snail vs slug

snail slug

Definitions

  • 1) A slow person; a sluggard.
  • 2) Any of very many animals (either hermaphroditic or nonhermaphroditic), of the class Gastropoda, having a coiled shell.
  • 3) Any of numerous aquatic or terrestrial gastropod mollusks that typically have a spirally coiled shell, retractile foot, and distinct head.
  • 4) A slow-moving, lazy, or sluggish person.
  • 5) Any one of numerous species of terrestrial air-breathing gastropods belonging to the genus Helix and many allied genera of the family Helicidæ. They are abundant in nearly all parts of the world except the arctic regions, and feed almost entirely on vegetation; a land snail.
  • 6) etc. See under Ear, Edible, etc.
  • 7) (Bot.) The pod of the sanil clover.
  • 8) obsolete A tortoise; in ancient warfare, a movable roof or shed to protect besiegers; a testudo.
  • 9) (Bot.) See Snail clover, above.
  • 10) (Mech.) A spiral cam, or a flat piece of metal of spirally curved outline, used for giving motion to, or changing the position of, another part, as the hammer tail of a striking clock.
  • 11) (Zoöl.) a boring univalve mollusk; a drill.
  • 12) (Bot.) a cloverlike plant (Medicago scuttellata, also, M. Helix); -- so named from its pods, which resemble the shells of snails; -- called also snail trefoil, snail medic, and beehive.
  • 13) (Zoöl.) the shell of snail.
  • 14) (Bot.) a leguminous plant (Phaseolus Caracalla) having the keel of the carolla spirally coiled like a snail shell.
  • 15) Any gastropod having a general resemblance to the true snails, including fresh-water and marine species. See Pond snail, under pond, and sea snail.
  • 16) Hence, a drone; a slow-moving person or thing.
  • 17) freshwater or marine or terrestrial gastropod mollusk usually having an external enclosing spiral shell
  • 18) edible terrestrial snail usually served in the shell with a sauce of melted butter and garlic
  • 19) In anatomy, the cochlea of the ear.
  • 20) Helix fusca, a delicate species peculiar to the British Isles, found in bushy places.
  • 21) An aquatic pulmonate gastropod with an operculate spiral shell, living in fresh water; a pond-snail or river-snail; a limneid. See Limnæidæ.
  • 22) Specifically— A member of the family Helicidæ in a broad sense; a terrestrial air-breathing mollusk with stalks on which the eyes are situated, and with a spiral or helicoid shell which has no lid or operculum, as the common garden-snail, Helix hortensis, or edible snail, H. pomatia. There are many hundred species, of numerous genera and several subfamilies. In the phrases below are noted some of the common British species which have vernacular names. See Helicidæ, and cuts under Gasteropoda and Pulmonata.
  • 23) One of many small gastropods.
  • 24) Hence A slow, lazy, stupid person.
  • 25) plural Same as snail-clover.
  • 26) A spiral piece of machinery somewhat resembling a snail; specifically, the piece of metal forming part of the striking work of a clock. See cut under snail-wheel.
  • 27) A littoral or marine, not pulmonate, gastropod with a spiral shell like a snail's; a sea-snail, as a periwinkle or any member of the Littorinidæ; a salt-water snail.
  • 28) A tortoise.
  • 29) A mollusk like the above, but shell-less or nearly so; a slug.
  • 30) A snail-bore; an oystermen's name for various shells injurious to the beds, as the drills or borers, particularly of the geuera Urosalpinx and Natica. See snail-bore.
  • 31) Milit., a protective shed, usually called tortoise or testudo.
  • 32) gather snails

Definitions

  • 1) Any of various terrestrial gastropod mollusks having a slow-moving slimy elongated body with no shell or with a flat rudimentary shell on or under the skin, usually found in moist habitats.
  • 2) A lump of metal or glass prepared for further processing.
  • 3) A commuter who slugs.
  • 4) A sea slug.
  • 5) A hard heavy blow, as with the fist or a baseball bat.
  • 6) A strip of type metal, less than type-high and thicker than a lead, used for spacing.
  • 7) A slimy mass of aggregated amoeboid cells that develops into the spore-bearing fruiting body of a cellular slime mold.
  • 8) An amount of liquid, especially liquor, that is swallowed in one gulp; a swig.
  • 9) A line of cast type in a single strip of metal.
  • 10) Informal A sluggard.
  • 11) Physics The British unit of mass that accelerates at the rate of one foot per second per second when acted on by a force of one pound on the surface of the Earth.
  • 12) A small metal disk for use in a vending or gambling machine, especially one used illegally.
  • 13) A round bullet larger than buckshot.
  • 14) The smooth soft larva of certain insects, such as the sawfly.
  • 15) A shot of liquor.
  • 16) A compositor's type line of identifying marks or instructions, inserted temporarily in copy.
  • 17) A rather heavy piece of crude metal, frequently rounded in form.
  • 18) A stunted horn. Compare scur.
  • 19) A slow, heavy, lazy fellow; a sluggard; a slow-moving animal.
  • 20) The trepang or sea-cucumber; any edible holothurian; a sea-slug.
  • 21) A hindrance; an obstruction.
  • 22) Some or any slug-like soft-bodied insect or its larva; a grub: as, the yellow-spotted willow-slug, the larva of a saw-fly, Nematus ventralis. See pear-slug, rose-slug, slug-caterpillar, slug-worm.
  • 23) A terrestrial pulmonate gastropod of one of the families Limacidæ and Arionidæ and related ones, which has only a rudimentary shell, if any.
  • 24) A heavy or forcible blow; a hard hit.
  • 25) Specifically— A bullet not regularly formed and truly spherical, such as were frequently used with smooth-bore guns or old-fashioned rifies. These were sometimes hammered, sometimes chewed into an approximately spherical form.
  • 26) A lead of extra thickness used to widen the space between lines of type.
  • 27) In mech., a name proposed by Worthington for the mass to which a gravitational unit of force must be applied to produce a foot-pound unit of acceleration; 32.2 (or g) times the mass of a standard pound.
  • 28) A thick blank of typemetal made to separate lines of print and to show a line of white space; also, such a piece with a number or word, to be used temporarily as a direction or marking for any purpose, as in newspaper composing-rooms the distinctive number placed at the beginning of a compositor's “take,” to mark it as his work. Thin blanks are known as leads. All blanks thicker than one sixteenth of an inch are known as slugs, and are called by the names of their proper typebodies: as, nonpareil slugs; pica slugs
  • 29) Hence Any slow-moving thing.
  • 30) Hence— Any projectile of irregular shape, as one of the pieces constituting mitraille
  • 31) In mining, a loop made in a rope for convenience in descending a shallow shaft, the miner putting his leg through the loop, by which he is supported while being lowered by the man at the windlass.
  • 32) Slow;sluggish.
  • 33) Tohinder;retard.
  • 34) Tomakesluggish.
  • 35) To wait for or obtain a ride to work by standing at a roadside hoping to be picked up by a driver who needs another passenger to use the HOV lanes of a highway.
  • 36) To become reduced in diameter, or changed in shape, by passing from a larger to a smaller part of the bore of the barrel; -- said of a bullet when fired from a gun, pistol, or other firearm.
  • 37) obsolete To move slowly; to lie idle.
  • 38) To strike heavily, especially with the fist or a bat.
  • 39) Printing To add slugs to.
  • 40) Informal To drink rapidly or in large gulps.
  • 41) To load with a slug or slugs.
  • 42) Cant or Slang To strike heavily.
  • 43) obsolete To make sluggish.

Examples

  • 1) What did he think of the snail porridge?
  • 2) Which country do you think would shell out for snail caviar?
  • 3) You can cure them by rubbing them with a garden snail.
  • 4) The issue is now progressing via snail mail.
  • 5) This precaution should stop slugs and snails in their tracks.
  • 6) All that snail porridge has meant sacrificing family life.
  • 7) In some gardens small snails nibble the buds.
  • 8) Maybe it is not surprising that it is known as snail mail.
  • 9) Strict security will be in force to keep the slugs and snails away from the veg.
  • 10) It was a day in which the letter and snail mail reigned supreme.
  • 11) For us a bag is like a snail shell in which we carry the things we need for the day.
  • 12) You have slowed down to a snail's pace when it comes to work and career issues.
  • 13) These small marine snails are usually thrown back by the English boats or exported.
  • 14) Vine vowed to stick to a snail's pace in future.
  • 15) Rain and warmth are bringing out the garden snails, mainly at night.
  • 16) His last two defeats were because they went a snail's pace early on.
  • 17) And then the media withdraws, like a snail into its shell.
  • 18) Take one celebrity chef, famous for his wacky dishes such as snail porridge and bacon and egg ice cream.
  • 19) Does it include snail porridge?
  • 20) Garden snails are not poisonous.
  • 21) I had snail and sea bass.
  • 22) I make small snails look like Usain Bolt.
  • 23) It's good for a laugh — the term "snail mail" takes on a whole new meaning — but the hope is there's a touching side to this story, and that its intended recipient, or her relatives, may still be found.
  • 24) SOLOMON: Well, certainly, snail mail still exists, however, as suggested by the term snail mail, it is a slow process and parents do like to hear from their children on a more regular basis and certainly e-mail can accomplish that.
  • 25) That little stringy thing next to the snail is a clump of snail feces.
  • 26) According to McNeill Alexander (who has tested the viscosity of the stuff) the foot mucus of a snail is a really quite sophisticated substance.
  • 27) Maurice the snail is also an excellent cook, "to Mona's surprise."
  • 28) The scene where that flying muppet carbonates beer with the guy riding a snail is a riot!
  • 29) The drug Prialt derived from this cone snail is effectively treating pain, including phantom-limb pain; it's non addictive and the human body does not appear to develop a tolerance.
  • 30) Minutes as good will be sent by email to those who have been electronically up to date, as good as by unchanging mail to members who have been still ensnared in snail station (so to speak).
  • 31) ‘Large or small, landlubbers or seafarers or both, hermit crabs have one feature in common: they generally spend their lives inside the empty shells of snails or other mollusks.’
  • 32) ‘As gardeners already know, all other slugs and snails (or gastropod mollusks, to the experts) sport a soft and slimy foot.’
  • 33) ‘For most species of snails, shells and body plans curl in only one direction.’
  • 34) ‘Many snails have an operculum, a horny plate that seals the opening when the snail's body is drawn into the shell.’
  • 35) ‘The cone shell is a marine snail that lives in tropical regions worldwide, including the waters around northeastern Australia's Great Barrier Reef.’
  • 36) ‘Slipper limpet snails are infesting Puget Sound, off the coast of Washington State.’
  • 37) ‘Ruddy kingfishers in the Philippines remove land snails from their shells by smashing them against stones on the forest floor.’
  • 38) ‘The average shell strength of mud snails was twice that of Littorina, and three times that of Uca.’
  • 39) ‘As for cone snails, their shells are collected and sold by the thousands at curio shops to tourists.’
  • 40) ‘These loose mats provide a sheltered and humid habitat for many mid shore animals, including shore crabs, littorinid snails, barnacles, mussels, young fish, lugworms and other invertebrates.’
  • 41) ‘Many larger animals (including snails, sand dollars, and fish) eat forams, and some are very selective about which species they eat.’
  • 42) ‘Lobsters are bottom-feeding predators and their diet consists of worms, mussels, snails and other small marine bottom-dwelling organisms.’
  • 43) ‘Bluegills are carnivores, primarily eating invertebrates such as snails, worms, shrimp, aquatic insects, small crayfish, and zooplankton.’
  • 44) ‘Most of the more recent success stories involve snails, isopods, and other marine animals that have colonized leaf litter or remained in environments close to the seashore.’
  • 45) ‘Some snails, sea slugs, and worms embed embryos in gel, often in the form of thin strings or beautiful coiled ribbons that undulate gracefully in the current.’
  • 46) ‘Many predators will take a wide variety of prey, but some species of snakes feed exclusively on other snakes, others want only rodents, and still others concentrate on snails or scorpions.’
  • 47) ‘Molluscicides destroy snails and slugs, which can be pests of agriculture or, in waterbodies, the vector of human diseases such as schistosomiasis.’
  • 48) ‘The small body size of Pacific land snails has been considered indicative of the importance of aerial transport, with drift transport secondary.’
  • 49) ‘The Quitobaquito spring snail is a tiny, 0.06 inch long aquatic snail that belongs to the Hydrobiidae family.’
  • 50) ‘The exotic mud snail, Batillaria attramentaria, is common in a few bays and estuaries at the northern extent of C. californica's range.’
  • 51) ‘A ship, slower than a snail, is crossing the sea.’
  • 52) ‘Your internet connection is slow as a snail and your telephone makes buzzing noises.’
  • 53) ‘When this kicks in, the PC can slow to a snails ' pace.’
  • 54) ‘On a different front - gender equality has been moving at a snails pace in Namibia, which serves as a particular challenge for the incoming government to improve the situation.’
  • 55) ‘Small stabbings of pain made him move at a snails pace.’

Examples

  • 1) The only preservative is a good slug of brandy or rum.
  • 2) This precaution should stop slugs and snails in their tracks.
  • 3) Some people also use coffee grounds as a barrier to deter both slugs and ants.
  • 4) Others have secured large slugs of cash by forging partnership deals with big pharma.
  • 5) Place in a roasting tin and pour over a generous slug of olive oil.
  • 6) But they are ideal for dealing with those small slugs that lurk just below the soil surface.
  • 7) They may have consumed poisonous plants and been exposed to slug pellets.
  • 8) Strict security will be in force to keep the slugs and snails away from the veg.
  • 9) It sets them off well visually and will deter slugs and snails.
  • 10) Gardeners can enter the largest slug and heaviest snail sections.
  • 11) They also keep slug pellets protected and dry so their effect lasts longer.
  • 12) It can be spread around plants to deter slugs.
  • 13) But slugs and snails like them so keep them up off the ground in pots to reduce attacks.
  • 14) He takes another slug of wine.
  • 15) And infested with large orange slugs.
  • 16) This is a big orange slug and where it comes in, the ecosystem suffers.
  • 17) The cute creatures are seen as a gardener's friend because they help control pests like slugs.
  • 18) My eyelids are swollen from crying, like little slugs.
  • 19) It is very cosy but has one big problem: slugs.
  • 20) Dress with the lemon juice, a good slug of olive oil and season with the salt and pepper.
  • 21) Take precautions against slug attack.
  • 22) Take out the pancetta pieces, add a slug of olive oil and sweat the shallots until they are soft and translucent.
  • 23) The crawling speed of a slug may also depend on air temperature and humidity, whether or not the slug is also grazing on the tree surface while crawling, its species and size and the slope as well as the microscopic characteristics of the surface.
  • 24) This slug is then followed successively by varying quantities of Diesel Fuel, Kerosene, other intermediate products, ordinary grade Gasolene, high octane, premium and Aviation Gasolenes, each succeeding product pushing the others on ahead in the line.
  • 25) In the thickest of my fight with the slugs some one said to me, Everything living has its enemy; the enemy of the slug is the toad.
  • 26) And what could happen when condensation builds up on the inside of those pipes is that the velocity of the steam picks up those little droplets of water, turns them into what they refer to as a slug and it can fire that slug at 100 miles an hour against a standing part of that pipe, like an elbow or something, and it can be like a hammer punch right to the inside of that pipe.
  • 27) You have a valid point, I have asked this of others in slug hunting forums.
  • 28) For example, I rifle fired from a tree usually means the slug is going to impact the ground.
  • 29) On 2nd thought, the idea of dbadass being teabagged by a slug is gross!
  • 30) I grew up in "slug only" country and killed lots of deer with 12 ga. foster types thru the years.
  • 31) ‘slugs and snails are mainly nocturnal, and the sun's heat can be fatal to slugs and to all mollusc eggs, so cultivate the soil thoroughly to bring them to the surface.’
  • 32) ‘Centipedes also eat slugs and smaller insect pests.’
  • 33) ‘Twenty slugs were filmed while receiving 10 swim-eliciting tail stimuli at a 2 min inter-trial interval.’
  • 34) ‘Firefly larvae live underground or beneath leaf litter, feeding on earthworms, snails, slugs, and soft-bodied insect larvae.’
  • 35) ‘As gardeners already know, all other slugs and snails (or gastropod mollusks, to the experts) sport a soft and slimy foot.’
  • 36) ‘Brains of limpets and abalones are much simpler than brains of garden snails and slugs in histological differentiation.’
  • 37) ‘Molluscicides destroy snails and slugs, which can be pests of agriculture or, in waterbodies, the vector of human diseases such as schistosomiasis.’
  • 38) ‘They also eat slugs, snails, earthworms, and small fish.’
  • 39) ‘Fieldfares find their food (including slugs, insects and earthworms) on the ground often locating it more by sound then sight.’
  • 40) ‘The omnivorous diet of these insects is known to include garden pests such as slugs, snails and cutworms, so they can be regarded as beneficial allies.’
  • 41) ‘Watch for slugs and other pests on plants, in pots, under trays, in corners and beneath benches.’
  • 42) ‘More conventionally, a sharp barrier such as gravel or crushed seashells or eggshells sprinkled around plants will stop slugs and snails in their tracks.’
  • 43) ‘The legislation met some initial controversy after it was reported that the new law would extend protections to snails and slugs.’
  • 44) ‘One or two pairs of tentacles are found on the head, depending on whether the snail or slug is terrestrial (two pairs) or aquatic (one).’
  • 45) ‘Look for pests such as caterpillars, flys, mites, termites and slugs are garden pests that might like to make a meal of your geraniums.’
  • 46) ‘A claim of moral equality on behalf of animals is surely not plausible if one means literally all animals, including centipedes, slugs, and amoebas.’
  • 47) ‘Diatomaceous earth, shredded bark, eggshells, and wood ash have been used as barriers to prevent slugs from feeding on plants.’
  • 48) ‘Suzy Davis of Arizona recommends Epsom salts (magnesium sulfate) to rid your plants of slugs.’
  • 49) ‘Since some plants are more susceptible to slug injury, check around those particular plants to detect slugs.’
  • 50) ‘The only major pests of hostas are slugs, which thrive in the moist, cool, shady areas that hostas love.’
  • 51) ‘If there's somebody sitting around saying, you know, I'm just a lazy slug, my first question is, ‘are you?’’
  • 52) ‘The memos are self-defeating in that regard - why would the sort of low life slug who would write such a thing actually care enough to write such a thing?’
  • 53) ‘And maybe everything has added up to make a big old apathetic slug.’
  • 54) ‘And every Dem is going to have the fact that some Dems voted for this slug crammed down their throat.’
  • 55) ‘At one level, I am - or at least I was - quite a decent swimmer; and it's exactly the sort of exercise I need to stop myself turning into a middle aged slug.’
  • 56) ‘Even someone with his track record - and, for a tubby obnoxious slug, he has managed to shack up with some stunners - must occasionally fall at the first hurdle.’
  • 57) ‘The highly hyped competition may be tempting the odd couch slug to dribble down to the nearest five-a-side pitch, but he or she will be lucky to get a free slot when they get there.’
  • 58) ‘I mean, he's just like this slug who hangs around the house all the time.’
  • 59) ‘The sugar high took me into the wee hours, and as a result, today I am feeling slug like and overly emotional.’
  • 60) ‘slugs do not talk, they don't use their mobile phones for more than a short while, any time they do talk religion and politics are avoided and there's no smoking or eating by the driver or slug.’
  • 61) ‘If, as you say, she hates to be alone, she will most likely tolerate this slug until she either can't stand it another minute, or he departs… whichever comes first.’
  • 62) ‘That fat, overweight, pompous slug would never be able to get me himself, she thought, without sending one of his henchmen to retrieve me.’
  • 63) ‘Maddie was the one going to college, and I was a Generation X slug.’
  • 64) ‘I'm not sure how I became such a walker, because I come from a long line of slugs.’
  • 65) ‘Hearty Aussie reds like the latter go happily in a sangria-style mix - slip a couple of orange slices into each glass and add a whoosh of soda water, a clunk of ice-cubes and a slug of brandy if it's raining.’
  • 66) ‘Makes around 4 litres of cordial (which you can kick up a notch with a splash of soda water and a slug of your favourite gin).’
  • 67) ‘The last straw comes when three old Russian ladies snub my invitation to join our flotilla, dog-paddling away as if no one had ever offered them a slug of beer through a ten-foot hose.’
  • 68) ‘Put all the fruit in a saucepan on a gentle heat and add a couple of tablespoons of caster sugar and a slug of something pleasantly alcoholic such as brandy, whisky or even sherry.’
  • 69) ‘We came home, ran the bath, sat in it, drank a slug of whisky each and climbed in to bed, exhausted by thinking.’
  • 70) ‘‘It's so hot in here,’ he complained, walking back from the toilet, wiping his mouth with the back of his hand and reaching for a slug of ‘black and tan’.’
  • 71) ‘The cherries were for the family; a slug of what Hoard called ‘Christmas cheer’ was for my father.’
  • 72) ‘Do you know how long it's been since I had a slug of whiskey?’
  • 73) ‘He quickly takes a slug of beer and stares up at the trophies.’
  • 74) ‘When they say ‘spiritual micro-breaks’, they don't mean a slug of vodka in the server room, either.’
  • 75) ‘To drink, we have all the good cold water you want, and a slug of red wine.’
  • 76) ‘Joe took a slug of his beer to half empty the can and, there!’
  • 77) ‘After delicately dipping a last onion ring in mayonnaise, he moistens his throat with a slug of brandy, and starts to talk.’
  • 78) ‘Secrets and truths emerge, which cause emotional bruising, but nothing a slug of Scotch can't cure.’
  • 79) ‘I tasted it once and had to take a slug of sour mash to get the sweet out of mouth.’
  • 80) ‘Place the first six ingredients in a food processor and whizz until smooth then splash in a slug of Kirsch.’
  • 81) ‘If he offered you a slug from the bottle he either liked you, was testing you, or didn't want to drink alone.’
  • 82) ‘By this time, Santiago had poured a hefty slug of rum into a cup and handed it to Jesse.’
  • 83) ‘He takes another slug of vodka, poured for him by one of the younger members of the company.’
  • 84) ‘Good thing he hadn't just taken a slug at his drink or I'm sure it would have come out of his nose.’
  • 85) ‘For the first time in nearly two thousand years everyone everywhere was paying for everyday articles using slugs of base metal.’
  • 86) ‘For smaller vessels, this may be as easy as firing a copper slug into an outboard engine.’
  • 87) ‘I would have been shocked if we had because he was using an air gun with an enormous piece of slug instead of birdshot.’
  • 88) ‘The team built a robot which could distinguish a slug from a stone and pick it up.’
  • 89) ‘Three slugs ripped through the space Karl had just vacated.’
  • 90) ‘I would have a strong urge to put a .50 calibre slug through the guy in this picture.’
  • 91) ‘One shot I missed clear, probably because my abilities were off, but one slug removed his left ear and a clump of his hair, yet the third bullet struck his right shoulder and caused him drop back to the floor.’
  • 92) ‘In any case, a diminutive .410 bore, 1/2 oz rifled slug zinging out at 1,830 fps is a respectable load.’
  • 93) ‘In addition the heavy bullet has a lot of sectional density and should penetrate deeply compared to a standard 30 or 40-grain slug.’
  • 94) ‘His second .45 slug missed harmlessly, but it didn't matter, because the first had found the gunman's thorax and dropped him cold.’
  • 95) ‘The 12-gauge.50-caliber slug weighs in at 385 grains and is nestled in a sabot.’
  • 96) ‘A man with a small revolver was trying to sneak up on them, and Niane kindly ended his existence with a well-placed .45 slug in his forehead.’
  • 97) ‘He had been instantly neutralized, and killed almost as quickly, by a massive 12 gauge rifled slug wound that had destroyed his heart.’
  • 98) ‘The 1 oz, .72 caliber shotgun slug had torn through the center of his chest, killing him outright.’
  • 99) ‘The.22 caliber slug had ricocheted off the top of his cranium, knocking him cold as effectively as a hammer.’
  • 100) ‘As he shuffled to the side, another slug tore a huge hole in the wall where he had been a heartbeat before, throwing wood pieces in his face.’
  • 101) ‘A former mental patient went after him with a cleaver, and Shea dropped him with a single .38 slug to the belly.’
  • 102) ‘There's also a cantilever, rifled slug barrel available at modest cost.’
  • 103) ‘I've had a bit of a problem editing posts with a slug of 'miscellaneous' - for some reason when I republish the post, it likes to change the slug to ' miscellaneous - 2'.’
  • 104) ‘This function is what WordPress will use to generate the URL slugs from your post titles.’
  • 105) ‘Changing longer post slugs into short, keyword-centric slugs will increase your click-through rate in the search engine result pages and make your content easier to share.’
  • 106) ‘You just add the episode number to the slug or permalink of your podcasts.’
  • 107) ‘This has happened to most of us at one point or another: We start optimizing a website's URL structure or permalink slugs to be more user- and SEO-friendly, and we end up forgetting about an old URL that dozens of websites were already linking to.’
  • 108) ‘She slugged the first drink down smoothly, then without any hesitation she grabbed the other drink and slugged it down too.’
  • 109) ‘Matt picked up the champagne bottle and slugged the wine straight down.’
  • 110) ‘She now slugged the remainder of her drink back in an attempt to numb her irritation.’
  • 111) ‘A bit of the swig, swig, slugging back old granddads cough medicine are we?’
  • 112) ‘He pushed his empty glass to the side, and slugged the remaining beer directly out of the long necked bottle.’
  • 113) ‘You barely have time to slug it down before they're racing back to tear the cup out of your hands and slam your seat back into it's upright and locked position.’
  • 114) ‘We return to our hotel to slug whiskey and create conversational doodles in the private bar.’
  • 115) ‘The woman slugged the bourbon back in one abrupt gulp and held out the shot glass for a refill.’
  • 116) ‘Popping the lid off, I poured two into my hand and slugged them back with a gulp of my soda.’
  • 117) ‘Her eye twitching more violently, she slugs the fresh cup of tea.’
  • 118) ‘At 10:29 p.m. I'm slugging some coffee and feeling good.’
  • 119) ‘We stood around down by St Mary's church slugging back bottles of beer and singing ‘There is an Isle’ until we were hoarse with it.’
  • 120) ‘There they gather short, or editor-shortened, letters in which correspondents with opposing views slug away at each other on a topic selected by the editor.’
  • 121) ‘The man gave Mr. Love one huge slug in the face just as Tommy and Joe, the security guards, hurried up the stairs, Tommy huffing frantically.’
  • 122) ‘It wasn't a ladylike slap, it was an all-out, full-fisted slug to the jaw that could have broken his nose if she had been aiming for it.’
  • 123) ‘Drink companies say they're being unfairly slugged with the cost of a refund in South Australia - an unfair tax.’
  • 124) ‘Locals who have called Balmain home for more than 50 years are being forced to sell or subdivide their homes after being slugged with land tax bills of up to $16,000 a year.’
  • 125) ‘Neverthelesss, they both proved themselves solid winners, even if Ramirez benefited from the powerful Atlanta Braves attack, and Robertson got a big lift Houston's slugging lineup.’
  • 126) ‘No way he finishes seventh in slugging this year.’
  • 127) ‘He led the team last season with 11 pinch hits and made 55 starts, finishing with a .429 slugging percentage.’
  • 128) ‘As a 19-year-old, he knocked 23 balls over the fence to get a .513 slugging percentage in A-ball.’
  • 129) ‘But he worked on his swing in the off season and finished fifth in the winter league with a .531 slugging percentage.’
  • 130) ‘After perhaps five minutes, Joel slugged Benji in the face, knocking him down.’
  • 131) ‘Cesar managed to wriggle a hand free and slugged Glenn in the side of the face, knocking him to the ground.’
  • 132) ‘Brettingen, who hit .478 with 44 RBI and a .739 slugging percentage in 2002, is picking up right where he left off, hitting .438 in the young season.’
  • 133) ‘And it continued on - from 1998 through 2002 Sammy hit 292 homers while batting .306 with a .649 slugging percentage.’
  • 134) ‘He is closing on a record with his .610 on-base percentage - 28 points higher than the mark he set in 2002-and has an .827 slugging percentage.’
  • 135) ‘Today slugging percentage has replaced batting average, and Tejada's slugging percentage was less than five-sixths that of Rodriguez.’
  • 136) ‘Numbers break down into columns of infinite refinement: total bases, slugging percentage, on-base percentage, and on and on.’
  • 137) ‘Then when I asked - when I walked across the street, the next thing I know is somebody slugged me.’
  • 138) ‘Workers, of course, even the lowly paid, will be slugged with an extra $6.20 to fill a prescription.’
  • 139) ‘Geraldton ratepayers will be slugged an 8.5 percent rate increase this year.’
  • 140) ‘It's easy for many to cheer when a developer is slugged for higher taxes.’
  • 141) ‘You've got to realise that when you do buy a good on credit, you'll be slugged with an interest charge.’
  • 142) ‘Now they're going to be slugged by this brand new tax when they actually come to sell the property.’
  • 143) ‘Now, it's probably a bad idea most of the time for guards to slug inmates - although I can think of lots of exceptions - but it isn't cruel and unusual punishment.’
  • 144) ‘Bangalore suffers as Singh and Gowda slug it out’
  • 145) ‘Sierra also led all qualifiers with a 1.067 slugging percentage last week, and he posted a .500 on-base percentage.’
  • 146) ‘Most drivers are probably unaware of the fact that all imported cars are slugged a 15 per cent tariff to protect the local car manufacturing industry.’
  • 147) ‘Provoked into a confrontation, Laramie slugs the photographer in front of a watchful eye and is ultimately sentenced to undergo anger management therapy.’
  • 148) ‘Participants can be fined or gaoled, employers who choose to pay them can be fined, and unions found to have organised the actions can be slugged up to $110,000.’
  • 149) ‘After reaching over and playfully slugging Sandy's arm, Carla remarked ‘I know it's part of your personality, but sometimes I get tired of your teasing.’’
  • 150) ‘After jabbing him early on, Rigby let his warrior instincts get the better of him and he ended up slugging it out in a fight which had the Wythenshawe Forum crowd on its feet.’
  • 151) ‘Students in York have been slugging it out in a competition to find the most popular piece of art in a city bar.’
  • 152) ‘Contestants slug it out to be the best news reader on TV and the winner goes into a head to head clash with Ms Bailey, as the viewer decides who gets the $800,000-a-year job.’
  • 153) ‘There was a contest, too, as both women slugged it out for supremacy in the final set.’
  • 154) ‘Twenty four towns across Northern Ireland will see top teams from home and the continent slug it out in what is the biggest competition ever staged in Northern Ireland.’
  • 155) ‘The annual Kaman Cup golf day was contested at Nowra on November 24, with 256 players slugging it out on a somewhat sodden track.’
  • 156) ‘At still other times, the two sounds fight for bragging rights, slugging it out between our ears.’
  • 157) ‘Nearly 16,000 fight fans roared their appreciation as the two big men slugged it out.’
  • 158) ‘Dennis is at the stage of his career where it's not about putting on more size - at 260 pounds contest weight, he's beefy enough to slug it out with the biggest brutes in the sport.’
  • 159) ‘With his refined boxing skills and blending in his tendency to slug it out, he can still entertain us with some great fights in the future.’
  • 160) ‘This is followed by a ladies fight over 4 x 2 minute rounds, and they slug it out as well as any man.’
  • 161) ‘One in the last five Premiership games and a string of similar enlightening statistics gleaned from scanning this season's ‘goals for’ column show why Wanderers are slugging it out with the rest of the relegation pack.’
  • 162) ‘The cute boy was cynosure of all eyes while his cousin was slugging it out in the National ‘B’ Chess Championship tournament at Chennupati Ramakotaiah hall here on Tuesday.’
  • 163) ‘For a first time spectator, it's the only phrase that seems suitable because the sight of bigger than average, fully grown men slugging it out, eyeball to eyeball, is as engrossing as sport could possibly be.’
  • 164) ‘Aden Ridgeway likes their ideas on political positioning, and, faced with contesting the next election, must weigh up whether he's got a better chance in the centre than slugging it out with the Greens.’
  • 165) ‘In the 21st century, though, the focus of democratic debate has moved from the street to the broadcasting studio where, more and more, ordinary people are slugging it out with their politicians live on air.’
  • 166) ‘And at that time, I was the independent guy who kind of - whose career had kind of gone downhill and was now slugging it out anywhere and everywhere that I could be paid.’
  • 167) ‘We'd been slugging it out against the vexing factor of distance, but now that other awful variable - time - had jumped us from behind and was punching our kidneys.’
  • 168) ‘Well, maybe, while the yokels are slugging it out in the parking lot, the ‘have-mores’ can sneak in the back door and make off with the cash register.’
  • 169) ‘India will be slugging it out with 12 teams including Champions Trophy winners Holland, Pakistan, Spain, South Africa, Malaysia and Poland.’
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