adventure vs venture

adventure venture

Definitions

  • 1) That which happens without design; chance; hazard; hap; hence, chance of danger or loss.
  • 2) video games A text adventure or an adventure game.
  • 3) A mercantile or speculative enterprise of hazard; a venture; a shipment by a merchant on his own account.
  • 4) The encountering of risks; hazardous and striking enterprise; a bold undertaking, in which hazards are to be encountered, and the issue is staked upon unforeseen events; a daring feat.
  • 5) A remarkable occurrence; a striking event; a stirring incident; as, the adventures of one's life.
  • 6) A financial speculation or business venture.
  • 7) An undertaking or enterprise of a hazardous nature.
  • 8) Participation in hazardous or exciting experiences.
  • 9) An unusual or exciting experience.
  • 10) An undertaking of a questionable nature, especially one involving intervention in another state's affairs.
  • 11) (Com.) a writing setting forth that the goods shipped are at the owner's risk.
  • 12) A remarkable occurrence; a striking event; a stirring incident.
  • 13) obsolete Risk; danger; peril.
  • 14) 1. That which comes or happens to one; hap; chance; fortune; luck.
  • 15) A hazardous enterprise; an undertaking of uncertain issue, or participation in such an undertaking.
  • 16) A speculation of any kind, commercial, financial, or mining; a venture; specifically, a speculation in goods sent abroad.
  • 17) Peril; danger.
  • 18) Adventurous activity; participation in exciting or hazardous undertakings or enterprises: as, a spirit of adventure.
  • 19) A remarkable occurrence in one's personal history; a noteworthy event or experience in one's life.
  • 20) transitive To risk or hazard; jeopard; venture.
  • 21) intransitive To try the chance; to take the risk.
  • 22) transitive To venture upon; to run the risk of; to dare.
  • 23) To venture on; take the chance of; run the risk of doing or suffering.
  • 24) To risk or hazard; put in the power of unforeseen events: as, to adventure one's life.
  • 25) To take the risk involved in doing anything; proceed at a venture.
  • 26) To venture upon; undertake or try.
  • 27) To proceed despite risks.
  • 28) To try the chance; to take the risk.
  • 29) To risk, or hazard; jeopard; to venture.
  • 30) To venture upon; to run the risk of; to dare.

Definitions

  • 1) A risky or daring undertaking or journey.
  • 2) A business enterprise involving some risk in expectation of gain.
  • 3) An undertaking that is dangerous, daring, or of uncertain outcome.
  • 4) Something, such as money or cargo, at hazard in a risky enterprise.
  • 5) An undertaking of chance or danger; the risking of something upon an event which can not be foreseen with certainty; a hazard; a risk; a speculation.
  • 6) An event that is not, or can not be, foreseen; an accident; chance; hap; contingency; luck.
  • 7) The thing put to hazard; a stake; a risk; especially, something sent to sea in trade.
  • 8) at hazard; without seeing the end or mark; without foreseeing the issue; at random.
  • 9) any venturesome undertaking especially one with an uncertain outcome
  • 10) a commercial undertaking that risks a loss but promises a profit
  • 11) an investment that is very risky but could yield great profits
  • 12) Specifically, a scheme for making gain by way of trade; a commercial speculation.
  • 13) Synonyms Hazard, etc. See risk.
  • 14) The thing put to hazard; a stake; a risk; particularly, something sent to sea in trade.
  • 15) An undertaking of chance or danger; the risking of something upon an event which cannot be foreseen with certainty; the staking of something; a hazard.
  • 16) Chance; hap; contingency; luck; an event that is not or cannot, be foreseen.
  • 17) transitive To confide in; to rely on; to trust.
  • 18) transitive To undertake a risky or daring journey.
  • 19) transitive To risk or offer.
  • 20) transitive To put or send on a venture or chance.
  • 21) intransitive to dare to engage in; to attempt without any certainty of success. Used with at or on
  • 22) proceed somewhere despite the risk of possible dangers
  • 23) put at risk
  • 24) put forward, of a guess, in spite of possible refutation
  • 25) To brave the dangers of.
  • 26) To express at the risk of denial, criticism, or censure.
  • 27) To expose to danger or risk.
  • 28) To take a risk; dare.
  • 29) To proceed despite possible danger or risk.
  • 30) To hazard one's self; to have the courage or presumption to do, undertake, or say something; to dare.
  • 31) To make a venture; to run a hazard or risk; to take the chances.
  • 32) to dare to engage in; to attempt without any certainty of success.
  • 33) To put or send on a venture or chance.
  • 34) rare To confide in; to rely on; to trust.
  • 35) To expose to hazard; to risk; to hazard.
  • 36) (at a venture) By mere chance or fortune; at random.

Examples

  • 1) However, Mrs Southern had seemed of all of them the least upset by her adventure.
  • 2) In the wake of our little adventure, many of his followers have abandoned him, to return to the true Old Blood ways.
  • 3) The urge for adventure, the unknown, which one day she suspected she would regret, overcame the desire for a lazy day.
  • 4) Rabbi Ben Ezra waited for death to open the gate to it, but to her it seemed that she was in the midst of it now, that 'adventure brave and new' _in which death itself was also to be an adventure_ ....
  • 5) Life is an adventure: The word adventure comes from the Latin word ad-venire.
  • 6) I make the mistake of using the word adventure and he says: "You can use this word in my presence only in quotes."
  • 7) Its literature is comparatively scant, but Doug Ammons has already crafted a classic meditation on what he calls "adventure sports," one that easily transcends the river genre.
  • 8) “The mission of our adventure is about taking almost 50 women across the finish line together,” said founder Sunny Becks-Crumpton.
  • 9) The only clear winner in the adventure is the state.
  • 10) “The mission of our adventure is about taking almost 50 women across the finish line together,” said Sunny Becks-Crumpton, founder of Hooping for Hope, which provides hoop fitness classes to breast cancer survivors free of charge.
  • 11) I can't even decide which step of this adventure is the most aggravating.
  • 12) Still, the best part of this adventure is the diversion and camaraderie of adventurous friends.
  • 13) The word adventure is really a bad pick, would not you say?
  • 14) ‘Does the idea of touring conjure up exciting images of places to see and new foods and adventures to experience in foreign lands?’
  • 15) ‘For some children starting kindergarten is an exciting adventure, for others the experience borders on the terrifying.’
  • 16) ‘It is also an exciting adventure and a story of a quest that must be fulfilled.’
  • 17) ‘In the tale Alice, an innocent enough young girl, steps through her mirror into a magical world where she has a range of exciting adventures.’
  • 18) ‘For Charlie, who has suffered heart and lung problems since he was born prematurely, the weekend is set to be packed with exciting adventures.’
  • 19) ‘I may post our exciting adventures from the road tomorrow night.’
  • 20) ‘She said she is certain he would approve of her daring adventures.’
  • 21) ‘Read the exciting adventures of Black Bob, the clever sheepdog, in the wilds of Canada.’
  • 22) ‘The trip is an exciting adventure for Alex and mum Karen who is accompanying him, especially as the location for the shoot was originally going to be Nottingham.’
  • 23) ‘A holiday in this province can be an exciting adventure.’
  • 24) ‘Even for veteran scuba divers such as myself, an excursion on a submarine is an exciting adventure.’
  • 25) ‘You may find it one of your most exciting adventures.’
  • 26) ‘So grab your day pack, and get ready for some exciting adventures!’
  • 27) ‘You'll meet fascinating people and have exciting adventures, but do pay attention, Taurus.’
  • 28) ‘Unearthing incredible facts and artifacts for the Museum requires some exciting adventures.’
  • 29) ‘As he readied himself to leave, his mind conjured up images of cities, strange new lands and exciting adventures.’
  • 30) ‘‘I feel as though we're embarking upon an exciting adventure,’ she confessed, her eyes sparkling.’
  • 31) ‘Starting a business based on a passion is an exciting adventure.’
  • 32) ‘Every year brings new adventures, experiences and surprises.’
  • 33) ‘It is a new experience, a new adventure, and we have lots of family and friends who will come out to see us.’
  • 34) ‘Men crave adventure, risk, danger and heroic sacrifice.’
  • 35) ‘The danger, excitement and adventure of racing yachts on the high seas awaits a North Yorkshire woman, picked to take part in one of the world's toughest yacht races.’
  • 36) ‘I am armed with a sense of adventure, and excited for what awaits.’
  • 37) ‘What is lacking is suitable play equipment for our children to explore and develop their sense of adventure and excitement.’
  • 38) ‘But the people I met find excitement and adventure, an extraordinary sense of freedom.’
  • 39) ‘There is something endlessly appealing about this film, a sense of adventure and excitement as seen through the lens of a Hollywood of a more innocent time.’
  • 40) ‘What happened to that sense of academic adventure, excitement and curiosity?’
  • 41) ‘As for those choosing to trek, this activity will mean thrill, excitement and adventure.’
  • 42) ‘Travelling by train has always been associated with romance and adventure, and one of the best ways to see the east coast of the States is by doing just that.’
  • 43) ‘There was a flushed look on his face, as if the thrill of danger and adventure was something he dearly missed.’
  • 44) ‘I go out looking for adventure and risk, so I can feel alive.’
  • 45) ‘You are a roamer and need adventure, excitement, and freedom.’
  • 46) ‘A walled and deserted garden provides the idea place for adventure and excitement for the town's children, until its owner returns.’
  • 47) ‘There is, of course, some thrill and sense of adventure in this sudden departure to a wholly new country and continent.’
  • 48) ‘Rome offers you a wide range of excitement, adventure, and enjoyment.’
  • 49) ‘There was so much excitement and adventure in this story that really made me think about my life, in particular what I take for granted.’
  • 50) ‘But suppressing their sense of adventure and insulating them from risk is not good for their long-term development.’
  • 51) ‘The past year was full of adventure and excitement.’
  • 52) ‘She is a woman accustomed to both adventure and danger.’
  • 53) ‘This was what I had always dreamed of, true excitement and adventure.’
  • 54) ‘The only downside to my commercial adventure is the mischief being done to the American dollar.’
  • 55) ‘The first recorded case of an Indian being christened here was bound up with British commercial adventures in South Asia.’
  • 56) ‘At this stage in history, the merchant class, desperate for money to finance their adventures, struggled with the monopoly of the moneylenders and overcame it.’
  • 57) ‘For the time being, bushwacking will still be permitted, as will adventuring on unofficial boot trails, but protecting low-use zones will be a high priority.’
  • 58) ‘To prevent further adventuring, these emperors made it a capital offense to build a boat with more than two masts.’
  • 59) ‘The European seaman is prudent when adventuring out to sea.’
  • 60) ‘I have been out adventuring again today at the Karori Wildlife Sanctuary.’
  • 61) ‘Wills, a three-year-old black and white cat, decided to go adventuring.’
  • 62) ‘Before they killed him he said, ‘I have adventured my life in endeavouring to obtain the liberty of my countrymen, and I am a willing sacrifice in their cause.’’
  • 63) ‘The document contains lists of the men and women who adventured money to the Virginia Company.’
  • 64) ‘The adventurers were so called because they lent or adventured money to parliament.’
  • 65) ‘In at least two battles, he had adventured his life for love of liberty.’
  • 66) ‘Why had she adventured her life on a bold impulse to satisfy mere curiosity?’

Examples

  • 1) The unnamed businessman is understood to want the loan for a new venture.
  • 2) After that he hardly dared to venture outside of his house.
  • 3) Managers would be encouraged to push ahead with new ventures and capital spending plans.
  • 4) His second wife is a partner in the new venture.
  • 5) He won't have any complaints about her new venture.
  • 6) Then he withdrew the app with a view to refreshing it, but school and other business ventures intervened.
  • 7) But he announced he is shutting down most of his business ventures and will hand over the bulk of their financial reserves to his charitable work.
  • 8) This means looking at where venture capital is going, checking out company mergers and acquisitions and looking at the research literature.
  • 9) He wanted to build a convention centre in a joint venture with the city, but he also wanted his name on the building.
  • 10) Have you just launched your dream business venture, but don't know what to do next?
  • 11) Perhaps her next business venture should be to bring out her own line of suncream.
  • 12) You begin the week wrestling with important but tedious issues involving money or joint ventures.
  • 13) There is a new emphasis on smart commercial and property ventures.
  • 14) These are likely to go beyond the project joint ventures that are common in the industry.
  • 15) Firms set up joint ventures for a variety of reasons.
  • 16) You have to go into a venture expecting to become much better off than you are now.
  • 17) Another of my key projects is a commercial property venture.
  • 18) Otherwise they would not have dared venture so close to our lines.
  • 19) Those funds could be used to help launch a less risky venture.
  • 20) Neither has she launched a successful business venture.
  • 21) The investment company has insisted that the partnerships were commercial ventures and not tax avoidance schemes.
  • 22) Rio also plans to increase its share of its joint venture projects.
  • 23) An exciting venture launched in October is bucking the trend.
  • 24) Executives were amazed when none of the 50 people in the audience ventured to ask a question.
  • 25) The backers of this exciting new venture in British cinema would do well not to lose the plot.
  • 26) ‘‘This was always a risky venture but it has been done in style thanks to the dedication and commitment of all involved,’ he said.’
  • 27) ‘I still think I'm right, but it's probably too risky a venture.’
  • 28) ‘Allowing bloggers be the reviewers is potentially a risky venture, depending on how powerful you think blogs really are.’
  • 29) ‘Doubts about the success of such a risky venture were soon put on the backburner as cinemagoers thronged to cinema halls.’
  • 30) ‘This, like for every drug discovery in the world, is also a risky venture with dubious chances of success.’
  • 31) ‘For such a risky venture, the reasons for straying outside that safety zone of London is to pick-up more fans.’
  • 32) ‘Collins said the venture is potentially risky but the time is right to study the possibility.’
  • 33) ‘Sometimes those test cases are, by their very nature, very, very risky ventures.’
  • 34) ‘As a result Hollywood tries to avoid any risky ventures and is keen to fund tried and tested genres.’
  • 35) ‘Presenting this sketch as a public performance in Belfast, Mayne remembers, was ‘a daring venture.’’
  • 36) ‘It seemed a risky venture: print-runs had to be huge and cheap paper was used.’
  • 37) ‘I came up with the idea at a venture capitalist firm.’
  • 38) ‘While Billie's acting career is forging ahead, Chris' latest TV ventures have flopped.’
  • 39) ‘Your bold nature will make you undertake risky ventures.’
  • 40) ‘The withdrawal of Old School Baptists allowed missionary Baptist associations to pursue cooperative ventures.’
  • 41) ‘Now, in his first solo venture, he faces a daunting task.’
  • 42) ‘She walked through the door on the opening night of his first solo venture back in 1978.’
  • 43) ‘Several white European women shared the results of their ventures into African territory.’
  • 44) ‘Grateful thanks was extended to all who put so much work into bringing the venture to fruition.’
  • 45) ‘But you shouldn't mix up the venture failing with the person failing.’
  • 46) ‘Wait for clarity and totality before starting a new business venture.’
  • 47) ‘He's starting a new business venture here.’
  • 48) ‘The goals of Bard's collaborative ventures were established jointly with our partners abroad.’
  • 49) ‘Thanks to all who so generously supported the fund-raising venture.’
  • 50) ‘Life insurance became a profitable commercial venture provided by firms such as the Prudential.’
  • 51) ‘The gimmick is part of the company's latest venture to target the UK's 3.2m students in higher education.’
  • 52) ‘Ms Browning's latest venture involves the launch of an organic fast food truck, called the Flying Pig.’
  • 53) ‘In today's overheated financial markets, euphoric investors are once again happily financing risky ventures.’
  • 54) ‘She started her entrepreneurial venture three years ago, distributing chocolates to her friends and acquaintances.’
  • 55) ‘Find out how the most successful e-commerce ventures help customers help themselves.’
  • 56) ‘They simply change employers or pursue entrepreneurial ventures.’
  • 57) ‘Lately, successful joint ventures with foreign partners produce consumer goods.’
  • 58) ‘After all, the time to get in on an e-commerce venture has come and gone.’
  • 59) ‘One can turn his ideas into profitable ventures with the use of 3D.’
  • 60) ‘Last year, analysts were putting a valuation of e150 million on the business-to-business e-commerce venture.’
  • 61) ‘The money was not paid under the terms of the joint venture agreement.’
  • 62) ‘Others say they might invest in an Internet venture and its stock shoots up.’
  • 63) ‘The competition was more like those run by government agencies or major foundations than an agile start-up venture.’
  • 64) ‘His Honour made a finding that this venture failed very soon after inception in 1990.’
  • 65) ‘They're government agencies that use public money to underwrite risky private ventures.’
  • 66) ‘He of course, ventured out there everyday, occasionally dragging Amina along.’
  • 67) ‘I really knew I'd made progress when I ventured out the gate and down the trail aboard Topper.’
  • 68) ‘I ventured out to the grocery store and it was nearly deserted.’
  • 69) ‘Chris even ventured out and tried his skipping skills while he was timed by 1983 world athletics champion, Eamon Coughlan.’
  • 70) ‘Later on that night, I ventured out with my friends to Dupont Circle.’
  • 71) ‘The course ended on a windy Friday night when some adventurous sailors ventured out for a ‘plane’ across the bay.’
  • 72) ‘Last Wednesday, wearing several layers of Factor 60 and a large hat, I ventured out, keeping to the shade whenever I could.’
  • 73) ‘And then, somewhat shamefacedly, I ventured out into the garden.’
  • 74) ‘Only the college hostel girls ventured out to buy snacks.’
  • 75) ‘Up until last Sunday, only 76 runners had ventured out of Warren Place, just 13 returning with a win under their belts.’
  • 76) ‘Ash went to bed and we ventured out into Manhattan.’
  • 77) ‘I ventured out tonight, and made a few comments here and there.’
  • 78) ‘And after the agitation started they never even ventured out.’
  • 79) ‘That seems a little extreme to me, but I decided that I would try this out while I ventured out on yet another first date last night.’
  • 80) ‘After the long weekend's excess, it was only the dedicated disciples of dance that ventured out this cold and frosty night.’
  • 81) ‘Essex Green is really poppy and cute and sometimes ventures into trippy alt-country territory.’
  • 82) ‘Her prescription - substituting therapy for justice - ventures into dangerous moral territory.’
  • 83) ‘The venture aims to open five to 10 stores per year.’
  • 84) ‘As she moved from the cave, her head slowly ventured out into the sunlight.’
  • 85) ‘Occasional gunfire could be heard in the streets, and few British soldiers ventured out of their Warrior and Challenger II tanks.’
  • 86) ‘The general point that emerges from these thought experiments is that much may be ventured, at great risk, for very small gains.’
  • 87) ‘No one would venture such capital without some chance of generating a return on investment.’
  • 88) ‘If a man is venturing his own money, this is the only risk which is relevant.’
  • 89) ‘For an investment bank expert in venture capital, nothing has been ventured here and nothing gained.’
  • 90) ‘Kerry compounded the problem by venturing no information about his public career in the Senate for the past two decades.’
  • 91) ‘Apparently not, or so I was told by my wife before I had even ventured to express an opinion or a comment on the subject.’
  • 92) ‘Dare I venture to ‘guesstimate’ a not inconsiderable number!’
  • 93) ‘Ever noticed how a woman is ignored if she dares to venture an opinion on the weekend's football game?’
  • 94) ‘I am venturing to write you this email for introducing our company as one of the professional exporters of car audio from China.’
  • 95) ‘Accountants on the other hand stick to the letter of the detail, rarely venturing even informed opinions.’
  • 96) ‘Which is why I am venturing to write this column on last week's encounter in Ahmedabad.’
  • 97) ‘She ventures a few speculations about the woman with whom he likely had a long relationship.’
  • 98) ‘If he were a betting man, he would venture a wager that she was uncomfortable with the position she was now in where it came to him.’
  • 99) ‘Part travel log, part art history primer, it elegantly provides the context for Klett's life's work without venturing much in the way of criticism.’
  • 100) ‘I remember overhearing them speaking French to one another and venturing a ‘bonjour.’’
  • 101) ‘I'm venturing a guess that most of those people would swap that for having insulting signs written on their bodies any day.’
  • 102) ‘And she ventures a few guesses on why it's not happened thus far.’
  • 103) ‘Occasionally, Ducros - who is French - quietly ventures a suggestion about some nuance of diction.’
  • 104) ‘He ventures the notion of ‘publicisation’ to rival the Tories' privatisation project.’
  • 105) ‘Stephen even ventures the possibility of a change of name and even in its remit of building a knowledge economy.’
  • 106) ‘Without abandoning her earlier assessment of Jeff Tweedy's performance, she ventured a more complex answer.’
  • 107) ‘Again, no one has ventured a coherent explanation of this theory, let alone bothered to hint at what the evidence for it might be.’
  • 108) ‘We ventured a guess that it was a ‘long shot’ at the time but our loyal readers have come to the rescue yet again.’
  • 109) ‘I ventured that science, research and technology are the only things which will get us out of the hole we're very likely digging even now.’
  • 110) ‘We ventured a guess that she wasn't off to moderate a ‘Successful Selling Schemes’ seminar.’
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