homonym vs homophone

homonym homophone

Definitions

  • 1) taxonomy A name for a taxon that is identical in spelling to another name that belongs to a different taxon.
  • 2) semantics (strict sense) A word that both sounds and is spelled the same as another word but has a different meaning.
  • 3) loosely A word that sounds or is spelled the same as another word but has a different meaning, technically called a homophone (same sound) or a homograph (same spelling).
  • 4) Biology A taxonomic name identical to one previously applied to a different species or other taxon and therefore unacceptable in its new use.
  • 5) A namesake.
  • 6) One of two or more words that have the same sound and often the same spelling but differ in meaning, such as bank (embankment) and bank (place where money is kept).
  • 7) A word used to designate several different things.
  • 8) A word having the same sound as another, but differing from it in meaning; as the bear and the verb bear.
  • 9) two words are homonyms if they are proced or spelled the same way but have different meanings
  • 10) two words are homonyms if they are pro ced or spelled the same way but have different meanings
  • 11) In philology, a word which agrees with another in sound, and perhaps in spelling, but is not the same in meaning; a homophone: as, meet, meat, and mete, or the verb bear and the bear.
  • 12) Specifically, in systematic biology, a name given to a group (usually a genus or species) at a later date than that at which the same name had been given to another group.
  • 13) One word used to express distinct meanings, or applied as a name to different things: as, Heteropus is a homonym of eight different genera.

Definitions

  • 1) A letter or group of letters which are proced the same as another letter or group of letters.
  • 2) A letter or group of letters which are pro ced the same as another letter or group of letters.
  • 3) One of two or more words, such as night and knight, that are pro ced the same but differ in meaning, origin, and sometimes spelling.
  • 4) One of two or more words, such as night and knight, that are proced the same but differ in meaning, origin, and sometimes spelling.
  • 5) A word having the same sound as another, but differing from it in meaning and usually in spelling
  • 6) A letter or character which expresses a like sound with another.
  • 7) two words are homophones if they are pro ced the same way but differ in meaning or spelling or both (e.g. bare and bear)
  • 8) two words are homophones if they are proced the same way but differ in meaning or spelling or both (e.g. bare and bear)
  • 9) A letter or character expressing a like sound with another.
  • 10) Same as homophony.
  • 11) A word having the same sound as another, but differing in meaning and usually in derivation, and often in spelling; a homonym.

Examples

  • 1) Even a near homonym, such as Lincoln or leaking, could make her jump.
  • 2) The first disagreement I have with her is in her use of the term homonym, which she defines as "[a word] looking the same, but differing in meaning
  • 3) Technically a homonym is both a homophone (different words that sound the same) and a homograph (different words that are spelled the same).
  • 4) I learned the word homonym in grade school for words that sound the same but have different meanings.
  • 5) Also, it is amusing to have this debate in a Journal called a homonym of, penumbra.
  • 6) A homonym is a word which has more than one meaning;
  • 7) The example is called a homonym - you know - words that sound alike but are spelled differently and have very different meanings.
  • 8) In this context, homonym, which is usually defined as a ` word that is pronounced or spelled like another but having a different meaning, 'is ambiguous, if not inaccurate, for the implication is that homonyms are different words.
  • 9) And Desire as a homonym, meaning the urgency to possess, achieve, prevail-he certainly had thati-which was a possible synonym for team spirit-
  • 10) The difference between "homonym" and "homophone" posting discussed sound-alike words that are often mistaken for one another, despite their different meanings.
  • 11) ‘What exactly are the differences between synonyms, antonyms, and homonyms?’
  • 12) ‘Each court reporter might use different conventions to represent homonyms or other ambiguous words.’
  • 13) ‘He fractured grammar to create double or triple meanings; he developed enigmas to give his readers the satisfaction of interpreting them; he used a vocabulary of homonyms and antonyms to create multiple possible meanings…’
  • 14) ‘Much of the chatter derives from the abundance of homonyms in Chinese, where a single sound can carry many meanings.’
  • 15) ‘Though as Dave Heasman points out far too often, I still mix up homonyms.’
  • 16) ‘There is one obligatory element of the New Year's feast all over China, and that is a whole fish, because the Chinese phrase ‘have fish’ (you yu) is a homonym of ‘have surplus’, so eating it is supposed to augur well for the new year.’
  • 17) ‘Obviously, ‘compliment’ and ‘complement’ are homonyms.’
  • 18) ‘So much humor depends upon homonyms and creative mishearing.’
  • 19) ‘When my first-grader Clare typed in ‘rows’ for ‘rose,’ the device did not recognize the homonym.’
  • 20) ‘Rhett Miller is king of the homonym and double meaning.’
  • 21) ‘The pun lost status in English, despite a wealth of homonyms.’
  • 22) ‘Read aloud again, looking for word problems: missing words, wrong homonyms (their when you mean there), misspellings, grammatical errors, and confusing words.’
  • 23) ‘Still, the basic idea is sound: given that most of our misspellings are now corrected for us by computers, the only thing standing between us and perfect spelling is homonyms.’
  • 24) ‘This is clearly an error as Miller and Gurley's younger name could not have priority over Meek and Worthen's older name, unless it was a replacement name for a homonym.’
  • 25) ‘Official codes of nomenclature continue to enforce this rule - one name, one species - although rooting out synonyms and homonyms is a constant struggle.’
  • 26) ‘In 1895 C.S. Sargent assigned it the name R. michauxii to correct Michaux's use of a homonym and to honor its discoverer.’

Examples

  • 1) This confusion of homophones appears quite often in our pages.
  • 2) ‘But there are huge numbers of homophones that are also homographs: pen ‘writing implement’, pen ‘enclosure for animals’, and pen ‘penitentiary’, to choose a textbook example.’
  • 3) ‘Over time, the computer program learned to produce the correct meanings and pronunciations for almost all the words, including homophones such as ‘plane’ and ‘plain.’’
  • 4) ‘In my own pronunciation, for example, latter and ladder are homophones, unless I'm trying hard to convey the distinction.’
  • 5) ‘Because of the risk of confusion between homophones, the words were first read in a sentence.’
  • 6) ‘The vase shape symbolizes peace, because the Chinese word for ‘vase’ is a homophone for the word for ‘peace’.’
  • 7) ‘Plus I have a curious form of dyslexia when I type: rather than the word I intend to write, I write a homophone of the same word.’
  • 8) ‘There are very few different surnames in China, and the fact that the Chinese language depends so much on tones (not indicated in Pinyin) increases the number of apparent homophones and near homophones.’
  • 9) ‘I've never been good with homophones or homonyms.’
  • 10) ‘She thinks that people who mix up homophones (like stationary for stationery) ought to have bricks thrown through their windows.’
  • 11) ‘They were not told that the words they would hear were homophones.’
  • 12) ‘Participants were presented with homophones and asked to report the first associated word that came to mind.’
  • 13) ‘Participants were instructed to respond with the first associated word that came to mind after hearing the homophone.’
  • 14) ‘Apart from the distressing number of literals and homophones which infest my proof copy, my main criticism is that the author never quite succeeds in bringing her subject into full view.’
  • 15) ‘Technical limitations in the current study meant that the order in which the homophones were presented could not be separately randomised for each participant.’
  • 16) ‘It is interesting to note that of the 18 homophones that were common to both experiments, the same response bias was observed in 16 of them.’
  • 17) ‘You merely assumed that was the homophone I meant.’
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