nature vs nurture

nature nurture

Definitions

  • 1) The set of inherent characteristics or properties that distinguish something.
  • 2) The forces and processes that produce and control these phenomena.
  • 3) The basic character or qualities of humanity.
  • 4) A kind or sort.
  • 5) The processes and functions of the body, as in healing.
  • 6) The material world and its phenomena.
  • 7) A primitive state of existence, untouched and uninfluenced by civilization or social constraints.
  • 8) The fundamental character or disposition of a person; temperament: synonym: disposition.
  • 9) Heredity.
  • 10) The world of living things and the outdoors.
  • 11) Physical constitution or existence; the vital powers; the natural life.
  • 12) Kind, sort; character; quality.
  • 13) the worship of the personified powers of nature.
  • 14) The established or regular course of things; usual order of events; connection of cause and effect.
  • 15) The existing system of things; the universe of matter, energy, time and space; the physical world; all of creation. Contrasted with the world of mankind, with its mental and social phenomena.
  • 16) a process of printing from metallic or other plates which have received an impression, as by heavy pressure, of an object such as a leaf, lace, or the like.
  • 17) Untamed; uncivilized.
  • 18) Constitution or quality of mind or character.
  • 19) The personified sum and order of causes and effects; the powers which produce existing phenomena, whether in the total or in detail; the agencies which carry on the processes of creation or of being; -- often conceived of as a single and separate entity, embodying the total of all finite agencies and forces as disconnected from a creating or ordering intelligence.
  • 20) see under Good and Ill.
  • 21) The sum of qualities and attributes which make a person or thing what it is, as distinct from others; native character; inherent or essential qualities or attributes; peculiar constitution or quality of being.
  • 22) Natural affection or reverence.
  • 23) to die.
  • 24) Conformity to that which is natural, as distinguished from that which is artificial, or forced, or remote from actual experience.
  • 25) The regular course of human life.
  • 26) The material and spiritual universe, as distinguished from the Creator; the system of things of whieh man forms a part; creation, especially that part of it which more immediately surrounds man and affects his senses, as mountains, seas, rivers, woods, etc.: as, the beauties of nature; in a restricted sense, whatever is produced without artificial aid, and exists unchanged by man, and is thus opposed to art.
  • 27) The vital powers of man; vitality; vital force; life; also, natural course of life; lifetime.
  • 28) In theology, in a state of sin; unregencrated.
  • 29) The physical or moral constitution of man; physical or moral being; the personality.
  • 30) Inborn or innate character, disposition, or inclination; inherent bent or disposition; individual constitution or temperament; inbred or natural endowments, as opposed to acquired; hence, by metonymy, a person so endowed: as, we instinctively look up to a superior nature.
  • 31) Birth; origin; parentage; original stock.
  • 32) Hence That which is conformed to nature or to truth and reality, as distinguished from that which is artificial, forced, conventional, or remote from actual experience; naturalness.
  • 33) The primitive aboriginal instincts, qualities, and tendencies common to mankind of all races and in all ages, as unchanged or uninfluenced by civilization; especially, the instinctive or spontaneous sense of justice, benevolence, affection, self-preservation, love of show, etc., common to mankind; naturalness of thought, feeling, or action; humanity.
  • 34) An original, wild, undomesticated condition, as of an animal or a plant; also, the primitive condition of man antecedent to institutions, especially to political institutions: as, to live in a state of nature.
  • 35) Spontaneity. abandon; felicity; truth; naturalness.
  • 36) See law, 3
  • 37) The forces or processes of the material world, conceived of as an agency intermediate between the Creator and the world, producing all organisms and preserving the regular order of things: as, in the old dictum, “nature abhors a vacuum.” In this sense nature is often persouified.
  • 38) . Cause; occasion; that which produces anything.
  • 39) Conscience.
  • 40) Inherent constitution, property, or quality: essential character, quality, or kind; the qualities or attributes whieh constitute a being or thing what it is, and distinguish it from all others; also, kind; sort; species; category: as, the nature of the soul; the divine nature; it is the nature of fire to burn; the compensation was in the nature of a fee.
  • 41) In theology, the natural unregenerate state of the soul; moral character in its original condition, unaffected by grace.
  • 42) The metaphysical principle of life; the power of growth; that which causes organisms to develop each in its predeterminate way.
  • 43) Kindly disposition: a natural disposition such that one does not readily take or give offense; an easy, indulgent spirit.
  • 44) Cel. Let us sit and mock the good housewife Fortune. … Those that she makes fair she scarce mates honest, and those that she makes honest she makes very ill-favouredly.
  • 45) obsolete To endow with natural qualities.

Definitions

  • 1) That which nourishes; food; diet.
  • 2) The environmental influences that contribute to the development of an individual; see also nature.
  • 3) The act of nourishing or nursing; tender care; education; training.
  • 4) Something that nourishes; sustenance.
  • 5) The fostering or overseeing of the development of something.
  • 6) The action of raising or caring for offspring.
  • 7) Biology The sum of environmental influences and conditions acting on an organism, especially in contrast to heredity.
  • 8) That which nourishes; food; diet.
  • 9) The act of nourishing or nursing; tender care; education; training.
  • 10) helping someone grow up to be an accepted member of the community
  • 11) the properties acquired as a consequence of the way you were treated as a child
  • 12) Upbringing; training; discipline; instruction; education; breeding, especially good breeding.
  • 13) Synonyms Training, Discipline, etc. (see instruction), schooling.
  • 14) Nourishment; that which nourishes; food; diet.
  • 15) The act of supplying with nourishment; the act or process of cultivating or promoting growth.
  • 16) to nourish or nurse
  • 17) bring up
  • 18) help develop, help grow
  • 19) provide with nourishment
  • 20) Tofeed;nourish.
  • 21) To encourage or help develop; cultivate.
  • 22) To provide sustenance for; nourish.
  • 23) To raise or educate (a child, for example).
  • 24) To educate; to bring or train up.
  • 25) To feed; to nourish.

Examples

  • 1) The other disturbing thing is the nature of the treatment donors are helping to fund.
  • 2) He fails to understand that nature takes care of itself and man is the real problem.
  • 3) This was the nature of the man.
  • 4) The progressive agenda is all about changing the world and human nature to accord with a preferred model of existence.
  • 5) nature and animals are pretty predictable.
  • 6) If you run a union, you need to think deeply about the nature of your power.
  • 7) nature notes Very small birds suffer most in icy weather.
  • 8) The album may venture into uncharted territory, but it sounds like second nature.
  • 9) That's the nature of my life now, and it becomes futile to fight the rumours.
  • 10) This is unusual, because I am not by nature a forgiving person.
  • 11) You were bound to flounder if you failed to acknowledge the spontaneous nature of the man.
  • 12) You control nature and provide for all the animals of nature.
  • 13) Thus the story evokes the redemptive power of nature.
  • 14) They took those few thousand years to show up in nature.
  • 15) We do actually have some kind of control over the nature and the quality of those changes.
  • 16) nature and nurture act together to tip a person over to act in cruel ways.
  • 17) But you just get over that barrier and it becomes second nature.
  • 18) We must make sure the players understand the nature of what we face.
  • 19) This takes us back to a time when wild nature was not something to be exploited.
  • 20) The first centres on the way nature works.
  • 21) There are times when the world of nature conservation lurches dangerously close to lunacy.
  • 22) That is how things happen in nature.
  • 23) The island has long been a marine nature reserve.
  • 24) What is the true nature of love?
  • 25) It feels more like a nature programme than a standard cookery course.
  • 26) He was by nature a shy man who could at times be highly strung.
  • 27) What distinguishes human from any other animal nature is its ability to be unnatural.
  • 28) The piece uses a series of burglaries to lay bare the diverse nature of life in a modern city.
  • 29) Anyone who lets the surprising nature of life work for them rather than against them is on to a winner.
  • 30) Yes, there is an abrasive nature to his character.
  • 31) In order to fend off any reminiscences of pagan polytheism, Philoponus points out that unlike the individually differentiated gods of the pagans the three divinities of the Trinity are all of the same, single divine nature in the universal sense of ˜nature™.
  • 32) And since, even when idealized, nature still remains ˜nature™, it follows according to Jacobi that in practice Fichte's idealism is but a form of materialism.
  • 33) Nothing can please persons of taste but nature drawn with all her graces and ornament -- _la belle nature_; or, if we copy low life, the strokes must be strong and remarkable, and must convey a lively image to the mind.
  • 34) Mineralogy _-alogy_, not _-ology_ nature _nature_, or _choor_ oleomargarine _g_ is hard, as in _get_ orchid _orkid_ oust _owst_, not _oost_ peculiar _peculyar_ pecuniary _pekun'yari_ perspiration not _prespiratian_ prestige _pres'tij_ or _prestezh'_ pronunciation _pronunzeashun_ or _pronunsheashun_ saucy not _sassy_ schedule _skedyul_ semi not _semi_ theater _the'ater_ not _thea'ter_ turgid _turjid_ usage _uzage_ usurp _uzurp_ vermilion _vermilyun_ wife's not _wives_
  • 35) Agnes, a devoted admirer of nature, was in an ecstasy which she could not conceal, as one beautiful view succeeded another during their sail up the lake; but the other ladies were so much occupied in trying the effect of _art_, that they had no eye for the beauties of _nature_.
  • 36) {193} "Corresponding to our progressive perception of nature and our immovable conviction of the truth of the evolution theory, our religion can be only a _religion of nature_."
  • 37) But you yourself can aid nature the most by realizing that _nature is health and it is normal to be well_.
  • 38) Very few people, I suppose, are so foolish as to believe that man is by nature either a chaste or a constant animal, and indeed in this respect he appears to his disadvantage when compared with certain varieties of birds, which are _by nature_ constant to each other.
  • 39) To discover the nature of Man and the laws of that _nature_, marks the summit of human enterprises.
  • 40) The novelist professed to give an imitation of nature, but it was, as the French say, _la belle nature_.
  • 41) ‘Religions are moving from a primarily human focus to include concerns for nature and all creation.’
  • 42) ‘It is from him that I gained my love of nature, my creative streak and my eye for detail.’
  • 43) ‘For humanists, the highest value is intelligent coexistence between humans and nature.’
  • 44) ‘Keeping a good balance is the only way that humans and nature can coexist.’
  • 45) ‘In this understanding, the split between humans and nature is sealed by technology.’
  • 46) ‘Humans are encroaching on nature, but we can be more mindful of our impact when enjoying summer wilderness.’
  • 47) ‘Carson's hostility to increasing human control over nature is expressed in many different ways by her successors.’
  • 48) ‘The floods in Britain in autumn 2000 were blamed on man's arrogance and human interference in nature.’
  • 49) ‘They worked to transform part of the school grounds into a garden where children will be able to grow plants and study nature.’
  • 50) ‘It is a metaphysical experience based on the interconnectedness of nature and humans.’
  • 51) ‘I really had the capacity to know and learn about plants and growing and nature.’
  • 52) ‘Residents and the local authority said they are not opposed to a nature reserve.’
  • 53) ‘A commemorative plaque will be placed at the nature reserve at a later date.’
  • 54) ‘Incidentally, the nature reserve is likely to be destroyed by the building process.’
  • 55) ‘Examples of National Parks worldwide demonstrate that nature conservation does not mean excluding people.’
  • 56) ‘I took a lot of pictures during my walk through that Maine nature preserve.’
  • 57) ‘My partner is a park ranger so we actually live on a nature preserve.’
  • 58) ‘As a nature lover, you'll totally dig a woodsy or musky fragrance.’
  • 59) ‘The walk provides an excellent opportunity to develop a nature trail in the town.’
  • 60) ‘Noise, pollution and grimaces tend to undo any good that nature has done.’
  • 61) ‘Attempts to unify all four forces of nature have eluded physicists from Einstein to the current day.’
  • 62) ‘The extent to which a human can be made to feel insignificant in the face of an intractable force of nature knows no bounds.’
  • 63) ‘The sheer destructive force of nature demonstrated here is numbing.’
  • 64) ‘In the life of this nation, we have often been reminded that nature is an awesome force and that all life is fragile.’
  • 65) ‘The next hurricane will follow the path that the forces of nature ordain for it regardless of what we do or don't do.’
  • 66) ‘Well, I mean, really against that kind of force of nature, there was nothing any of us could do.’
  • 67) ‘Every time humans have been able to tackle and control a new force of nature, a technological revolution happens.’
  • 68) ‘I don't know, you guys, you're tampering with a force of nature and you might regret it.’
  • 69) ‘I think the catastrophe demonstrates that we are not as completely attuned to the forces of nature as we think we are.’
  • 70) ‘It is a sad and grim reminder of how vulnerable we are to the force of nature.’
  • 71) ‘Perhaps Mother nature was just having a little fun?’
  • 72) ‘Fill your lungs with purifying air and feast your eyes on Mother nature's bounty.’
  • 73) ‘Said Archibald, " There's not a lot you can do to change Mother nature.’
  • 74) ‘Imagine nature's bounty matching up to the lavish interiors of the chateau.’
  • 75) ‘The rural India even today is at the mercy of nature's bounties and fury.’
  • 76) ‘How can we provide our pets with nutrition closer to what nature intended?’
  • 77) ‘Truly can it be said that Pete Flanagan was one of nature's gentlemen.’
  • 78) ‘The resources which man uses to procure his subsistence are of two kinds: gifts of nature, and products of human labour.’
  • 79) ‘No pathetic fallacy here, nature remains impervious to human crises.’
  • 80) ‘The fact is that the victims of the typhoon were victims of nature, as human beings have been since the dawn of time.’
  • 81) ‘The diversity of species is perhaps the most obvious example of nature's creativity.’
  • 82) ‘As if to compound the brutal deeds of humans, nature chipped in with a devastating famine.’
  • 83) ‘The tsunami may be an act of nature but humans are complicating the relief effort.’
  • 84) ‘The story illustrates the true nature of the relationship between journalists and the police.’
  • 85) ‘Both men have difficulty defining the exact nature of their relationship.’
  • 86) ‘Further study is necessary to elucidate the precise nature of the relationship between media exposure and cognitive development.’
  • 87) ‘"Our equipment is merely reflecting the changing nature of society and allowing people to live their lives more easily.’
  • 88) ‘Our experience in conflicts over the past decade has revealed the changing nature of warfare.’
  • 89) ‘Handy's work examines the changing nature of work, working life and of organisations.’
  • 90) ‘Ongoing research is now directed toward understanding the precise nature of these intermolecular forces.’
  • 91) ‘His piece highlights the fickle nature of Australian politics.’
  • 92) ‘Her husband's illness and her father's death have underlined the unpredictable nature of human existence.’
  • 93) ‘A preliminary archaeological study has been completed to determine the exact nature of this site.’
  • 94) ‘Stark warnings and a constant bombardment of information on the fragile nature of Earth's environment surround us on a weekly basis.’
  • 95) ‘It is changing much about the very nature of human society itself.’
  • 96) ‘It boasted of the clean and long-lasting nature of the product.’
  • 97) ‘I would then move into a discussion of the biological nature of the human body.’
  • 98) ‘All three names were derived from the shape of the flower, but none warned of the plant's deadly nature.’
  • 99) ‘As a nation, America knows that democracy, by its very nature can not be forced.’
  • 100) ‘The picturesque nature of many of the pieces is a great stimulus to the imagination.’
  • 101) ‘It was also due to the physical conditions of the country and the nature of the war itself.’
  • 102) ‘What he tells us is that migrants change the nature of a country.’
  • 103) ‘Given the vital nature of such work why stop at free parking passes?’
  • 104) ‘Yes, what he did to us was very personal in nature and so it was only logical that my response would be equally personal.’
  • 105) ‘The complaints of alleged defamation are personal and political in nature.’
  • 106) ‘I just want to make a remark of a more personal nature about my work.’
  • 107) ‘By nature, every individual seeks to prove himself as a useful person in his or her society.’
  • 108) ‘By nature, a lot of us are selfish opportunists who tend to pay a lot more mind to something when a treat is guaranteed.’
  • 109) ‘By nature I'm definitely a spender, but I'm trying to force myself to be a saver instead.’
  • 110) ‘By nature generous, Matt sometimes paid for his friends' drinks when they had no money.’
  • 111) ‘By nature, I'm a little bit of a loner and I don't open up myself to people that easily when I meet them for the first time.’
  • 112) ‘By nature, alligators are shy and reclusive, and are typically wary of humans.’
  • 113) ‘No matter how far they run, the characters can never escape their essential natures.’
  • 114) ‘By nature, I'm not an impulsive person so you can see why he was so surprised.’
  • 115) ‘Wilson thinks those imperfections of character are essential to our nature.’
  • 116) ‘I don't expect cats to be free of the wild instinct that's an essential part of their nature.’
  • 117) ‘Man's nature in some basic ways is also not mutable.’
  • 118) ‘For example, animals by nature do not have an odd number of feet.’
  • 119) ‘No slug has ever harmed, offended, or otherwise done ill to me and it's in their nature to eat plants.’
  • 120) ‘It is also a thought-provoking examination of the animal nature of humans and at what point a punishment should fit a crime.’
  • 121) ‘Taking such risks is an obligation that our nature as humans imposes on us.’
  • 122) ‘My strongest belief is that such a trait is ingrained into our nature as human beings.’
  • 123) ‘The root cause is not so much the drugs trade, as the malignant rat-like nature of the human race.’
  • 124) ‘His obsessive nature saw him force actors to repeat scenes endlessly in his films as he strove for perfection.’
  • 125) ‘It has been suggested that the basic nature of social workers prevents them from performing effectively.’
  • 126) ‘Of course, it's very difficult to disentangle children's basic natures from what adults have taught them.’
  • 127) ‘You said yourself that it was in my personality and nature to be sarcastic.’
  • 128) ‘Who of us cannot look back on our growing up years and see how our parents influenced us by both nature and nurture?’
  • 129) ‘He also has an eminently sane attitude to the ferocity of past arguments about the relative influences of nature and nurture.’
  • 130) ‘He was fascinated with the idea of whether genius is the result of nature or nurture.’
  • 131) ‘The rapid transformation of warring societies into peaceful ones underscores the power of nurture over nature.’
  • 132) ‘Yes, when passion ebbs, nurture comes before nature and compassion must overflow.’
  • 133) ‘I think we need to be careful when we start talking about whether it's nature or nurture.’
  • 134) ‘Infant determinists argue for the determining effects of both nature and nurture, leaving little to individuals' free will.’
  • 135) ‘It's neither nature nor nurture that determines who we are, but the choices we make.’
  • 136) ‘And you can answer many questions about nature versus nurture in that way.’
  • 137) ‘Man is a product of nature, the argument runs, but societies are contrived by men.’
  • 138) ‘However, he perpetuates a common misconception that the battle has been nature versus nurture.’
  • 139) ‘We have an innate nature, because we have inherited genes from our most successful ancestors.’

Examples

  • 1) It's a mixture of nature and nurture.
  • 2) Is it nature or nurture?
  • 3) Governments are also increasingly interventionist when it comes to protecting and nurturing their own industrial base.
  • 4) We want to look at what more we need to do to support and nurture family relationships.
  • 5) My ancestors have nurtured it for generations.
  • 6) Our aim is evangelism and the nurture of young disciples.
  • 7) We want teachers and parents to encourage and nurture youngsters too.
  • 8) Those who are nurturing it care for the victims but the victims remain victims.
  • 9) So put time into nurturing your relationships with them.
  • 10) They are clearly the result of both nature and nurture.
  • 11) It is fought by a generation nurtured on high technology.
  • 12) Nuclear families allow the economically active to nurture the young and prepare for a short retirement.
  • 13) They wanted to be helped and loved and encouraged and nurtured.
  • 14) Since then she has nurtured a symbiotic relationship with her rolling court of photographers.
  • 15) His popularity made him a millionaire and ensured that he would become a protégé to be nurtured and protected.
  • 16) This is normal because our role is to both nurture and protect them as we prepare them to leave us.
  • 17) These environments nurture innovation, helping to push the boundaries of business.
  • 18) Employees praise the business as a positive, nurturing environment.
  • 19) ˜evolutionary biopsychosocial model™ is meant to encompass the life-history connection between specific components of nature and specific components of nurture that can be expressed teleologically either as ˜nature operates via nurture™ or ˜nurture operates via nature.™
  • 20) At the top of the list is the need for the child to receive unconditional love, empathy and nurture from a parent.
  • 21) But the leading edge, the next Boom economy that the state not only needs to nurture but has already begun to nurture, is in greentech.
  • 22) It's important to realize that for evaluating the likelihood of Idiocracy or Freakonomics, it doesn't particularly matter whether nature or nurture is the driving force in molding the next generation.
  • 23) The industry the farmers are trying to nurture is also - like most markets in China - plagued with fakes.
  • 24) And in that book authors portrayed the opinion that nurture is what makes us what we are.
  • 25) My question about nurture is in response to this remark byÂyou:
  • 26) ‘They also want to maintain their carefully nurtured relationships with individual solicitors.’
  • 27) ‘At Mia's Montessori, each child's love of learning is carefully nurtured.’
  • 28) ‘Doherty took the rural heartlands he has so carefully nurtured over the past four years.’
  • 29) ‘America identifies and nurtures talent more methodically than any society I have heard about.’
  • 30) ‘But she never nurtured her talents by painting either for pleasure or for business.’
  • 31) ‘The workshop would go a long way in nurturing female talent, she avers.’
  • 32) ‘The assistance these support services provide can help institutions create a more nurturing learning environment.’
  • 33) ‘The mother nurtures the children and manages the household; the father legally provides for the family and the home.’
  • 34) ‘However, their lovingly nurtured plots could be swallowed up by Eastleigh Council's plans to build hundreds of homes.’
  • 35) ‘You can say something that will either nurture the relationship or tear it down.’
  • 36) ‘Properly nurtured the two central defenders have huge senior careers ahead of them.’
  • 37) ‘Agreed - a certain amount of natural skill is required - but that skill needs to be properly nurtured.’
  • 38) ‘Then, properly nurtured, they would be " hatched " into the real world as fully formed companies.’
  • 39) ‘Johnson also intends to nurture a new generation of " engaged political voices".’
  • 40) ‘So how are churches today seeking to nurture the next generation of Christian social activists?’
  • 41) ‘"Hopefully we are nurturing the next generation of black and Asian magistrates.’
  • 42) ‘The church is the seedbed of gospel preachers, and we must value and nurture what God plants among us.’
  • 43) ‘In reality, both soldiering and nurturing children are vital forms of public service.’
  • 44) ‘"Lobby groups " are destroying " the harmony that nurtures creativity".’
  • 45) ‘She nurtures creativity, including student compositions, and promotes a lifelong love of music.’
  • 46) ‘Following the inspiration of Saint Patrick we have to accept their faith has been nurtured in a different culture.’
  • 47) ‘He had spent his life always being there for me, pushing me to new heights, nurturing great ambitions.’
  • 48) ‘Support is what is needed to nurture Canadian cinema.’
  • 49) ‘In addition to the physical, parents also have trouble finding time to nurture their kids ' emotional well-being.’
  • 50) ‘The leftovers are composted, helping to nurture a new cycle of growth.’
  • 51) ‘Yet he seemed intent on alienating the very industry that had nurtured his awe-inspiring talent.’
  • 52) ‘This could actually undermine brand equity by nurturing a negative brand attitude.’
  • 53) ‘A thousand years of theological disputes nurtured the habit of analytical thinking that could be applied to the analysis of natural phenomena.’
  • 54) ‘It seems to me that democracy's challenge is to nurture civic virtues among all citizens - not just elites.’
  • 55) ‘Develop and nurture a culture of firmness and fairness.’
  • 56) ‘It is a way to increase knowledge and learn new skills, build confidence, and nurture a sense of place, and community.’
  • 57) ‘For those with artistic pretensions, he advises on how to stay sane while nurturing creative flow.’
  • 58) ‘Even better, your supervisor, a top researcher in the field, wants to nurture your interest in science.’
  • 59) ‘Her current heartthrob is superstar Shah Rukh Khan and she nurtures an ambition to meet up with King Khan.’
  • 60) ‘I have nurtured this ambition since I was a schoolgirl, but it was 17 years before I got around to achieving it.’
  • 61) ‘Geddes nurtured the belief that common ground in culture, if used wisely, could do society real, practical good.’
  • 62) ‘The older man stored away in the trunk of his mind dates and memories from his own career, while his son nurtured the same ambitions he once had.’
  • 63) ‘After a couple of years as Rajya Sabha member, he nurtured hopes of being chief minister of the state.’
  • 64) ‘Pakistan, on the other hand, have serious worries ahead of the match and need to sort their bowling problems if they nurture any hope of a series-levelling comeback.’
  • 65) ‘But there is also a sense that many of those who complain bitterly about the direction of government policy still nurture the hope that Tony is really on their side.’
  • 66) ‘But maybe they nurture this belief that they live in a classless society and these status considerations conflict with that.’
  • 67) ‘But did he nurture ambitions to return to Queen Margaret Drive?’
  • 68) ‘A travel agent by day and dreamer by night, he nurtures idealistic hopes of becoming a TV writer.’
  • 69) ‘My mother had nurtured a hidden ambition to visit the Holy shrines of Badrinath and Kedarnath.’
  • 70) ‘Others inside the party nurtured hopes of a return to past Stalinist glories or some form of militant syndicalism.’
  • 71) ‘Many had nurtured hopes that a major clearout would be made, opening the door for a large number of appointments.’
  • 72) ‘She nurtured the hope of becoming a teacher, a field of endeavour that received the approval of both parents.’
  • 73) ‘For a long time Vavilov nurtured the hope that he would be allowed to go to the Congress.’
  • 74) ‘Soldiers' allegiances were stronger towards their generals than the discredited deputies and army leaders began to nurture political ambitions of their own.’
  • 75) ‘Having come this far, the city government now nurtures more ambitions.’
  • 76) ‘He also nurtures a dream about this land which includes the virgin patch of forest, Silent Valley.’
  • 77) ‘Maybe we rushed too fast towards the dream we had secretly nurtured or maybe it just was just a chimera.’
  • 78) ‘The Golden Quartet line up was a dream Smith had nurtured for some 30 years till their formation in 2000.’
  • 79) ‘These candidates should then be given support, nurture, and a challenge to test whether God is calling them to cross cultural borders with the gospel.’
  • 80) ‘At stake is not the status of marriage in our society (important though that is) but the safe and sensitive nurture of all our children from whatever home background they come.’
  • 81) ‘Asleep, he dreamed again and again of a dying child who turned into a wet rag when he tried to comfort it - a terrible, potent image for a self allowed to slip away and powers of nurture never exercised.’
  • 82) ‘Also, another group of chicks will be brought over from Russia next year to go through the same nurture and acclimatisation routine that the current influx is undergoing.’
  • 83) ‘It needed nurture but the Labour council killed it off, ostensibly because it had debts of 130,000.’
  • 84) ‘Children who've grown up without nurture apparently lack any sense that they can be something other than what they are.’
  • 85) ‘I don't just mean in the field of higher education, where Americans give, or give back, to their places of nurture on a scale that we find unthinkable.’
  • 86) ‘One cone-shaped hill is topped with a rock pile like a nipple, a metaphor of nurture.’
  • 87) ‘We must make the proper nurture of children our highest priority, but this can never be done in a risk-free way.’
  • 88) ‘She turned to one for advice and nurture, another for kicks, and another for career advice, and each knew what was expected of them.’
  • 89) ‘And nurture is interrupted again when your colleague's husband is stopped from checking their baby.’
  • 90) ‘Since March, hours of thought and planning have been spent on design, preparation and nurture.’
  • 91) ‘Acceding to these requests seriously damages our understanding of conception and fatally fractures the link between parental relationships and infant nurture.’
  • 92) ‘But how to price and value love, nurture, community trust and neighbourliness?’
  • 93) ‘They have only vague, dim ideas about feelings, the development and nurture of human emotions.’
  • 94) ‘But the Jews had established places where worship and spiritual nurture could take place.’
  • 95) ‘In such prayer lies spiritual nurture and wholeness.’
  • 96) ‘The process of Christian nurture, from cradle to grave is continuous.’
  • 97) ‘Moreover, the Christian nurture model offered worried Protestant parents a much firmer guarantee of a child's good outcome.’
  • 98) ‘In the nurture of children, they are taught in both religious traditions.’
  • 99) ‘So whichever way you stand on the nature nurture debate, Kierkegaard was always likely to turn out a depressive.’
  • 100) ‘In the nature / nurture debate there's room for both to have their influence.’
  • 101) ‘Finally, the nature / / nurture debate is addressed throughout the book.’
  • 102) ‘The rapid transformation of warring societies into peaceful ones underscores the power of nurture over nature.’
  • 103) ‘In a John Steinbeck novel, two characters engage in the nature vs. nurture argument.’
  • 104) ‘The upshot is that the age-old nature versus nurture dichotomy is completely erroneous.’
  • 105) ‘Ridley's goal is to demolish this view and explain why Galton's nature / nurture dichotomy is erroneous.’
  • 106) ‘Then we are left with an empirical question of understanding how nature and nurture interact.’
  • 107) ‘Of course, there is continuing debate about the extent to which such behaviours are inherent in our nature, or whether they are the result of nurture through a socialization process.’
  • 108) ‘A lot of people have a problem with the nature versus nurture debate because they think then, ‘OK, if it's nurture, then it's curable’.’
  • 109) ‘The idea, however, that men and women are separated from each other merely by nurture is a relic of early feminism.’
  • 110) ‘He himself grew up without his biological parents, being raised by a foster family, and is understandably sceptical about the elevation of biology over nurture.’
  • 111) ‘Religion is a product of nurture and therefore a matter of choice. I reject discrimination on the grounds of religion.’
  • 112) ‘I think we are who we are via nature (as a foundation) and then are further shaped by nurture.’
  • 113) ‘You say you are interested in the nature/nurture debate, but all the evidence is with nurture in your presence.’
  • 114) ‘Many on the left seem to assume that if everybody has the same nurture, then everybody will be equally intelligent.’
  • 115) ‘But he overestimates the extent to which the supremacy of nurture is generally accepted.’
  • 116) ‘I used to think that nurture had the upper hand and I'm slowly swinging the other way: I now tend to believe we're genetically predisposed for a lot of things.’
  • 117) ‘But it seems to the Professor that nurture has made women more receptive to the idea of retributive violence.’
  • 118) ‘He was quick to point out that nurture plays a big role, not just our genes.’
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