seem vs seam

seem seam

Definitions

  • 1) obsolete To befit; to beseem.
  • 2) copulative To appear; to look outwardly; to be perceived as.
  • 3) appear to one's own mind or opinion
  • 4) give a certain impression or have a certain outward aspect
  • 5) appear to exist
  • 6) seem to be true, probable, or apparent
  • 7) Tobefitorsuitable.
  • 8) To give the impression of being in a certain way; appear to be.
  • 9) Used to call attention to one's impression or understanding about something, especially in weakening the force of a following infinitive.
  • 10) To appear to be probable or evident.
  • 11) it appears; it is understood as true; it is said.
  • 12) To appear, or to appear to be; to have a show or semblance; to present an appearance; to look; to strike one's apprehension or fancy as being; to be taken as.
  • 13) obsolete To befit; to beseem.

Definitions

  • 1) cricket The stitched equatorial seam of a cricket ball; the sideways movement of a ball when it bounces on the seam.
  • 2) A suture.
  • 3) A thin stratum, especially of coal or mineral.
  • 4) An old English measure of grain, containing eight bushels.
  • 5) sewing A folded back and stitched piece of fabric; especially, the stitching that joins two or more pieces of fabric.
  • 6) A line across a surface, as a crack, fissure, or wrinkle.
  • 7) A line of junction formed by sewing together two pieces of material along their margins.
  • 8) A similar line, ridge, or groove made by fitting, joining, or lapping together two sections along their edges.
  • 9) A suture.
  • 10) A thin layer or stratum, as of coal or rock.
  • 11) A scar.
  • 12) engraving, engraving The quantity of eight bushels of grain.
  • 13) The fold or line formed by sewing together two pieces of cloth or leather.
  • 14) a lace used by carriage makers to cover seams and edges; -- called also seaming lace.
  • 15) (Agric.) A tailor's sadiron for pressing seams.
  • 16) (Geol. & Mining) A thin layer or stratum; a narrow vein between two thicker strata.
  • 17) Obs. or Prov. Eng. Grease; tallow; lard.
  • 18) Hence, a line of junction; a joint; a suture, as on a ship, a floor, or other structure; the line of union, or joint, of two boards, planks, metal plates, etc.
  • 19) A line or depression left by a cut or wound; a scar; a cicatrix.
  • 20) a set for flattering the seams of metal sheets, leather work, etc.
  • 21) a blast made by putting the powder into seams or cracks of rocks.
  • 22) engraving The quantity of 120 pounds of glass.
  • 23) In anatomy, a suture; a raphe.
  • 24) The line formed by joining two edges; especially, the joining line formed by sewing or stitching together two different pieces of cloth, leather, or the like, or two edges of the same piece; a line of union.
  • 25) A piece of plain sewing; that on which sewing is being or is to be done; sewing.
  • 26) The ridge in a casting which marks the place where two parts of the mold have been in contact, as in a plaster east or a molded piece of earthenware.
  • 27) A fissure; a cleft; a groove.
  • 28) A joint used in sheet-metal work where two plates are joined by turning over the edge of the plate and hooking this turned edge into the similarly flexed edge of the next.
  • 29) A cicatrix or scar.
  • 30) In sail-making, a seam run in the middle of a cloth longitudinally, by overlaying a fold of the canvas on itself, so as to give the appearance of a regular seam as between two separate cloths. This is done for appearance in yacht-sails, and to make the sail stand flatter.
  • 31) Same as slit-band.
  • 32) A line of separation, as between two strata, or two planks or the like when fastened together; also, the fissure or gap formed by the imperfect union of two bodies laid or fastened together: as, to calk the seams of a ship.
  • 33) Tallow; grease; lard.
  • 34) A bed or stratum: so used especially in speaking of coal: as, a seam of coal (a bed or continuous layer of coal).
  • 35) plural See the quotation.
  • 36) A horse-load; a load for a pack-horse; specifically, eight bushels of grain or malt.
  • 37) To mark with a groove, wrinkle, scar, or other seamlike line.
  • 38) To become fissured or furrowed; crack open.
  • 39) To put together with or as if with a seam.
  • 40) To become ridgy; to crack open.
  • 41) To mark with something resembling a seam; to line; to scar.
  • 42) To make the appearance of a seam in, as in knitting a stocking; hence, to knit with a certain stitch, like that in such knitting.
  • 43) To form a seam upon or of; to join by sewing together; to unite.

Examples

  • 1) Everyone seems to want a piece of him.
  • 2) This seems to have given it a chance to rest and recover.
  • 3) We seemed to get on well together.
  • 4) Your sight and hearing may seem very sharp.
  • 5) We cannot tell anyone what happened to us and it seems that the couple have extra rights.
  • 6) The government seems to be preparing to do just that.
  • 7) We got on so well it seemed natural to get close on the sofa.
  • 8) There seems something so poignant about it all.
  • 9) They suddenly seem a lot more earthy.
  • 10) Why do humans seem to need sacred time?
  • 11) This may seem a bit incidental to general planning but it is certainly very well worth doing.
  • 12) They do not bully anyone and seem a bit nice.
  • 13) Everyone seems to have thought the same thing.
  • 14) They seem to give them away now.
  • 15) He does not particularly seem to mind.
  • 16) The couple seem relaxed about the possibility of public opprobrium.
  • 17) The difference may now seem trivial, but not then.
  • 18) Also, I should have understood 'boots' where you wrote it, in the letter in question; if it had not been for _the relation of two things_ in it -- and now I perfectly seem to see _how_ I mistook that relation; ( '_seem to see_'; because I have not looked into the letter again since your last night's commentary, and will not --) inasmuch as
  • 19) III. iii.127 (435,5) Or, those that be not, 'would they might seem none!] [W: seem knaves] I believe the meaning is, _would they might no longer seem_, or bear the shape of _men_.
  • 20) Questions about whether Palin knew what she was getting into by using the term seem to miss the mark when it comes to the approach that she has adopted in her public pronouncements since bursting on the national political scene as Republican Sen. John McCain's vice presidential running mate in 2008.
  • 21) He's also co-author of a book called "Getting to YES: Negotiating Agreement Without Giving In" (the last three words of the title seem important).
  • 22) Without Leos Carax's all-caps MERDE between them, the sad, introversive films by Michel Gondry and Bong Joon-ho might make the exclamation point at the end of the title seem ironic.
  • 23) Not only did the title seem strangely fitting, but there are surely parallels between the modern devotional practice surrounding coffee and the role of Soma in ancient Vedic religion.
  • 24) Here, analogical reasoning is at work; “[m] odels in this sense of the term seem to provide what might be termed strong causal analog models” (Ankeny 2001, p. S255).
  • 25) In the development of metaphysical Idealism in the post-Kantian philosophers, the notion of abstraction becomes very general, so general in fact that the origi - nal meanings of the term seem almost lost.
  • 26) ‘Nobody else seems very interested, but I think it looks great!’
  • 27) ‘Nobody else seems to notice, except perhaps Barry, who simply wants to be left alone.’
  • 28) ‘Therefore, it seems somehow a bit excessive to single him out for this sort of treatment.’
  • 29) ‘She also seems more at ease than ever while delivering her songs.’
  • 30) ‘He looked at Gabriel, who almost seemed on the verge of tears.’
  • 31) ‘Now, he seemed almost on the verge of tears, though Reana could only guess why.’
  • 32) ‘Having decided to gift it to the nation, she seems somewhat miffed that nobody now seems to want it.’
  • 33) ‘His master's voice seems unlikely to wake him.’
  • 34) ‘Some things seem destined for repeat discovery until the results are finally taken seriously.’
  • 35) ‘After what seems like an eternity, we finally make it to the entrance.’
  • 36) ‘For what seemed like an eternity, they squirmed in their chairs, speechless.’
  • 37) ‘Still, calling the other lists whimsical seems a tad unfair.’
  • 38) ‘I realize my condemnation of male diner culture may seem a tad harsh.’
  • 39) ‘I might get discouraged but you guys don't seem to care.’
  • 40) ‘Although this argument seems plausible, the evidence quoted in its support does not withstand critical examination.’
  • 41) ‘The administration seems somewhat oblivious to the resultant dangers.’
  • 42) ‘While such an argument seems counterintuitive at first, it does have some grounding in evolutionary biology.’
  • 43) ‘Burton's flair for image seems always at odds with the story at hand.’
  • 44) ‘I know it seems surprising, but I have never ever had a boyfriend.’
  • 45) ‘At first sight, the statements issued by the major churches might seem surprising.’
  • 46) ‘Superficially it would seem to have very little to do with an historic attack on Greece over a millennium before!’
  • 47) ‘On the basis of this evidence, it would seem that the battle against it is lost!’
  • 48) ‘More weight is given to politics than poetry, history or writing, it would seem.’
  • 49) ‘So the sooner these countries are brought under the one umbrella the better, it would seem.’
  • 50) ‘Yet, it would seem that we are going to have a war whether we want it or not.’
  • 51) ‘What is it in a country like this where we have everything, it would seem, at our fingertips?’
  • 52) ‘In fact, it would seem that investigative journalism in the media is no longer the norm.’
  • 53) ‘Roy's save was probably the best action on the pitch, though not, it would seem, of the afternoon.’
  • 54) ‘On the face of it, it would seem that Canadian society is moving in a positive direction.’
  • 55) ‘Alas, unless the place is being refurbished, it would seem that Porter Black's is no more.’
  • 56) ‘You and your husband need to sit down and talk about your problems - at some length, it would seem.’
  • 57) ‘Edward is a perpetual student, it would seem, born in the year of the rooster!’
  • 58) ‘There is no redemption from punishment as rigid as this, it would seem, only escalation.’
  • 59) ‘Colleges and universities have come a long way from discussing beauty it would seem.’
  • 60) ‘In such a situation, it would seem that people do not have a real choice in our democracy.’
  • 61) ‘Well, it seems we are going to hear rather less of this stuff over the coming weeks.’
  • 62) ‘Trying to get anywhere in this day and age, it seems, is just too fraught with danger.’
  • 63) ‘It seems to me that what the citizens want will most definitely not be what we get.’
  • 64) ‘It seems that there are people here who are cutting off their noses to spite their faces.’
  • 65) ‘It seems that the media training he is said to have had over the summer has had a positive effect.’
  • 66) ‘Despite pre-tournament warnings the game cannot seem to rid itself of diving and there was a surfeit of the antic throughout the competition.’
  • 67) ‘The truly odd thing is that, despite everything, the people who buy the season tickets cannot seem to get the truth into their heads.’
  • 68) ‘I would have had more time to socialise but I started playing pool and by some fluke couldn't seem to put a ball wrong.’
  • 69) ‘I just couldn't seem to get a hold on my emotions - and this was before I found out about the earthquake.’
  • 70) ‘She fidgeted with her necklace, and couldn't seem to decide where to look.’
  • 71) ‘The problem was that they just couldn't seem to apply any sustained pressure.’
  • 72) ‘The schoolgirl said she had been scared and had wanted to cry out but she couldn't seem to find her voice.’
  • 73) ‘I just cannot seem to get the ‘tick’ and the ‘tock’ in beat - the intervals between them have to be exactly the same.’
  • 74) ‘Try though I might, there are some people whose motivations, whose hardwiring one might say, I cannot seem to figure out.’
  • 75) ‘Guess which is the one which I cannot seem to face?’
  • 76) ‘Some words cannot seem to escape their associated stereotypes.’
  • 77) ‘You go through the same emotions and questions over and over, and talk with your friends about the same topics because you cannot seem to make a decision.’
  • 78) ‘I cannot seem to connect with my machine right now.’
  • 79) ‘One of the emotions that some people cannot seem to manage is anger.’
  • 80) ‘I cannot seem to achieve anything if I don't have a deadline with a date and a fixed hour, looming over my head.’
  • 81) ‘I cannot seem to find out any other information about this change.’
  • 82) ‘This act made me cry instantly and I cannot seem to get over the fact that someone would have taken these things.’
  • 83) ‘You spend far more time alone than you would like to and cannot seem to change this’
  • 84) ‘Above all, I find it very hard just to blame the player when his own manager cannot seem to grasp what the fuss might be about.’
  • 85) ‘I have been drinking cranberry juice, but I cannot seem to break the cycle of reinfection.’

Examples

  • 1) The toe seams are sewn by hand and this guarantees a great fit.
  • 2) Thread yarn through remaining stitches and join seam.
  • 3) We almost picked a side with only two seam bowlers.
  • 4) Africa is no longer a commodity seam fit only to be looted.
  • 5) Their bodies have still not been recovered because of a fire burning in a coal seam.
  • 6) Use plain seams and seam the lining together in the same way.
  • 7) She somehow combined a rich seam of anarchy with a deep conservatism.
  • 8) It will be a battle between their batters and our seam bowling unit.
  • 9) This also allows for top hem and base seam.
  • 10) Underneath the careful insouciance lay a thick seam of resolution.
  • 11) Turn in seam allowance at one end of tube.
  • 12) Secrets of royalty and celebrity remain sewn into the seams of the garments.
  • 13) It has been a seam bowlers' match.
  • 14) Unlikely to be involved unless injuries take their toll of the front-line seam bowling attack.
  • 15) Pin, tack and stitch lengths together with a narrow flat fell seam.
  • 16) The margin was only a millimetre or two, a row of stitches on the seam.
  • 17) Just how rich a seam they have hit will become clear over the next year, probably within months.
  • 18) Indeed, it was the second-highest score of a match in which seam bowlers held sway.
  • 19) This seam is your back seam. it is good to trim the edges with pinking shears if you have them.
  • 20) After the coal seam is mined, the coal operator may move on to reclamation, perhaps by planting lespedeza sericea, a hardy imported ground cover.
  • 21) It looked wonderful, and fit to perfection, the sleeve-set-in seam sitting precisely on the shoulder, the stripes looking deliberate across body and sleeves.
  • 22) Or dropped-shoulder, like the dinosaur sweater last year, where only a simple straight seam is required.
  • 23) In portal-quest fantasy, you have a here-and-now and an elsewhen which have a point of contact or overlap; the seam is generally sealed tightly but there's at least one portal that allows the protagonist to set out from the former on a grand adventure through the latter.
  • 24) Place the roll in the prepared loaf pan, making sure the seam is on the bottom.
  • 25) ‘He turned to the foreman and said, ‘The patterns of the side seams on these coats do not match.’’
  • 26) ‘The flapper dress echoed the flattened forms and straight seams of the Japanese kimono.’
  • 27) ‘Cut two pieces of terry cloth, each as wide as the chair, plus 1-inch seam allowances.’
  • 28) ‘When practical, sew in sleeves before sewing the side seams and sleeve seams.’
  • 29) ‘Stitch the side seams and hem the lower edge.’
  • 30) ‘To bind a neckline, sew only one sweater shoulder seam before adding the binding.’
  • 31) ‘Sew the shoulder seams and press open, then set in the sleeves.’
  • 32) ‘Stitch a shoulder seam from the pin to the end of the fabric.’
  • 33) ‘Sew the border strips to the long edges and press the seams toward the inner border.’
  • 34) ‘Sew to opposite long edges of the quilt top and press the seams toward the borders.’
  • 35) ‘The top of the underarm seam is where the design should match when cutting the bodice and sleeves.’
  • 36) ‘Baste the seams, leaving the center back seam open about 8 inches.’
  • 37) ‘Eliminate the center back seam on the vest upper and lower back sections.’
  • 38) ‘Pin the sleeve and its lining together at the underarm seam down at your wrist.’
  • 39) ‘Sew buttons at the garment neckline seam, and button the collar in place.’
  • 40) ‘The inside seams do not create any discomfort or cause itching.’
  • 41) ‘They were made of fine gauze and silks and their seams showed no wear.’
  • 42) ‘Apply the spray to the point of runoff to as many surfaces as possible, especially joints, seams, cracks, ledges, and corners.’
  • 43) ‘To hide the rough seams, I purchased raw wood moulding from the lumberyard and finished it to match the aged look of the Arquati frame.’
  • 44) ‘A seam roller is a handy tool that flattens the seams between lengths of wallpaper.’
  • 45) ‘If they are, try to use the seam roller and press the seams back into place.’
  • 46) ‘Of these, the most important advantage is extremely thin weld seams.’
  • 47) ‘The sheets are nailed together at the seams.’
  • 48) ‘In the 16th century it was chiefly utilitarian, covering wall seams and keeping out drafts.’
  • 49) ‘But it also can come in tongue-and-groove styles so there are virtually no seams once it is installed.’
  • 50) ‘As with any liner system, it is important to use as few seams as possible.’
  • 51) ‘This more recent house on the Izu Peninsula marks a temporary break with mining the fertile seams of Toyko's quixotic urban geology.’
  • 52) ‘A seam of coal about two feet thick was discovered, but underlying this seam of coal was a seam of clay approximately four feet thick.’
  • 53) ‘There was a coal seam on his property, a V-shaped trench behind the old homesite where the farm family had dug out chunks for home use.’
  • 54) ‘There in the bottom of the brook was a seam of amethyst crystals that averaged perhaps to be one half inch thick and a inch long.’
  • 55) ‘Free-standing crystals and two-dimensional sprays in thin seams can be found.’
  • 56) ‘Mine operators deferred new mines in recent years because future reserves tend to be in deeper, thinner seams.’
  • 57) ‘And they are beginning to mine it as a thick seam of pure gold.’
  • 58) ‘On his mother's side of the family, Ian found a further rich seam of history.’
  • 59) ‘But there is now a seam of talent in reserve that gets the manager's blood racing.’
  • 60) ‘But Australia has always had a seam of prim respectability running alongside its man o' the people stuff.’
  • 61) ‘Each president had a seam of fatalism, but neither acted as if he lacked the power to shape the course of the conflict.’
  • 62) ‘When straight-stitch seaming, gently stretch the fabric in front of and behind the presser foot as you sew.’
  • 63) ‘Perfect for traveling due to its wrinkle resistance, tussah is appropriate for garments where shaping is produced by seaming, rather than gathering or pleating.’
  • 64) ‘Before cutting, review faux fur seaming options and note whether seam allowances will require adjustment.’
  • 65) ‘All the seams are finished by serging then seaming as she instructs in her patterns.’
  • 66) ‘Avoid patterns with darts and princess seaming.’
  • 67) ‘A low back and side seaming tailor the leotard while complementing natural curves.’
  • 68) ‘Lots of girls we talked to said they liked the look of seamed mesh convertible tights.’
  • 69) ‘For patterns with straight front or back seaming, add extra-wide seam allowances to the pattern pieces to support embroidery.’
  • 70) ‘At the bottom the gunwale board was seamed to the next board with tread seam and further down with rivet nails of iron.’
  • 71) ‘Constructed of two rectangles of fabric, generally of linen, the chiton was seamed together in a number of variations.’
  • 72) ‘The fabric was just wide enough to wrap around the body and was seamed up one side to form a tube.’
  • 73) ‘On the other hand, for more fashion conscious women there are seamed nylon stockings of thinner varieties, which enhance the beauty of your legs.’
  • 74) ‘Many joined shopkeepers in wearing period costumes, including authentic make up and seamed stockings.’
  • 75) ‘He was a stocky, dark, hard-countenanced man who had never bothered to have removed the scar that seamed his brow.’
  • 76) ‘His face was seamed with wrinkles, and he generally dressed as if he were an unmade bed.’
  • 77) ‘They were moving away from the sea, over flat farmlands seamed with stony riverbeds.’
  • 78) ‘She was painfully thin and her face was seamed with many fine lines.’
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