muscle vs mussel

muscle mussel

Definitions

  • 1) uncountable, figuratively Strength.
  • 2) uncountable, usually plural A well-developed physique, in which the muscles are enlarged from exercise.
  • 3) uncountable A contractile form of tissue which animals use to effect movement.
  • 4) uncountable Hired strongmen or bodyguards.
  • 5) countable An organ composed of muscle tissue.
  • 6) A contractile organ consisting of a special bundle of muscle tissue, which moves a particular bone, part, or substance of the body.
  • 7) Muscular strength.
  • 8) A tissue composed of fibers capable of contracting to effect bodily movement.
  • 9) Informal Power or authority.
  • 10) (Physiol.) contraction curve of a muscle; a myogram; the curve inscribed, upon a prepared surface, by means of a myograph when acted upon by a contracting muscle. The character of the curve represents the extent of the contraction.
  • 11) slang Bodyguards or other persons hired to provide protection or commit violence.
  • 12) An essential part of something.
  • 13) The contractile tissue of which muscles are largely made up.
  • 14) (Zoöl.) See Mussel.
  • 15) An organ which, by its contraction, produces motion.
  • 16) colloq. Muscular strength or development.
  • 17) authority or power or force (especially when used in a coercive way)
  • 18) animal tissue consisting predominantly of contractile cells
  • 19) Figuratively, muscular strength; brawn: as, a man of muscle.
  • 20) A kind of animal tissue consisting of bundles of fibers whose essential physiological characteristic is contractility, or the capability of contracting in length and dilating in breadth on the application of a proper stimulus, as the impulse of a motor nerve, or a shock of electricity; flesh; “lean meat.”
  • 21) A certain portion of muscle or muscular tissue, having definite position and relation with surrounding parts, and usually fixed at one or both ends.
  • 22) See mussel.
  • 23) A part, organ, or tissue, of whatever histological character, which has the property of contractility, and is thus capable of motion in itself.
  • 24) To use force to make progress, especially physical force.
  • 25) make one's way by force
  • 26) To move or force with strength.
  • 27) To make one's way by or as if by force.
  • 28) To compel by threat of force.
  • 29) To moved by human force.

Definitions

  • 1) A small edible bivalve shellfish of the families Unionidae (fresh water mussels) and Mytilidae (salt water mussels).
  • 2) Any of various marine bivalve mollusks that attach to hard surfaces in intertidal areas with byssal threads, especially the edible members of the family Mytilidae and in particular Mytilus edulis, a blue-black species of the North Atlantic Ocean, raised commercially for food.
  • 3) Any of numerous freshwater bivalve mollusks of the order Unionoida that burrow in the sand or mud of rivers, streams, and ponds.
  • 4) Any of several similar bivalve mollusks, such as the zebra mussel.
  • 5) (Zoöl.) Any one of numerous species of Unio, and related fresh-water genera; -- called also river mussel. See Naiad, and Unio.
  • 6) (Zoöl.) Any one of many species of marine bivalve shells of the genus Mytilus, and related genera, of the family Mytidæ. The common mussel (Mytilus edulis; see Illust. under byssus), and the larger, or horse, mussel (Modiola modiolus), inhabiting the shores both of Europe and America, are edible. The former is extensively used as food in Europe.
  • 7) (Zoöl.) the grayback whale. See Gray whale, under Gray.
  • 8) marine or freshwater bivalve mollusk that lives attached to rocks etc.
  • 9) black marine bivalves usually steamed in wine
  • 10) Any one of many bivalve mollusks of various genera and species.

Examples

  • 1) Work out at home with simple weights or bands to build and tone your muscle.
  • 2) Newly discovered back muscles were beginning to ache.
  • 3) All of a sudden a woman muscled her way to the front of the queue.
  • 4) Some personnel dismissed the body mass index measurements because soldiers with a heavier muscle mass might also be classed as overweight.
  • 5) The Arsenal striker is battling a muscle injury.
  • 6) When they go wrong it can lead to potentially fatal conditions affecting organs, muscles and growth.
  • 7) It is true Chinese clubs have the financial muscle to buy any player on the planet.
  • 8) It allows for gentle, steady walking and fresh air with a lot of movement of all the muscle groups.
  • 9) His facial muscles rarely move.
  • 10) BUILDING up muscles boosts brain power for over-55s, a study found.
  • 11) The heart does something else that the body muscles cannot do.
  • 12) The same goes for lean tissue such as muscle.
  • 13) Their thigh muscles are long and lean but their upper bodies can sometimes appear puny.
  • 14) Yet somehow she has maintained a healthy glow and good muscle tone.
  • 15) You will be surprised at the power of muscle memory.
  • 16) All my muscles and organs work in perfect harmony.
  • 17) Zumba targets the abdominal and back muscles.
  • 18) You have to move your muscles not to move.
  • 19) The ice baths are not pleasant but it means his strained muscles will recover quicker.
  • 20) This exercise is designed to exercise muscles in the back.
  • 21) Holding the shrug at the top for one second strengthens muscle.
  • 22) This will produce good muscle and bone overload.
  • 23) She has not trained much recently and has lost muscle mass.
  • 24) This is perceived as a " strong " muscle test.
  • 25) United simply have such financial muscle they can blow other clubs away.
  • 26) This muscle group deserves all the attention heaped on it in pursuit of physical prowess.
  • 27) This puts more weight on your leg muscles and means they work harder.
  • 28) It has dragged back the curtains of musical theatre and muscled its way on to the classical podium.
  • 29) It's very difficult to find a particular thing about a muscle injury.
  • 30) The child who is ‘spastic’ has muscle stiffness, or ‘muscle tension’.
  • 31) It will be well to note that the two shells of an oyster, which are called _valves_, are held together by a single muscle, known as the _adductor muscle_, that lies near the center, and that this muscle must be cut before the shell will open readily.
  • 32) Between the ciliary processes and the sclerotic coat is a small muscle, containing both circular and longitudinal fibers, called the _ciliary muscle_.
  • 33) Brad Radke will not be ready to return to the mound when he's eligible to come off the DL Saturday, as his pulled groin muscle is worse than it was when he first injured it.
  • 34) The term muscle signifies every organ of the human body which, by contraction, produces the movements of the organism.
  • 35) Sir Charles Bell, who wrote the book about the Hand, used the term muscle sense and I suspect you would have to be interested in the human hand and body for any of this to be meaningful to you.
  • 36) Kind of gives new meaning to the term muscle-head.
  • 37) RICHARD BURT, SPECIAL AGENT FOR FLIGHT PROGRAMS: There's defensive measures, there's judgmental shooting, and it makes them think and respond and develop what we call a muscle memory.
  • 38) BROWN: Hey, this is what we call the muscle flex, because it really does demonstrate the muscle that you have behind you, Wolf.
  • 39) If the stimulus be repeated, the muscle makes a new twitch, apparently resembling the preceding one; and if the muscle is attached to a suitable connecting lever, the several twitches give the same effect as the strokes of a piston in a steam-engine.
  • 40) ‘The powerful venom acts on the victim's voluntary muscles, paralysing the muscles required for body movement and breathing.’
  • 41) ‘Make sure you get sufficient protein to protect not only your bones, but your muscles and other body tissues.’
  • 42) ‘Each time the calf and thigh muscles contract when walking, veins deep inside the leg are squeezed.’
  • 43) ‘In this specimen, large lymphoid cells diffusely infiltrated muscle and fibrous tissue.’
  • 44) ‘The tendon is the strong, white fibrous tissues that connect muscles to bones.’
  • 45) ‘In this condition, muscle and fibrous tissues of the renal artery wall thicken and harden into rings.’
  • 46) ‘The processes that bring about movement of the voluntary muscles of the body start on the surface of the brain in an area called the motor cortex.’
  • 47) ‘He also leaned laterally during single leg stance, which may indicate weak gluteus medius muscles relative to his body weight.’
  • 48) ‘RSI occurs when repeated physical movements damage tendons, nerves, muscles and other soft body tissues.’
  • 49) ‘A heartbeat is when the muscles of the heart contract and push blood around the body.’
  • 50) ‘Energy is also needed to grow and repair the body's tissues, and to power the muscles for movement.’
  • 51) ‘The second group called sarcomas, arise from the substance of solid tissues such as muscle, bone, lymph glands, blood vessels and fibrous and other connective tissues.’
  • 52) ‘A septum of connective tissue separates the circular muscle layers of the pylorus and duodenum.’
  • 53) ‘And I had thought maybe I'd done something, you know, pulled a muscle or something.’
  • 54) ‘Contraction of the circumferential muscle bundles constricts the infundibulum to a conical shape.’
  • 55) ‘The pain is the result of an overload on your tibia and the connective tissues that attach your muscles to your tibia.’
  • 56) ‘We should explain: a tendon is basically a strong piece of tissue which connects a muscle to bone and is the extension which pulls on the bone and allows the joint to straighten or flex.’
  • 57) ‘On physical examination, pain is present from the tip of the medial epicondyle to the pronator teres and flexor carpi radialis muscles.’
  • 58) ‘The striated muscles innervated by cranial nerves are usually affected the most severely.’
  • 59) ‘Once extracted, they can be stimulated in a laboratory to develop into any type of body cell or organ including bone, muscle and body tissue.’
  • 60) ‘Her stomach tightens, strong muscles visible beneath her skin.’
  • 61) ‘He stroked her neck, feeling the strong muscles beneath the skin ripple at his touch.’
  • 62) ‘He watched the way she took up a pickaxe and swung it, saw the muscles rippling beneath her tanned skin.’
  • 63) ‘He shrugged, muscles rippling beneath his bare bronzed skin.’
  • 64) ‘Beneath his golden skin, muscles rippled as he shifted positions.’
  • 65) ‘The mountain lion had a tawny coat; beneath, its muscles rippled, bunching and stretching with each step.’
  • 66) ‘Her physique is trim and strong; you can see every ripple of her well-defined muscles beneath her shiny fur.’
  • 67) ‘The mastiff is powerful, heavy muscles rippling beneath its scarred pelt.’
  • 68) ‘He wore all black clothes but she could see the ripple of his muscles beneath the fabric on his arms and chest.’
  • 69) ‘Vastly enhanced muscles rippled beneath his armour, as if threatening to burst through their restraints at any moment.’
  • 70) ‘He pressed his palm against Rob's chest, felt his heart beating slowly beneath the smooth, tanned skin and taut muscles.’
  • 71) ‘She felt the slight ripple underneath the skin, his muscles bunching and clenching in reaction to her touch.’
  • 72) ‘She was thin, so nearly every bone protruded beneath translucent white skin and emaciated muscles.’
  • 73) ‘His silken hide of blood brown hue gleamed as he moved, muscles rippling beneath the sleek pelt.’
  • 74) ‘His muscles under his tan skin rippled, sending shivers up my spine.’
  • 75) ‘The muscles rippled and jerked under a sick gray skin that looked as though it had been stretched too tightly over the body.’
  • 76) ‘He was at least twice my size, all muscle and brute strength.’
  • 77) ‘Both have played an awful lot of rugby in the past few seasons and right now they're concentrating on building muscle and power.’
  • 78) ‘We've power of muscle and brain, and where else is that combination useful?’
  • 79) ‘A matter of a difference in opinion should not be settled with muscle rather than the brain.’
  • 80) ‘But without our brain and muscle not a single wheel can turn.’
  • 81) ‘Predictably, the alien blesses the boy with his powers, so the audience is not robbed of the opportunity to see some muscle, brawn and macho acts from the young star in the second half.’
  • 82) ‘He trained in the UK as a chef, but because of his dyslexia the jobs he can get use his muscle not his brain and he cannot get a driving licence - he can't take the written test.’
  • 83) ‘The crafting of such language, potent with muscle and brain, lends objective shape to the act of consciousness itself.’
  • 84) ‘Months in the planning, it is a job that needs all the skills of a group of experienced villains, brains, muscle and connections, with no man greater than the sum of the whole.’
  • 85) ‘He thought Luke was all muscle and no brains.’
  • 86) ‘But we've got to fight with our muscle and our brain, and do it in a smart way.’
  • 87) ‘Asha thought of him as a dumb jockey with no brains but plenty of muscle.’
  • 88) ‘He was the executive producer of the unit and its brains and muscle, too.’
  • 89) ‘The Wolves also could use some muscle at power forward, which would give Garnett and Smith some help up front and take the pressure off the perimeter shooters.’
  • 90) ‘He taught that power was a must, yet it must be total power that included muscle, mind, and ki working in unison.’
  • 91) ‘At power forward, Portland can go with Wallace or Brian Grant, depending on whether you want star power or muscle and hustle.’
  • 92) ‘Nesterenko is tall and strong, though, and started mobilising that muscle at just the right time.’
  • 93) ‘Louis was the sort of low-grade man child that shoestring celebrities often employ as muscle to keep up appearances and work as a butler.’
  • 94) ‘By this time both sides had brought some professional muscle to bear on proceedings.’
  • 95) ‘I really hope he cuts a deal and brings in the hired muscle.’
  • 96) ‘The former uses hired thugs to enforce repayment from the debtors; the latter employs the Feds as paid muscle.’
  • 97) ‘If the Sopranos ever need some muscle they should drop by the Flamingo.’
  • 98) ‘The truth is, governments and governments alone have the financial and political muscle that can deliver real change.’
  • 99) ‘Public officials must provide the political muscle and resources to implement these programs.’
  • 100) ‘They'd just pay their better players more, and use their financial muscle to build a dominant team.’
  • 101) ‘The history of the first group of wines has been heavily influenced, nay hampered, by the commercial muscle of protectionist Bordeaux.’
  • 102) ‘It is a clever strategy, which has the double benefit of emphasising the Chancellor's political muscle while displaying the weakness of his rival.’
  • 103) ‘Sent this book by someone with less commercial muscle, his editors would unquestionably have demanded a thorough overhaul.’
  • 104) ‘This is a clear case of a multinational conglomerate using its political muscle to the disadvantage of everyone but itself.’
  • 105) ‘But it is an election year and these groups are ready to flex the political muscle.’
  • 106) ‘Consumer and other civic interest groups also put their feet in the door, though they found it much harder to exercise effective political muscle.’
  • 107) ‘These offer the prospect of being able to mobilise grassroots lobbying muscle to influence policy makers.’
  • 108) ‘Countries needed to put political muscle behind health improvement measures, he added.’
  • 109) ‘And the only way to do that is to use the industrial and political muscle that unions have because individuals can't make a lot of difference.’
  • 110) ‘But he needed some financial muscle, a little fiscal clout to open a few doors for him.’
  • 111) ‘The government would provide money to groups of volunteers to give financial muscle to land care projects across the nation.’
  • 112) ‘These groups are easy targets because they don't have the political muscle or the money.’
  • 113) ‘Did you applaud the hauliers and farmers and gleefully hope that their muscle would bring down the cost of fuel?’
  • 114) ‘Behind the scenes, a bit of diplomatic muscle was brought to bear.’
  • 115) ‘Australia has given more than one million dollars to help the process along and it could still be asked to supply judicial muscle to the international tribunal.’
  • 116) ‘His Parliamentary opponents delightedly congratulated each other on their unprecedented exhibition of constitutional muscle.’
  • 117) ‘With European animation companies supplying the creative juice and the US bringing their marketing muscle to bear, these could be profitable for all concerned.’
  • 118) ‘His strength allows him to muscle shots even when he doesn't put the bat's sweet spot on the ball.’
  • 119) ‘A third-generation Marine, he lugged the same heavy pack, muscled the same kind of machine gun into his foxhole at night and took the same risks as any of the bigger men.’
  • 120) ‘The six-liter, 325-horsepower turbo diesel engine can muscle you up loose inclines and keep you in the passing lane.’
  • 121) ‘The silver of the cuffs that bind his hands together behind his back glint as they muscle him down in the direction of the street below, where many sprawling police cars have gathered.’
  • 122) ‘He was a young kid, and now they were going to muscle him out of there.’
  • 123) ‘He muscles the log toward the opposite bank, crouches atop a slick boulder, and steadies the log.’
  • 124) ‘This chef is a meat man, of course, an aggressive, boisterous character used to spending long hours muscling chickens and slabs of beef over a hot open flame.’
  • 125) ‘It moves by rolling, log-style, or by lifting its head or tail, inchworm-like, and muscling itself forward.’
  • 126) ‘It was muscling its way onto shore, hands sinking deeply into the sand.’
  • 127) ‘We see it every day on our way to work, a street scene replicated city-wide: white-collar execs hailing taxis on every street corner, muscling others out of the way for the comfort of air-conditioned interiors.’
  • 128) ‘I was driving to work one morning recently when a gentleman in a big Sports Utility Vehicle barreled down on me from a side street and muscled his way into the line of morning traffic.’
  • 129) ‘And Labour MPs have not just muscled this off the agenda in the run-up to the General Election expected next summer only to see it reappear in the autumn.’
  • 130) ‘He suffered the further indignity of almost being muscled out of the party by executives who wanted to strip him of his riding nomination.’
  • 131) ‘The government also seem to have muscled out the UN in the reconstruction programme.’

Examples

  • 1) Tip in the mussels and clams and pour in the white wine.
  • 2) Wash and scrub the clams and mussels.
  • 3) Arrange prawns or washed mussels over the top with lemon quarters.
  • 4) Add the mussels and season well with salt and pepper.
  • 5) Shell the mussels and keep them hot in a bowl.
  • 6) Now add the cleaned clams and mussels.
  • 7) Add the mussels and put the lid on.
  • 8) Serve with some fresh parsley and the reserved mussels in their shells.
  • 9) Remove the cooled mussels from their shells.
  • 10) Add the mussels and dressing and mix carefully.
  • 11) Discard the thyme and garlic and any mussels or clam shells that are still closed.
  • 12) Add the mussels and cover the pan.
  • 13) Helped by the suckers on her tentacles she can easily prise open clams and mussels that would defeat most people.
  • 14) The oysters, horse mussels and clams that used to carpet the seabed are gone.
  • 15) When all the clams and mussels have opened up, detach their meat from the shells.
  • 16) Tip in the prawns, mussels and clams and cover with a lid.
  • 17) Its underside will become home to mussels and other shellfish, acting as a natural purification plant for the marine environment.
  • 18) Alternatively, eat up the mussels and enjoy the broth with individual portions of blanched rice noodles tossed with a little sesame oil.
  • 19) Simmer the clams, monkfish, mussels and prawns in the casserole for ten minutes.
  • 20) He and his girlfriend enjoy oysters and mussels but recently there have been reports of health problems being suffered by French and British consumers.
  • 21) ‘The shop also has a wide range of seafood including tiger prawns, mussels, sea bream and breaded crab claws.’
  • 22) ‘Add the vegetables, watercress and shelled mussels and clams to this, season to taste and serve.’
  • 23) ‘Extract the meat from most of the mussels and discard the shells.’
  • 24) ‘When cool enough to handle, slip the mussels from their shells and set aside.’
  • 25) ‘I started with mussels, tiger prawns and scallops in a light fish broth flavoured with Chinese spices.’
  • 26) ‘Think of molluscs and chances are it is shellfish such as limpets, whelks, scallops and mussels that spring to mind.’
  • 27) ‘Four or five minutes later, add the clams, then the mussels and prawns, and stir in the saffron strands.’
  • 28) ‘Scrub the mussels and clams, discarding any whose shells are gaping open or seem lifeless when you squeeze them.’
  • 29) ‘I actually like rocks because you can find lots of stuff in them like mussels and crabs and shellfish.’
  • 30) ‘Remove the heads and shells from the prawns and shell the mussels.’
  • 31) ‘Soak the clams and the mussels in a big pot of cold water for an hour or two.’
  • 32) ‘Fresh mussels, also known as poor man's oysters for their cheap abundance, are marvellous at this time of year.’
  • 33) ‘Why couldn't they be farmed, like oysters, or grown on ropes, like mussels?’
  • 34) ‘Press the shells of any open mussels together with your fingers; if they don't close, throw them away.’
  • 35) ‘Meanwhile Andrew lived simply on a diet of mussels and whelks and the occasional boiled crab that bubbled in the pot.’
  • 36) ‘Shell the mussels, watching out for any reluctant beards, and discard any that aren't open.’
  • 37) ‘We ate fish soup, mussels, oysters, skate in brown butter and my aunt's tomato salad.’
  • 38) ‘To this she added most of a can of tomatoes and a touch of cream, and the mussels were put in to steam.’
  • 39) ‘Remove the mussels with a draining spoon and transfer to warm bowls.’
  • 40) ‘When everything is boiling, put in the bag of mussels and boil for 2 minutes.’
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