lie vs lay

lie lay

Definitions

  • 1) The manner or position in which something is situated.
  • 2) A false statement deliberately presented as being true; a falsehood.
  • 3) Something meant to deceive or mistakenly accepted as true.
  • 4) A haunt or hiding place of an animal.
  • 5) Sports The position of a golf ball that has come to a stop.
  • 6) An obsolete spelling of lye.
  • 7) That which is intended or serves to deceive or mislead; anything designed or adapted to produce false conclusions or expectations: as, this epitaph is a lie.
  • 8) Manner of lying; relative direction, position, arrangement, etc. See lay, n., 4.
  • 9) A false statement made with the purpose of deceiving; an intentional untruth; a falsehood; the utterance by speech or act of that which is false, with intent to mislead or delude.
  • 10) The place where a bird, beast, or fish is accustomed to lie or lurk; haunt.
  • 11) An obsolete form of lee.
  • 12) In railroading, a siding or short offset from the main line, into which trucks may be run for the purpose of loading and unloading; one of the different sets of rails at a terminus on which trucks stand while being loaded or unloaded.
  • 13) Synonyms Untruth, deception. Compare fib.
  • 14) To be placed on or supported by a surface that is usually horizontal.
  • 15) Archaic To stay for a night or short while.
  • 16) To present false information with the intention of deceiving.
  • 17) To occupy a position or place.
  • 18) To be or remain in a specified condition.
  • 19) To be or place oneself at rest in a flat, horizontal, or recumbent position; recline.
  • 20) To exist; reside.
  • 21) To be buried in a specified place.
  • 22) To extend.
  • 23) To consist or have as a basis. Often used with in:
  • 24) To say or write as a lie.
  • 25) To convey a false image or impression.
  • 26) Law To be admissible or maintainable.
  • 27) (lie) To bide one's time but remain ready for action.
  • 28) (lie) To keep oneself or one's plans hidden.
  • 29) (lie through (one's) teeth) To lie outrageously or brazenly.

Definitions

  • 1) Sexual intercourse.
  • 2) The direction the strands of a rope or cable are twisted in.
  • 3) The amount of such twist.
  • 4) A partner in sexual intercourse.
  • 5) The state of one that lays eggs.
  • 6) Not of or belonging to a particular profession; nonprofessional.
  • 7) Of, relating to, or involving the laity.
  • 8) To present for examination.
  • 9) To put forward as a demand or an assertion.
  • 10) To cause to lie down.
  • 11) To put or set down.
  • 12) To impose as a burden or punishment.
  • 13) To put up to or against something.
  • 14) To bury.
  • 15) To place in or bring to a particular position.
  • 16) To put or set in order or readiness for use.
  • 17) To produce and deposit.
  • 18) To make in this manner.
  • 19) To bet; wager.
  • 20) To devise; contrive.
  • 21) To produce and deposit eggs.
  • 22) Nonstandard To lie.
  • 23) Nautical To put oneself into the position indicated.
  • 24) To cause to be in a particular condition.
  • 25) Games To place (a bet); wager.
  • 26) To place together (strands) to be twisted into rope.
  • 27) To aim (a gun or cannon).
  • 28) To put forward as a reproach or an accusation.
  • 29) To cause to subside; calm or allay.
  • 30) To spread over a surface.
  • 31) Vulgar Slang To have sexual intercourse with.
  • 32) To place or give (importance).

Examples

  • 1) But under the surface of the city streets lies a sadder story.
  • 2) She warns us that she might lie about her personal life.
  • 3) Or to check the lie of the land?
  • 4) You do not need to read between the lines to know what lies ahead.
  • 5) They just give lies on top of other lies.
  • 6) The best way to make this lie on your floor.
  • 7) We ran outside and there was a man lying near the back of the car who looked like he was dead.
  • 8) The blame lies with that country 's government.
  • 9) A strip of upturned earth lies beside the site.
  • 10) The city lay behind them under a tattered amber smog.
  • 11) We had a fight and old stuff came up about me lying.
  • 12) We like to be familiar with the lay of the land.
  • 13) Tune in to what lies ahead and focus on getting there.
  • 14) You just want to lie down all the time.
  • 15) She lay on the floor hurt and stunned.
  • 16) The future of this country lies in social mobility and diversity.
  • 17) The big areas for reform lie elsewhere.
  • 18) The responsibility for accessing the internet and the choice of site lay with the individual.
  • 19) But at the heart of it lies the arrogance of power unchecked.
  • 20) Who is to say where reason lies in such a case?
  • 21) She lies to us when she stays at his place and lies about money too.
  • 22) She thinks something sinister could lie beneath the ice.
  • 23) The reason for its popularity lies in the way it drives.
  • 24) They placed me in a lying position on the back seat.
  • 25) It looks as if the card is simply lying on the open hand.
  • 26) The answer to their dilemma is sometimes to tell a lie.
  • 27) The lie of the land on the coast can be deceptive.
  • 28) The patient lies strangely angled with his feet in the air, his head near the ground.
  • 29) A city of rock lay all around us.
  • 30) I can now - mostly - tell what angle they are lying at.
  • 31) They learnt to lie, and they grew to appreciate the beauty of a lie….
  • 32) ’ If again, it was not well cut, he would answer, I spake not true: this is called the ‘reproof valiant: ’ if again, it was not well cut, he would say, I lie: this is called the ‘countercheck quarrelsome’: and so to the ‘lie circumstantial, ’ and the ‘lie direct.
  • 33) "Laddie lie near me," must _lie by me_ for some time.
  • 34) | Modifier of _beds_. beds | | Prin. word in Prep.phrase. lie | | Predicate of _who_. and | | Connects _lie_ and _waste_. waste | | Predicate of _who_. away.
  • 35) "_Laddie lie near me_ must _lie by me_ for some time.
  • 36) All the origins of the term lie in expressions of argument and opinion, and of "dissent" from ruling systems or ideologies.
  • 37) Sometimes the best way to lie is to tell the truth.
  • 38) So when politicians lie, and honest people in the debate try to "explain" why the lie is a lie, we then give credence to the lie by providing the details!
  • 39) And this lie is all too willingly swallowed up by the American Sheeple.
  • 40) ‘You'll lie here and rest until the young master recommends otherwise for you!’
  • 41) ‘By 11.30 pm, my stomach was growling and I was lying horizontal on the sofa yawning, as she made mention yet again of leaving.’
  • 42) ‘She was lying, asleep we assumed, on the carpet outside our bedroom door.’
  • 43) ‘His arms were bound to the surface he was lying on and so were his legs.’
  • 44) ‘It would happen even when she was lying on her bed trying to rest.’
  • 45) ‘She was lying on her bed, supported by her left arm as the right one flipped through magazines.’
  • 46) ‘Instead, Chelsea finds her mother lying on the bed, her back supported by pillows to prop her up into a seated position.’
  • 47) ‘When they finally made their way upstairs, Kate lay down on the bed and didn't resurface the rest of the night.’
  • 48) ‘I was lying down to rest for a moment, and I must have drifted off.’
  • 49) ‘Subjects were asked to lie on a support surface, positioning their left heel on the end cell of a support surface.’
  • 50) ‘She cried out in pain and frustration, and remained where she lay.’
  • 51) ‘She lies on an empty avenue overlooked by curious streetlights.’
  • 52) ‘When they detect a predator, chicks either lay low in the nest and remain still, or lie on their backs and strike at the predator with their talons.’
  • 53) ‘But lying there in that empty bedroom told me exactly what kind of girl I was, and what kind of girl I would never be.’
  • 54) ‘Instead, I'm just staring blankly at the metal ceiling trying to keep my head empty whilst lying on the mattress.’
  • 55) ‘Today she lay on her back and looked up at the gray sky through the twisted branches of the oak.’
  • 56) ‘He had no idea how long he had been lying there, or how long he could have remained there before anyone came.’
  • 57) ‘The sun had been beating fiercely down on her tear-streaked face as she saw her father lying there, dead.’
  • 58) ‘The next time, he was lying dead in Bradford Royal Infirmary.’
  • 59) ‘The dead woman lies cold and serene on a formal bier.’
  • 60) ‘The walls were made of stone and a small pallet lay by two book cases.’
  • 61) ‘Beer bottles and cups were scattered about the room and a pizza box lay open on the table.’
  • 62) ‘He circled around the machine to where a sole book lay on a work surface.’
  • 63) ‘Flip the pad on a preacher bench so your chest and abs rest on the inclined side and your arms lie along the flat, vertical side.’
  • 64) ‘Make sure the paper flange and the staples lie flat against the board, to create an even surface for attaching the finished wall material.’
  • 65) ‘She stepped closer to the bed where the open suitcase lay, picking up a pearl necklace.’
  • 66) ‘This roomy yet compact bag lies flat, with adjustable compartments and a mesh opening for ventilation.’
  • 67) ‘The river had come over its banks several times more since the big flood, and was up again today, and heavy rainfall lay on the surface rather than draining away.’
  • 68) ‘For example the boot can take a child buggy and golf clubs, both items lying flat on the floor, between the rear wheel arches, without having to utilise the folding seat facility.’
  • 69) ‘Her eyes grew accustomed to the starlight and she spotted her own shadow lying on the surface.’
  • 70) ‘The emptied wax wrapper of a disposable cardboard bento box lay next to his sprawled mass.’
  • 71) ‘Eventually, as she got older, the bank book lay unused in a drawer.’
  • 72) ‘On the desk under the palm of her left hand lay a black book, a fairly thick one at that.’
  • 73) ‘Then during a lull in the sickening waves of withdrawal, he noticed a pack of book matches lying on one of the flat, iron crosspieces between the bars.’
  • 74) ‘To cook asparagus, remove the woody ends first and peel part way up if the stalks are tough, then place in a skillet where the stalks can lie flat.’
  • 75) ‘The romance novel lay on Eva's boudoir dresser, open and ragged from her wear-and-tear for the last week and a half.’
  • 76) ‘Only one thing lay there, a small black leather bound address book.’
  • 77) ‘With eyes sharpened by experience, a senior member of the team has spotted remains lying beneath a felled palm tree.’
  • 78) ‘Forty or fifty feet before it lay the broken remains of a section of stone wall that had been erected there, possibly as a target.’
  • 79) ‘It's now that I notice the empty liquor bottles, lying broken on the floor.’
  • 80) ‘For more than 400 years, the remains of James Hepburn, the 4th Earl of Bothwell, have lain in a Danish church where they were turned into a grisly tourist attraction.’
  • 81) ‘The corpses were left where they lay pending forensic examination today.’
  • 82) ‘He lies among the remains of pontiffs from centuries past and near the tomb traditionally believed to be of the Apostle Peter, the first pope.’
  • 83) ‘A large Celtic Cross stands in the middle of the plot and there too many of the Jones Family lay at rest underneath.’
  • 84) ‘After all, there would be no point in saving a building just for it to lie empty and rot.’
  • 85) ‘As a child I wandered through it when it lay silent and empty.’
  • 86) ‘For 170 years Ballina's Augustinian Abbey has lain derelict and inconspicuous at the bottom of Ardnaree near St Muredach's Cathedral.’
  • 87) ‘Number thirty-two had lain empty for over a year, and its unlocked garage acted as our unofficial gang headquarters for dirty deeds and general hiding from parents.’
  • 88) ‘The writings specify an abbey that has lain unused for a century, and that is what this is.’
  • 89) ‘The body was taken from the villa up the hillside, where it lay for a night in the church.’
  • 90) ‘His remains, which lay undisturbed for 59 years, have been found in a swamp near the town of Nieuw Chappelle, along with the wreckage of his plane.’
  • 91) ‘Situated on the outskirts of Ballybunion, this church was built in 1930 and has now been lying idle and in a general state of disrepair for over three decades.’
  • 92) ‘The original hospital buildings date back to the 1850s, but the site has lain empty for nearly five years while the Clements Park estate has grown up around it.’
  • 93) ‘And, in some winter scenes, the landscapes lie still and silent as though waiting for the ice and snow to melt.’
  • 94) ‘Other times, the water lies still and flat, reflecting the blaze of sunset and sunrise.’
  • 95) ‘Similarly, our comedies season is not just about laughter, but the yearning for harmony and reconciliation which lies at the heart of Shakespeare's great comedies.’
  • 96) ‘The Belgian band encapsulated the friendly spirit of fraternity that lies at the heart of folk.’
  • 97) ‘It's the coming together with a common purpose of two such different men that lies at the heart of his novel.’
  • 98) ‘Imaginary resources, in the form of sovereign rents and aid flows, lie at the heart of the impasse.’
  • 99) ‘Where there is trouble to be enacted, they lie at its bitter heart.’
  • 100) ‘To perform the operation with pencil and paper one must start with the million or so numbers among which the solution is known to lie.’
  • 101) ‘While an accurate prediction is near impossible, the attention of many in the market is now turning to the subject that lies at the heart of economic performance: consumer confidence.’
  • 102) ‘The answer, of course, does not lie within the hallowed halls of government, finance or business.’
  • 103) ‘The solution, of course, may not lie inside the churches at all.’
  • 104) ‘As ever, a painting freezes a moment and expression in time and has the viewer wondering what story lies beneath the surface.’
  • 105) ‘The power of art lies not in its surface beauty but in its quality of inducing self-reflection.’
  • 106) ‘Therein lies the rub for those who would curb latte consumption with pocketbook reasoning.’
  • 107) ‘The answer lies somewhere between these two extremes.’
  • 108) ‘Perhaps the answer lies somewhere in the fact that the world is imperfect and gets more so every day.’
  • 109) ‘In spite of these reform measures that favor the implementation of integration, a number of challenges still lie ahead.’
  • 110) ‘The truth lies somewhere between these two extremes - although closer to the pro side than the con.’
  • 111) ‘The answer lies just ahead in what many are calling the interview of the century.’
  • 112) ‘The heroic prototype is considerably watered down and herein lies the crux of the problem.’
  • 113) ‘Do one's loyalties lie on one side, the other, or somehow on both?’
  • 114) ‘The real blame lies at the feet of the people who profit from this carnage.’
  • 115) ‘The town of Shanhaiguan lies on a five mile sliver of plain between mountains and sea, a pass that opens like an avenue into the heart of China.’
  • 116) ‘Bishop's Crossing is a small village lying ten miles in a south-westerly direction from Liverpool.’
  • 117) ‘The neutral locus lies at two different positions between two selected loci.’
  • 118) ‘The proposed site for the centre lies between the Airport Road and the Burma Road.’
  • 119) ‘As Newry's push for city status reaches fever pitch, a forgotten city lies merely 10 miles away from the frontier town.’
  • 120) ‘On a Salmon River tributary downstream from Francis' place lies the site of the old mining town of Florence.’
  • 121) ‘The village lies five miles east of Ilfracombe in a valley that runs from the north-western edge of the Exmoor upland down to the Bristol Channel.’
  • 122) ‘I consider however that a means of overcoming the problem should be feasible although it may involve land lying between the appeal site and the river that is not in the control of the appellant.’
  • 123) ‘Besides, the port lies just 10 nautical miles from the international shipping route.’
  • 124) ‘Taxis are available for the ride into town, which lies just three miles away.’
  • 125) ‘The city lies 100 miles south of the U.S. border in Baja, California.’
  • 126) ‘The town of Whistler lies 15 miles away, just over the summit of 7,639-foot Rainbow Mountain.’
  • 127) ‘The fact that Grange lies ten miles north of Sligo town means it is never likely to be considered a suburb of the town, which is just fine for the many people who call Grange home.’
  • 128) ‘Culturally integrated but politically separate, the United States Territory of Guam lies thirty miles farther south at the bottom of the chain.’
  • 129) ‘The Aral Sea lies within Uzbekistan and Kazakhstan.’
  • 130) ‘The top of the Kimmeridge Clay Formation lies within the more widely used, but poorly constrained, Tithonian Stage.’
  • 131) ‘And it lies within a stone's throw of the most intensively used footpath on the North York Moors.’
  • 132) ‘At Nagaon, it lies within a palm grove and is about an eight-minute walk from the Nagaon Beach - a complete horticulture project.’
  • 133) ‘Still, the reef can be safely explored from dozens of places along the Queensland coast, where it lies within a couple of hours' boat trip from the shore.’
  • 134) ‘As a matter of etiquette, York and Ainsty South had to give permission for hounds from other hunts to attend, as York Minster lies within its area.’
  • 135) ‘Wind whistled against the hole in the back wall, which heightened the eerie effect of the scene which lay before them.’
  • 136) ‘An open door lay beyond them and Chris could see the first few steps of the staircase that would lead him to the top floor.’
  • 137) ‘The first team currently lie mid-table in the York and District League division one, while the reserves prop up reserve ‘B’.’
  • 138) ‘On Wednesday night, against a team lying fifth in the Portuguese league, United made their earliest exit from the Champions League in a decade.’
  • 139) ‘The Cape Town team is currently lying mid-table and will be desperate to prove their cup success last season was no fluke.’
  • 140) ‘They have the tenth best goal-scoring record and the twelfth best defensive record, suggesting the team should be lying mid-table rather than sixteenth.’
  • 141) ‘Currently lying 12 th in the league, they still harbour hopes of a play-off push but have been hindered by a failure to go on and win games.’
  • 142) ‘They currently lie 8th in the Northern Counties East League, first division.’
  • 143) ‘Workington currently lie next to bottom in the league table with just two victories and a draw from their nine games.’
  • 144) ‘Currently lying 15th in the championship, Dean is confident of rising through the ranks as the 18-race season progresses.’
  • 145) ‘After five matches the town lies 6th place overall out of a total of 8 towns.’
  • 146) ‘New Earswick will be anxious to avoid a sluggish start against Dewsbury Moor, who have just one win from their opening five games and lie just one place off the bottom.’
  • 147) ‘Before the judge and before us there was some debate whether such a claim lies for breach of fiduciary duty generally or only those which also involve the misapplication of property.’
  • 148) ‘Where a policy provides cover against one of two or more concurrent causes of a casualty, a claim will lie under the policy provided that there is no relevant exclusion.’
  • 149) ‘Prerogative remedies for criminal charges will not ordinarily lie where an appeal is available.’
  • 150) ‘Where the injury to the claimant is caused as a result of his especially sensitive activity, no claim will lie.’
  • 151) ‘He said that the Crown Prosecution Service accepted the pleas and would ask for the rape charge to lie on the file after sentence.’
  • 152) ‘With the lie of Scottish theatreland already shifting, we are seeing a nascent, semiconscious shuffling for position for next year's awards.’
  • 153) ‘Then, too, I am scared of tying too much money up here, not being entirely sure where the lie of the politics is.’
  • 154) ‘You should brush along the lie of the hair, and in the places hardest for the cat to reach such as under the chin and the back of the neck.’
  • 155) ‘You have been invited to play a new golf course and now want to find out more about it, perhaps even ‘walk’ the course in advance of your game or visualise the lie of the greens.’
  • 156) ‘Look, the last thing that a star wants is to disrupt the lie of a dress by eating a cheeseburger before a show.’
  • 157) ‘Change the lie and the shot to keep your mind engaged.’
  • 158) ‘You can play this shot off any lie, even bare ground if your wedge has minimal bounce.’
  • 159) ‘As the lie gets deeper, the ball automatically goes farther back in your stance.’
  • 160) ‘She decides to play the shot anyway, because the lie is so good.’
  • 161) ‘If the heel is up then well-struck shots will go right, and the lie needs to be more upright to correct.’
  • 162) ‘And I told the world that your case for the war was a pack of lies.’
  • 163) ‘It implies that everything up until now has been a pack of lies.’
  • 164) ‘I was appalled at the political mileage that was made out of a pack of lies told about desperate people in need.’
  • 165) ‘It is largely a pack of lies but it is an ingeniously presented pack of lies.’
  • 166) ‘They can be made by a young conscript who chooses to tell her family about the horrors to which she contributed, rather than maintain the silent lie of false heroism.’
  • 167) ‘The first statement is an honest-to-goodness lie, the last a half truth.’
  • 168) ‘The above was, of course, a pack of lies designed to illustrate the fact that fox hunting is not a sport.’
  • 169) ‘This conformity makes them not false in a few particulars, authors of a few lies, but false in all particulars.’
  • 170) ‘They tell lies, they give false addresses, they even take out temporary accommodation in the area.’
  • 171) ‘But, on the merits, what he says in between is just flat-out false, a lie.’
  • 172) ‘In the absence of such a consequence, the statement is a lie.’
  • 173) ‘This is a farce, a cruel hoax, a pack of lies, a fraud.’
  • 174) ‘The ingredients are fear, pejorative statements, secrecy, lies, a bought press and economic uncertainty.’
  • 175) ‘Accordingly, you resort to false premises, lies and diversionary tactics.’
  • 176) ‘It was as if everything I believed in was proved, in one revealing second, to be false, lies.’
  • 177) ‘We make things too easy for ourselves if we regard such a statement as a barefaced lie.’
  • 178) ‘I needn't remind you that this is the very same society that shackles them with its false smile and pristine lies and acts as a drug for the braindead masses.’
  • 179) ‘Soon I would be thrust into the upper-class whirlwind of lies and false smiles.’
  • 180) ‘But when you live a false life, the lies are all you have to keep you honest.’
  • 181) ‘She was bold, brave and was able to get herself out of almost any situation through quick lies and witty deceptions.’
  • 182) ‘To be forced to present themselves as if they were lay persons is for them a very painful deception; they feel that they are living a lie.’
  • 183) ‘It encouraged me to live deceitfully; I enjoyed living a lie.’
  • 184) ‘Eight ordinary people have left behind their regular lives to take part in the series, taking on a fake alias and living a lie.’
  • 185) ‘In fact, I had probably been living a lie all those years.’
  • 186) ‘I have a word of advice for Will: Be a real man, and stop living a lie.’
  • 187) ‘‘There is a perverse sense of release once you get caught because you have been living a lie,’ he said.’
  • 188) ‘Which breathtaking blonde, who married into wealth and privilege, and has one of the cutest little babies on the supermodel circuit, is living a lie?’
  • 189) ‘Last season was the one in which Scotland's top flight finally decided to be honest with itself, and admitted that for the previous few years it had been living a lie.’
  • 190) ‘Yet no one knows that he has been living a lie since arriving at Shannon Airport in 1996 with his pockets full of cash and little idea about what the future held.’
  • 191) ‘But shortly after the baptism she felt she was living a lie.’
  • 192) ‘Ever feel like you're living a lie by not saying anything?’
  • 193) ‘One of them broke down crying and said she wanted to stop living a lie.’
  • 194) ‘It gives us the freedom of being true to ourselves and not living a lie.’
  • 195) ‘Easy to say, but I do believe that living a lie is pointless and not only hurts you but all those around you.’
  • 196) ‘He will become rich and famous, but in doing so he will find that it comes at the cost of living a lie.’
  • 197) ‘After deciding not to go on living a lie, isn't she being a little economical with the truth?’
  • 198) ‘There is no greater stress than that of running from our past or living a lie.’
  • 199) ‘Years of living a lie suddenly came crashing down.’
  • 200) ‘Though the expected laughs are still there, many of the characters have a hunted look about them, as though constantly aware that they are living a lie, either literally or emotionally.’
  • 201) ‘If they could be happy living a lie, than so be it.’
  • 202) ‘If we do, that would be tantamount to lying, deceit or unprofessionalism.’
  • 203) ‘At every stage he has lied, prevaricated and obstructed this process of disarmament.’
  • 204) ‘I think most children tend to tell the truth, particularly if it's in their best interests not to lie or fabricate.’
  • 205) ‘Those young people have deliberately lied and falsified documents, which is fraud, misuse of a document, and so on.’
  • 206) ‘Under these circumstances, you would surely say that your friend had lied: what he had said was false.’
  • 207) ‘Both these people have lied and manipulated people through the press to believe one facade after another in order to get whatever it is they want…’
  • 208) ‘If neither player lied, or if both players lied, assign the penalties to the Chooser and his Partner as prescribed in the basic game.’
  • 209) ‘The people lied, betrayed one another, and frequently tried to kill each other.’
  • 210) ‘They have lied, cheated and stolen - and a crime is a crime, no matter what influential social circles the criminal is fortunate enough to mix in.’
  • 211) ‘But the sheriff in this case decided that the boys had lied.’
  • 212) ‘Mary, how long did it take for them to come forward after the end of that trial and to learn that one of their own witnesses had lied?’
  • 213) ‘So the survivors lied and hid their guilty secret and trauma.’
  • 214) ‘Given that so many men in her life have lied, cheated on her and tried to sell stories about her, she would be forgiven for becoming just a bit cynical.’
  • 215) ‘MacLean later learned, in 1942, while he was fighting in North Africa, that the Scot had lied.’
  • 216) ‘Three have deliberately lied; two have never been interviewed to this day.’
  • 217) ‘No one in the court bothered to think that the witnesses could be lying and presenting false testimonies.’
  • 218) ‘Is that suggesting that the solicitor has lied before the Tribunal?’
  • 219) ‘Yet there is scant evidence that doctors targeted by these organizations have lied on the stand.’
  • 220) ‘When I was a child, I would lie my way out of any situation.’
  • 221) ‘We claim that we are friends, and yet we keep secrets from each other, lying our way out of most everything.’
  • 222) ‘I pretty much lied my way out of there, just so I could get home and hurt myself again.’
  • 223) ‘He said that in the immediate aftermath of the accident, he had been ‘shocked enough to tell lies but not the truth… you found a way that you could lie your way out of it’.’
  • 224) ‘And when they can't lie their way out of a jam, they send their minions to ‘correct’ the electronic record, and to make sure the originals are safely flushed down the memory hole.’
  • 225) ‘We can never lie our way out of responsibility for the decisions we have made.’
  • 226) ‘I tried to lie my way out of it, but I quickly realized there was no getting out of it.’
  • 227) ‘Thanks for putting this up, but it does sound like Jordan's trying to lie his way out of the hole he dug with his own mouth.’
  • 228) ‘And there is great irony in a man obviously trying to lie his way out of this while pretending to be a man of God.’
  • 229) ‘She released confidential information on someone dealing with her Ministry, then tried to lie her way out of it.’
  • 230) ‘But I had to find some way of lying my way out of this.’
  • 231) ‘I'm just saying you lied your way out of that one.’
  • 232) ‘My mother did get suspicious, but I lied my way out of it.’
  • 233) ‘I'd love to hear you try to lie your way out of this one!’
  • 234) ‘You can't lie your way out of this one… your true colors were exposed before my eyes…’
  • 235) ‘The chances of lying your way into a job and remaining unsuspected and undetected have become slimmer.’
  • 236) ‘I don't know if I'd recommend lying your way into good writing habits, but it worked for me.’
  • 237) ‘She knew that we would not survive if the Nazis found us again, so she took her chances at lying her way out of the country.’
  • 238) ‘The writers of these shows cannot let an episode pass without coercing a confession or lying their way into an illegal search.’
  • 239) ‘Anyone that tells you otherwise or promises great results in just a few days or even weeks is either unqualified or lying their way into stealing your money.’

Examples

  • 1) lay one leaf of smoked salmon on top of a sheet of clingfilm on the work surface.
  • 2) The council is already having to lay off 1,000 workers after cuts in grants imposed by central government.
  • 3) There are only so many ways you can lay out new maps.
  • 4) The road led them across a heath upon which huge pieces of rock lay strewn about.
  • 5) Just lay the problem out on the table and ask for help in finding a solution.
  • 6) Which of them is at home and who can lay claim to owning what?
  • 7) No time like the present to lay to rest a bad idea.
  • 8) The call was from one of our lay leaders at the church.
  • 9) Now he can take people on and lay it short.
  • 10) But she was just as resolved to lay completely passive under him.
  • 11) But thousands booed and whistled as he entered the cemetery to lay flowers.
  • 12) He just could not lay a bat on it.
  • 13) ‘Chuckling, I scooped them up in the palm of my hand and laid them gently on top of a soft pile of Green Stamps and bore them so to London town.’
  • 14) ‘He scoops up a selection of the sliced eggplant and limps over to the grill on his stovetop, where he carefully lays them to cook alongside the red and yellow peppers.’
  • 15) ‘Colt lays his hand gently on her shoulder in solidarity.’
  • 16) ‘He lays a hand gently on my shoulder, stretching his arm further round my back when I do not push him away.’
  • 17) ‘Liza smiled gently, laying her cheek against his chest.’
  • 18) ‘Vincent sighed laying an arm gently over my shoulder.’
  • 19) ‘I frown and move closer to him, laying my hand gently on his shoulder.’
  • 20) ‘Softly and carefully she removed each jewel that kept her hair in place before laying it gently on her lap.’
  • 21) ‘Cleo cradled her broken arm and gently lay it so it was supported by her lap.’
  • 22) ‘The dog whined and gently laid its head into her lap.’
  • 23) ‘He laid the gun gently on the stool next to her plate.’
  • 24) ‘I did as she told me, and she laid the boy gently on my arms.’
  • 25) ‘He gently laid the violin back into its case and locked it shut, handing it to one of the band members to put in the back for safe keeping until he was ready leave.’
  • 26) ‘I gently laid my hands upon her shoulders and heard her quiet tears.’
  • 27) ‘She gently laid the pills next to it and waited for her brother to answer.’
  • 28) ‘She reached out and laid a hand gently on his elbow, and her eyes were soft.’
  • 29) ‘He took off his long jacket and laid it carefully across the back of the chair and took his boots and glasses off as well.’
  • 30) ‘He laid the peasant girl gently in the grass beside him and looked down at her dark eyes brimming with tears.’
  • 31) ‘Sasha laid his new sister carefully in the playpen that had been erected in the corner of the living room.’
  • 32) ‘Becca carefully laid the last pieces of her clarinet in their places and snapped the case shut.’
  • 33) ‘There was a thunder storm here this morning, and I was hoping that the rain might lay the pollen and dust a bit.’
  • 34) ‘The rain the day before cooled the air and laid the dust.’
  • 35) ‘The light rain has laid the dust and little is lifted by your wheels as you drive.’
  • 36) ‘With the state of the roads in those parts, palm branches might have improved the surface no end, and been effective in laying the dust clouds.’
  • 37) ‘My flat is progressing too, with the bulk of the decorating work likely to be finished this week, and new (cheap and cheerful) carpet to be laid on Wednesday.’
  • 38) ‘The Red Carpet was especially laid for the guests who really enjoyed their stay there.’
  • 39) ‘In addition the ventilation system is being improved, seats have been re-covered and new carpets are being laid.’
  • 40) ‘Overnight these streets have been laid with colored sawdust carpets.’
  • 41) ‘The thick green carpet that was laid down looked almost like real, lush grass.’
  • 42) ‘It's certainly better than the nanotechnology-thick carpet that was previously laid directly onto the concrete screed.’
  • 43) ‘A lovely window seat has been built into one of the bay windows, and a pine floor has just been laid - the carpet was destroyed by our parties.’
  • 44) ‘The ancient and largely uncomfortable seating would be replaced and the giant 2,300-seater Oval Hall redecorated and a new carpet laid.’
  • 45) ‘The recent fall of snow, laid in a thick carpet, deadened any sound, adding to the tranquillity and pristine feel of the mountains.’
  • 46) ‘With the blue carpet only laid recently and the translation booths still to be fitted out, the 13th floor has yet to be finished.’
  • 47) ‘The drums scatter while a trembling, funky bass-riff lays the ground work for the string section to lead.’
  • 48) ‘He grinned against my lips and propelled me towards his bed, but before we got there, I laid some ground rules.’
  • 49) ‘This will lay the ground rules for anyone who tries to seek an exception to go whaling in the future.’
  • 50) ‘This lays the ground for suggesting some means to move forward in the debate.’
  • 51) ‘He hid it away carefully, thus laying the groundwork for a future evil villain to rediscover it at some later time and take over the world then.’
  • 52) ‘No expense had been spared in the ballroom itself, where the tables had been laid for a lavish banquet.’
  • 53) ‘The Green Room features a table laid ready for a meal.’
  • 54) ‘I remember looking into one and seeing a little dining table laid out with tiny silver cutlery.’
  • 55) ‘She laid the table then went back and returned with two more glasses.’
  • 56) ‘Then off we go to find the dining room, and lay the table.’
  • 57) ‘Once they have prepared and cooked the two-course meal, the children sit down at a table they have laid and eat together.’
  • 58) ‘The tables were being laid, and there's a Bouncy castle for the children.’
  • 59) ‘In the houses located in the Midlands, guests dine at one large polished dining table laid with old family silver.’
  • 60) ‘The gleam of an oil lamp cast a brilliant pool of light through the open door and they saw that a table had been laid for supper.’
  • 61) ‘He stepped into the kitchen to see his sister laying the table for them both.’
  • 62) ‘She turned quickly, in a swirl of black robes, and hurried along the forbidding corridors back to a table laid for two.’
  • 63) ‘As well as the existing handrails, the slopes are also being laid with a non-slip surface.’
  • 64) ‘In recent years, the surface has been laid with sand and loam.’
  • 65) ‘Modern display units feature large sliding trays laid with tiles, enabling customers to envisage a whole floor.’
  • 66) ‘The acupressure track has been laid with stone pebbles and tiles.’
  • 67) ‘In shambles, pavements once laid with tiles were chaotically dug up.’
  • 68) ‘A new plastic surface will also be laid for the event.’
  • 69) ‘The entrance hall has original floor tiles laid out in a herringbone design, moulded cornices and an original ceiling rose.’
  • 70) ‘One example of this was a blind elderly woman who had non-slip tiles laid on her bathroom floor to minimize the risk of injury.’
  • 71) ‘Beautiful golden cream tiles lay upon the floor along with some that were chocolate brown.’
  • 72) ‘The heavy slabs laid to cover drains along the tracks hinder cleaning and have become a breeding ground for mosquitoes.’
  • 73) ‘It will also have a new hard surface laid for older children to play ball games.’
  • 74) ‘And the benefits are promised to be worth the wait with new lights installed, bridges strengthened and a new smoother and quieter road surface laid.’
  • 75) ‘The all-weather surface comprises artificial turf laid onto a rubber composite material, giving a realistic feel.’
  • 76) ‘There's an outside seating area laid with gravel and helpfully placed stone benches.’
  • 77) ‘The bar had a chalkboard of snacks listed, and for a moment my heart sunk, but settled at a window table laid with crisp white linen, the menu for the restaurant was really enticing.’
  • 78) ‘When I arrive in out of the cold, the tables are laid with fresh white tablecloths, gleaming cutlery and sparkling wine glasses.’
  • 79) ‘Every one of the 400 bedrooms had a coal fire, laid by the staff each day.’
  • 80) ‘The girl closed the door, lit lamps and a fire that was already laid, then shuttered the only window of the one room cottage, as if wanting privacy.’
  • 81) ‘A fire has been laid for us in the parlour and I am certain we have much to discuss.’
  • 82) ‘The only light came from the fire that had been laid so the room would be a comfortable temperature for me.’
  • 83) ‘The rooms were bigger than The Laughing God's, but no fires had been laid, there were no hot baths, and meals cost two coppers apiece.’
  • 84) ‘Hunter returned to his place by Missy's side in front of the glowing embers of the dying fire laid in the black iron stove.’
  • 85) ‘The crowd was focusing its attention on an old woman who sat next to a fire laid on the stone floor of the classroom.’
  • 86) ‘I hastily finished laying the fire before going down below the stairs to the kitchen.’
  • 87) ‘She had some sort of trap laid and she was preparing to spring it on him.’
  • 88) ‘By now, the immediate surroundings were quiet, most of the troops had mustered at the south side of camp in preparation to spring the trap that had been laid.’
  • 89) ‘He laid a ‘glue trap’ by the hole at the back of my kitchen cupboard.’
  • 90) ‘Those involved in the ambush said a trap had been laid, and that the area was marked with defensive earth berms and firing positions.’
  • 91) ‘But the trap has usually been laid for the opponent, supported by a strong defense and kicking game.’
  • 92) ‘A trap should only be laid if it is part of the overall strategic plan.’
  • 93) ‘They also easily become prey to traps that are indiscriminately laid.’
  • 94) ‘A pest-control company has told me there is no evidence of any activity in the attic, though traps and poison were laid.’
  • 95) ‘At suitable sites, mist nets are strung up, and traps laid that harmlessly snare the birds as they come down to roost or rest.’
  • 96) ‘The course covers the laws about poisons, and the dangers to wildlife, and practical exercises in laying and baiting a trap.’
  • 97) ‘Last weekend, I laid down traps to catch the rats.’
  • 98) ‘There was no off-switch, and the seemingly clean-cut, anti-drugs pop star fell into every artfully concealed trap that fame laid for him.’
  • 99) ‘And stupidity, sheer stupidity, meant that they did not see the trap that they had laid for themselves.’
  • 100) ‘He likes his sport but is only too aware how it can lay dangerous and unseen traps.’
  • 101) ‘It makes bureaucratic booby traps, laid down by government civil servants at their final destination, cruel indeed.’
  • 102) ‘In the ensuing panic, it appears other hostages had inadvertently set off booby traps laid in the theatre by the rebels.’
  • 103) ‘There was still many hours of daylight left, plenty of time to lay out the trap in his mind.’
  • 104) ‘They have fallen into the trap the publishers laid down nearly 300 years ago.’
  • 105) ‘But she wasn't ready to accept him yet, it could be an elaborate trap laid by one of the Four.’
  • 106) ‘We zoom in for a brief moment to show the array of spike traps the police have laid in place to disable the car.’
  • 107) ‘French security sources said that advanced plans had been laid to use a stolen truck or a helicopter loaded with explosives.’
  • 108) ‘Plans had also been laid to raise more then £1 million locally.’
  • 109) ‘Plans are being laid to turn the clock back 60 years across large swathes of the resort for three days in early September.’
  • 110) ‘As stormy weather closes in, delaying passage even longer, Joan's carefully laid plans are dashed upon the rocks by an equally powerful emotional gale.’
  • 111) ‘We are instructed by the above-named prosecutor, and wish to lay the following information before the court.’
  • 112) ‘But several requests to lay proposals before the bank met with no serious response except that the bank should simply lend more money.’
  • 113) ‘He lays the evidence before us, without comment, so that we may draw our own conclusions.’
  • 114) ‘I've recruited a great blogger to fill in for me for a few days since I'm unable to lay my pearls before you with the frequency you deserve.’
  • 115) ‘The government will then lay an order before Parliament before they become effective from November.’
  • 116) ‘We voters must not feel singled out by the Prime Minister's refusal to lay the full facts before us.’
  • 117) ‘The proposals will be laid before parliament in the autumn.’
  • 118) ‘The first Order under this paragraph shall not be made unless a draft of the Order has been laid before and approved by resolution of each House of Parliament.’
  • 119) ‘Section 31 required that the code should not be issued unless a draft had been laid before and approved by a resolution of each House of Parliament.’
  • 120) ‘Thereafter, the Secretary of State lays the report before Parliament pursuant to Section 73.’
  • 121) ‘The Act gives the shareholder two possibilities for laying a removal resolution before a meeting of the shareholders in the face of an uncooperative board.’
  • 122) ‘If you will say that this sum (for the time above specified) will be sufficient, I shall lay the matter before the English Government.’
  • 123) ‘There may be other cases where allegations are put forward in some other form, and that may be an appropriate case for the Board to lay a complaint before the Tribunal.’
  • 124) ‘A spokesman had earlier said the police could not act solely on the basis of a video and that someone had to lay a charge before an investigation could be started.’
  • 125) ‘It may otherwise generally regulate its own procedure, but it must lay a report before Parliament.’
  • 126) ‘I set out first the Defendants' witnesses, as, by agreement, the Defendants led their evidence first, as they were most easily able to lay the factual position before the Court.’
  • 127) ‘Something funny is going on here… I'd lay all my money on a bet that it was the Emperor who sent that spell to kill me.’
  • 128) ‘But despite taking $25,000 bets before, she will be content with laying a more modest wager.’
  • 129) ‘The money was duly laid down, so Lucas whipped off his kit and plunged in.’
  • 130) ‘Yet not all the blame can be laid at the feet of the activists, because it was the very nature of the government's debate process that encouraged them to act as they did.’
  • 131) ‘Much blame can be laid on the corrupt and profit-ravenous food industry that shovels false information and dreadful products down our throats all day long.’
  • 132) ‘The blame here cannot be laid on some interagency squabble between, say, the State Department and the Pentagon.’
  • 133) ‘All the mistakes are clearly coming into the light, blame is being laid down hard and fast and there is nowhere to hide, not a spin left in the cycle.’
  • 134) ‘True blame must be laid at the feet of those who refuse to accept that there is a need now, more that ever before, for constitutional reform.’
  • 135) ‘No single reason explains this sorry state of affairs - the region is too parti-coloured for the blame to be laid at any one door.’
  • 136) ‘If any blame is to be laid at all, it is at the defense's door for this delay.’
  • 137) ‘But the blame cannot be laid solely at the door of the organisation and its leaders.’
  • 138) ‘The finger of blame cannot be laid at the door of the team management, for our planning was immaculate.’
  • 139) ‘If blame is to be laid, it should be at the feet of a handful of aged and godly spinsters and widows who taught me through my primary education.’
  • 140) ‘The report lays much of the blame at door of the UK's planning authorities.’
  • 141) ‘There are, after all, dangers in laying all the blame at the manufacturer's door.’
  • 142) ‘We cannot lay all the blame on foreigners visiting the country.’
  • 143) ‘It's just easier to lay all the blame squarely on the shoulders of smokers.’
  • 144) ‘Yet it is all too easy to lay all the blame at the door of the coach and call for quick fixes.’
  • 145) ‘The conference is of great significance to the institute, as special stress would be laid on developing a training programme for it.’
  • 146) ‘I suppose I should not lay too much blame at the door of the opposite sex.’
  • 147) ‘Too much stress cannot be laid on this point since it is perhaps the most important of all, certainly quite as important as the maintenance of perfect balance.’
  • 148) ‘Then stress should be laid accordingly so that one treats the root.’
  • 149) ‘Stress must be laid on product quality and benefits before any discussions on price.’
  • 150) ‘The female wasp lays her eggs inside the developing medfly egg.’
  • 151) ‘A female butterfly lays an egg that looks like a miniature pearl, or a squashed golf ball, or a whiskey barrel.’
  • 152) ‘Female flies lay eggs every two or three days, 300 eggs each time, which means the number of flies will rocket if not controlled.’
  • 153) ‘The adult female louse lays eggs, which hatch after seven days, in sacs adjacent to the scalp.’
  • 154) ‘Female turtles begin laying their eggs at age 50 and then come back to lay them every six years for another 50 years.’
  • 155) ‘Most adult female sea turtles will lay several hundred eggs during a nesting season.’
  • 156) ‘Being reptiles, the crocodilians lay eggs, but they are not abandoned by mother croc.’
  • 157) ‘The female beetle lays eggs only where she knows aphids are present.’
  • 158) ‘These host plants are where the female butterfly will eventually lay her eggs.’
  • 159) ‘However, some insects selfishly lay their own eggs in empty cells rather than taking care of the queen's eggs.’
  • 160) ‘They were overjoyed as the mother bird laid eggs.’
  • 161) ‘A mother bird lays her eggs and protects them as they grow.’
  • 162) ‘In fact most perching birds lay eggs that are mostly white except for a ring of reddish spots around the blunt end.’
  • 163) ‘In the middle of it all, this bird laid an egg but abandoned it and continued to mate.’
  • 164) ‘The moth lays eggs, and the larvae leave silvery trails as they damage the foliage.’
  • 165) ‘When a bee lays its eggs, it also provides a packet of pollen and nectar - like an energy gel for a long bike ride - for its offspring.’
  • 166) ‘At night on the beaches, giant turtles would lay their eggs.’
  • 167) ‘For example, turtles lay their eggs within hours in beach sand and then leave them.’
  • 168) ‘The initial report said that the beaches of both islands are places where sea turtles lay their eggs.’
  • 169) ‘On another day, we all rushed to the headman's home after hearing that a chicken had laid a strange egg.’
  • 170) ‘I had just arrived in the park to do some hedge laying.’
  • 171) ‘He was particularly skilled at draining with hand tools and either laying or cutting thorn hedges.’
  • 172) ‘The ancient art of hedge laying is alive and well thanks to a lone Preston craftsman, plying his trade around the area's villages.’
  • 173) ‘Pay particular attention to the topping or lopping of trees or the trimming or laying of hedges.’
  • 174) ‘All entrants should have some hedge laying experience and onlookers are welcome.’
  • 175) ‘Members of the group spend Sundays laying hedges and developing the grounds of the church.’
  • 176) ‘Not doing more than getting the lay of the land, but they were there.’
  • 177) ‘As they say, there is safety in numbers, so if you're in an unfamiliar place, stay with a group, at least until you know the lay of the land.’
  • 178) ‘Let's take a look at some satellite imagery, give you a sense of the lay of the land of where those pictures are coming from.’
  • 179) ‘And he sees it all and always has a real good feeling about the lay of the land, but his heart is really unique.’
  • 180) ‘In addition to learning the lay of the land, we would work out logistics for travel with twenty students.’
  • 181) ‘Give us a lay of the land right now, just about two weeks before the caucuses.’
  • 182) ‘Which is pretty much the way to evaluate the current lay of the land in Ukraine.’
  • 183) ‘They know the lay of the land literally, and they know what a hurricane of this type will do.’
  • 184) ‘I just did not think that where we were in the lay of the land that water was going to collect here.’
  • 185) ‘Just as we are getting a feel for the lay of the land, we stumble on a new wing we had almost forgotten had existed.’
  • 186) ‘I'm sort of going to give you the lay of the land and then we'll go inside.’
  • 187) ‘They dream of living off the land of their parents - but the lay of the land has changed a lot since 1948.’
  • 188) ‘Animals are often better at working out the lay of the land than are human beings, and Isobel's horse was no exception.’
  • 189) ‘She was trying to get the lay of the land, not to get herself laid.’
  • 190) ‘The lay of the land is also a defensive tool for the prudent general.’
  • 191) ‘Then, in a remarkable burst of rail building energy, engineers began cutting straight swaths across the lay of the land.’
  • 192) ‘She had no idea of the lay of the surrounding land, and nowhere to stay.’
  • 193) ‘Each one was adept at their trade; they knew the lay of their respective lands.’
  • 194) ‘JB knew the lay of the land pretty well and steered us to a hotel on O'Farrell.’
  • 195) ‘And Bip and Bop they knew the lay of the land.’
  • 196) ‘Both male and female breeders are subject to a restricted feeding regime for their first few weeks of life - about 20 days to the point of lay.’
  • 197) ‘Modern scholarship has done much to rescue the pastoral reputation and moral seriousness of the clergy and their lay supporters at all levels.’
  • 198) ‘She was training to be a lay preacher, but knew that wasn't where she wanted to be, and wasn't sure where she was going.’
  • 199) ‘During this time Bethel has been well supported by ministers from the South Wales area, some of them retired, and by lay preachers from the locality.’
  • 200) ‘A knife to his belly had brought him to the Bowery Mission, where he continues as a lay preacher.’
  • 201) ‘This book is intended primarily for lay study groups in Episcopal parishes and Lutheran congregations.’
  • 202) ‘In my opinion the church needs lay advisory boards with some teeth.’
  • 203) ‘So, baptism establishes the lay status of a believer by ordaining that person into the lay order.’
  • 204) ‘Another characteristic of those days is that salaries for lay workers and pastors were low.’
  • 205) ‘Look for opportunities to form teams in communicating with pastors and lay people.’
  • 206) ‘Therefore, if a bishop chooses to close a particular parish instead of bringing in a lay minister, he is free to do so.’
  • 207) ‘Even if we don't serve as lay ministers or volunteers, there is one thing we can do: pray!’
  • 208) ‘In the colonies the lay vestry emerged to help with the management of church resources and property.’
  • 209) ‘But a special effort will be required if lay preaching is to bear fruit.’
  • 210) ‘Part of the answer, in short, is found in the array of lay ministries that are integral to most thriving parishes.’
  • 211) ‘All of these academic settings are educating the church's future lay ministers.’
  • 212) ‘Many of its adherents promoted the individualism and lay preaching that Edwards so deplored.’
  • 213) ‘If only consultative, the lay voice will remain mostly window dressing for clerical decision makers.’
  • 214) ‘It's nice to think we might stay to help reclaim the house, but how is an ordinary lay Catholic to do that?’
  • 215) ‘And how does it bear on the roles, lay or clerical, of women in the church?’
  • 216) ‘Eventually, the pope had the lay people boycott married priests and not attend Masses celebrated by them.’
  • 217) ‘Often faculty are not clinicians but other health professionals and lay community members.’
  • 218) ‘Newspapers are an important source of information about the results of medical research, both for lay people and health professionals.’
  • 219) ‘Like lay rules, most professional rules are tacit and informal and are never formally articulated.’
  • 220) ‘When this bill was brought in, it had the same number of lay people and professionals.’
  • 221) ‘For a lay person, inhaled medicines are often linked to smoking or opium inhalation and is, therefore, perceived as addictive.’
  • 222) ‘And why are we stuck with two discrete inquiries which will not take place in public nor take evidence from lay people or racism experts?’
  • 223) ‘They act as a filter and a translator from the expert source to the lay reader.’
  • 224) ‘One can see the appeal of such stories for experts writing for a lay audience.’
  • 225) ‘My experience suggests that the lay member's views on legal questions, though diffidently expressed, can also sometimes be helpful.’
  • 226) ‘That panel will be made up of three people - a lay member and two with legal expertise.’
  • 227) ‘The process would involve an evaluation of a doctor's fitness to practise by a local revalidation group, of which one member would be a lay person.’
  • 228) ‘Third, the talking styles of men and women have been of interest to both lay and professional persons.’
  • 229) ‘There are, at present, 104 members of the council, 25 of whom are lay members.’
  • 230) ‘Some of the lay members of the council would thus like to see a council where the doctors had less power.’
  • 231) ‘Imbalances in knowledge between lay people and professionals make it difficult for lay people to assess doctors' ability and competence.’
  • 232) ‘These arrangements are currently being actively developed and entail consultation with lay and professional advisers.’
  • 233) ‘This committee will consist of experts from a range of different disciplines, and half its members will be lay people.’
  • 234) ‘The recently released handbook is intended to help even the lay public grasp the medicinal properties of herbs.’
  • 235) ‘That what a psychiatrist or an expert might know is not to be attributed to the lay person.’
  • 236) ‘This question is as relevant to any lay person as it is to me as an expert.’
  • 237) ‘James Macpherson based his Ossianic pieces on these lays.’
  • 238) ‘We come to the lay's treatment of the third type: the woman, as represented by the wife.’
  • 239) ‘In no other of Marie's lays is the roster of personages so heavily weighted toward a single gender.’
  • 240) ‘The first of the lays appeared in Blackwood's Magazine in Apr. 1843, and the volume was published in 1849.’
  • 241) ‘The company in the royal or noble hall provided the audience for a literature which mirrored the age: heroic lays recited by professional bards.’
  • 242) ‘Their roster of dazzling images is annually expanded by increments, as happened with bardic lays after the fall of Troy.’
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