humor vs humour

humor humour

Definitions

  • 1) A fluid or semi-fluid of the body.
  • 2) medicine Either of the two regions of liquid within the eyeball, the aqueous humour and vitreous humour.
  • 3) uncountable A mood, especially a bad mood; a temporary state of mind brought upon by an event; an abrupt illogical inclination or whim.
  • 4) uncountable A mood, especially a bad mood; a temporary state of mind brought upon by an event; an abrupt illogical inclination or whim.
  • 5) medicine Either of the two regions of liquid within the eyeball, the aqueous humour and vitreous humour.
  • 6) The ability to perceive, enjoy, or express what is amusing, comical, incongruous, or absurd.
  • 7) Aqueous humor.
  • 8) The quality that makes something laughable or amusing; funniness.
  • 9) A person's characteristic disposition or temperament.
  • 10) A sudden, unanticipated inclination; a whim.
  • 11) That which is intended to induce laughter or amusement.
  • 12) Vitreous humor.
  • 13) A body fluid, such as blood, lymph, or bile.
  • 14) One of the four fluids of the body, blood, phlegm, choler, and black bile, whose relative proportions were thought in ancient and medieval physiology to determine a person's disposition and general health.
  • 15) An often temporary state of mind; a mood.
  • 16) Capricious or peculiar behavior.
  • 17) That quality of the imagination which gives to ideas an incongruous or fantastic turn, and tends to excite laughter or mirth by ludicrous images or representations; a playful fancy; facetiousness.
  • 18) (Med.) A vitiated or morbid animal fluid, such as often causes an eruption on the skin.
  • 19) (Anat.) See Eye.
  • 20) Moisture, especially, the moisture or fluid of animal bodies, as the chyle, lymph, etc.
  • 21) (Med.) A vitiated or morbid animal fluid, such as often causes an eruption on the skin.
  • 22) (Anat.) See Eye.
  • 23) State of mind, whether habitual or temporary (as formerly supposed to depend on the character or combination of the fluids of the body); disposition; temper; mood
  • 24) Changing and uncertain states of mind; caprices; freaks; vagaries; whims.
  • 25) dissatisfied; displeased; in an unpleasant frame of mind.
  • 26) the liquid parts of the body
  • 27) the trait of appreciating (and being able to express) the humorous
  • 28) the quality of being funny
  • 29) a message whose ingenuity or verbal skill or incongruity has the power to evoke laughter
  • 30) An animal fluid, whether natural or morbid; now, especially, any of the thinner bodily fluids, limpid, serous, or sanious, as the constituent fluids or semi-fluids of the eye, or the watery matter in some cutaneous eruptions.
  • 31) and
  • 32) Hence One's special condition of mind or quality of feeling; peculiarity of disposition, permanent or temporary; mental state; mood: as, a surly humor; a strange humor.
  • 33) Wit, Humor (see wit); pleasantry, jocoseness, facetiousness, jocularity.
  • 34) See the adjectives.
  • 35) A facetious or jocular turn of mind, as in conversation; the disposition to find, or the faculty of finding, ludicrous aspects or suggestions in common facts or notions.
  • 36) In lit., witty, droll, or jocose imagination, conspicuous in thought and expression, and tending to excite amusement; that quality in composition which is characterized by the predominance of the ludicrous or absurdly incongruous in the choice or treatment of a theme: distinguished from wit, which implies superior subtlety and finer thought. Humor in literature may be further distinguished by its humane and sympathetic quality, by force of which it is often found blending the pathetic with the ludicrous, and by the same stroke moving to tears and laughter, in this respect improving upon the pure and often cold intellectuality which is the essence of wit.
  • 37) Specifically— Disposition, especially a capricious disposition; freak; whim; vagary; oddness of mood or manners: in this sense very fashionable in the time of Shakspere.
  • 38) Fancy, whimsey, crotchet, fad.
  • 39) Moisture; an exhalation.
  • 40) transitive : To pacify by indulging.
  • 41) transitive : To pacify by indulging.
  • 42) Synonyms Indulge, etc. See gratify.
  • 43) To comply with the humor, fancy, or disposition of; soothe by compliance; indulge; gratify.
  • 44) To endeavor to comply with the peculiarities or exigencies of; adapt one's self to; suit or accommodate: as, to humor one's part or the piece.
  • 45) To give a slight direction or turn to (a fly, in fishing, or the like).
  • 46) To adapt or accommodate oneself to: synonym: pamper.
  • 47) To comply with the wishes or ideas of (another) in order to keep that person satisfied or unaware of criticism; indulge.
  • 48) To adapt or accommodate oneself to: synonym: pamper.
  • 49) To comply with the humor of; to adjust matters so as suit the peculiarities, caprices, or exigencies of; to adapt one's self to; to indulge by skillful adaptation.
  • 50) To help on by indulgence or compliant treatment; to soothe; to gratify; to please.
  • 51) (out of humor) In a bad mood; irritable.
  • 52) (out of humor) In a bad mood; irritable.

Definitions

  • 1) obsolete Moist vapour, moisture.
  • 2) Any of the fluids in an animal body, especially the four "cardinal humours" of blood, yellow bile, black bile and phlegm that were believed to control the health and mood of the human body.
  • 3) One's state of mind or disposition; one's mood.
  • 4) The quality in events, speech or writing which is seen as funny, or creates amusement, such as a joke, satire, parody, etc.
  • 5) Either of the two regions of liquid within the eyeball, the aqueous humour and vitreous humour.
  • 6) obsolete Moist vapour, moisture.
  • 7) Chiefly Brit. same as humor.
  • 8) Chiefly Brit. same as humor.
  • 9) the liquid parts of the body
  • 10) a characteristic (habitual or relatively temporary) state of feeling
  • 11) the trait of appreciating (and being able to express) the humorous
  • 12) the quality of being funny
  • 13) a message whose ingenuity or verbal skill or incongruity has the power to evoke laughter
  • 14) (Middle Ages) one of the four fluids in the body whose balance was believed to determine your emotional and physical state
  • 15) etc. See humor, etc.
  • 16) transitive To pacify by indulging.
  • 17) transitive To pacify by indulging.
  • 18) put into a good mood

Examples

  • 1) There were further tests on the blood, bile and vitreous humor.
  • 2) His daughter's presence restored Pedro Morales's good humor.
  • 3) Manfred had already argued a difficult position with a compelling mix of conviction and crowd-pleasing humor.
  • 4) There might be more of it were there not a tolerably constant strain of humor, though more generally the characteristic American “good humor” than wit or comedy.
  • 5) The word "humor" comes from the Greek word for fluid or juice.
  • 6) The author's ultimate goal, cloaked in humor, is to be serious about the errors both individuals and society are prone to.
  • 7) This meaning of the word humor as a bodily fluid is now preserved in the aqueous and vitreous humors of the eyeball.
  • 8) You'll be much smarter about movies after watching it (and yes, the humor is as dark as ever).
  • 9) In his 40th film as director, Woody Allen revisits themes of life, love and mortality that he has examined before; but this time the humor is a bit darker and the characters, perhaps, more desperate.
  • 10) While some of the humor is a bit dated, most holds up rather well, and the production design here is nothing short of stunning.
  • 11) ‘They are full of raw Taiwanese humor and literary surprises.’
  • 12) ‘They remain a benchmark of quality for British humour.’
  • 13) ‘What made all this watchable, indeed endearing, was a constant thread of humour and the quality of the writing and acting.’
  • 14) ‘Full of its characteristic humour and human drama, the series takes the gang from Middlesbrough to Arizona.’
  • 15) ‘If a comic can find humour in broken limbs, then why not in mental illness, too?’
  • 16) ‘Fisher himself is well equipped with sharp observational humour and precision comic timing.’
  • 17) ‘‘We put out a variety of quality humor on a consistent basis,’ he said.’
  • 18) ‘One of her enduring contributions may be to bring humor to this tight-lipped literature.’
  • 19) ‘More recently, there has been interest in comics, humour, and folktales.’
  • 20) ‘Of all the recent attempts to tread this fine line between quality and humor, he does it better than almost anyone.’
  • 21) ‘The result is a record with remarkable perspective, full of honesty, humor and beauty.’
  • 22) ‘Gone were the days of situational comedy when humour formed an integral part of the plot of the movie.’
  • 23) ‘His was a speech laced with much humour and more than a little self-deprecation.’
  • 24) ‘He doesn't need notes because he knows what he's talking about, and he can invest his speech with humor on the spot.’
  • 25) ‘They have the characteristics of honesty and humour and they speak to audiences at their level, not from on high.’
  • 26) ‘A jovial person, his speeches are peppered with humour.’
  • 27) ‘Those movies were exciting, full of humour, suspense and great characters - everything this film lacks.’
  • 28) ‘If a speaker does use humor in a speech, make certain the story, anecdote or joke is surefire funny with all listeners.’
  • 29) ‘I assume you are referring to our inclusion of humor and attempted humor in our public speeches.’
  • 30) ‘We both have a good sense of humour and we try to find humour in everything so I guess that comes out in the music.’
  • 31) ‘Sense of humour is still a winner with both sexes; 64 per cent of women and 60 per cent of men rated it the most important personality trait.’
  • 32) ‘Sense of humor is said to be the biggest turn-on.’
  • 33) ‘Sense of humour is definitely what we need in this particular subject matter, and especially looking at that text.’
  • 34) ‘She has a perfect balance of wit, sense, humour and intelligence and knows the value of a well crafted insult.’
  • 35) ‘As well as James bringing his own inimitable brand of Jewish humour, in recent months clergymen of all denominations have chipped in with their own.’
  • 36) ‘His earthy humor, his ability to joke when things seemed darkest, and his endless supply of homespun stories certainly helped him cope with the crises of war.’
  • 37) ‘No, my greatest ability is my spontaneous humour.’
  • 38) ‘Yet he still managed to make his special brand of humor understood.’
  • 39) ‘He's put that optimism, curiosity, humour, and his ability to play guitar to good use, performing close to 150 dates a year.’
  • 40) ‘Charlie senior, famed for his red nose and bowler hat, was known all over the world for his tricks, humour and ability to play countless musical instruments.’
  • 41) ‘And for one more thing: I realised people who appreciate my kind of humour, are those who are smart.’
  • 42) ‘I admire both her humour and her ability to make theatre accessible.’
  • 43) ‘We became involved the usual way: working closely together in the same department, appreciating each other's humor and views of life.’
  • 44) ‘I have the sneaking suspicion that most comedy fans below the age of 20 won't appreciate Simon's offbeat humor.’
  • 45) ‘He didn't appreciate my humor and dragged me into the kitchen.’
  • 46) ‘He doesn't look at me, but I can tell he understood my brand of humor.’
  • 47) ‘Through their humour, wit and banter, they made significant observations and remarks on social issues.’
  • 48) ‘It would not be an exaggeration to say I am in some awe of this lady; she is facing a difficult time in her life with courage, common sense and humour.’
  • 49) ‘If one tickles your sense of curiosity, humour, or intellect, have a browse through the archives for much more.’
  • 50) ‘She has an infectious humour, a hearty laugh and can fill a room with her cheerful personality.’
  • 51) ‘This resulted in some labels for groups that reflected participant moods or humor.’
  • 52) ‘You forgave her for anything, noticed her every little change and could naturally sense her mood or humour.’
  • 53) ‘Twenty minutes later we were shown to our table and instantly, everyone's humour improved.’
  • 54) ‘She phoned about three quarters of an hour later, apologising that the line got chopped off, and in a better humour.’
  • 55) ‘This was very disappointing, but when the meal was over he appeared to be in a better humour.’
  • 56) ‘Also working against the timber framed houses was the fact that I was in a 9am humour, not much of a morning person - me.’
  • 57) ‘The continent's ruling class is thus in a foul humor.’
  • 58) ‘According to humoral theory, the body comprised of the four humours blood, phlegm, choler, and melancholy; and pathological conditions are the result of humoral abnormalities.’
  • 59) ‘According to this theory, the most important determinants of health were the four humours found in the body: blood, phlegm, black bile, and yellow bile.’
  • 60) ‘Traditionally, disease is seen as the effect of bad winds and an imbalance of the four humors of the body.’
  • 61) ‘Back in the days of the four humors, people had no problem believing that temperaments emerged from the balance, or imbalance, of chemicals in the body.’
  • 62) ‘Its most important doctrine was that of the four humours.’
  • 63) ‘I had always figured he humored me while I chattered away so he could take some more pictures.’
  • 64) ‘I can't really understand the distinct aversion felt by the three persons who humored me by coming along.’
  • 65) ‘But the old man seemed to have made up his mind, and so, to humor him, he did as he wished.’
  • 66) ‘You never quite get the feeling they're interested, they always seem to be doing it to humour you.’
  • 67) ‘Not that I don't like talking to you, but I always feel like you're just humoring me when you listen to me rave about this show or that show.’
  • 68) ‘‘Well, that's always good to hear,’ the nurse said, humoring me.’
  • 69) ‘She humored me and encouraged me nonstop, and I shall always be indebted to her.’
  • 70) ‘You're right,’ she said, humoring him with an indulgent smile.’
  • 71) ‘When I get upset, people humor me and tell me it's okay - that I'll get over it.’
  • 72) ‘I know this is an old chestnut, written by loads of people ad infinitum but for now humour me.’
  • 73) ‘I've met one other person in my life who has related to this, although actually with hindsight I think she might just have been humouring me.’
  • 74) ‘I feel like I'm the only girl on the boy's team and they're humouring me.’
  • 75) ‘The women looked at the photograph, but you could see they were just humouring him.’
  • 76) ‘I humoured him, not attempting to put his illusions straight.’
  • 77) ‘But we humoured him, since he spoke our sort of language.’
  • 78) ‘His manner was friendly, and I decided to humour him.’
  • 79) ‘To humour him I used that term throughout the interview.’
  • 80) ‘I'll just humour him for the 7 days and then we can get back to normal!’
  • 81) ‘However, it's possible they were just humoring me.’
  • 82) ‘Well, I'm trying to justify the money we spent tonight, so humor me.’

Examples

  • 1) There was not a trace of feigning good humour.
  • 2) You need quite a sense of humour to find that amusing.
  • 3) She has taken her newfound fame in good humour.
  • 4) Good humour will get you only so far.
  • 5) And all of it took place in a gentle mist of good humour.
  • 6) The humour hid a dry determination.
  • 7) His humour is dry and he has the ability to join in a fight, unlike his shiny gold friend.
  • 8) Oh and, by the way, you needed a sense of humour and warmth.
  • 9) On the contrary, they ask us to face them head on with courage, humour and fortitude.
  • 10) Pity that their dry northern humour seems a little jaded.
  • 11) Despite losing his voice to cancer he was full of courage and humour.
  • 12) They gave me extra help with good humour and understanding.
  • 13) These are the people who used humour to avoid conflict in the playground.
  • 14) Thankfully there was still lots of humour on the terraces.
  • 15) It shows how much people love the programme and how much humour they find in it.
  • 16) The other books have been humour with emotional bits.
  • 17) For me the most important trait in a man is humour.
  • 18) You are finding humour in many situations and others see a new side to you.
  • 19) What is missing here is humour and warmth.
  • 20) He has a wry sense of humour and an astonishing smile.
  • 21) His dry humour could soothe the most fraught situation.
  • 22) Her good humour is strictly for company.
  • 23) The humour of the people is in a league of its own.
  • 24) His sense of humour still had not left him.
  • 25) The unification feels contrived: it is only the humour that feels true.
  • 26) What he does very well is down-to-earth physical humour.
  • 27) Typically, he fought the disease with humour and courage.
  • 28) Despite a few good lines, too much of the humour feels thin and gentle.
  • 29) A personal trainer with a sense of humour is something to be treasured.
  • 30) I see only those with a very short attention span and a cruel sense of humour finding it entertaining.
  • 31) Q Why do you think that your brand of humour has become so popular?
  • 32) III. ii.439 (293,5) [to a living humour of madness] If this be the true reading we must by _living_ understand _lasting_, or _permanent_, but I cannot forbear to think that some antithesis was intended which is now lost; perhaps the passage stood thus, _I drove my suitor from a_ dying _humour of love to a living humour of madness_.
  • 33) Or rather thus, _from a mad humour of love to a_ loving _humour of madness_, that is, from a _madness_ that was _love_, to a _love_ that was _madness_.
  • 34) The butt of his humour is a group so ostentatiously righteous that few commentating on the Booker mentioned Jacobson's attack.
  • 35) Your humour is a refreshing rest stop on our busy highway of genealogical data.
  • 36) Its hilarious but the humour is arrived at by making fun of the ignorance of Americans.
  • 37) Like the people of Southern Europe, the Semite is easily managed by a jest: though grave and thoughtful, he is by no means deficient in the sly wit which we call humour, and the solemn gravity of his words contrasts amusingly with his ideas.
  • 38) Nevertheless, the essence of what we call humour is that amusing weaknesses should be combined with an amicable humanity.
  • 39) Miss Keller's humour is that deeper kind of humour which is courage.
  • 40) But the deep background that lies behind and beyond what we call humour is revealed only to the few who, by instinct or by effort, have given thought to it.
  • 41) Not getting them for a_a though, he hides behind what he calls humour but really does think he is an infanteer,
  • 42) ‘They are full of raw Taiwanese humor and literary surprises.’
  • 43) ‘They remain a benchmark of quality for British humour.’
  • 44) ‘What made all this watchable, indeed endearing, was a constant thread of humour and the quality of the writing and acting.’
  • 45) ‘Full of its characteristic humour and human drama, the series takes the gang from Middlesbrough to Arizona.’
  • 46) ‘If a comic can find humour in broken limbs, then why not in mental illness, too?’
  • 47) ‘Fisher himself is well equipped with sharp observational humour and precision comic timing.’
  • 48) ‘‘We put out a variety of quality humor on a consistent basis,’ he said.’
  • 49) ‘One of her enduring contributions may be to bring humor to this tight-lipped literature.’
  • 50) ‘More recently, there has been interest in comics, humour, and folktales.’
  • 51) ‘Of all the recent attempts to tread this fine line between quality and humor, he does it better than almost anyone.’
  • 52) ‘The result is a record with remarkable perspective, full of honesty, humor and beauty.’
  • 53) ‘Gone were the days of situational comedy when humour formed an integral part of the plot of the movie.’
  • 54) ‘His was a speech laced with much humour and more than a little self-deprecation.’
  • 55) ‘He doesn't need notes because he knows what he's talking about, and he can invest his speech with humor on the spot.’
  • 56) ‘They have the characteristics of honesty and humour and they speak to audiences at their level, not from on high.’
  • 57) ‘A jovial person, his speeches are peppered with humour.’
  • 58) ‘Those movies were exciting, full of humour, suspense and great characters - everything this film lacks.’
  • 59) ‘If a speaker does use humor in a speech, make certain the story, anecdote or joke is surefire funny with all listeners.’
  • 60) ‘I assume you are referring to our inclusion of humor and attempted humor in our public speeches.’
  • 61) ‘We both have a good sense of humour and we try to find humour in everything so I guess that comes out in the music.’
  • 62) ‘Sense of humour is still a winner with both sexes; 64 per cent of women and 60 per cent of men rated it the most important personality trait.’
  • 63) ‘Sense of humor is said to be the biggest turn-on.’
  • 64) ‘Sense of humour is definitely what we need in this particular subject matter, and especially looking at that text.’
  • 65) ‘She has a perfect balance of wit, sense, humour and intelligence and knows the value of a well crafted insult.’
  • 66) ‘As well as James bringing his own inimitable brand of Jewish humour, in recent months clergymen of all denominations have chipped in with their own.’
  • 67) ‘His earthy humor, his ability to joke when things seemed darkest, and his endless supply of homespun stories certainly helped him cope with the crises of war.’
  • 68) ‘No, my greatest ability is my spontaneous humour.’
  • 69) ‘Yet he still managed to make his special brand of humor understood.’
  • 70) ‘He's put that optimism, curiosity, humour, and his ability to play guitar to good use, performing close to 150 dates a year.’
  • 71) ‘Charlie senior, famed for his red nose and bowler hat, was known all over the world for his tricks, humour and ability to play countless musical instruments.’
  • 72) ‘And for one more thing: I realised people who appreciate my kind of humour, are those who are smart.’
  • 73) ‘I admire both her humour and her ability to make theatre accessible.’
  • 74) ‘We became involved the usual way: working closely together in the same department, appreciating each other's humor and views of life.’
  • 75) ‘I have the sneaking suspicion that most comedy fans below the age of 20 won't appreciate Simon's offbeat humor.’
  • 76) ‘He didn't appreciate my humor and dragged me into the kitchen.’
  • 77) ‘He doesn't look at me, but I can tell he understood my brand of humor.’
  • 78) ‘Through their humour, wit and banter, they made significant observations and remarks on social issues.’
  • 79) ‘It would not be an exaggeration to say I am in some awe of this lady; she is facing a difficult time in her life with courage, common sense and humour.’
  • 80) ‘If one tickles your sense of curiosity, humour, or intellect, have a browse through the archives for much more.’
  • 81) ‘She has an infectious humour, a hearty laugh and can fill a room with her cheerful personality.’
  • 82) ‘This resulted in some labels for groups that reflected participant moods or humor.’
  • 83) ‘You forgave her for anything, noticed her every little change and could naturally sense her mood or humour.’
  • 84) ‘Twenty minutes later we were shown to our table and instantly, everyone's humour improved.’
  • 85) ‘She phoned about three quarters of an hour later, apologising that the line got chopped off, and in a better humour.’
  • 86) ‘This was very disappointing, but when the meal was over he appeared to be in a better humour.’
  • 87) ‘Also working against the timber framed houses was the fact that I was in a 9am humour, not much of a morning person - me.’
  • 88) ‘The continent's ruling class is thus in a foul humor.’
  • 89) ‘The female incapable of intellectual purpose, governed by her whims and humours, is a misogynistic cliche not only of the time, but very much of his writings.’
  • 90) ‘According to humoral theory, the body comprised of the four humours blood, phlegm, choler, and melancholy; and pathological conditions are the result of humoral abnormalities.’
  • 91) ‘According to this theory, the most important determinants of health were the four humours found in the body: blood, phlegm, black bile, and yellow bile.’
  • 92) ‘Traditionally, disease is seen as the effect of bad winds and an imbalance of the four humors of the body.’
  • 93) ‘Back in the days of the four humors, people had no problem believing that temperaments emerged from the balance, or imbalance, of chemicals in the body.’
  • 94) ‘Its most important doctrine was that of the four humours.’
  • 95) ‘I had always figured he humored me while I chattered away so he could take some more pictures.’
  • 96) ‘I can't really understand the distinct aversion felt by the three persons who humored me by coming along.’
  • 97) ‘But the old man seemed to have made up his mind, and so, to humor him, he did as he wished.’
  • 98) ‘You never quite get the feeling they're interested, they always seem to be doing it to humour you.’
  • 99) ‘Not that I don't like talking to you, but I always feel like you're just humoring me when you listen to me rave about this show or that show.’
  • 100) ‘‘Well, that's always good to hear,’ the nurse said, humoring me.’
  • 101) ‘She humored me and encouraged me nonstop, and I shall always be indebted to her.’
  • 102) ‘You're right,’ she said, humoring him with an indulgent smile.’
  • 103) ‘When I get upset, people humor me and tell me it's okay - that I'll get over it.’
  • 104) ‘I know this is an old chestnut, written by loads of people ad infinitum but for now humour me.’
  • 105) ‘I've met one other person in my life who has related to this, although actually with hindsight I think she might just have been humouring me.’
  • 106) ‘I feel like I'm the only girl on the boy's team and they're humouring me.’
  • 107) ‘The women looked at the photograph, but you could see they were just humouring him.’
  • 108) ‘I humoured him, not attempting to put his illusions straight.’
  • 109) ‘But we humoured him, since he spoke our sort of language.’
  • 110) ‘His manner was friendly, and I decided to humour him.’
  • 111) ‘To humour him I used that term throughout the interview.’
  • 112) ‘I'll just humour him for the 7 days and then we can get back to normal!’
  • 113) ‘However, it's possible they were just humoring me.’
  • 114) ‘Well, I'm trying to justify the money we spent tonight, so humor me.’
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