smelled vs smelt

smelled smelt

Definitions

  • 1) Simple past tense and past participle of smell.

Definitions

  • 1) Any of the various liquids or semi-molten solids produced and used during the course of such production.
  • 2) Production of metal, especially iron, from ore in a process that involves melting and chemical reduction of metal compounds into purified metal.
  • 3) Any small anadromous fish of the family Osmeridae, found in the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans and in lakes in North America and northern part of Europe.
  • 4) Any of various small silvery marine, freshwater, and anadromous food fishes of the family Osmeridae, found in cold waters of the Northern Hemisphere, especially Osmerus mordax of North America and O. eperlanus of Europe.
  • 5) (Zoöl.) the silverside.
  • 6) obsolete A gull; a simpleton.
  • 7) (Zoöl.) Any one of numerous species of small silvery salmonoid fishes of the genus Osmerus and allied genera, which ascend rivers to spawn, and sometimes become landlocked in lakes. They are esteemed as food, and have a peculiar odor and taste.
  • 8) small trout-like silvery marine or freshwater food fishes of cold northern waters
  • 9) small cold-water silvery fish; migrate between salt and fresh water
  • 10) A gull; a simpleton.
  • 11) Any one of various small fishes.
  • 12) Simple past tense and past participle of smell.
  • 13) to fuse two things into one, especially when involving ores; to meld
  • 14) extract (metals) by heating
  • 15) imp.&p.p.ofsmell.
  • 16) To melt or fuse. Used of ores.
  • 17) To melt or fuse (ores) in order to separate the metallic constituents.
  • 18) (Metal.) To melt or fuse, as, ore, for the purpose of separating and refining the metal; hence, to reduce; to refine; to flux or scorify.

Examples

  • 1) You know when you buy something and it has a distinctive smell about it?
  • 2) They detected a rotting smell and pulled up floorboards.
  • 3) Dogs have a far superior sense of smell.
  • 4) The man who made it smell like one.
  • 5) When did we begin to think that clean should smell of anything at all?
  • 6) So why do so many people wish to smell of her?
  • 7) They smell horrible and will have potential buyers running for the door.
  • 8) You could practically smell the coffee roasting.
  • 9) You can almost smell the panic and desperation.
  • 10) Why do the lavatories always smell unpleasant?
  • 11) You might well be able to smell something you cannot see or hear.
  • 12) Your tub will sparkle and smell delicious.
  • 13) You can almost smell which particular plant it was pressed at.
  • 14) They will smell her smells and could become unsettled and upset.
  • 15) The steam will loosen the dirt and the lemon will make the microwave smell fresh.
  • 16) Do they spit venom or emit noxious smells?
  • 17) When his wife came into the room she smelt round for an instant.
  • 18) Traders heard about it and smelled weakness.
  • 19) Both have lost their sense of smell and say this stops them enjoying their food.
  • 20) One man said he had a smell like petrol in his nose for weeks.
  • 21) Unlike when we discern images of sounds, we basically detect smell by forming a memory of that smell.
  • 22) But Stephen Crowley stooped before a lovely carnation, and smelled, and _smelled_, drawing in long breaths, as though he meant to take its fragrance all away with him; and Nimble Dick picked up the straying end of an ivy, and restored it to its support again, in a way that was not to be lost sight of by one who was looking for hearts; and Dirk Colson brushed back his matted hair and stood long before a great, pure lily, and looked down into its heart with an expression on his face that his teacher never forgot.
  • 23) The puff on the bed they put me in smelled old-fashionedly of flake soap, the way my mother's laundry used to when I helped her carry the wet wash basket out back to the clothesline.
  • 24) Although several vets wanted to euthanize her on the spot, I wanted time to right the wrong -- she had been banished to the backyard for months because she was bleeding and "smelled" -- when in fact, treatable cancer was allowed to become terminal.
  • 25) Actually now that you mention the hotwheels I used to carry pez dispensers which would often 'disappear' and then pen markers that 'smelled' - I guess smelling grape every now and then made a bad day a little better.
  • 26) The word honey smelled the worst, and I pretended to look out my window to get away from it.
  • 27) Call smelled the sizzling meat and realized he was hungry.
  • 28) "When we took it away, it really changed the way the restaurant smelled, which is a big part of the dining experience."

Examples

  • 1) The T-shirt she'd left to dry overnight was stiff and smelt of peat.
  • 2) She recognized them all as Steve's, they had his look somehow, smelt like him.
  • 3) She tugged at the tangles as best she could and slowly re-braided her long hair, wondering if she smelt as bad as everyone else did.
  • 4) ‘Through a back door, Jinx could see a small clearing, the middle of which was clear of snow surrounding a pit in the ground - evidently Rob's metalworking needs could be addressed by smelting metal in an earth-pit.’
  • 5) ‘Iron was smelted, converted to steel, and subsequently rolled or forged to meet the demands of both domestic and international industrial markets.’
  • 6) ‘The deforestation was especially expensive to the Norse Greenlanders because they required charcoal in order to smelt iron to extract iron from bogs.’
  • 7) ‘Ventilation of the spaces on the south end, where gold and silver were smelted, apparently had turned out to be inadequate; the third floor was designed to correct that problem.’
  • 8) ‘Belonging to a more elite corps, they promoted the railway by actively participating in the modernisation of the steel industry, creating English-style forges and a renaissance in smelting furnaces.’
  • 9) ‘In most of the world other than the U.S., rotary furnaces (long, short, and top blown) have replaced blast furnaces as the major smelting vessels for lead recycling.’
  • 10) ‘The Coalbrookdale Company had smelted its last iron in the area by 1821, and that year had dismantled the Resolution steam engine that pumped water up the dale to power the furnace bellows.’
  • 11) ‘The Bangka and Belitung regency governments have invited private investors to set up smelting facilities to process tin ore into tin metal, which would help increase the price of tin in the international market.’
  • 12) ‘‘This very important site is one of only a handful of water-powered iron smelting furnaces in the country,’ said John Hodgson, LDNPA senior archaeologist.’
  • 13) ‘Now a researcher is to test his theory that rural Ryedale could have become one of the great industrial centres of the North by re-creating a medieval iron smelting furnace at Rievaulx Abbey, near Helmsley.’
  • 14) ‘Once upon a time, long, long ago, the tribal craftsmen of India knew how to smelt iron of such purity that it never rusted.’
  • 15) ‘Without charcoal we wouldn't have been able to smelt the metals that helped transform early man into the technological man we are today.’
  • 16) ‘More recently, archaeological discoveries have documented the Incas' extensive efforts to mine silver ore and extract the precious metal in smelting operations.’
  • 17) ‘It was more difficult to use coal where higher temperatures were needed to smelt metals, for the fuel came into contact with the ores and introduced impurities.’
  • 18) ‘In turn, when Longdale's owner, William Firmstone smelted his first pig iron at Lucy Selina Furnace with this coke, he turned out the first iron ever produced in Virginia with this fuel.’
  • 19) ‘The concentrates are refined by smelting - they are melted, and the impurities are removed as a slag.’
  • 20) ‘Local metallurgy evolved into bigger factories and British technology, including English smelting furnaces and imported coal, was used intensively.’
  • 21) ‘Since charcoal was traditionally used to smelt iron from its ore, some carbon was always incorporated into the metallic product by chance.’
  • 22) ‘Over two millennia these Mesopotamian cities developed the art of copper smelting, alloying bronze and, most importantly, writing.’
  • 23) ‘Bricks have always been used for years by the construction industry, and for lining of ore smelting furnaces.’
  • 24) ‘They were made by the labour of men who won iron ore and coal; who turned the coal into coke; who smelted the ore; who fashioned the crude ingots of metal into engines; and so on.’
  • 25) ‘At Swansea, the ore was smelted using huge quantities of cheap coal, producing a poisoned landscape.’
  • 26) ‘More than thirty-four years after its discovery some sixty miners were employed raising the ore while above ground thousands of tons of old tailigs and ore were smelted.’
  • 27) ‘To make smalt, cobalt ore is smelted, and the resulting cobalt oxide poured into molten glass.’
  • 28) ‘The simple explanation is that modern production techniques of smelting ore and manufacturing copper, brass, and iron for commercial use remove impurities.’
  • 29) ‘Larger salmon eat a variety of fishes such as herring and alewives, smelts, capelin, small mackerel, sand lace, and small cod.’
  • 30) ‘The Brown Pelican's diet consists almost entirely of fish such as smelt and anchovies.’
  • 31) ‘You can find whole fresh smelts at the market, and you typically cook them whole.’
  • 32) ‘Baits are normally small smelts, sardines or roach.’
  • 33) ‘And if you're really lucky, they'll have pristine fried smelts to offer: tender sardine-size fish, split down the middle and gorgeously fried.’
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