rabbit bunny hare

Definitions

  • 1) A mammal of the family Leporidae, with long ears, long hind legs and a short, fluffy tail.
  • 2) cricket A very poor batsman; selected as a bowler or wicket-keeper.
  • 3) The fur of a rabbit typically used to imitate another animal's fur.
  • 4) A runner in a distance race whose goal is mainly to set the pace, either to tire a specific rival so that a teammate can win or to help another break a record; a pacesetter.
  • 5) A racehorse that is run at a fast pace early in a race in order to tire the favorite so that another horse can take the lead.
  • 6) Any of various long-eared, short-tailed, burrowing mammals of the family Leporidae, such as the commonly domesticated species Oryctolagus cuniculus, native to Europe and widely introduced elsewhere, or the cottontail of the Americas.
  • 7) A competitor who is designated to set a fast pace for a teammate during a long-distance race.
  • 8) A hare.
  • 9) A mechanical decoy that is propelled around the track in a greyhound race to incite the dogs.
  • 10) The fur of a rabbit or hare.
  • 11) (Zoöl.) Any one of several species of plectognath fishes, as the bur fish, and puffer. The term is also locally applied to other fishes.
  • 12) a hole in the earth made by rabbits for shelter and habitation.
  • 13) a dish of which the chief constituents are melted cheese over toasted bread, flavored in various ways, as with ale, beer, milk, or spices. The name is popularly said to be a corruption of Welsh rare bit, but it is probably merely a humorous designation; -- also called Welsh rarebit.
  • 14) a piece of ground appropriated to the breeding and preservation of rabbits.
  • 15) (Zoöl.) Any of the smaller species of the genus Lepus, especially the common European species (Lepus cuniculus), which is often kept as a pet, and has been introduced into many countries. It is remarkably prolific, and has become a pest in some parts of Australia and New Zealand.
  • 16) (Zoöl.) the pika.
  • 17) (Bot.) See Cyclamen.
  • 18) (Zoöl.) a variety of the domestic rabbit having long, soft fur.
  • 19) flesh of any of various rabbits or hares (wild or domesticated) eaten as food
  • 20) the fur of a rabbit
  • 21) any of various burrowing animals of the family Leporidae having long ears and short tails; some domesticated and raised for pets or food
  • 22) Hence Any hare; a leporid, or any member of the Leporidæ.
  • 23) A rodent mammal, Lepus cuniculus, of the hare family, Leporidæ; a kind of hare notable for burrowing in the ground.
  • 24) A wooden implement used in mixing mortar.
  • 25) A wooden can used as a drinking-vessel.
  • 26) US, intransitive To flee.
  • 27) UK, intransitive To talk incessantly and in a childish manner; to babble annoyingly.
  • 28) intransitive To hunt rabbits.
  • 29) hunt rabbits
  • 30) Tohuntortraprabbits.
  • 31) To hunt rabbits or hares.

Definitions

  • 1) sports In basketball, an easy shot (i.e., one right next to the bucket) that is missed.
  • 2) mining A sudden enlargement or mass of ore, as opposed to a vein or lode.
  • 3) A bunny girl: a nightclub waitress who wears a costume having rabbit ears and tail.
  • 4) A chine or gully formed by water running over the edge of a cliff; a wooded glen or small ravine opening through the cliff line to the sea.
  • 5) A swelling from a blow; a bump.
  • 6) South Africa bunny chow; a snack of bread filled with curry
  • 7) A culvert or short covered drain connecting two ditches.
  • 8) mining A sudden enlargement or mass of ore, as opposed to a vein or lode.
  • 9) South Africa bunny chow; a snack of bread filled with curry
  • 10) Any small drain or culvert.
  • 11) A small pool of water.
  • 12) A rabbit, especially a juvenile.
  • 13) sports In basketball, an easy shot (i.e., one right next to the bucket) that is missed.
  • 14) A brick arch or wooden bridge, covered with earth across a drawn or carriage in a water-meadow, just wide enough to allow a hay-wagon to pass over.
  • 15) Sports A shot that is uncontested or should be easily made, as in basketball.
  • 16) A rabbit, especially a young one.
  • 17) Sports A shot that is uncontested or should be easily made, as in basketball.
  • 18) A person of a specific type.
  • 19) (Mining) A great collection of ore without any vein coming into it or going out from it.
  • 20) A pet name for a rabbit or a squirrel.
  • 21) (Mining) A great collection of ore without any vein coming into it or going out from it.
  • 22) (usually informal) especially a young rabbit
  • 23) a young waitress in a nightclub whose costume includes the tail and ears of a rabbit
  • 24) A swelling from a blow; a bump.
  • 25) A gully formed by water making its way over the edge of a cliff.
  • 26) Same as bonny.
  • 27) A pet name for a rabbit.
  • 28) not comparable In skiing, easy or unchallenging.
  • 29) not comparable In skiing, easy or unchallenging.
  • 30) Resembling a bun

Definitions

  • 1) Any of several plant-eating animals of the family Leporidae, especially of the genus Lepus, similar to a rabbit, but larger and with longer ears.
  • 2) Any of various mammals of the family Leporidae, especially of the genus Lepus, similar to rabbits but having longer ears and legs and giving birth to active, furred young.
  • 3) (Zoöl.) See Aplysia.
  • 4) (Zoöl.) a small Australian kangaroo (Lagorchestes Leporoides), resembling the hare in size and color
  • 5) (Bot.) a plant of the genus Sonchus, or sow thistle; -- so called because hares are said to eat it when fainting with heat.
  • 6) (Zoöl.) See Aplysia.
  • 7) (Zoöl.) See under Jumping.
  • 8) a game played by men and boys, two, called hares, having a few minutes' start, and scattering bits of paper to indicate their course, being chased by the others, called the hounds, through a wide circuit.
  • 9) (Zoöl.) See under Jumping.
  • 10) (Astron.) A small constellation situated south of and under the foot of Orion; Lepus.
  • 11) (Zoöl.) See Chief hare.
  • 12) (Zoöl.) A rodent of the genus Lepus, having long hind legs, a short tail, and a divided upper lip. It is a timid animal, moves swiftly by leaps, and is remarkable for its fecundity.
  • 13) (Zoöl.) A rodent of the genus Lepus, having long hind legs, a short tail, and a divided upper lip. It is a timid animal, moves swiftly by leaps, and is remarkable for its fecundity.
  • 14) (Bot.) a plant of the genus Sonchus, or sow thistle; -- so called because hares are said to eat it when fainting with heat.
  • 15) (Zoöl.) See Chief hare.
  • 16) (Zoöl.) a small Australian kangaroo (Lagorchestes Leporoides), resembling the hare in size and color
  • 17) (Astron.) A small constellation situated south of and under the foot of Orion; Lepus.
  • 18) swift timid long-eared mammal larger than a rabbit having a divided upper lip and long hind legs; young born furred and with open eyes
  • 19) flesh of any of various rabbits or hares (wild or domesticated) eaten as food
  • 20) So many new species and subspecies of hares have been described of late years that common names have not kept pace with scientific names.
  • 21) [capitalized] In astronomy, one of the forty-eight ancient constellations of Ptolemy, situated in the southern hemisphere.
  • 22) A rodent quadruped of the family Leporidæ and genus Lepus.
  • 23) Everybody; people generally.
  • 24) intransitive To move swiftly.
  • 25) intransitive To move swiftly.
  • 26) run quickly, like a hare
  • 27) Seehe,I.,D.
  • 28) See he, I., D .
  • 29) To harass; worry; frighten.
  • 30) To move hurriedly, as if hunting a swift quarry.
  • 31) obsolete To excite; to tease, harass, or worry; to harry.
  • 32) obsolete To excite; to tease, harass, or worry; to harry.

Examples

  • 1) He explained they were commonly used for hunting squirrels, rabbits and other small animals.
  • 2) But perhaps you just feel sorry for the poor rabbit.
  • 3) He learned to hunt rabbits with the help of a ferret.
  • 4) But why not bring back rabbit fur?
  • 5) He claimed he bought the rabbit meat at a store.
  • 6) They snared rabbits for food and skins with which to sew caps and cloaks.
  • 7) We must catch the rabbit if we want to eat.
  • 8) One owner in three thinks rabbits live for no more than five years.
  • 9) He made rabbit liver and kidney on toast followed by a rabbit stew.
  • 10) Animals from rabbits to cattle eat them.
  • 11) This year my garden has become overrun with wild rabbits from the field next door.
  • 12) There may yet be scope for a small rabbit from the hat.
  • 13) Young squirrel is better than rabbit or chicken.
  • 14) It is still legal to use dogs to catch rats and rabbits.
  • 15) He also liked to hunt rabbits with a ferret, which was against the law.
  • 16) When the rice turns translucent, pull the meat off the rabbit and add to the risotto.
  • 17) Yet not so long ago, kale was considered below rabbit food.
  • 18) I have felt like one of those poor rabbits when the snake is writhing towards it.
  • 19) I like to use a hat that combines rabbit fur with fabric.
  • 20) ‘The chances of survival for South Africa's most endangered mammal, the riverine rabbit, looks even more desperate than has commonly been feared.’
  • 21) ‘Appearances were put in by eastern chipmunks, gray squirrels, a rabbit and our new resident woodchuck.’
  • 22) ‘Two new extinct species are named (a rabbit and squirrel) and two of the mustelids may represent extinct new species as well.’
  • 23) ‘In other words, the Amami rabbit has been isolated for so long from other rabbits and hares, including the volcano rabbit, that they are scarcely kin.’
  • 24) ‘Rodents (except the groundhog) and members of the rabbit or hare families are rarely infected with rabies.’
  • 25) ‘It is a patient bird, quite content to sit for hours at a time until a young rabbit, a rat or a mouse chances to pass beneath it.’
  • 26) ‘English landowners introduced the European rabbit to the continent in 1859, seeking game animals for sport hunting.’
  • 27) ‘Most of the animals that participate in the program are dogs and cats - the occasional rabbit and guinea pig are introduced from time to time.’
  • 28) ‘The rabbit was sitting up on its hind legs, still staring at her.’
  • 29) ‘After all, to a shooting man the only good rabbit is a dead rabbit.’
  • 30) ‘The next day she found the white rabbit still had no food or water.’
  • 31) ‘Deer, rabbits and foxes came racing out of the woods.’
  • 32) ‘They mostly eat rodents, eastern cottontail rabbits, insects, and fruit.’
  • 33) ‘They take other small rodents, shrews, rabbits, gophers, bats, and muskrats as well.’
  • 34) ‘The large, ever growing incisors in both rabbits and rodents do not undergo functional replacement.’
  • 35) ‘Foxes, rabbits, harvest mice, house mice, dormice, shrews, weasels, and voles all depend on the hedgerows as a place to breed, hunt or shelter.’
  • 36) ‘Deer, hares, rabbits, mice, rats, pigeons, crows and many insects have to be ‘controlled’ in order for these crops to thrive.’
  • 37) ‘The magnificent cats are taking their natural prey, such as deer and rabbits, but discovering also that sheep and cattle and goats are easier to catch.’
  • 38) ‘Indeed, meat and pelts are a resource, but rabbits also destroy crops.’
  • 39) ‘Elsewhere, disappearing rabbits can signal declining health of grassland and sagebrush ecosystems.’
  • 40) ‘From every kitchen in the village arose the most delicious aromas: apple pies, rabbit and chicken pies, fairy cakes, pancakes.’
  • 41) ‘Wild rabbit has a much darker flesh than farmed rabbit, but both are extremely versatile and, because of the price, you can afford to experiment.’
  • 42) ‘My recipe for today is an old Australian country recipe for rabbit pie.’
  • 43) ‘This weekend's patrons can expect to be served shrimp bisque or rabbit pie with bay-leaf juice.’
  • 44) ‘I scoffed everything my mother put in front of me - plate-sized Yorkshire puddings, meat and potato pie, rabbit and dumplings, the lot.’
  • 45) ‘Exotic meats such as rabbit, venison and wild boar are available, in addition to countless varieties of sausages.’
  • 46) ‘Add the chicken and rabbit and cook until golden brown, about five minutes.’
  • 47) ‘Cretan cuisine centres mainly on chicken, pork, lamb, rabbit or fish, served in a variety of non-spicy sauces.’
  • 48) ‘Sturdier ones, such as lavender, can be stuffed into chicken or rabbit before roasting, and then discarded later.’
  • 49) ‘My main course - confit of wild rabbit with Savoy cabbage and bacon with garlic and parsley mash - looked delectable.’
  • 50) ‘The rabbit ballotine was so plain as to be almost unpleasant.’
  • 51) ‘If local meat eaters all got hooked on home-grown rabbit, imagine the effect on our food import bill.’
  • 52) ‘Like lamb cutlets, rabbit joints seem to be made for holding in your hands.’
  • 53) ‘I sampled a tender saddle of rabbit, wrapped in fatty Portuguese bacon and doused in a bubbly mustard emulsion.’
  • 54) ‘The document reveals that the bishop's menu would have included a range of meats, from mutton and beef to veal, geese, rabbit, duck and lamb.’
  • 55) ‘The substantial plate of rabbit was beautifully tender and came with the sort of gloriously rich sauce that you can feel furring up your arteries as you eat.’
  • 56) ‘My other food friend was excited by the presence of rabbit on the menu.’
  • 57) ‘Fuller Pinot styles go well with poached or grilled salmon, foie gras, charcuterie, rabbit, hare, boar and ham.’
  • 58) ‘The game selection in my dish included venison, rabbit and pigeon.’
  • 59) ‘Hot Cross Bunny turns out to be a recipe for curried rabbit that includes a shot of fiery Thai red curry paste.’
  • 60) ‘Elsewhere both the English and Indian rabbits failed miserably in their quest for world domination.’
  • 61) ‘Hunting with dogs would ban a number of less well-known bloodsports, like hare coursing, mink hunting, rabbiting with terriers.’
  • 62) ‘This was it, Evelyn recalls thinking, everything would go back to how it used to be; they would go rabbiting in the Phoenix Park, take trips in the car and visit the strawberry beds.’
  • 63) ‘It does, however, need plenty of exercise and will enjoy a days rabbiting, should the opportunity arise.’
  • 64) ‘I wanted to go out rabbiting with Oscar, but you've been gone ages and now he's gone to sleep.’
  • 65) ‘Their excuse, said Mr Evans, was that they were visiting Cumbria for rabbiting and ferreting - an implausible explanation at a time when people were not allowed on to farmland because of the foot-and-mouth epidemic.’
  • 66) ‘Our mate Robbo came over here for a few weeks last year and when he got back he couldn't stop rabbiting on about the place.’
  • 67) ‘Some of you may remember, in the dim and distant recesses of your cobwebbed memory, that last week I was rabbiting on about my son's chums and their abundance of confidence when it came to chit-chatting with adults.’
  • 68) ‘He answered the shop phone and an executive-type started rabbiting on about buying a laptop computer.’
  • 69) ‘As she made her grateful escape, Mum is rabbiting on, ‘I hope she's got a good deodorant on a day like this.’’
  • 70) ‘The rest were rabbiting on about share prices, company takeovers, fashion accessories, holiday destinations or some such guff.’
  • 71) ‘She is rabbiting on about antibiotics and bacterial resistance, which have nothing to do with the financial review debate.’
  • 72) ‘There is nothing in Part 1 about pensions, schools, holidays, or whatever he was rabbiting on about.’
  • 73) ‘While he was rabbiting on about how we would jump off the cliffs at Barnageeragh, I slipped quietly away.’
  • 74) ‘I'm starting to rabbit on now, so I'll stop there.’
  • 75) ‘Given half a chance, she's rabbiting passionately about cultural strategies, architectural policies and the thorny problem of getting teenage girls into sport.’
  • 76) ‘She was in the kitchen when I arrived, simultaneously rabbiting into a mobile phone while watching a soap opera on television.’
  • 77) ‘Frank, why did you rabbit?’
  • 78) ‘I spotted him, and he rabbited and abandoned the car.’
  • 79) ‘A rushing in the bushes to her left let her know the Doolittle boys had rabbited.’
  • 80) ‘Carlos wants to know why they rabbited and did someone tip them off.’
  • 81) ‘What had sent James rabbiting off to Bedfordshire when Mr. Turnbull was supposed to have gone?’
  • 82) ‘I noticed another junkie watching me: he was trying to decide whether to rabbit or freeze.’

Examples

  • 1) The defence mechanism came in the form of bunny ears and a smartphone.
  • 2) One gym bunny admitted:'You know all those exercise mats you see lying around?
  • 3) We were gym bunnies together, pushing the limits of our injuries, making plans for what might become of the rest of our lives.
  • 4) There was no sign of a mobile phone and a distinct absence of the bunny ears that sent the Formula One world champion into fits of giggles.
  • 5) They agree that bunny rabbits have five legs.
  • 6) When did you turn into a gym bunny?
  • 7) He is more fluffy bunny than hot rabbit.
  • 8) Now a younger generation of gym bunnies has put the boot camp back into ballet.
  • 9) Fancy yourself as a ski bunny?
  • 10) The England striker has not looked a happy bunny in recent weeks.
  • 11) The ski bunnies expect the very best, too.
  • 12) So she's not what you would call a happy bunny.
  • 13) We don't want cute little bunny rabbits choking on our plastic bottles.
  • 14) That's because some man wearing bunny ears is in my way.
  • 15) Who bought the 70 bunny costume?
  • 16) Talk about bringing new meaning to the term bunny slope
  • 17) Of course the real actor who plays the title bunny never actually shows her boobies.
  • 18) Just last night I received what I call a bunny facial -- a thorough grooming of my face with a little bunny tongue at 1 a.m. when one of my rabbits decided I needed it.
  • 19) Watercolor, ink, and potato prints; and the bunny is adorable.
  • 20) I freaked out over the “baby bunny in the forest oh LOOK baby bunny is dead blood everywhere” stories that daughter wrote (dictated) and illustrated in preschool.
  • 21) And that picture of the easter bunny is my favorite picture ever taken.
  • 22) The pink bunny is the mascot character of the not-very-sadly missed English school, Nova, which succumbed to market forces last year, although the name has been bought out and the rabbit has returned from the grave and been spotted in television advertisements.
  • 23) Marshall-Stacks said ... children can be traumatised by the loss of a favourite huggy thing, and I guess the nice people know that a missing bunny is Very Significant in a life out there somewhere.
  • 24) ‘Think bunny rabbits, chocolates and Valentine Cards.’
  • 25) ‘Easter bunnies, mad March hares and a tonne of daffodils, chicks and eggs all of them made an appearance on this year's traditional Easter bonnets.’
  • 26) ‘No sooner had Beccy and I finished our meals, mum popped her head around the door, and with an evil little smile exclaimed ‘Ha, ha, you two just ate a bunny rabbit’.’
  • 27) ‘We can do this, says the book, since it has already been done to a fluffy bunny rabbit somewhere deep in a secret underground laboratory.’
  • 28) ‘Blue is the colour, according to top rabbit breeder Lew Bevan, whose rare blue-eyed white bunnies are attracting enthusiasts from all over the world.’
  • 29) ‘Cotton Tails cares for around 40 bunnies needing new homes at its headquarters in Westbury, but has a further 100 queuing up to be admitted.’
  • 30) ‘The practice of keeping house rabbits started in the US where many bunnies are treated exactly the same as cats or dogs.’
  • 31) ‘However, some travellers argue that, depending on the viewing angle, the rock looks more like the head of a bunny rabbit.’
  • 32) ‘To help keep him warm, he nearly always wore a cap: a black velour beret, a red-and-white striped cotton cap, a white and pale blue cotton knit hat with bunnies.’
  • 33) ‘My bunny, Pumpkin, is still not eating her carrots so I will have to take her to the vet: (.’
  • 34) ‘A rabbit rescue centre is urging parents to beware of the ‘silly season’ and remember a bunny is not just for Easter.’
  • 35) ‘Traffic wardens in Eccles caused a national outcry when they hit Bugsy the bunny with a £60 penalty charge as he snuffled around in his cage.’
  • 36) ‘One day, the bunny was hopping through the forest, and the snake was slithering through the forest, when the bunny tripped over the snake and fell down.’
  • 37) ‘This is the law of the blue bunny rabbit: If the author doesn't care what happens to the blue bunny, the kid won't care what happens to the blue bunny.’
  • 38) ‘He was a lovely bunny and will be missed by us all.’
  • 39) ‘Police were bemused when they found the bunny, which they dubbed Hoppy, on a roadside verge in Manchester and decided to take him into custody.’
  • 40) ‘Whiplash is a truly comic experience, rare enough among today's video games, and brutalising a bunny is refreshing fun to begin with.’
  • 41) ‘The card features a bunny holding a tube of toothpaste.’
  • 42) ‘Now the bunny has licence to roam all over the flat and even has his very own Chateaux Lapin: a rabbit castle, complete with turrets.’
  • 43) ‘He looked my poor bunny over and asked how long we'd had her.’
  • 44) ‘Prior to that, my boxing experience had been limited to a few jaunts in the 1970s from the dance floor at Tramps or the Playboy Club, where I was a bunny girl.’
  • 45) ‘Born in Manchester, she started her working life as a bunny girl, went on to run pubs and spent nine years training with leading American relationships expert Chuck Spezzano, author of If It Hurts, It Isn't Love.’
  • 46) ‘Not being on hand to inject a little passion or enthusiasm into her girl, the performance is left entirely up to Diane - and, dressed like a bunny girl in a wine bar at lunchtime, she's already way out of her comfort zone.’
  • 47) ‘Now if a redesigned Playboy bunny suit is not another contributor to the general darkness, well, then I'm a… well, not a monkey's uncle, but a Playboy bunny girl - and I can assure you that I never was one.’
  • 48) ‘Last month, it was revealed that he was selling a Playboy stationery range targeted at children, featuring the infamous bunny girl logo of the adult magazine.’
  • 49) ‘The cute bunny girl brought him meals several times a day-cycle, but she was always accompanied by another armed crewmember.’
  • 50) ‘His new love was Sara Lowndes, a former Playboy bunny girl whom he married in 1965, although his obsession with privacy prevented them being photographed together.’
  • 51) ‘Inside is not at all what one expects of a club privée: no black laqueur, not a single tired bunny girl.’
  • 52) ‘Carr's script is gloriously silly and the cast of five have as much fun as the audience - I particularly liked the Greek chorus that offers Quinn in all her incarnations, including that of bunny girl.’
  • 53) ‘This may explain why I can't get to sleep now, though - my body now believes I am a club bunny.’
  • 54) ‘Also, in honor of Statia's secret career as a bunny waitress I've made her an honorary Acerbia-girl for the time being.’
  • 55) ‘Early on they were offended by her image, not least when she posed in bunny costume for the cover of Playboy in 1978.’
  • 56) ‘In 1969-at the tender age of 19 - Ross became one of the UK's very first bunny girls, hand-picked by the maestro Hugh Hefner himself.’
  • 57) ‘Blessed with good looks, an easy Irish charm and more than a touch of arrogance, he wooed and won over almost every woman he met: from bunny girls to arch-feminist Germaine Greer.’
  • 58) ‘The bar staff dressed as bunny girls and collection buckets on the bar grew fuller and fuller as people paid for drinks with notes and freely threw in their change.’
  • 59) ‘His usual entourage of bunny girls, see example, below, are expected to accompany him.’
  • 60) ‘The bar staff had dressed up as bunny girls and the men had done a spud crawl round six pubs carrying a 56 lb sack of potatoes to boost the total.’
  • 61) ‘Organisers flagged up the rally as fun, typified by the sight of a string of young blondes and brunettes dressed as bunny girls.’
  • 62) ‘Marchers were led by Banwen Miners Hunt and a line of more than a dozen bunny girls, who later staged a naked protest and rushed into the icy-cold sea to whoops of delight from campaigners.’
  • 63) ‘It's a commonplace that actors are dumb bunnies when they start talking about politics.’
  • 64) ‘So, like the brave little bunny I am, I took the day off and have mainly spent it vegetating and feeling sick.’
  • 65) ‘If I've got 20-30 pages open, which is by no means unusual, then I'm going to be a deeply sad bunny if they all just vanish with a thud.’
  • 66) ‘But being the optimistic little bunny I am, I didn't let it get me down.’
  • 67) ‘Except I think it's wrong… if I didn't think that I'd probably be a very upset little bunny.’
  • 68) ‘A few weeks away, and it's obvious why I've been such an unhappy bunny.’
  • 69) ‘I must just be an odd bunny, it appears that i alone in the world am happy talking to people regardless of looks, age, sex or race.’
  • 70) ‘To punctuate this I was having to dash for the loos every 5 minutes - I was REALLY not a well bunny.’
  • 71) ‘Here, four cool retreats where you can explore the season's best activities and get a little R & R, whether you're a snow bunny, a spa bunny - or both!’
  • 72) ‘Skiers and snowboarders at all levels can revel in snow and apres-ski fun; kids can have a go in ski school or try snow tubing; and the Snowies has always been a mecca for snow bunnies!’
  • 73) ‘I needed about 10 more lessons to keep up with the snow bunnies,.’
  • 74) ‘Once stereotyped as a haven for twenty-something gym bunnies and bodybuilders, health clubs are now attracting a wider demographic spectrum.’
  • 75) ‘The friends joked about how jaded they had become regarding the dating scene in West Hollywood, which they found to be filled with "celebrity wannabes" and "shallow gym bunnies."’
  • 76) ‘In the UK, 89 per cent of gym bunnies give their quadriceps a rest by driving to the gym, contributing to climate changing emissions.’
  • 77) ‘You poor bunny-how's the conference going?’
  • 78) ‘It was a Sunday afternoon, and Canadian beach bunnies had set up towels and umbrellas only inches apart, all along the strand.’
  • 79) ‘She looks like a Los Angeles beach bunny (regulation blond hair, blue eyes, big smile).’
  • 80) ‘It will all become clear, a PR bunny informed us.’
  • 81) ‘Barclays' PR bunnies also told us that they were unwaware of any problems.’
  • 82) ‘Being an optimistic bunny, I really hope that the mayor will come forward with a transport strategy that does not prioritise car drivers at the expense of everyone else.’
  • 83) ‘Nevertheless, at this stage it is going down well with the bunnies, despite warnings such a move will make the health insurance industry less viable - and what is not spelled out directly yet, result in still higher premiums.’
  • 84) ‘Coles would have appeared, or did someone think it was worth getting the bunnies at Coles Myer all panicked by introducing Newbridge into the equation?’
  • 85) ‘And, of course no more bunnies like Fosters with assets to sell.’
  • 86) ‘By doing that one can find that investment is easy, and that all the bunnies who invested off shore just did not know how to do it.’
  • 87) ‘Those party members in the House with him right now are a bunch of bunnies.’

Examples

  • 1) A classic example of tortoise rather than hare.
  • 2) On the stone of the drive outside my window sat a huge brown hare.
  • 3) You can set the hare running on that.
  • 4) You remember the story of the hare and the tortoise?
  • 5) We run with the hare and hunt with the hounds.
  • 6) The hare and the tortoise spring to mind.
  • 7) My only tip would be to remember the tortoise and the hare.
  • 8) The rest included poaching of game birds, hare coursing and badger baiting.
  • 9) There's no close season for the brown hare.
  • 10) It is the first time protesters have successfully used the Act against a hare hunt.
  • 11) The brown hare is the one we find in drier parts, often in the arable landscape.
  • 12) It's a bit like the tortoise and the hare.
  • 13) But watch out for the man who might play tortoise to the hare that is Hales.
  • 14) I could kick with either foot and run like a hare.
  • 15) The brown hare is larger than the mountain hare, and opinions divide as to which is the best.
  • 16) Presumably their mother had pulled the fur from her own coat to keep them warm, but was she a rabbit or a hare?
  • 17) The Scots mountain hare is smaller than its lowland cousin and it's not often cooked commercially.
  • 18) My wife is not here today and the reason she is not here today is because I detest hare coursing.
  • 19) They are also found in much of Ireland, where the brown hare is hardly known.
  • 20) Britain's only indigenous hare, the animals grow a white coat in winter to improve their camouflage in the snow.
  • 21) All those pictures are beautiful, but he picture of the beagles and the hare is my favorite.
  • 22) And now I'm reading John Green's marvelous An Abundance of Katherines, and am pleased to have found another child for whom fables were not all that: "if only he'd known that the story of the tortoise and the hare is about more than a tortoise and a hare, he might have saved himself considerable trouble."
  • 23) OF all the animals in the forest the hare is the wisest, and the animals all know this.
  • 24) The tortoise and the hare is like you sitting watching a guy getting his butt kicked and hoping he's going to land a punch and win.
  • 25) The little hare is in her hands and she will take all the necessary care and advice.
  • 26) There does appear to be widespread acceptance of its specific status, however, even though there is some indication that the species hybridizes with the Mountain hare L. timidus (Melo-Ferreira et al. 2005).
  • 27) * The correct species name for the Brown hare is controversial and the reality/monophyly of the Blue hare has recently been contested.
  • 28) ‘European game animals include various deer, wild boar, hare, and rabbit.’
  • 29) ‘Three species of hares are native to California, the snowshoe, black-tailed, and white-tailed.’
  • 30) ‘He said: ‘I've noticed an increase in birds and a lot more hares since the grassland has been in place.’’
  • 31) ‘In a peak year for hares, the hares edged out the voles as a source of meat for both adult owls and their owlets.’
  • 32) ‘The reserve is also home to mountain reedbucks, common duikers, hares, guinea fowl and butterflies.’
  • 33) ‘Traditional methods of using beating and hunting dogs are also engaged to corner and hunt muntjacs, wild boars and blacknaped hares.’
  • 34) ‘The recent Burns Report into hunting concluded that hunting with dogs ‘seriously compromised the welfare’ of foxes, deer, hares and mink.’
  • 35) ‘Moors and heaths would have supported populations of wild horses and cattle, hares, wild goats and smaller creatures like voles, snakes and lizards.’
  • 36) ‘Wildlife, particularly rabbits and hares, act as reservoirs of disease.’
  • 37) ‘Rabbits, hares, and a few other species make up the Lagomorpha.’
  • 38) ‘Most hunts say there are enough options open to them within the legislation to allow foxes, hares and deer to be legally chased by hounds, though guns may need to be used for the kill.’
  • 39) ‘All young broadleaf sites should be adequately fenced with rabbit wire to prevent damage from rabbits and hares.’
  • 40) ‘Rabbits and hares are a universal pest, particularly while vineyards are being established.’
  • 41) ‘We who hunted rabbits, hares, pigeons and pheasants as part of our wintry routine were certainly aware of the mad March hare days.’
  • 42) ‘As any schoolchild knows, hares don't live down burrows, rabbits do; hares live above ground at all times.’
  • 43) ‘The family Leporidae consists of 11 genera and around 54 species, commonly known as hares and rabbits.’
  • 44) ‘Deer, hares, rabbits, mice, rats, pigeons, crows and many insects have to be ‘controlled’ in order for these crops to thrive.’
  • 45) ‘Woodpigeons are attacking what is left of the cabbage and sprout crops and damage by rabbits and hares has been reported to apple trees in the area.’
  • 46) ‘Other causes of damage in young trees can be grazing by animals such as hare and rabbits and trespass by cattle or sheep.’
  • 47) ‘Animals such as deer, boar, hares and rabbits lived in woodland surrounding most villages.’
  • 48) ‘The Legend of the Mick the Miller is both touching and funny, yet Michael Tanner's tale of the greatest greyhound ever to chase a mechanical hare is ultimately flawed.’
  • 49) ‘And let's face it, you don't hear people at the greyhound track complaining that the hare's not real, do you?’
  • 50) ‘They are, essentially, a covered bike rack for dogs, designed to line them up and point them unarguably in the same direction ready for the key moment when the hare goes by.’
  • 51) ‘When Franklin decides on an objective, he pursues it with the mad resolve of a greyhound chasing a mechanical hare.’
  • 52) ‘The programme did, however, contain something rare and more thought-provoking - a clip from a greyhound race in which a dog caught the hare.’
  • 53) ‘Mutu leaves Toure for dead, hares down the left wing and shoots from a narrow angle.’
  • 54) ‘Then Harry came haring out of the bathroom like some over-protective mother bear and just about bit my head off.’
  • 55) ‘He has already been haring about this morning, giving awards to schoolchildren and meeting with constituents.’
  • 56) ‘The hillock did, indeed, provide a good vantage point as we watched the colourful parade of racing cars haring around the corner in front of us.’
  • 57) ‘Sarah Jane spent most of the day haring across the lawn with arms waving all over the place looking like a very well dressed windmill.’
  • 58) ‘The Saudi No23, whose name I don't know, hares past him and hooks a last-ditch cross behind the goalkeeper and across the face of goal.’
  • 59) ‘Young people should settle into communes rather than keep haring from flat to flat in a vain attempt to keep up with the labour market.’
  • 60) ‘The sight of vintage McAllister haring up the wing, a trail of defenders made to look like lumpen bystanders in his wake, thrilled us all.’
  • 61) ‘He hared off down Cirencester Way, going the wrong way up the road and weaving in and out of traffic.’
  • 62) ‘Surely it's worth stepping off at Tours, taking in a Loire chateau or two, before haring down to the Atlantic.’
  • 63) ‘Henry hares through the centre and is brought down outside the penalty area by Dede, who sees yellow.’
  • 64) ‘Time and again I drive around a tight bend to be confronted by a high-speed bike haring towards me on my side of the road, having taken the bend way too wide.’
  • 65) ‘The burly prop forward, suddenly found himself at the tail of a line-out with the ball in his hands and he pinned back his ears and hared towards the line.’
  • 66) ‘Button is a fine driver, but even non-petrolheads know the crucial difference between him and thousands of kids haring around the backstreets of every major city from Sao Paulo to Sydney.’
  • 67) ‘I looked up towards the top of the road and saw silver Mercedes haring down.’
  • 68) ‘Edwards hares down the right and nearly latches onto a through ball from Birchall.’
  • 69) ‘We'd been there for about a week, sat outside our teepee smoking weed, when suddenly there was this huge commotion at the stockade, and this motorbike comes haring down towards the lake.’
  • 70) ‘Kryszalowicz hares down the left wing and the ball is cleared by Frechaut for a throw.’
  • 71) ‘Mpenza hares down the wing, pulls the ball back to his captain who shoots.’
  • 72) ‘When we left, about twoish, Vic just hared away from the front door and ran down the street.’
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