tack vs tact

tack tact

Definitions

  • 1) The act of changing from one position or direction to another.
  • 2) The harness for a horse, including the bridle and saddle.
  • 3) Food, especially coarse or inferior foodstuffs.
  • 4) A short, light nail with a sharp point and a flat head.
  • 5) A rope for holding down the weather clew of a course.
  • 6) Stickiness, as that of a newly painted surface.
  • 7) An approach to accomplishing a goal or a method of dealing with a problem.
  • 8) The distance or leg sailed between changes of position or direction.
  • 9) The part of a sail, such as the weather clew of a course, to which this rope is fastened.
  • 10) A large, loose stitch made as a temporary binding or as a marker.
  • 11) The position of a vessel relative to the trim of its sails.
  • 12) A rope for hauling the outer lower corner of a studdingsail to the boom.
  • 13) The lower forward corner of a fore-and-aft sail.
  • 14) Specifically, among sailors, soldiers, etc., bread, or anything of the bread kind, distinguished as hard tack (or hardtack) and soft tack. See hardtack.
  • 15) Something that is attached or fixed in place, or that holds, adheres, or sticks.
  • 16) Hence— Land occupied on lease; a rented farm.
  • 17) Substance; solidity: spoken of the food of cattle and other stock.
  • 18) Hired pasturage; the renting of pasture for cattle.
  • 19) The part of a sail to which the tack is fastened, the foremost lower corner of a course, jib, or staysail, or the outer lower corner of a studdingsail.
  • 20) A spot; a stain; a blemish.
  • 21) Hence A determinate course or change of course in general; a tactical line or turn of procedure; a mode of action or conduct adopted or pursued for some specific reason.
  • 22) Food in general; fare: as, hard tack, coarse fare; soft tack, good fare.
  • 23) In needlework, a long stitch, usually one of a number intended to hold two pieces of stuff together, preparatory to more thorough sewing. Compare basting.
  • 24) A temporary change of a few points in the direction of sailing, as to take advantage of a side wind; one of a series of movements of a vessel to starboard and port alternately out of the general line of her course.
  • 25) Nautical: A heavy rope used to confine the foremost lower corner of the courses; also, a rope by which the outer lower corner of a studdingsail is pulled out to the end of the boom.
  • 26) Side: said of a speculator's relationship to the market.
  • 27) A short, sharp-pointed nail or pin, used as a fastener by being driven or thrust-through the material to be fastened into the substance to which it is to be fixed.
  • 28) In plumbing, the fastening of a pipe to a wall or the like, consisting of a strip of lead soldered to the pipe, nailed to the support, and turned back over the nails.
  • 29) Bad food.
  • 30) A distinctive taste or flavor; a continuing or abiding smack.
  • 31) Bad malt liquor.
  • 32) A variety of pistol used by the Highlanders of Scotland. See dag, 2.
  • 33) The condition of being tacked or fastened; stability; fixedness; firm grasp; reliance. See to hold tack, below.
  • 34) Hence— The course of a ship in relation to the position of her sails: as, the starboard tack, or port tack (the former when she is close-hauled with the wind on her starboard, the latter when close-hauled with the wind on her port side).
  • 35) In the arts, an adhesive or sticky condition, as of a partially dried, varnished, painted, or oiled surface; stickiness.
  • 36) In Scots law, a contract by which the use of a thing is let for hire; a lease: as, a tack of land.
  • 37) Toattack.
  • 38) To fasten or mark (cloth or a seam, for example) with a loose basting stitch.
  • 39) To put together loosely and arbitrarily.
  • 40) To add as an extra item; append.
  • 41) To change tack.
  • 42) To change the direction of a sailing vessel, especially by turning the bow into and past the direction of the wind.
  • 43) To change one's course of action.
  • 44) To sail a zigzag course upwind by repeatedly executing such a maneuver.
  • 45) To fasten or attach with a tack or tacks.
  • 46) Nautical To bring (a vessel) into the wind in order to change course or direction.

Definitions

  • 1) The sense of touch; feeling.
  • 2) music The stroke in beating time.
  • 3) The ability to deal with embarrassing situations carefully and without doing or saying anything that will annoy or upset other people; careful consideration in dealing with others to avoid giving offense; the ability to say right thing.
  • 4) Sensitive mental touch; peculiar skill or faculty; nice perception or discernment; ready power of appreciating and doing what is required by circumstances.
  • 5) Acute sensitivity to what is proper and appropriate in dealing with others, including the ability to speak or act without offending.
  • 6) The sense of touch; feeling.
  • 7) (Mus.) The stroke in beating time.
  • 8) Sensitive mental touch; peculiar skill or faculty; nice perception or discernment; ready power of appreciating and doing what is required by circumstances.
  • 9) consideration in dealing with others and avoiding giving offense
  • 10) Mental perception; especially, fine perception; intuitive sense of what is true, right, or proper; fineness of discernment as to action or conduct, especially a fine sense of how to avoid giving offense; ability to do or say what is best for the intended effect; adroitness; cleverness; address.
  • 11) A touching; touch.
  • 12) The sense of touch.
  • 13) In music, a beat or pulse; especially, the emphatic down-beat with which a measure begins; hence, also, a measure.

Examples

  • 1) In a keynote speech, she will say that people power has transformed the world and politicians must change tack or lose office.
  • 2) I'd like to take a different tack.
  • 3) Where small and medium-sized companies have an advantage over their larger counterparts is their ability to change tack swiftly when faced with this sort of uncertainty.
  • 4) I try a different tack.
  • 5) Then one day her career took a different tack.
  • 6) Now they were taking the opposite tack.
  • 7) Blue will usually tack her sails to put her on starboard as well.
  • 8) They are on the wrong tack when they do so.
  • 9) So it has taken a different tack.
  • 10) The cynical will say it is just another tack for selling his book.
  • 11) You may wonder if other nations would have followed the same tack.
  • 12) This change of tack was long overdue.
  • 13) Suggest to your daughter and her fiancé that a different tack may help.
  • 14) Bridge should have taken a similar tack.
  • 15) And this one will take a different tack.
  • 16) Rumours were rife of yet another change of tack over plans for two expensive new aircraft carriers.
  • 17) Happy people also appear better able to cope with practical problems because they know when to change tack or give up.
  • 18) NS&I then suggested a different tack.
  • 19) Work up the blind, then tack top edges together.
  • 20) So Labour is trying a new tack.
  • 21) This change of tack with his first romantic Russian role comes as something of a surprise.
  • 22) Ancient ships generally had but one main square sail, so their ability to tack against the wind was limited.
  • 23) What was wrong with hard tack, salt beef, a few limes and a barrel of rum?
  • 24) "_Nej tack, nej tack_" (no thank you), she apparently understood and desisted.
  • 25) The reason for pursuing this tack is my belief that unless we firmly understand the force of events which has led us to the current pass, we are very unlikely to seize the present opportunity to rebuild a more certain and more prosperous future.
  • 26) That switch in tack is just because the growth rate argument failed, it doesn’t make sense factually.
  • 27) Yeah, the psuedo-outdoorsman tack is what prompted my remark in #99 about him being a pretty good candidate for the offspring of a “Red Green Show” doof.
  • 28) The much stronger tack is for Republicans to win the 2012 elections and repeal the bill in 2013, before the benefits start rolling in.
  • 29) Simply put, a tie tack is a short pin with an embellished head.
  • 30) Others may argue that the tie tack is too tiny to be worth wearing.
  • 31) This was a change in tack by the tax authorities, who had been arguing that Vodafone International -- a wholly owned unit of Vodafone Group PLC. -- was liable to be taxed as it had failed to withhold tax when it bought the 67% stake in Hutchison Essar from Hutchison Whampoa for $11.2 billion.
  • 32) A necktie without a tie tack is like potato chips without potatoes.
  • 33) Sometimes the back-side of the tack is rusty and has probably been there a year or more.
  • 34) ‘In the house, the canisters are good for storing tacks, nails, and small screws.’
  • 35) ‘These make great places to store nails, screws, nut, bolts, washers, tacks, and staples.’
  • 36) ‘The tack hammers are very small but the actual tacks themselves are very sharp.’
  • 37) ‘Production on this scale required a high degree of organization and many suppliers for the webbing, stuffing, covering, fringe, tacks, and nails.’
  • 38) ‘Pull the webbing tight and tack it in place using two rows of size 12 tacks.’
  • 39) ‘Clean-up crews were called to the scene as the van had shed its load of nails and tacks and roadblocks were set up outside the George Ward School in Melksham, while other diversions were put in place.’
  • 40) ‘You could stick tacks, staples, pins, or just about anything sharp in it and you could take it right back out.’
  • 41) ‘A chair made entirely of nails, barbed wire, tacks, and sand paper would be more comfortable.’
  • 42) ‘And as you can see, there are nails or tacks affixed to the side, held in place with plastic wrap.’
  • 43) ‘For added support and color, ribbons run through the centers of the wreaths and fasten to the top of the door frame with tacks.’
  • 44) ‘The only ever so slightly disconcerting thing is that I had eight screws and four tacks left over at the end.’
  • 45) ‘As we excavated this area we found tiny pieces of twisted gold wire, gold foil, and little gold tacks, presumably used to tack the foil onto a wooden object sitting on a post.’
  • 46) ‘Today the anchors and chain, piles of hardware that broke through as the vessel tilted, iron ballast, bronze pins, lead hull sheathing, tacks, musket and pistol shot, cannonballs and cannon - all lie scattered where the ship's bow struck.’
  • 47) ‘All the separate pieces are precariously held together with glue, tape, tacks, and pins.’
  • 48) ‘He took the yarn and looped it around each of the tacks in order.’
  • 49) ‘One room we were decorating, I put copper tacks all over the wall, and I connected them with colored yarn.’
  • 50) ‘‘I tried curry combs, cat brushes and Velcro but finally settled on a simple 4-inch square of carpet with a few small tacks sticking through it,’ he says.’
  • 51) ‘I got two kitchen chairs recently that are pretty nice except for this fabric, so I holed myself up today with some upholstery tacks and my fabric and got to work.’
  • 52) ‘Here, we padded a wall with batting and fabric, then secured crisscrossing ribbons with fabric tacks.’
  • 53) ‘Stretch the sheet over the door, securing with tacks along the outer edges.’
  • 54) ‘Insert map pins, metal tacks, and pushpins with plastic heads to create dots, stripes, and hearts.’
  • 55) ‘This wooden tote comes to the rescue by organizing all the necessary implements, including pens, self-adhesive notepads, tacks, and paper dips.’
  • 56) ‘‘You wore labels last year,’ Tiffany said suddenly, looking the tiniest bit disbelieving as she jumped into the conversation, placing her box of tacks down onto her desk.’
  • 57) ‘The man picked up a tack from a rickety wooden table and fastened the clipping to a paint-peeled wall.’
  • 58) ‘Startlingly, her creative materials include marker caps, spools of thread, tacks, stickers, and pipe cleaners.’
  • 59) ‘Chapters and medical facilities wishing to display a poster should bring it to the convention center and affix it to the display board provided with materials they supply (eg, tacks, hook and loop fasteners).’
  • 60) ‘Ryan tugged gently at the tacks on the corners of a poster until they released from the wall.’
  • 61) ‘So he changed tack, keeping the innovative production methods but applying them to better-known repertoire, until he felt he had built up an audience that was loyal to the company.’
  • 62) ‘In the summer of 1998, when the Bank was still getting used to independence, it changed tack abruptly from raising rates in the summer to cutting them in the autumn.’
  • 63) ‘The first tack, known as Plan A, is the latest version of Ottawa's appeasement strategy.’
  • 64) ‘However, when Russia sent Sputnik into orbit in October 1957, he changed tack and put his efforts into America's space exploration programme.’
  • 65) ‘Although the British made some initial moves in that direction, they soon changed tack.’
  • 66) ‘Taking a different tack, he proposed in 1746 to build two more clocks.’
  • 67) ‘Instead, trustees will take a different tack during their 30-minute meeting.’
  • 68) ‘Two years ago the tack was changed again.’
  • 69) ‘Having worn out these straw men almost completely, educators are trying a new tack.’
  • 70) ‘Lobbying by the organisations failed to persuade the government to change tack, however.’
  • 71) ‘Far from abandoning it when he changed tack, it is still going strong.’
  • 72) ‘We were underweight but changed tack about a month ago and are now slightly overweight.’
  • 73) ‘The opposite tack, deleting most messages, is also risky.’
  • 74) ‘The reason I adopt this tack is because entropy of the universe is said to be directional.’
  • 75) ‘Changing tack, I decided the bar staff might be better placed to help.’
  • 76) ‘We take a simpler tack, serving the roast chicken - colored deep red by the ground annato seeds in the achiote paste - on a bed of the sautéed onions.’
  • 77) ‘But since gay marriage is such a hot button, he suggests we take a different tack to achieve equality: let's get rid of straight marriage!’
  • 78) ‘He is taking the opposite tack - and if he succeeds, it'll be the first time a new vaccine is launched in a country with massive medical need but little profit potential.’
  • 79) ‘Although we might expect him to respond to such success with decorum, he took the opposite tack, highlighting his improprieties and provocations.’
  • 80) ‘Royal Caribbean has recognized that it is heading for this iceberg, and its captains have ordered a sharp tack.’
  • 81) ‘As I approach my first tack, I pull in the main sail.’
  • 82) ‘As the pair battled to the finish, Ian immediately tacked off to gain clear wind, but Jonathan timed his next tack well and came back to cover Ian across the line and win the event by half a boat length.’
  • 83) ‘The enemy ships made a clumsy tack northerly, not expecting to see Indefatigable in their path.’
  • 84) ‘There was indeed a ship headed in the direction of Dolphin which was still on her southeasterly tack while Indefatigable was now headed northwest.’
  • 85) ‘On the water, a yacht on starboard tack has undisputed right-of-way in any confrontation.’
  • 86) ‘They steer onto a port tack and begin to sail.’
  • 87) ‘Bowles gave the order to bring the Indy on a northeasterly larboard tack.’
  • 88) ‘As we started the climb, I told the crew that they must helm the yacht very carefully on the opposite tack, as the rigging was only holding up one side of the mast.’
  • 89) ‘Terrified of turning the boat into a land-yacht, I minced around in the middle of the navigation in uselessly short tacks that took us no appreciable distance against the wind.’
  • 90) ‘On the long beat back to Henholme, Fiscal Folly crossed the lake to the west shore, while F for Joy set a course down the east, with the rest of the fleet on shorter tacks in the centre of the lake.’
  • 91) ‘On the short windward leg to the finish, Pilgrim drew alongside Naiad, but was then forced to put in a short tack while Naiad was able to hold her line and clinch a deserved second place and victory in the Classic fleet.’
  • 92) ‘The mainly south-westerly air-stream, alternating with south-easterlies, turned the beat to Temple into a series of short tacks as the fickle breeze tempted boats on to a course before dying away and changing direction.’
  • 93) ‘Rigid foam board insulation is tacked onto the exterior sheathing, fortifying the thermal shield.’
  • 94) ‘Just tack them to the back of the frame, or glue on with a hot glue gun.’
  • 95) ‘Push the panel into the glued surface and use a level to make certain it is plumb before you tack it into position and glue it down permanently.’
  • 96) ‘To use the guide, align the cut edge with your cut line and clamp or tack the guide to your workpiece.’
  • 97) ‘Sometime in the late 16th century, furniture makers put padding and the cushion together and covered them with a decorative outer material that was then tacked to the chair's frame.’
  • 98) ‘If squirrels become a problem at a tree-mounted feeder, tack a 3-foot section of sheet metal around the trunk or branch.’
  • 99) ‘Unless you are quite handy with a circular saw, it's a good idea to clamp or tack a guide onto the work piece.’
  • 100) ‘Some designs are glued to the walls or ceiling, while most are tacked on with small nails.’
  • 101) ‘The fabric is stretched over the frame and tacked or stapled into place.’
  • 102) ‘Otherwise we recommend ripping this page from the magazine and tacking it up alongside those calendar girls who mock you from above your workbench.’
  • 103) ‘So my first act as the room's inhabitant was tacking a few posters to the walls and planting framed snapshots of my close circle of friends on the shelves.’
  • 104) ‘He took it without a word, tacking it to the bulletin board over his desk.’
  • 105) ‘Despite the weeks he spent tacking posters to walls, only 30 people turned up.’
  • 106) ‘There was only one other guy in the room but he appeared to be busy tacking something to the sand-coloured wall.’
  • 107) ‘Temporarily tack it in place at the top and bottom.’
  • 108) ‘Working in opposite corners, pull the fabric tight, roll edges under, and temporarily tack in place.’
  • 109) ‘Then, I saw a lottery ticket that I think someone had tacked up on the wall.’
  • 110) ‘Tassels hung from her ceiling fan and sketches were still tacked to the wall.’
  • 111) ‘In many places, his telegraph line was simply tacked onto trees instead of being tacked onto poles.’
  • 112) ‘When our firstborn, Nate, started walking, she tacked a cloth tape to the inside wall of our closet and measured his progress against the pencil marks she made on the wall.’
  • 113) ‘Fringe two same-sized strips, then stack, tack them together and use as one piece.’
  • 114) ‘The seams should be tacked down to avoid chafing.’
  • 115) ‘If you think it may get sloppy and peek out you can easily tack it to the shirt body on the front and bottom facing seam lines or into the ribbing seam if ribbing is left at the bottom.’
  • 116) ‘I use these ends to sew the corners more securely by invisibly tacking them down to the coat.’
  • 117) ‘Instead, the philosophical bits are tacked on in set speeches - much like in student essays, really.’
  • 118) ‘The bill suggests that it will be fairer to lift the excise duty on fuel, rather than tacking the increased cost on to the registration fee.’
  • 119) ‘The final settlement could balloon to $130 million after interest and lawyers' fees are tacked on.’
  • 120) ‘Although the word ‘conspiracy’ simply refers to the act of joining together in secret agreement to do a wrongful act, tacking it on as an adjective somehow evokes images of unfounded fears and even paranoia.’
  • 121) ‘Is it that the architects didn't bother to read the regulations, and tacked it on afterwards?’
  • 122) ‘I often tack holidays on the end of tours, but this is sacred: I never work when I'm skiing.’
  • 123) ‘I just wrote this in an email and since I liked it better than what I wrote above, I thought I'd just tack it on.’
  • 124) ‘I'm sure some of these may have had more realistic endings and the happier ones were tacked on by the demands of the studio, who always avoid offending the public.’
  • 125) ‘It says the final tab, however, can go several million dollars higher as extra costs are tacked on.’
  • 126) ‘Hitchcock seems disinterested in the relationship, tacking it on to fulfill audience expectations.’
  • 127) ‘Designing security into systems from the beginning, instead of tacking it on at the end, would give us the security we need, while preserving the civil liberties we hold dear.’
  • 128) ‘Just when I was standing to leave, I decided to tack something on to our meaningful conversation.’
  • 129) ‘Of course, these calculations are based on what the chancellor announced yesterday and, like most Budgets, details and amendments are tacked on in the following months, often with little publicity.’
  • 130) ‘But when the visitors get to Pattaya, they are fleeced when extra charges are tacked on when they arrive.’
  • 131) ‘Needless to say, there is usually some thematic crossover; however in many cases the theme is tacked on so weakly that the historical theme alone is all that stands between the engrossing and the bland.’
  • 132) ‘It has been introduced without the ownership of the providers themselves, and it was tacked on to a bill that had an industry training levy fund in it.’
  • 133) ‘The last scene in particular appears out of place, almost as if it was tacked on at a later date to provide a better sense of closure.’
  • 134) ‘Yes, that was slightly different in that, as part of the sentencing process, it was tacked on.’
  • 135) ‘If a pun related to the animal can be tacked on it must be, no matter how lame the joke is.’
  • 136) ‘This tax is a percentage of the assessed value of the portion of real property occupied or used, and it is tacked on top of the commercial property tax.’
  • 137) ‘She was tacking to come around on Indefatigable's starboard side.’
  • 138) ‘We sight Northern Caye, our anchorage for the night, on the horizon and tack to starboard.’
  • 139) ‘He spotted it, and they quickly tacked over west.’
  • 140) ‘Watching his handpicked crew in action, expertly tacking the boat, it's hard to believe Team Adventure will stand a chance against his well-funded campaign.’
  • 141) ‘After another half hour, the wind shifts, and the guys on deck need to tack the boat.’
  • 142) ‘This is a good arrangement for some sailors, but tacking the Genoa will require going forward to pull the sail through the slot or furling the Genoa and unfurling it on the new tack.’
  • 143) ‘She points to the left side of the bay, where a small sailing boat is tacking past the tumble of fallen cliff.’
  • 144) ‘I had a mental picture of the surface with the sun shining, and sailing boats tacking to and fro.’
  • 145) ‘There she tacked east to west in the lee of the island, and reported winds gusting to 60 knots from the west-northwest, and large to moderate seas.’
  • 146) ‘Standing a moment longer on the shore he watches the dinghy, until it tacks out of sight on the far side of the broad bay, heading for harbour.’
  • 147) ‘Added to the tremendous loading on an anchor line in high winds is the fact that in high winds boats do not tend to lie head to wind, but rather tack back and forth.’
  • 148) ‘New materials will also be used for tack and horse equipment.’
  • 149) ‘Too many training methods place too much emphasis on what kind of tack or equipment to use with the trainer conveniently selling that equipment.’
  • 150) ‘She passed the tree where the horse's tack was propped and grabbed Hawk's bridle, the silverwork glinting in the moonlight.’
  • 151) ‘Keen riders and horse owners were urged to attend the awareness day to help prevent thefts of trailers, tack and horse boxes.’
  • 152) ‘Though there was a large amount of care equipment, tack, and supplies, there were only four horses.’
  • 153) ‘Use of defective tack is not a risk of horseback riding that an equine provider is unable to eliminate.’
  • 154) ‘The last two to three times you work your horse before the show, ride her with your show tack and make sure all equipment fits properly.’
  • 155) ‘A young leukaemia sufferer has endured a further blow after thieves stole riding tack belonging to a family friend who had just bought a horse for her to enjoy riding.’
  • 156) ‘Horses are shod with iron shoes and fitted with salvaged horse tack.’
  • 157) ‘Though he had left his leather hauberk with his horse's tack and dunked his head in a water barrel, he still felt too uncomfortable to eat much.’
  • 158) ‘The three stood in silence and watched as the defenders made final adjustments to their armor and their horses' tack.’
  • 159) ‘After the two had managed to set up the horse's tack, Allen stepped out of the stall, grinning broadly.’
  • 160) ‘At present they have to travel to the stables, carrying saddles and other tack, every day and to ensure the security of the property.’
  • 161) ‘Whilst waiting for the wagons, the boys organised sentries, checked their horses' tack, loaded their revolvers and relaxed.’
  • 162) ‘Along with making riding tack from scratch, he also mends pieces and fits his work to the horse.’
  • 163) ‘The film industry still does not come close to using remotely authentic-looking horse tack and, for the most part, never did.’
  • 164) ‘A good horse is a good horse, regardless of what sort of tack it's ridden in.’
  • 165) ‘When they stopped and made camp, she was unable to relieve her horse of its tack.’
  • 166) ‘He smiled down at her and leaned back against the tack and saddlebags that they'd piled on top of each other.’
  • 167) ‘She dismounted in front of Shadowed Fury's stall, and took off his tack and began to groom the stallion into perfection.’
  • 168) ‘Rather than set out to offer an alternative to novelty acts, it cashes in on cheap tongue-in-cheek tack.’
  • 169) ‘Tourist tack is almost absent; instead, there are a number of delicatessens, a good wine bar, an antiquarian bookshop and even a shop specialising in period jewellery.’
  • 170) ‘If the makers of the film did one thing right, with what is otherwise wholly sentimental tack, it was to cast these two as the leads.’
  • 171) ‘The assumption that 50s consumers didn't know tack when they saw it is about as safe as the assumption that 50s teenagers didn't have sex.’
  • 172) ‘Only five minutes from the rivers of tourist tack around the station, but miles away in spirit, this tiny store perches on a corner near the top of the Canale di Cannaregio.’
  • 173) ‘In LaChapelle's interpretation of the desert oasis, it is almost as if the city does not know that it is the epitome of tack and distaste.’

Examples

  • 1) Usually you're the soul of tact and discretion and rarely find yourself in an embarrassing position.
  • 2) The matter would have to be managed with great tact so far as she is concerned.
  • 3) Your blend of patience and tact ensures a family day out works.
  • 4) Research here therefore requires considerable tact to overcome these problems.
  • 5) Wise teachers know that the solution is always honesty coupled with tact and diplomacy.
  • 6) With great tact and patience he shouldered the detailed practical business of planning the film.
  • 7) Use intuition to get the feel of things and tact and diplomacy to sort them out.
  • 8) Patience and tact will get your home plans moving.
  • 9) He is full of tact and diplomacy and good leaders are like that.
  • 10) But they must approach with the utmost diplomacy and tact.
  • 11) The latter bears discreet witness to her capacity for change, sensitivity and tact.
  • 12) You sense that a friend needs advice, but it must be given with great tact.
  • 13) In some situations others have a right to be annoyed, and those situations will require tact.
  • 14) You have good advice for a relative, but use great tact while giving it.
  • 15) You can solve a family dilemma, but great tact is needed.
  • 16) Try to be patient and show some tact and diplomacy... as you bite your lip!
  • 17) Still, tact and diplomacy are essential.
  • 18) The tact, sensitivity and intuitive mutual understanding of carpenters or musicians can be converted into social skills.
  • 19) You see a family situation in clear light but need to add a great deal of tact if you want people to follow your advice.
  • 20) This requires tact and judgment.
  • 21) I wasn't born with a great deal of tact.
  • 22) True, this requires tact and patience, but the resulting insights could transform your thinking overnight.
  • 23) His efficiency, tact, patience and deep sensitivity meant that he was ideally suited for both roles.
  • 24) To be received in his consulting room was to encounter tact, extreme discretion, imagination and sympathy.
  • 25) Its bereavement department was exemplary in its tact and sensitivity, the branch staff were courteous and efficient and its management of my case was transparent and reassuring.
  • 26) This last letter of yours shows great understanding and tact and I hope to be able to draw on your advice in the months ahead.
  • 27) ‘The office needs tact, sensitivity, and skills of an unusual order.’
  • 28) ‘With great tact and skill, he was able to calm the crowd and disperse them.’
  • 29) ‘A controversial discussion can turn ugly very quickly, as tact is often a skill acquired at a more advanced language level.’
  • 30) ‘I know tact is difficult for you, but kindly refrain from humiliating me further.’
  • 31) ‘It is a situation that calls for sensitivity, tact and discretion.’
  • 32) ‘In this context, putting the case for armoured divisions was something that had to be done with skill and tact.’
  • 33) ‘Even now, he admired the skill and tact with which the review was written.’
  • 34) ‘The key to your personal success in this effort is to use poise, grace and tact.’
  • 35) ‘This kind of development work requires tact and cultural sensitivity.’
  • 36) ‘Helping survivors cope with the trauma needs knowledge and tact.’
  • 37) ‘You took the time to approach the issue with a lot more tact.’
  • 38) ‘Also, saying what you think is not the most useful skill for a job that requires a fair amount of tact.’
  • 39) ‘You deal with difficult situations efficiently and resolve conflicts with tact.’
  • 40) ‘She lacked tact and the finesse it took to write something beautiful.’
  • 41) ‘She had expected the girls to look down their noses at her obvious lack of tact and knowledge of titles and English customs.’
  • 42) ‘She never really knew how to handle delicate situations requiring tact and sincere honesty.’
  • 43) ‘There's a swath of middle ground to consider, and given reasonable tact and grace you can probably find a spot there.’
  • 44) ‘A unique combination of tact, charm, deportment and sartorial style, he was all one would wish to see in an idol.’
  • 45) ‘In particular the issue of race was handled with tact and care.’
  • 46) ‘You're totally honest but know how to deliver any piece of news with kindness, smarts and tact.’
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Get audience-specific corrections, access statistics, and view readability scores.

Browser Extensions

Get your writing checked on millions of websites, including Gmail, Facebook, and Google Docs.

Linguix Keyboard

Make your content read and look better on mobile.

MS Office add-ins

Download Linguix for Microsoft Word and Microsoft Outlook to check grammar, punctuation, and style instantly right in your documents.

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