here vs hear

here hear

Definitions

  • 1) An army, host
  • 2) abstract This time, the present situation.
  • 3) abstract This place; this location.
  • 4) A hostile force
  • 5) Anglo-Saxon An invading army, either that of the enemy, or the national troops serving abroad. Compare fyrd.
  • 6) An enemy, individual enemy
  • 7) This place.
  • 8) The present time or state.
  • 9) obsolete Hair.
  • 10) An individual enemy.
  • 11) An army; a host; a hostile host.
  • 12) A Middle English form of hair.
  • 13) That which is here; the present; this world.
  • 14) See Hera.
  • 15) A Middle English form of hare.
  • 16) Specifically In Anglo-Saxon history, an invading army, either that of the enemy, as the Danish invaders, or the national troops serving abroad. See fyrd.
  • 17) filler after a demonstrative pronoun but before the noun it modifies, solely for emphasis
  • 18) filler after a noun or demonstrative pronoun, solely for emphasis
  • 19) Used especially for emphasis after the demonstrative pronoun this or these, or after a noun modified by the demonstrative this or these:
  • 20) Nonstandard Used for emphasis between the demonstrative this or these and a noun.
  • 21) At this point in the argument or narration.
  • 22) location In, on, or at this place.
  • 23) abstract In this context.
  • 24) location To this place; used in place of the more dated hither.
  • 25) To this place; hither.
  • 26) At or in this place.
  • 27) At or on this point, detail, or item.
  • 28) In the present life or condition.
  • 29) At this time; now.
  • 30) In the present life or state.
  • 31) To or into this place; hither. [Colloq.] See Thither.
  • 32) In this place; in the place where the speaker is; -- opposed to there.
  • 33) At this point of time, or of an argument; now.
  • 34) it is neither in this place nor in that, neither in one place nor in another; hence, it is to no purpose, irrelevant, nonsense.
  • 35) in one place and another; in a dispersed manner; irregularly.
  • 36) In the present life or state; on earth.
  • 37) At the point of space or of progress just mentioned or attained; at or in the place or situation now spoken of: as, here we tarried a month; here the speaker paused.
  • 38) Seehe
  • 39) A Middle English form of hear.
  • 40) In the place or region where the person speaking is; on this spot or in this locality.
  • 41) To this place; to the situation or locality where the speaker is.
  • 42) See he
  • 43) At the nearer point, or at the one first indicated: opposed to there.
  • 44) At the place or in the situation pointed out, or assumed to be shown or indicated: as, here (in a picture) we see a cottage, and here a tree.
  • 45) A phrase used in calling attention to a toast or wish: as, here′ s a health to you; here′ s luck to you.
  • 46) UK, slang used for emphasis at the beginning of a sentence when expressing an opinion or want.
  • 47) Used to respond to a roll call, attract attention, command an animal, or rebuke, admonish, or concur.
  • 48) (be out of here) To leave; depart.
  • 49) (neither here nor there) Unimportant and irrelevant.
  • 50) obsolete Her; hers. See Her.
  • 51) obsolete See her, their.

Definitions

  • 1) perceive (sound) via the auditory sense
  • 2) examine or hear (evidence or a case) by judicial process
  • 3) receive a communication from someone
  • 4) Tobecalled.
  • 5) To listen; harken; give heed.
  • 6) To be heard, or heard of; be reported.
  • 7) To possess the sense of hearing; have that form of sense-perception which is dependent on the ear.
  • 8) To be a hearer of; attend usually the ministrations of: as, what minister do you hear?
  • 9) To pay regard to by listening; give ear to; give audience to; mark and consider what is said by; listen to for the purpose of learning, awarding, judging, determining, etc.: as, to hear prayer; to hear a lesson or an argument; to hear an advocate or a cause, as a judge.
  • 10) To perceive by the ear; receive an impression of through the auditory sense; take cognizance of by harkening.
  • 11) To be called.
  • 12) To be told; learn by report: as, so I hear.
  • 13) To listen to understandingly; learn or comprehend by harkening; hence, to learn by verbal statement or report.
  • 14) To receive news or information; learn.
  • 15) To be capable of perceiving sound.
  • 16) To learn by hearing; be told by others.
  • 17) To perceive (sound) by the ear.
  • 18) To attend or participate in.
  • 19) To consider, permit, or consent to something. Used only in the negative.
  • 20) To listen to (something) attentively or in an official capacity, as in a court.
  • 21) To listen to and consider favorably.
  • 22) To use the power of perceiving sound; to perceive or apprehend by the ear; to attend; to listen.
  • 23) To be informed by oral communication; to be told; to receive information by report or by letter.
  • 24) [Obs.] to be blamed.
  • 25) [Obs.] to be praised.
  • 26) To have the sense or faculty of perceiving sound.
  • 27) To perceive by the ear; to apprehend or take cognizance of by the ear
  • 28) To accede to the demand or wishes of; to listen to and answer favorably; to favor.
  • 29) To give audience or attention to; to listen to; to heed; to accept the doctrines or advice of; to obey; to examine; to try in a judicial court
  • 30) [Colloq.] to hear one say; to learn by common report; to receive by rumor.
  • 31) [Colloq.] to receive private communication.
  • 32) See Remark, under Hear, v. i.
  • 33) To attend, or be present at, as hearer or worshiper
  • 34) To give attention to as a teacher or judge.
  • 35) (never hear the end of) To be complained to or told about (something) repeatedly or for a long time.
  • 36) (hear, hear) Used to express approval.

Examples

  • 1) Then the President named Australia - he thought I had certain talents, connections, that would work out here.
  • 2) I just, I don't know, I felt she wasn't entirely a stranger here.
  • 3) She went to lunch with your wife and your wife told her she'd been here on a quick business trip some years ago.
  • 4) Let it come out that I called Mr. Julicher here to clear my name.
  • 5) _theeäzam here, theeäzamy here_, and _thizzam here_ for these, or these here; and sometimes without the pleonastic and unnecessary _here_.
  • 6) And we knew there was a market here that was famous..here is a water color.
  • 7) An alternative, dialetheic account of motion, which takes at face value the aforementioned Hegelian idea that “Something moves, not because at one moment it is here and another there, but because at one and the same moment it is here and not here, because in this ˜here™, it at once is and is not”, is exposed in Priest, 1987, Ch. 12.
  • 8) “Something moves, not because at one moment it is here and another there, but because at one and the same moment it is here and not here, because in this ˜here™, it at once is and is not” (1831, p. 440).
  • 9) “You have one here, you have one back here—“ “Oh, I didn’t even know about that, yeah.
  • 10) We might long to go here, "she brought her fist up to her breast, and then raised it to her head --" but there was that _here_ which kept us to the camp and their will.
  • 11) The world will little note, nor long remember, what we say here; but it can never forget what _they did here_.
  • 12) A man and a woman HAVE been here (not _has been here_).
  • 13) And now only one of those two years is gone; and -- I am here, _here_, alive only through charity!
  • 14) It is for us, the living, _rather_, to be dedicated here to the unfinished work which _they who fought here_ have thus far so nobly advanced.
  • 15) ‘I notice you have a little bit of a close community going on here where you live.’
  • 16) ‘At the moment, there are some other women living here who are near her age to keep her company.’
  • 17) ‘Beveridge once lived near here, where he would have seen all the ills he listed.’
  • 18) ‘Today there are thousands of immigrants who live and work here driven underground.’
  • 19) ‘What does it mean to you to be on pole position here at the French Grand Prix?’
  • 20) ‘In all the years he has lived here, he has never seen killer whales approach so close.’
  • 21) ‘Soon there will be very few of us left as generations have to leave the city because they can't afford to live here anymore.’
  • 22) ‘They moved to Wiltshire in 1957 to farm at Chitterne in the west of county and they have lived here ever since.’
  • 23) ‘It is easy to see how, living here, she can maintain what's most important to her: a grip on normality.’
  • 24) ‘I didn't even live here in those days, and he sold land all around Australia by direct mail.’
  • 25) ‘If you are very lucky, you may even be able to get hold of some tickets for one of the concerts or other live performances staged here.’
  • 26) ‘I feel like I might be coming down with a cold; one of my coworkers has a cold and is not here today.’
  • 27) ‘They also have the chair massage people here today, so I'm thinking of going for that.’
  • 28) ‘I inform him that I've been living here for over 9 years, and am coming back tonight.’
  • 29) ‘Val Kilmer is here live to tell us all about his new movie and the roles that made him famous.’
  • 30) ‘It is for Australia, and for Australia alone, to decide who comes here and who lives here.’
  • 31) ‘We have a saying here that donkeys in general do not hit their head twice at the same stone.’
  • 32) ‘Nevertheless, there was general approval here this morning for the bird's bid for freedom.’
  • 33) ‘They settled in Brooklyn and all of the children were raised and other generations born here.’
  • 34) ‘We drank a toast to friends and family, here and far away, and I thought about the people I was missing the most.’
  • 35) ‘Go here to sign up for day by day emails that will give you ways to feel better about the world.’
  • 36) ‘I have here an exam from the Basic 1401 Programming course.’
  • 37) ‘I have here a very old letter, written to a Mrs. Bixby in Boston.’
  • 38) ‘Sign up here to receive email alerts when new music is made available for free download.’
  • 39) ‘The man at the desk made some notes a large piece of paper and turned it towards him. ‘Sign here on the line please.’’
  • 40) ‘Finally, here comes a film that is a joy, sheer joy, from the first frame, almost to the last.’
  • 41) ‘This was no longer the myth of ‘here comes the person to rob the bank’.’
  • 42) ‘Just when you thought it was safe to go back in the water, here comes the return of the shark movie.’
  • 43) ‘Instead I am here, in my English class, and here comes Evan waltzing in, now with his track jacket on.’
  • 44) ‘Hooray, say some, here comes big capital to modernise the road and provide jobs and homes for the needy.’
  • 45) ‘Times have changed, but here comes my hero Ronaldo, which has to be good news for all concerned.’
  • 46) ‘After some pretty hot days, here comes the rain pouring heavily in our part of the world.’
  • 47) ‘Yes, the wave of the future is here my friends, and it's sure to bring on a new era of gaming for us all.’
  • 48) ‘After so much talk of football widows, here comes a story of how the World Cup brings a family together.’
  • 49) ‘I'm here to win a championship, and it's a great plus to be with coach Mike Martz.’
  • 50) ‘I know why you're here. You're here to revel in rock bottom for the Notre Dame football team.’
  • 51) ‘I’m from the Government. I’m here to help.’
  • 52) ‘We're here to do it better than anybody has ever done it before.’
  • 53) ‘Hang the police, we're here to rock!’
  • 54) ‘An infinitely happy life is not a life without difficulties here in our finite existence.’
  • 55) ‘What is life really about? Why are we here? How did life begin? Was it really random? Or was there a purpose behind it?’
  • 56) ‘You cannot answer that question simply by asking why does God allow sin, without asking why are we here - what is our mission in life, why did God put us here in the first place.’
  • 57) ‘This is the thanks given to a generation whose efforts helped to win the war, and had they failed, none of us would be here today.’
  • 58) ‘I can honestly say I probably would not be here today if it wasn't for her.’
  • 59) ‘There is a strong possibility that you may have heard this story before but here is how it goes anyway.’
  • 60) ‘Our thanks to Ernie Evans for this story and here is a picture of his grandfather with a new Skippy!’
  • 61) ‘To make a long story short, here is the history of the royalty payments on that song.’
  • 62) ‘On to lighter things, here is a story of me and the purse snatcher at Town Hall Station.’
  • 63) ‘So here is my story in hopes that maybe someone reading this will understand that someone does care and that they are not alone.’
  • 64) ‘Thank you for reading our story, here is a list of people that we have to say thank you to.’
  • 65) ‘In his own words, here is the story of how Michael arrived at the track you can hear on this page.’
  • 66) ‘If you haven't seen it yet, here is the first Fathers 4 Justice story of the year.’
  • 67) ‘The real news is terrible right now, so here is a random science story from September 2001.’
  • 68) ‘So if you will entertain me a bit longer here is the rest of the story.’
  • 69) ‘So here is the ultimate Mexican egg dish, huevos rancheros, to spice up your weekend.’
  • 70) ‘Getting a good story relies in part on luck, but here is a checklist that might help when something happens near you.’
  • 71) ‘Each one has certain markings and, so you can amaze your friends, here's how to decipher them.’
  • 72) ‘And as a gesture of goodwill, here's a photo of her pointing at my leg for no apparent reason.’
  • 73) ‘But if you're not convinced the situation is dire, here is a warning from history.’
  • 74) ‘Anyway, his list of observations could apply to so many situations, so here it is, cut and paste it now.’
  • 75) ‘Nevertheless, here's some general advice on making the most of your newfound fortune.’
  • 76) ‘However, here are some general points to be borne in mind when planning the campaign.’
  • 77) ‘Little is wrote about him elsewhere so here is my small attempt to address the balance.’
  • 78) ‘Following many recent comments in the Press about fireworks, here is what happened to my daughter.’
  • 79) ‘here is the money I saved. Please hand it to the American sailors injured.’
  • 80) ‘And here is your lanyard, I replied, which I made with a little help from a counselor.’
  • 81) ‘here's some furniture for you - just needs some lovin'.’
  • 82) ‘It looks like this is becoming a real trend and it finally feels like summer is here.’
  • 83) ‘But when I read things like this, it becomes clear that the time when that can happen is not yet here.’
  • 84) ‘Summer days are here again, and the winter woollies have finally been put in mothballs.’
  • 85) ‘Summer is nearly here, and a local theatre group are preparing to hit the road and take advantage of the good weather.’
  • 86) ‘Looking at the schedules, one can't help but feel that summer is here and the people who run TV are not.’
  • 87) ‘You also know summer is here when the food markets finally open after a winter of hibernation.’
  • 88) ‘Summer is here and Agapanthus are one of the most striking plants in early Summer.’
  • 89) ‘I can also wear skimpier tops and short sleeves, which is great now that summer is here!’
  • 90) ‘Summer holidays are here, bringing the chance to bask in delicious sunshine.’
  • 91) ‘Summer is here and a bit more fun would be welcome on the streets of Kerry towns.’
  • 92) ‘Just when we imagined we've seen the gamut, here comes a genuine first in the industry.’
  • 93) ‘Well, here comes a ten-ton surprise, because it turns out that their gratitude was all talk.’
  • 94) ‘But here comes another constraint that you might just consider to be a smoking pistol.’
  • 95) ‘I was just getting caught up in wrecks and we got that out of the way early, so here comes our stretch again.’
  • 96) ‘here, hold this in your hand, right here, young fella, just like this.’
  • 97) ‘here, have a piece of my heart.’
  • 98) ‘here, have some laundry detergent!’
  • 99) ‘Then his face got all twisted up, and before he even uttered another word, I shouted here, and went to get my paper.’
  • 100) ‘My count is now at 60 (counting the women who said ‘here’ and the women who've posted a new message since then).’
  • 101) ‘The teacher would call out your name and you would then respond by saying, ‘here.’’

Examples

  • 1) They are waiting to hear about whether they qualify.
  • 2) You hear people talking about it for days leading up to the game.
  • 3) The appeal hearing could be heard in summer or autumn next year.
  • 4) She thought others on the beach would have heard screaming if something truly awful had happened.
  • 5) The next scene is in training and we hear him talking about the pressure.
  • 6) The elite refuses to see and hear what the people want.
  • 7) The panel hearing the misconduct case have been told to strike any allegation that she acted with dishonesty.
  • 8) So talk, but listen to hear rather than listen to answer.
  • 9) She wanted to resume her studies but specialists expressed concerns, the Gloucester hearing heard.
  • 10) You may think this is the first time you have heard of this case.
  • 11) We would love to hear about it.
  • 12) You really feel that people want to hear music again.
  • 13) Why must a secret service fair hearing be heard in secret?
  • 14) We heard something terrible had happened at the match.
  • 15) You hear of people who wait all their lives to become an overnight sensation.
  • 16) People love football and always want to hear something.
  • 17) His wife is unfit to stand trial and her case is being heard in her absence.
  • 18) Everyone has heard about the fear of the unknown.
  • 19) His independent voice of protest and reason began to be heard at licensing hearings.
  • 20) Not something you often hear from the average pop trumpet.
  • 21) It is love at first listen when you hear an intriguing accent.
  • 22) It could be love at first listen when you hear a distinctive voice.
  • 23) Yet it is a grim certainty we will hear cases like this for years and years to come.
  • 24) But sometimes he will ask them if they mind the music being played and if they would prefer to hear something else.
  • 25) Oooh tankee! da fann wil bee muchly apreesheatted dis weakind. sposed ta gits reely hawt hear – inna 90′s *das mayjor HAWT hear*
  • 26) Oh, my own Ba, hear _my_ plain speech -- and how this is _not_ an attempt to frighten you out of your dear wish to '_hear_ from me' -- no, indeed -- but a whim, a caprice, -- and now it is out! over, done with!
  • 27) But yet hear me, � hear with patience; �hear me with that unprejudiced reason which is as much your distinction as your beauty or your virtue.
  • 28) These verses are truly beautiful, with the exception of one fault that we often find in poets, which is, their being misled by Fancy to believe that they really do see and hear _what they wish to see and hear_, and yet even this is far below their ideal.
  • 29) _Word of denial in_ my _Labra's_ hear; that is, _hear_ the word of denial in my _lips.
  • 30) _understand_, but the _endeavour_ to find God in the Bible depends on ourselves: our Lord has described it in the words _He that hath ears to hear let him hear_.
  • 31) Some people make little home videos of their performances, I make audio recordings just using my laptop just to hear it and feel like I understand what’s going on with vocal qualities- it’s weird and uncomfortable to watch/listen to yourself sometimes, though, so mirrors are good to watch yourself, but sometimes it’s good to actually *hear* what you’re doing.
  • 32) Well, there are some problems with Pop Occulture’s analysis … first of all, SChizophrenia - the reason schizophrenics hear voices and don’t recognize thema s coming form themselves is because the voices occur in a part of the brain that processes hearing - thatis to say, they really do *hear* voices or whatever.
  • 33) I call for a reply, -- I have a right to demand a reply, "Lumley was startled to hear the tone in which his chief uttered the comprehensive and significant" _hear, hear_! "
  • 34) ‘This may sound cruel but I hear catcalls and people pick on me enough outside my family home.’
  • 35) ‘She stumbled out of the way just as she heard the voice, sounding quite irritated.’
  • 36) ‘As Claire walked into the main corridor, she heard voices that sounded not too far off.’
  • 37) ‘Her voice was so quite that he almost didn't hear her over the sound of the river.’
  • 38) ‘At that very moment, she hears some familiar sounds and feels some movement behind her back.’
  • 39) ‘At 16 he awoke to his country's indigenous sounds after hearing traditional music played at his father's funeral.’
  • 40) ‘It is through the use of pictures, sounds, and hearing the language on a daily basis that helps them to learn.’
  • 41) ‘They've been hearing the sound bites from the government ministers and also from the farmers.’
  • 42) ‘I remember hearing the bus driver sounding his horn as if he was angry.’
  • 43) ‘A neighbour reported hearing a thud that sounded like a garbage bag being dropped.’
  • 44) ‘Perhaps they enjoy hearing me sound all ratty and scratchy, trying to be polite in the name of friendship.’
  • 45) ‘If you haven't heard the sound clip you really have to get with the programme.’
  • 46) ‘Five minutes after that I heard seven bangs which sounded like firecrackers.’
  • 47) ‘I've never heard anyone with a sound scientific background argue that it's better for you.’
  • 48) ‘Humans cannot generate or hear the high frequency sound waves generated by bats.’
  • 49) ‘And yet it still sounded remarkable to hear the words that came yesterday.’
  • 50) ‘It helped her hear some vowel sounds in the lower frequencies, but that was all.’
  • 51) ‘The noise of the blast has left him struggling to hear high frequency sounds.’
  • 52) ‘The roaring and crashing sounds she had heard the night before had not stopped either.’
  • 53) ‘Whilst we were talking, we heard a sort of sound between a yelp and a bark.’
  • 54) ‘It is at that point that his mantra changes from a selfish need to be heard to actually listening.’
  • 55) ‘He may be willing to listen but will he hear anything that's said?’
  • 56) ‘She complains that I don't talk to her and then she wonders why I get so angry because she never listens or hears anything I say.’
  • 57) ‘The Ivorians seemed willing to be heard, but none of them seemed willing to listen.’
  • 58) ‘The children learn to open their hearts and to really listen to others and be heard by them.’
  • 59) ‘If he does not listen, the only other way to be heard is at the ballot box in November.’
  • 60) ‘Anna started to speak to me again, and I listened, nodding, although not really hearing anything she had to say.’
  • 61) ‘James stood there listening the whole time but only heard half the conversation.’
  • 62) ‘It knows the difference between listening and hearing.’
  • 63) ‘So, I decided that I would hear them out and just listen.’
  • 64) ‘She doesn't listen to their problems, their wants or needs, she just assumes that she knows exactly what they need or want without really hearing them out.’
  • 65) ‘The mother hadn't found out her daughters' motives, she hadn't heard them out.’
  • 66) ‘Ariel Rogers heard them out, but it was important to her that, if they were to use Stan's name, they would have to do it right.’
  • 67) ‘The panelists, members of a national government advisory congress, intervened and heard the student out, according to one witness and accounts by others posted on the Internet.’
  • 68) ‘I've done a fair amount of that kind of work before - I once worked with kids in a juvenile hall - and over the years I have found that if you can convey that you really want to hear them out as opposed to preaching to them, then they open up.’
  • 69) ‘They ruled that if defendants could show they were acting out of necessity or under duress the jury had the right to hear them out.’
  • 70) ‘The best never try to persuade the reader to believe them, only to hear them out, as Fort himself once did.’
  • 71) ‘As long as we exclude them and don't hear them out, we will allow them to continue their hate.’
  • 72) ‘Before you people start screaming, hear my case out.’
  • 73) ‘It was pointed out that all other common law jurisdictions hear such cases in jury courts.’
  • 74) ‘To hear cases, the judges sit in Chambers of seven, appointed on a rotating basis from within each Section.’
  • 75) ‘Three appeal court judges will hear the case on March 31 as he launches his fight against the conviction.’
  • 76) ‘Accordingly I rule that this court has jurisdiction to hear this case against all defendants.’
  • 77) ‘Four Scottish judges, sitting without a jury, are hearing the case.’
  • 78) ‘This is nothing short of God hearing a child's prayer and graciously giving him his heart's desire.’
  • 79) ‘Those prayers were heard, for God was preparing him for his future task.’
  • 80) ‘The service beseeches God to hear the prayers of the community.’
  • 81) ‘It said to him that his prayer had been heard and that soon his desire would be granted.’
  • 82) ‘Jesus hears our cries for help when we find strife in our lives, just as he hears our prayers of thanksgiving and praise when things are going well.’
  • 83) ‘We can place our full confidence in the One who called us by name and hears every prayer that springs from our hearts.’
  • 84) ‘Then, we'll learn that Jesus is always with us, strengthening our faith and hearing our prayers.’
  • 85) ‘He heard my prayer, for when I went back to work after Christmas, a Christian lad started working alongside me.’
  • 86) ‘Following that meeting, my husband and I both felt strongly that the Lord had heard our prayers.’
  • 87) ‘But there is no record that He ever refused to hear the prayer of anyone; not even the lowest.’
  • 88) ‘When we intercede, God hears and answers our prayer.’
  • 89) ‘That easy promise he'd made not to pray was the means of arousing him to meet the God who inspires and hears and answers prayer.’
  • 90) ‘Come, pray with me and understand that all of our prayers will be heard by the same God.’
  • 91) ‘The tumult has at last been quieted, but it unclear whether the prayers have been heard.’
  • 92) ‘Would God hear my prayer, for a hundred million were praying for their loved ones?’
  • 93) ‘She finally understood that God had indeed heard her prayers every cold and lonely night.’
  • 94) ‘Does it mean my prayers are those of a nonbeliever and not worthy of being heard by my Lord?’
  • 95) ‘The next news they heard about Belinda was a phone call in 1997 informing them she had been arrested.’
  • 96) ‘If we could absorb the significance and importance of every death we heard about in the news then we would be unable to function.’
  • 97) ‘Many people saw things as they were reported on the TV news, or heard about them on the radio as they drove along.’
  • 98) ‘The Duchess of York, who is an old friend of Murray and knows her as Jeffa, said she was delighted to hear of the explorers' safe rescue.’
  • 99) ‘Every time I talk to or hear of anyone studying anything at all, I get jealous.’
  • 100) ‘The mask, in a private collection, was unknown to researchers until Coe heard about it last year.’
  • 101) ‘I suspect we will hear of more research like this as mobile-phone using cohorts in the population age.’
  • 102) ‘However, just about every murder case we hear of in the news involves a religious murderer.’
  • 103) ‘We only heard about the scandal at the Sheffield clinic on the news.’
  • 104) ‘She told her husband about the incident the next day and he told her he had heard about the killing on the news and urged her to contact the police.’
  • 105) ‘I heard about this on the news on the radio on Friday, but didn't have the time to look any further into it at that point.’
  • 106) ‘Most employees arriving for work early today had only heard about the merger on the early morning news.’
  • 107) ‘She had not gone to work because she had heard about the bombs on the news.’
  • 108) ‘I sent an email to the minister informing him that I expect to hear of his resignation in coming days.’
  • 109) ‘If anyone has more information, I would be most interested to hear of it.’
  • 110) ‘We often hear of private records being dumped illegally or information being stolen.’
  • 111) ‘I decided to investigate, using an experiment I'd heard about in New York City.’
  • 112) ‘We have heard about investment but what about investment in pensioners?’
  • 113) ‘This is the first question my friends asked me when they heard about the trip.’
  • 114) ‘He had first heard about the investigation on the radio and contacted the police.’
  • 115) ‘I've never heard of a swimming pool anywhere in the world that has banned backstroke.’
  • 116) ‘They say the proposed change will associate them with a place most people have never even heard of.’
  • 117) ‘What about lab technicians who are rarely heard of but whose competence can be a matter of life or death?’
  • 118) ‘I have not heard of a single new urban transport plan for the town which would make any difference.’
  • 119) ‘I would like to ask him when was the last time he heard of a fox-hunter tucking into a tasty meal of fox stew?’
  • 120) ‘I have never heard of this before and wondered whether it could help the problem.’
  • 121) ‘By far the most common reaction is that they have never heard of him, he doesn't even register.’
  • 122) ‘We set up our site five years ago when many businesses hadn't even heard of e-commerce.’
  • 123) ‘It is fair bet that like millions of Americans you never heard of any of this.’
  • 124) ‘Dad ignores daughter if he passes her in the street and she wishes they had never heard of the Lottery.’
  • 125) ‘After games he would drink just water to rehydrate himself before we had even heard of doing that.’
  • 126) ‘You probably haven't even heard of some of these people but we had a great time.’
  • 127) ‘Few people outside the industry had heard of him and that's the way he liked it.’
  • 128) ‘If you have heard of all three, you will realise just how truly irreplaceable John Peel is.’
  • 129) ‘This is when all the people who don't give a toss or haven't heard of the scandal are still behind you.’
  • 130) ‘Just occasionally I hear a song by an artist I have never heard of that sticks in my mind for days.’
  • 131) ‘I'm the guy who makes part four and part five of movies where you haven't heard of the first one.’
  • 132) ‘If they haven't heard of the campaign, this will tell them what they need to know.’
  • 133) ‘The wife has arthritis and she went up to her specialist but he had never heard of it as a cure.’
  • 134) ‘They certainly did not expect a choir most of them had never heard of to leapfrog them into third spot.’
  • 135) ‘After a day without hearing from him, she contacted the police and began a search.’
  • 136) ‘I've not spoken to her on the phone nor heard from her via letter for three years.’
  • 137) ‘Not hearing from him, I contacted another friend in the UK, who had been in touch with his sister.’
  • 138) ‘So, what I'm trying to say is, I love hearing from you guys, even if I don't always show it.’
  • 139) ‘We always love hearing from you, even if you have tattoos and pierced places on you.’
  • 140) ‘If you have a story or information you would like to be included we would love to hear from you.’
  • 141) ‘If so the organisers of this year's Medieval Festival would love to hear from you.’
  • 142) ‘He would love to hear from anyone who has examples of animal folklore or legend in Yorkshire.’
  • 143) ‘If you have a story to tell or a regret to resolve they would love to hear from you.’
  • 144) ‘He would love to hear from anyone who can shed some light on the great cowboy mystery.’
  • 145) ‘The group is particularly keen to hear from people living close to mobile telephone masts.’
  • 146) ‘Take time to read some of the stories on the site and if you think you have what it takes, we'd love to hear from you.’
  • 147) ‘If you or one of your readers is interested in doing this we would love to hear from them.’
  • 148) ‘This contact is sometimes the first time they have heard from their families for decades.’
  • 149) ‘I still have not heard from you following my last letter, and do not expect to for some months.’
  • 150) ‘Though disqualified as a member of the council, he will address his former colleagues ‘in committee’ before the start of the monthly meeting and is likely to ask for a delay in filling his seat until he hears from the Department of Justice.’
  • 151) ‘Childline Scotland, the national helpline for children in trouble or danger, hears from a small, but significant, number of young people who are commercially sexually exploited every year.’
  • 152) ‘The programme hears from a woman who avoided leaving her house for 10 years, and if she had to, scrubbed herself so violently afterwards that she literally got down to the last of her seven layers of skin.’
  • 153) ‘In truth, I'm probably just a mild hypochondriac who should get out more, but if no one hears from me for more than three days, please call the following number…’
  • 154) ‘My dad heard from his two brothers that he never hears from, one in Romania who is now coming home to make funeral arrangements.’
  • 155) ‘Given my feeling about my own journals, when I ran across those kept by my friend's 89-year-old mother after her death, I would not hear of throwing them away.’
  • 156) ‘A neighbour of mine had a dog that was run over, it lost three of its legs, these caring people would not hear of the vet putting him down, so instead they used to take him out for a ‘drag’ a couple of times a day.’
  • 157) ‘When mom was told, she would not hear of such a thing.’
  • 158) ‘The conservative government was gung ho about supporting our ally and would not hear of possible defeat; we would never cut and run.’
  • 159) ‘In fact, the only reason she remained in school for so long was that her teachers would not hear of her being removed because she was such an excellent pupil.’
  • 160) ‘We offered to compensate the generous stranger but he would not hear of it.’
  • 161) ‘She will not hear of his proposal because he is homeless and illiterate.’
  • 162) ‘She could have walked to Annie's house, which was only twice the distance to the diner, but Annie would not hear of her walking through town with all of her luggage, especially seeing as how she was the talk of the town.’
  • 163) ‘He just hoped her mother would not hear of this because then she would no doubt be angry with him, letting her favorite daughter lift a finger and do something for herself.’
  • 164) ‘‘I told you, I had to study,’ not to mention the fact that my mom would not hear of me going out on a school night.’
  • 165) ‘I badly wanted to ride out and meet him, but Mama would not hear of it.’
  • 166) ‘The hotel would not hear of it and insisted it went to the courts.’
  • 167) ‘I offered to process the roll and send him the shots that I had taken in his museum, but he would not hear of it.’
  • 168) ‘But her mother, who had never once considered her child as anything but beautiful, would not hear of it.’
  • 169) ‘She had wanted someone to roll it out for her, but the director would not hear of it.’
  • 170) ‘He would not hear of my attending the funeral, or going for a day or two, to cheer poor Frederick's solitude.’
  • 171) ‘Margaret would not hear of this and three years ago Victor left the matrimonial home.’
  • 172) ‘I will not hear of any lofty titles as long as I stay on this island!’
  • 173) ‘Miss Reynolds, I will not hear of you traveling to Brighton unescorted.’
  • 174) ‘When he wants to quit again, Maria will not hear of it.’
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