumph.’
  • 79) ‘Yes, there were thousands and thousands of people converging on inner-city Atlanta for the tournament you're talking about.’
  • 80) ‘The couple joined an estimated 530,000 protesters who started converging on Victoria Park well before 3pm.’
  • 81) ‘At the venue later, a stagehand tells me that the airlines flying into Reno used to have lots of problems because of all the bowlers converging on this city.’
  • 82) ‘But it was still not time - darkness had not yet fully fallen - and as every minute passed more and more people were converging on the riverfront.’
  • 83) ‘Meanwhile the battle for votes in the area has intensified, with teams of canvassers from all parties converging on both town and country in search of support.’
  • 84) ‘That they were prevented from converging on their target destination left the protesters no option but to stage their demonstrations where they were.’
  • 85) ‘Squatters had occupied the building earlier that morning, but were cleared out within 15 minutes of police converging on the scene.’
  • 86) ‘With hordes of people converging on these malls at once, the traffic situation becomes unmanageable leading to endless traffic jams and chaos.’
  • 87) ‘The bike ride represented the first major clash between police and demonstrators converging on the city for the convention.’
  • 88) ‘But, the sea of people converging on the floor may have engulfed them because I don't see them any more.’
  • 89) ‘By mid-day ambulances, fire engines and police vehicles from all over the county were converging on the city.’
  • 90) ‘Over 2,000 people of Indian origin worldwide are converging on the capital.’
  • 91) ‘Based on a novel by Ruth Rendell, this compelling tale is told in neat subsections which gradually converge.’
  • 92) ‘Edgy technology converges with pop culture and creates a new kind of social connectivity.’
  • 93) ‘I am amazed by its astounding diversity where so many cultures converge in a spirit of oneness and harmony.’
  • 94) ‘Rather it will slowly evolve as conceptual developments and research methods converge.’
  • 95) ‘On the one hand, I address what it means for law and popular culture to converge.’
  • 96) ‘Sometimes Asian performance art and body art converge with developments in the West.’
  • 97) ‘It's only over the past few months that the original and revised payroll counts have started to converge.’
  • 98) ‘All of them were different, yet all eventually converged to the one thought.’
  • 99) ‘Everybody was giving their opinions, but eventually the opinions converged.’
  • 100) ‘Thus the interests of order-givers of different social classes often converge, forming a virtual class culture that has similar attitudes.’
  • 101) ‘It is probably truer to see the culture of Britain - at least in the South and East, and at the top layers of society, and to varying extents in different places - as converging with the Roman way of life.’
  • 102) ‘Modern routers have thus come to resemble telephone switches, whose technology they are currently converging with and may eventually replace.’
  • 103) ‘Eventually, both stories converge in an action-packed finale straight out of the Hollywood playbook (not to mention patently absurd in so many ways that it boggles the mind).’
  • 104) ‘It concludes that there is no single model of institutional arrangements to which the capitalist world must converge, but that different models may be equally suited to successful economic developments.’
  • 105) ‘By generating new hypotheses and weeding out false hypotheses, or hypotheses that perform poorly relative to others, the university of scholars will eventually converge to the Truth.’
  • 106) ‘Because of the averaging effect of great space and long lives, the average environment experienced by individual members of different species may also converge.’
  • 107) ‘These different beats converge into one time, one becoming.’
  • 108) ‘This assertion raises the question of whether institutions in different locales will converge or diverge over time.’
  • 109) ‘This is another of those interesting regions in which two very different developmental domains converge.’
  • 110) ‘And since the whole country is yearning for peace, I believe these different points of view will finally converge in a grand national consensus.’
  • 111) ‘In fact, the sequence converges to a limit whose value is 2.7182818.’
  • 112) ‘Since these series converge very rapidly, they can be used to calculate the digits of [pi] and other numbers.’
  • 113) ‘This is an arduous task by hand with a series which converges as slowly as this.’
  • 114) ‘He also gave an example of a trigonometric series which converged in one interval but diverged in a second interval.’
  • 115) ‘The limit of an infinite sequence of numbers often possesses properties not shared by any member of the sequence of terms that converges to it.’

Examples

  • 1) They will increasingly diverge between now and the next election.
  • 2) But these are nations that in reality have little in common and their economic and political fortunes increasingly will diverge.
  • 3) At this point the stories diverge.
  • 4) On one crucial issue, the two books diverge starkly.
  • 5) But beyond that, their views diverge widely.
  • 6) But if your interests diverge, you are likely to be hammered.
  • 7) They work hand in hand, but so often their career paths diverge.
  • 8) Although their paths diverge, their lives remain entwined.
  • 9) But it can be less troublesome simply to nod one's head in agreement rather than diverge from orthodox opinion.
  • 10) The two can diverge significantly.
  • 11) How did their paths diverge?
  • 12) When the two goals diverge, there are agency costs that the principal may incur because of some action the agent takes.
  • 13) Yet now, on demographic statistics, they are going to diverge sharply.
  • 14) But there come times when the interests of the market diverge from the interests of the people.
  • 15) "There are some differences," Raese said when asked if he and Manchin diverge on key issues.
  • 16) Yet what Jerry did was to diverge from the line of retreat and to start northward, across the bounds of Somo, and continue northward into a strange land of the unknown.
  • 17) These are some of the most interesting, unique whites around and they definitely diverge from the insipid pinot grigio that you might think of when you think of Italian whites.
  • 18) But where you and I diverge is this fear that consumers might somehow be led astray by these designations.
  • 19) The Time after the enabling legislation is used to sculpt specific Vested Interest desires, which often diverge from the enabling Polity's understanding of the Regulation.
  • 20) Strangely, the tracks did not diverge from the ones they had been following.
  • 21) To go through all of these options, however, would be to diverge from the point of discussion, which is Diamond's paternalistic assumption.
  • 22) And I am especially disappointed that they feel such an urgent need to attack writers, like me, who present balanced, carefully researched accounts of Mormon history that happen to diverge from the official, highly expurgated church version.
  • 23) ‘The airport is west of the city beyond the junction where the Glasgow and Fife lines diverge.’
  • 24) ‘Starting six or seven years ago, these two lines diverged dramatically: The volume of imports soared, while export growth leveled off.’
  • 25) ‘Solzhenitsyn talks about ‘the great fork of camp life’ where two roads diverge.’
  • 26) ‘Narrative lines may diverge sharply on the third or fourth page, or in the second paragraph.’
  • 27) ‘They don't fight, but O'Neal and Bryant remain two roads diverged.’
  • 28) ‘Two roads diverged in a wood, and I - I took the one less traveled by, And that has made all of the difference.’
  • 29) ‘Could two roads have diverged as far apart as these two and still be on their way to meeting?’
  • 30) ‘The road will diverge into three paths soon and it is then that we part.’
  • 31) ‘‘We stand now where two roads diverge,’ Carson wrote in the final chapter of Silent Spring.’
  • 32) ‘In that case, the shape of the universe is analogous to the shape of a saddle, in which initially parallel lines diverge.’
  • 33) ‘About halfway between the temple and the main road, a path diverged to the left.’
  • 34) ‘The curious thing about religion in this country is that it is beginning to diverge along two quite separate pathways.’
  • 35) ‘Just south of here is where the New Haven diverges off the Harlem Line, just beyond the Woodlawn Metro North station.’
  • 36) ‘He thought that many small changes could cause two lines of life to diverge.’
  • 37) ‘For beginners to this study, it sometimes gets confusing with all the lines converging and diverging to and from each other.’
  • 38) ‘The Loop Variant involves trolley tracks that diverge at the switch and then join together again in a loop.’
  • 39) ‘The trail diverges further as we track back past Old English and Classical Latin.’
  • 40) ‘Rapidly the distance between the two vehicles increased as their courses diverged.’
  • 41) ‘Three hollow rays diverge at angles of 120 degrees from the central part.’
  • 42) ‘But the fact that she could not overlook was that their paths had diverged.’
  • 43) ‘Although not thoroughly tested in the courts at the time of writing, legal opinion diverges widely on these questions.’
  • 44) ‘Our experiences and opinions diverge in areas and on issues I consider most important to the larger ‘body politic.’’
  • 45) ‘Today's offering suggests two issues where our opinions diverge.’
  • 46) ‘I addressed only the final point you made because it was there that our opinions diverged.’
  • 47) ‘Such a convergence was not a given - the two approaches sometimes diverge.’
  • 48) ‘Thus, our opinions diverge on the question of how consistent the book is in its overall treatment of its subjects.’
  • 49) ‘On one key subject in particular, European and American attitudes diverge and are moving further apart by the day.’
  • 50) ‘Already, we can see why they may diverge in their approach, and hence their conclusion, to a case.’
  • 51) ‘But while both performances include period instruments, their approaches to the music diverge in revealing ways.’
  • 52) ‘They argued that correlations could increase while observed and simulated global means diverge.’
  • 53) ‘The essay by Craig Dworkin's diverges wildly from this approach.’
  • 54) ‘Thenceforward these two approaches tend to diverge.’
  • 55) ‘Once a condition progresses, however, approaches to treatment diverge among cultures.’
  • 56) ‘Let's talk about the wildly diverging opinions.’
  • 57) ‘Where we diverge most sharply with Mr. Dean is on his emerging world view.’
  • 58) ‘On some issues, the views of faculty diverged significantly from public opinion.’
  • 59) ‘As the season begins, however, our two concepts diverge significantly.’
  • 60) ‘There are other ways too in which these supernatural encounters diverge from the medieval norm.’
  • 61) ‘But this common concept once shared by the East and West has diverged.’
  • 62) ‘Some of the most interesting speakers in the Commons debates were those who diverged slightly from party lines.’
  • 63) ‘I diverged from the newspaper standard of never changing a quote.’
  • 64) ‘Nevertheless, slang items often diverge from standard usage in predictable ways, especially by generalization and melioration.’
  • 65) ‘Of course, one must know the direct trajectory to diverge from it, and one must know where the orbit is to be able to go off it.’
  • 66) ‘The hard part is predicting where the the course of the future will diverge from the past.’
  • 67) ‘Our path seems destined to continue diverging from that of the Europeans.’
  • 68) ‘However, of late, some State forces have diverged from the national plan.’
  • 69) ‘The article he wrote diverged from the official line; it was never printed.’
  • 70) ‘But towards the end of the speech, Bacon diverges sharply from this text.’
  • 71) ‘So depending on how it gets handled, the stable/developer strands could diverge immediately.’
  • 72) ‘It is only after about the sixth week that male - female developments diverge.’
  • 73) ‘A recent further analysis reveals that the diverging development between these two groups is, in fact, even more explicit later on.’
  • 74) ‘Living chimps have diverged genetically from that common ancestor about as far as people have, the researchers add.’
  • 75) ‘After bony fishes and mammals diverged about 400 MYA, class II genes increased enormously in the mammalian lineage.’
  • 76) ‘The element encodes a Gag protein, and retroelement Gag protein sequences diverge more rapidly than the Pol sequences.’
  • 77) ‘Although the Alligator sequence was considerably diverged from the avian sequences, a reasonable alignment could be achieved.’
  • 78) ‘Recently diverged species will not demonstrate reciprocal monophyly for some time after they have stopped exchanging genes.’
  • 79) ‘In this study, we assumed that humans and mice diverged 100 MYA.’
  • 80) ‘From pollen data, these are estimated to have diverged 6 MYA.’
  • 81) ‘Assume that chimpanzees and humans diverged from a common ancestor about five million years ago.’
  • 82) ‘The hybridization occurred shortly after the two lineages diverged (old hybridization).’
  • 83) ‘Hence the authors concluded that gene expression had diverged most rapidly in the human brain.’
  • 84) ‘Daughter corallites generally diverge at various angles, and subsequently turn vertically and grow subparallel.’
  • 85) ‘Arrangements in the upper line represent periods in which duplicated genes diverged.’
  • 86) ‘However, different parts of the genome may diverge at different rates.’
  • 87) ‘But local infection rates and trends quickly diverged.’
  • 88) ‘As the tangents diverge, a sample of found sound enters the piece, with crowd murmur and the whine of vehicle brakes.’
  • 89) ‘As in the case of Hsp 70 genes, these two groups of genes diverged long before the separation of animals and fungi.’
  • 90) ‘In the six million years since the human and ape lines first diverged, the behaviour and lifestyles of apes have hardly changed.’
  • 91) ‘For this series, it also gives a sum if t = 1, but as soon as t>1, the series diverges.’
  • 92) ‘He gave an example of a trigonometric series which diverged at every point, yet its coefficients tended to zero.’
  • 93) ‘There we have an intuitive reason for believing that the harmonic series diverges.’
  • 94) ‘However, the harmonic series actually diverges - the sum increases without bound.’
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