dun vs done

dun done

Definitions

  • 1) countable A newly hatched, immature mayfly.
  • 2) countable A collector of debts.
  • 3) uncountable A brownish grey colour.
  • 4) uncountable A brownish grey colour.
  • 5) countable A newly hatched, immature mayfly.
  • 6) countable A collector of debts.
  • 7) A valley in the Himalayan foothills, e.g. Dehra Dun.
  • 8) An almost neutral brownish gray to dull grayish brown.
  • 9) An importunate demand for payment.
  • 10) An fishing fly that imitates such an insect.
  • 11) A mayfly in its earliest adult stage.
  • 12) A horse of this color.
  • 13) One that duns.
  • 14) An urgent request or demand of payment.
  • 15) A mound or small hill.
  • 16) One who duns; a dunner.
  • 17) horse of a dull brownish grey color
  • 18) a color or pigment varying around a light grey-brown color
  • 19) A familiar name for an old horse or jade: used as a quasi-proper name (like dobbin).
  • 20) A dun-colored natural or artificial fly used in angling: as, the pale-olive dun, made with a body of hair from the polar bear; goose-dun, with a body of gray goose-pinion; blue dun, with a body of pale mole-fur.
  • 21) A hill; a mound; a fortified eminence.
  • 22) One who duns; an importunate creditor, or an agent employed to collect debts.
  • 23) A demand for the payment of a debt, especially a written one; a dunning-letter: as, to send one's debtor a dun.
  • 24) Of a brownish grey colour.
  • 25) Of a dark color; of a color partaking of a brown and black; of a dull brown color; swarthy.
  • 26) (Zoöl.) the hooded crow; -- so called from its color; -- also called hoody, and hoddy.
  • 27) (Zoöl.) the goosander or merganser.
  • 28) (Zoöl.) the goosander or merganser.
  • 29) (Zoöl.) the hooded crow; -- so called from its color; -- also called hoody, and hoddy.
  • 30) of a dull greyish brown to brownish grey color
  • 31) transitive To ask or beset a debtor for payment.
  • 32) informal Eye dialect spelling of done: simple past tense and past participle of do.
  • 33) transitive To harass by continually repeating e.g. a request.
  • 34) informal Eye dialect spelling of done: simple past tense and past participle of do.
  • 35) transitive To harass by continually repeating e.g. a request.
  • 36) transitive To ask or beset a debtor for payment.
  • 37) To ask or beset (e.g., a debtor), for payment; to urge importunately.
  • 38) cure by salting
  • 39) treat cruelly
  • 40) make a dun color
  • 41) persistently ask for overdue payment
  • 42) To make a loud noise; din.
  • 43) To become of a dun color.
  • 44) Of a color partaking of brown and black; of a dull-brown color; swarthy.
  • 45) Dark; gloomy.
  • 46) Tobecomeofaduncolor.
  • 47) To demand payment of a debt from; press or urge for payment or for fulfilment of an obligation of any kind.
  • 48) Especially To cure, as cod, in such a manner as to impart a dun or brown color. See dunfish.
  • 49) To make of a dun or dull-brown color.
  • 50) Dark;gloomy.
  • 51) To importune (a debtor) for payment.
  • 52) To cure, as codfish, in a particular manner, by laying them, after salting, in a pile in a dark place, covered with salt grass or some like substance.
  • 53) Eye dialect spelling of don't.

Definitions

  • 1) Fashionable, socially acceptable, tasteful.
  • 2) In a state of having completed or finished an activity.
  • 3) Without hope or prospect of completion or success.
  • 4) of food Ready, fully cooked.
  • 5) of food Ready, fully cooked.
  • 6) Being exhausted or fully spent.
  • 7) Informal Totally worn out; exhausted.
  • 8) Cooked adequately.
  • 9) Informal Totally worn out; exhausted.
  • 10) Socially acceptable.
  • 11) Having been carried out or accomplished; finished.
  • 12) Given; executed; issued; made public; -- used chiefly in the clause giving the date of a proclamation or public act.
  • 13) cooked until ready to serve
  • 14) having finished or arrived at completion
  • 15) Past participle of do
  • 16) African American Vernacular Used in forming the perfective aspect.
  • 17) African American Vernacular Used in forming the perfective aspect.
  • 18) It is done or agreed; let it be a match or bargain; -- used elliptically.
  • 19) Performed; executed; finished.
  • 20) [Colloq.] tired out; used up; collapsed; destroyed; dead; killed.
  • 21) [Colloq.] a phrase in cookery; applied figuratively to one who has been thoroughly deceived, cheated, or fooled.
  • 22) [Colloq.] Worn out; exhausted.
  • 23) Completed; finished; decided; accepted: used in an exclamatory way to signify acceptance of a proposition, as a wager.
  • 24) As an auxiliary, used to express completed action: originally causal after have or had, followed by an object infinitive; in present use the have or had is often omitted and the infinitive turned into a preterit, leaving done as a mere preterit sign.
  • 25) Completed; executed; issued; made public: used chiefly in the concluding clause of a formal document, expressing the place at which and the date on which it received official sanction and became valid: as, done at Washington this 15th day of May, etc.
  • 26) Completely used up; thoroughly fatigued; tired out: sometimes with out or up (or with for: see to do for, under do, verb).
  • 27) An obsolete form of the infinitive (and present indicative plural) of do.
  • 28) (be done) To have finished something.
  • 29) (done for) Doomed to death or destruction.
  • 30) (be done) To have finished something.
  • 31) Informal (done in) Totally worn out; exhausted.
  • 32) Informal (done in) Totally worn out; exhausted.
  • 33) (done for) Doomed to death or destruction.

Examples

  • 1) Huh, sounds like they're the most northerly dun in the entire kingdom.
  • 2) Getting out of the dun through the guarded gates was, of course, a different matter altogether.
  • 3) Her masses of crinkly hair, once gold, now darkened by age to a dull dun, spread out around her head like a fan.
  • 4) (The same letter also warns that Chicago may become *** dun dun dun*** St. Louis with a lake, if The House ceases to exist.)
  • 5) Since I've left you all in candy-coated withdrawal, I wanted to return with a thrilling post on * dun dun dun* …
  • 6) *lyts da half dun wurk 2 maek it fully dun… moar den fully dun*
  • 7) In all parts of the world these stripes occur far oftenest in duns and mouse-duns; by the term dun a large range of colour is included, from one between brown and black to a close approach to cream-colour.
  • 8) He listened absently to a long dun from the type-writer people, his mind busy with ways and means of finding a job.
  • 9) ‘The prevailing greyish dun distances were relieved by colour, by small spots of cheerful intimacy in patches of cultivation the more precious for being sustained in such arduous circumstances.’
  • 10) ‘Into this dun world steps the elegant and cultured woman with vague ambitions to ‘tame inner-city thugs with recitations of poetry.’’
  • 11) ‘In literature the era of ‘offensively Australian’ nationalism and tediously dun naturalism was over.’
  • 12) ‘I gazed down upon the old quarter, a collage of dun roofs, domes and vaults, pencil and square minarets, ugliness and elegance.’
  • 13) ‘The stark, dun hills of the Hindu Kush cradled plots of corn, beans and potatoes.’
  • 14) ‘Beyond the river the dun slopes of Creag Dhubh, the black crag, rose in steady tiers to form an isolated hill cut off from the main Monadh Liath plateau by the broad valley of the Calder.’
  • 15) ‘Tufts of balding, meager dun hair sprouted out from the man's scalp in every possible direction like a windblown bush, followed by wide, tangled eyebrows and small, beady, madly darting eyes which bulged from within a round, bloated face.’
  • 16) ‘That first look down the length of the boardwalk, the black line of trees between sunset-fired sky and swamp, the dun bulk of a wild pony in the scrub or a heron's pose in a field of reeds… the moment is unique, but it moves all of us just the same.’
  • 17) ‘Realizing there was no chance of escape the struggling, captive woman dropped to her knees and glanced about, small eyes darting for a sympathetic face among the feral leers, limp dun hair lank against her fleshy, scantily clad back.’
  • 18) ‘Colours (ochre, sand and white) are taken from pre-Columbian and colonial houses, and are intended to respond to the endless layers of dry dun dust that blow up and down the coast.’
  • 19) ‘Like the others, she had exchanged her ball gown for a suit of dun deerskin, with a tall forester's cap, in which was affixed a long purple feather, which commingled with her black hair and nearly disappeared in it.’
  • 20) ‘Finally, he chuckled, and moved his own dun gelding up abreast of hers.’
  • 21) ‘This book is an unremitting account of misery, privation, and pointlessness in a world of dun landscapes, tormenting insects, malnutrition, and cultural stagnancy.’
  • 22) ‘She shifted uneasily beside him, and looked up the road again as he came trotting back astride his dun mare; he shook his head long before he reached them, and dismounted a few paces off.’
  • 23) ‘Accepting the cup, she deftly uncorked the bottle and proceeded to cautiously shake finely ground, dun colored grains into the water.’
  • 24) ‘He pointed to a dun lionhead that lumbered peaceful as a blimp.’
  • 25) ‘California fog provides a unifying tonalist palette, especially in the dry season when the hills are dun colored.’
  • 26) ‘In summer, the watercourse provides a green belt that distinguishes the town from the dun expanse that surrounds it.’
  • 27) ‘But what I saw was a peaceful landscape dotted with one man ploughing with a dun mule.’
  • 28) ‘After we ate, the servants readied our horses and we rode together, me on Mercy and he on a dun mare.’
  • 29) ‘She was his mount, a unicorn mare with a dun's coat.’
  • 30) ‘The Indians ride bareback on paints (white horses with dark colored markings) and duns (grayish brown horses) with snaffle bridles.’
  • 31) ‘Three women were working in the kitchen and a man was sitting at the table, sipping black coffee from a cup bigger than the dun's hoof.’
  • 32) ‘They were roans, grullas and duns, he said.’
  • 33) ‘‘You were jumping so beautifully, and Minty looked so wonderful,’ she whispered, her fingers knotted in the sheets as she leaned close, speaking of his show-jumper, the gorgeous dun, ‘The triple.’’
  • 34) ‘A white-fire blaze rang past her ear, and impacted the ground three paces before his gelding - the dun nickered it's anger at being so rudely startled, and danced around a moment.’
  • 35) ‘He laid the blanket on the back of the gaunt dun, moving his mouth - talking?’
  • 36) ‘He crowed, bringing the dun, Kai, to a skidding halt just feet away from her.’
  • 37) ‘The two stallions, a dun and a bay, were bred in Scotland by breeder and judge from Stirlingshire.’
  • 38) ‘Two of his mares were hitched to it; a cream dun and a paint.’
  • 39) ‘In July the three creeks - DePuy's, Nelson's, and Armstrong's - produce clouds of mayflies called pale morning duns, which draw monster rainbows to the surface.’
  • 40) ‘Later they take the emerging fly, the hatched dun (or ‘green drakes’) and the ovipositing (egg laying) spinner.’
  • 41) ‘But they can live for a week in the preceding stage, as winged, asexual duns; and before then, some live underwater for two or three years as nymphs.’
  • 42) ‘In mid-August, large hatches of a nighttime mayfly called the pale evening dun begin to appear.’
  • 43) ‘Trout rise to the surface to feed first on the duns, and then again when the female spinners return to lay their eggs.’
  • 44) ‘We went over nymphing tactics to start with and then, when the fish started rising to the duns, we started dry fly fishing.’
  • 45) ‘A beautiful two pound rainbow spent the next couple of minutes trying its hardest to imitate one of the swallows that were gracefully taking duns from the surface.’
  • 46) ‘I caught one of my biggest after-dark fish at this spot late one night on a fly that imitates a pale evening dun.’
  • 47) ‘Have I decided to stop dunning you for contributions?’
  • 48) ‘They had been dunning me for a £10 bill I had naively thought I would leave to the next serious accounting.’
  • 49) ‘The Vendome incident would haunt him for a long time, since well after he had served his prison sentence the Republican government would be dunning him for 500,000 francs, the cost of restoring the column.’
  • 50) ‘Yet, they don't mind dunning parents when scofflaw children can't pay their bills.’
  • 51) ‘He invoiced the corporations for product placement, and when he went on tour to promote the book, he read a selection of the past-due letters he'd written, dunning the corporations for nonpayment.’
  • 52) ‘It wasn't a charity deal: Like other pro runners, the Elites would still have to pay 15 percent of their prize money, endorsements, and appearance fees, and once they started earning they'd also be dunned for rent.’
  • 53) ‘Hospitals and doctors were dunning them for $15,000 in unpaid claims.’
  • 54) ‘Simple - until the losses get so high that the suppliers can't be dunned to fill out the OE profit projections, it's a case of ‘let the good times roll.’’
  • 55) ‘Aside from the fact that no one will let us have anything on credit - save for the butcher and baker, which will also cease at the end of this week - I am being dunned for the school fees, the rent, and by the whole gang of them.’
  • 56) ‘Indeed, the biblical law is that debtors may not be dunned for repayment.’
  • 57) ‘When the Republic took a village, they would allow the landlord to dun the peasants for the lost money, something which hardly endeared the ‘democratic’ regime to its new citizens.’
  • 58) ‘They even tried to dun me while I was in the hospital!’
  • 59) ‘She also collected small sums from people who owed her husband, including another female friend, whom she dunned for $20.’
  • 60) ‘But to fund its new law, Maryland needs to dun taxpayers across the state an extra $1.3 billion a year.’
  • 61) ‘In trying to dun the states, the cigarette giants are invoking a little-noticed clause in the 1998 deal.’
  • 62) ‘The tax dunned chemical and oil companies, among other industries, for money to clean up ‘orphan’ Superfund sites - sites whose owners have absconded or have gone bankrupt.’
  • 63) ‘The fliers included information about gun safety and dunned recipients for donations to the partnership, which helped lead efforts to ban concealed carry permits.’
  • 64) ‘Brochs, duns and wheel-houses can all be seen on South Uist, many of them on islands in the lochs.’
  • 65) ‘The presence of an Iron Age dun on its western edge suggests that it also had a much earlier sentinel role.’
  • 66) ‘Swindon - derived from the Saxon words swine dun meaning pig hill - was mentioned in the Domesday Book of 1086, but it was not until the late 13 th century that it grew into a small town with a weekly market.’

Examples

  • 1) This was done in cold blood by people who claim to be civilized.
  • 2) Their defending is not remotely done yet.
  • 3) The homework should have been done.
  • 4) One who gets the job done.
  • 5) Do so yourself; go right up to your neighbor without fear, and in love tell him to do the same, having this assurance on your mind continually, _that what ought to be done, can be done_.
  • 6) What are the deeds done in my body? the deeds which _I have done_.
  • 7) This was _to be done to have been done_ yesterday.
  • 8) Book, the clause, '_We have left undone those things which we ought to have done_,' precedes the clause, '_And we have done those things which we ought not to have done.
  • 9) If you know anything about military nursing, you know a good deal of our work has been done in the face of danger; _but it's always been done_. '
  • 10) As for you, you've done an abominable thing, Elizabeth; but it's _done_!
  • 11) I had done my beloved Mary; [54] but once more, _God's will be done_.
  • 12) _You have done this, _ says one judge; _done that, _ says another;
  • 13) Surely we shall do less wrong and injustice, if the conviction is fixed and embedded in our souls that everything done is done irrevocably, that even the Omnipotence of God cannot _uncommit_ a deed, cannot make that _undone_ which has _been done_; that every act of ours _must_ bear its allotted fruit, according to the everlasting laws, -- must remain forever ineffaceably inscribed on the tablets of Universal Nature.
  • 14) Nothing more could be done than wait until the meat should be _done_.
  • 15) ‘Drain each batch as it is done and eat whilst cooking the next batch.’
  • 16) ‘Curl up in front of the TV with your own bowl of this much-loved comfort food favourite, done my way.’
  • 17) ‘If food is not done when you take it out of the oven you can always return it to the oven for additional time.’
  • 18) ‘I sat down at the table and when the food was done, he pulled it out and sat it in front of me and then sat down.’
  • 19) ‘When the food was done, she put some in two bowls and carried them into the living room.’
  • 20) ‘Our hot dogs were soon done and we sat down on a blanket by the fire together, eating our lunch.’
  • 21) ‘Add four tablespoons of water and cook, uncovered, until the cabbage is done but still crisp.’
  • 22) ‘It is not the done thing to listen to music through headphones.’
  • 23) ‘He has worked in the media for more than twenty years, and he knows, or should know, the way the world is now and what is not the done thing.’
  • 24) ‘He's assured me that it's not the done thing to drink at lunchtime these days, but I'm not so sure.’
  • 25) ‘It is also apparently not the done thing for staff members to laze about on the lawns openly staring at the girls.’
  • 26) ‘A percentage tip left on the bar in a pub is not the done thing - although in a bar or club it's fine.’
  • 27) ‘It's not the done thing to grab something off a stranger in the supermarket just so you can check it out, is it?’
  • 28) ‘In populations where drinking cows' milk is not the done thing, lactose intolerance is still the norm.’
  • 29) ‘It is not the done thing in the upper class circles of public schools and gentlemen's clubs to put the boot in so crudely.’
  • 30) ‘When I was growing up it just was not the done thing for a woman to smoke outdoors.’
0

Use Linguix everywhere you write

Be productive and efficient, no matter where and what you write!

Linguix Apps

Get audience-specific corrections, access statistics, and view readability scores.

Browser Extensions

Get your writing checked on millions of websites, including Gmail, Facebook, and Google Docs.

Linguix Keyboard

Make your content read and look better on mobile.

MS Office add-ins

Download Linguix for Microsoft Word and Microsoft Outlook to check grammar, punctuation, and style instantly right in your documents.

This website uses cookies to make Linguix work for you. By using this site, you agree to our cookie policy