curtsy vs courtesy

curtsy courtesy

Definitions

  • 1) Alternative spelling of curtsey.
  • 2) A gesture of respect or reverence made chiefly by women by bending the knees with one foot forward and lowering the body.
  • 3) bending the knees; a gesture of respect made by women
  • 4) Same as courtesy, 3.
  • 5) bend the knees in a gesture of respectful greeting
  • 6) make a curtsy; usually done only by girls and women; as a sign of respect
  • 7) Sameascourtesy.
  • 8) Same as courtesy.
  • 9) To make a curtsy.

Definitions

  • 1) countable A polite gesture or remark.
  • 2) uncountable Consent or agreement in spite of fact; indulgence.
  • 3) uncountable Willingness or generosity in providing something needed.
  • 4) uncountable Polite behavior.
  • 5) Willingness or generosity in providing something needed.
  • 6) Polite behavior.
  • 7) A polite gesture or remark.
  • 8) Consent or agreement in spite of fact; indulgence.
  • 9) An act of civility, respect, or reverence, made by women, consisting of a slight depression or dropping of the body, with bending of the knees.
  • 10) Favor or indulgence, as distinguished from right.
  • 11) Politeness; civility; urbanity; courtliness.
  • 12) a title assumed by a person, or popularly conceded to him, to which he has no valid claim; as, the courtesy title of Lord prefixed to the names of the younger sons of noblemen.
  • 13) An act of civility or respect; an act of kindness or favor performed with politeness.
  • 14) a courteous or respectful or considerate remark
  • 15) a courteous manner
  • 16) a courteous or respectful or considerate act
  • 17) Favor; indulgence; allowance; common consent; conventional as distinguished from legal right: as, a title by courtesy; the courtesy of England. See phrases below.
  • 18) An act of civility or respect; an act of kindness, or a favor done with politeness; a gracious attention.
  • 19) The custom of confirming the nomination to an office by the President of a member or former member of the Senate without the usual reference to a committee.
  • 20) Naval, the interchange of official visits and salutes when a war-ship enters a foreign port.
  • 21) A gesture of reverence, respect, or civility: formerly used for both sexes; now, in a restricted sense, a kind of obeisance made by a woman, consisting in a sinking or inclination of the body with bending of the knees: in this sense now usually proced and often written curtsy (kėrt′ si), Scotch also curchie.
  • 22) Courtliness or elegance of manners; politeness; civility; complaisance; especially, politeness springing from kindly feeling.
  • 23) A gesture of reverence, respect, or civility: formerly used for both sexes; now, in a restricted sense, a kind of obeisance made by a woman, consisting in a sinking or inclination of the body with bending of the knees: in this sense now usually pro ced and often written curtsy (kėrt′ si), Scotch also curchie.
  • 24) Given or done as a polite gesture.
  • 25) Free of charge.
  • 26) To make a gesture of reverence, respect, or civility; make a courtesy: now said only of women.
  • 27) To treat with courtesy or civility.
  • 28) To make a respectful salutation or movement of respect; esp. (with reference to women), to bow the body slightly, with bending of the knes.
  • 29) obsolete To treat with civility.

Examples

  • 1) "Welcome to Karien, your Highness," she said with a deep curtsy.
  • 2) Inside the house a maid bobbed in curtsy to indicate that Grace should follow her upstairs.
  • 3) ‘Leave us, Monique,’ she waved her hand at the maid, who bobbed a curtsy and hurried out.’
  • 4) ‘A little maid rushed to the door and bobbed a curtsy.’
  • 5) ‘I could hear the rustle of the maid's woolen skirts as she bobbed a curtsy.’
  • 6) ‘‘I apologize, my lord,’ the girl said with a curtsy.’
  • 7) ‘Each girl gave a little curtsy and Joss wanted to laugh.’
  • 8) ‘Shalott stepped from the chariot and gave a formal curtsy.’
  • 9) ‘Turning around, she gave a formal curtsy to the Lord of Ghent.’
  • 10) ‘Each of the girls dipped a small curtsy when their name was called.’
  • 11) ‘I approached my father as usual, and fell in to a deep curtsy before his feet.’
  • 12) ‘A young seventeen year old boy bowed next to him, while a thirteen year old girl did a curtsy.’
  • 13) ‘They both smiled, and Cassandra managed a curtsey in greetings.’
  • 14) ‘With a slight curtsey, the girl left, shutting the door behind her.’
  • 15) ‘She gave the Unicorn a formal curtsey, feeling rather foolish for doing so.’
  • 16) ‘Breaking the silence, Clarice appeared and greeted Imogene with a curtsey.’
  • 17) ‘At the final curtsey, everyone was facing the front… except for her.’
  • 18) ‘As your arm comes forward to deliver the bowl your right knee rests on the heel of your left foot; you are doing a deep curtsey.’
  • 19) ‘Traditional gestures of salutation such as the bow and the curtsey only gradually gave way to the handshake.’
  • 20) ‘‘I am innocent, sir,’ she said with a small curtsy, ‘Do I look like a girl who would thieve?’’
  • 21) ‘Kurono did a formal bow, while Kaia did a curtsy.’
  • 22) ‘Triliny grinned and walked up to Kathryn, giving a slight curtsy and smiling at the girl's expression of disgust.’
  • 23) ‘Jocelyn, looking quite small on the large stage, curtsied and blushed though she was used to all the attention by now.’
  • 24) ‘And then, within a matter of months, people were bowing to her, people were curtsying to her, people were looking at everything she wore, analyzing everything.’
  • 25) ‘When the case began, the court clerk may not have gone as far as curtsying, but she still addressed her Royal highness as ‘Ma'am’.’
  • 26) ‘It sounded like a book that would teach me how to be a proper lady, complete with frilly lace, curtsying and a lot of time spent being meek.’
  • 27) ‘Many of the purses were handed to the Princess by children who curtsied shyly and shook hands.’
  • 28) ‘Laughing, she curtsied and let him lead her onto the dance floor.’
  • 29) ‘She curtseyed in return before they swept out onto the dance floor.’
  • 30) ‘I politely curtsied and hurried off the stage to meet up with my friends.’
  • 31) ‘‘Yes, Mother,’ Violet replied, curtsying and breaking into the smile which transformed her face into loveliness before flinging her arms around her mother.’
  • 32) ‘‘Your Grace,’ I murmured, curtsying to Cameron.’
  • 33) ‘‘I am her daughter,’ I replied, curtsying slightly.’
  • 34) ‘‘Hello, your highness,’ she said, curtsying quickly.’
  • 35) ‘‘I thought tennis had had enough of manners,’ he writes, ‘of bowing and curtsying to rich people who didn't pay taxes.’’
  • 36) ‘‘Why thank you sir,’ I said playing along by curtsying.’
  • 37) ‘‘Yes,’ I said, curtsying to him as we finished the dance.’
  • 38) ‘Why do all these people keep bowing and curtsying and such?’
  • 39) ‘‘Thank you,’ I said curtsying mockingly as we both laughed.’
  • 40) ‘‘Yes, your highness,’ she said, curtsying as best she could.’
  • 41) ‘‘Good day, Lord Cecil,’ she murmured at last, curtsying prettily and continuing to blush as he continued to scrutinize her.’
  • 42) ‘‘Happy Birthday, your highness,’ I said, curtsying and lowering my head.’

Examples

  • 1) Getting there from the town involves a taxi or the hotel's courtesy bus up a very steep hill.
  • 2) I emailed to complain on May 19 but have not yet had the courtesy of a reply.
  • 3) Other perks courtesy of the taxpayer include a coveted free parking space.
  • 4) All the work will be done free and a courtesy car provided when needed.
  • 5) They are also paid for providing courtesy cars.
  • 6) These meetings were far from idiosyncrasies or mere courtesy calls.
  • 7) What about some common courtesy or a bit of mobile etiquette?
  • 8) That led to another bogey courtesy of a misdirected chip and insipid putt.
  • 9) There was courtesy and consideration and manners.
  • 10) You are then more likely to treat each other with courtesy and respect.
  • 11) The other players had left the hotel earlier in courtesy cars.
  • 12) The courtesy call was far from out of the blue.
  • 13) It was just to show my appreciation and some common courtesy.
  • 14) The skirmishes are conducted with the utmost courtesy and subtlety, of course.
  • 15) One came courtesy of two goals in added time, the other via a penalty shootout.
  • 16) He understood the importance of table manners, as a way to teach courtesy and social skills.
  • 17) The first eye-catching piece of footwork came courtesy of the visiting team.
  • 18) The company provides courtesy cars to get drivers back on the road after a crash that wasn't their fault.
  • 19) With courtesy he received them.
  • 20) And the school should, of course, have given you the courtesy of a reply.
  • 21) In the end, see or got through courtesy an own goal after Wales battered them.
  • 22) Australia were ripped to pieces while Samoa's back three barely received any inquiries courtesy of the boot.
  • 23) More than 18,000 were in the audience courtesy of a free ticket ballot, and half a million more watched on giant screens.
  • 24) Then I came across something that appears to me to point the way - courtesy of the great game of football.
  • 25) Shall do a courtesy to our wrath] _To do a courtesy_ is to gratify, to comply with.
  • 26) Latin courtesy is a highly refined art, of which exaggeration is a part.
  • 27) It appears this "sub-horizonal" outrage will be allowed to stand without explanation, so, to help JMA's readership understand "sub-horizonal" here's some occurrences of the term courtesy of Google; chevron folds which have been overturned towards the south by subsequent sub-horizonal simple shear intensely folded with the sheet dip typically sub-horizonal or inclined gently
  • 28) I learned the term courtesy of Fred Rogers not long after I'd learned to speak, and the concept of finding deep, lasting truth in imagination has since become a guiding principle in my life.
  • 29) So Bound for Glory climaxed with Sting winning the title courtesy of an assist from Kevin Nash.
  • 30) He explained that the word curtsey comes from the word "courtesy."
  • 31) If I wouldn't recognise your name -- which might simply be an online handle -- it doesn't matter; point is, at least then you'd be distinguishable from the sort of trolling cretins whose "hit-and-run" posts are precisely the reason this courtesy is a convention in the blogosphere.
  • 32) ‘I expect politeness and courtesy towards me as landowner, my family, friends, guests and visitors.’
  • 33) ‘They want lessons in politeness, courtesy, and most of all the correct way to drive a car in traffic.’
  • 34) ‘But that is not all: it is unfailing courtesy, especially towards the very old and the very young, that makes association with such men such a privilege.’
  • 35) ‘The waiting staff, very much to their credit, were the epitome of courtesy, politeness and calm, despite being rushed completely off their feet.’
  • 36) ‘He should have politely and with great courtesy informed the Government that he wanted no such State reception.’
  • 37) ‘With faux courtesy, he politely suggested that Smith was being optimistic.’
  • 38) ‘Except that first night at the ball, he had shown her nothing but courtesy and reasonably cultured behaviour, given his background.’
  • 39) ‘Politeness and courtesy are highly valued as aspects of being ‘raised good.’’
  • 40) ‘They have no courtesy towards road users and commuters.’
  • 41) ‘It's a question of attitude - an attitude of courtesy that does not prevail here.’
  • 42) ‘Anarchy must not over-ride respect, decency and courtesy on our streets.’
  • 43) ‘Values such as respect, courtesy and consideration are the foundations of a civilised society’
  • 44) ‘The very least he deserved was some respect and courtesy, even if it killed me to be polite.’
  • 45) ‘The anonymity of the Internet is a definite negative when it comes to courtesy and good behavior.’
  • 46) ‘I have sought to do all this with courtesy, decency and honesty, respecting those who would like me to move faster and those who feel threatened by our moving at all.’
  • 47) ‘He coaches, organises games and transports the players always with courtesy and efficiency and an abundance of patience.’
  • 48) ‘Players should also show respect and courtesy to coaches.’
  • 49) ‘Just as in the off-line world, online there is also an expectation of socially acceptable behavior and common courtesy.’
  • 50) ‘Good humour, mutual respect, courtesy, a certain gentleness with people usually does the trick.’
  • 51) ‘I was brought up understanding that there were certain courtesies and considerations to be extended to all fellow creatures.’
  • 52) ‘Beneath the jargon, cautious phrases and academic courtesies, one thing was clear: the consensus about social constructs was unraveling.’
  • 53) ‘‘They used to chase us away, now they call us ‘madam’ and extend us courtesies,’ she adds.’
  • 54) ‘As a child, courtesies were drummed in to me by my parents.’
  • 55) ‘She has extended a lot of courtesies to me, and I feel somewhat indebted.’
  • 56) ‘Your presence is a courtesy, not a necessity.’
  • 57) ‘Hotels generally provide still mineral water in the rooms as a courtesy.’
  • 58) ‘An assistant manager was calling, not to discuss our predicament - he was obviously unaware - but as a courtesy.’
  • 59) ‘Touch base with your friend after the date as a courtesy.’
  • 60) ‘And the local Army recruiter had been selected to be my chauffeur, a bit of a courtesy for an old, retired four-star general.’
  • 61) ‘As a courtesy, reintroduce yourself to people you may have met before.’
  • 62) ‘Make sure you are on time as a courtesy to your stylist.’
  • 63) ‘I e-mailed him as a courtesy.’
  • 64) ‘I once spoke to a retailer who said she had a problem teaching her staff basic courtesies in handling customers.’
  • 65) ‘The elaborate academic courtesies seen at graduation ceremonies are a tremendous sham in the current environment.’
  • 66) ‘Your popularity is certain to increase if you are affable and ready to exchange courtesies.’
  • 67) ‘It is the absence of small courtesies in everyday life that creates an environment where evil can thrive.’
  • 68) ‘Would you not want similar courtesies extended to you?’
  • 69) ‘Customers appreciate and recall simple courtesies.’
  • 70) ‘His attentiveness was insistent and intrusive, far more aggressive than the almost archaic courtesies of his brother.’
  • 71) ‘Incidentally, does your motor insurer offer a free comprehensive courtesy car service when yours is out of action?’
  • 72) ‘Some hotels offer a courtesy shuttle to and from the airport.’
  • 73) ‘Excellent service facilities at very competitive prices with free courtesy cars available.’
  • 74) ‘I'm sure that most customers would prefer to have a service agent much closer to office or home, and not need to have the added customer service of a courtesy car.’
  • 75) ‘After I checked into the hotel, I took a courtesy shuttle back to the airport to catch the Blue Line toward Wrigley Field.’
  • 76) ‘They're supposed to provide free courtesy cars too, but you need to book 7 or 8 weeks ahead for that, and even then they sometimes aren't there when you turn up.’
  • 77) ‘Some events provide door-to-door service, courtesy cars and the like.’
  • 78) ‘It was also claimed that she would be given free flights, free accommodation and a free Jaguar courtesy car for the trip.’
  • 79) ‘He thought that I should supply him the clutch free of charge and refused to return the courtesy car unless I did!’
  • 80) ‘Ok, so if I take my little car to a dealership to be serviced I am lucky to get a courtesy car.’
  • 81) ‘This includes many hotel courtesy vehicles used for transporting customers, even though there is no charge.’
  • 82) ‘Instead of paying local taxi firms to work on contract, the courtesy cars will ferry patients and staff about in a more readily available service which will also save money.’
  • 83) ‘The whole event was very special with amazing locker-rooms and a courtesy car that was waiting for me at the airport and available for use all week.’
  • 84) ‘She had to spend two days on the phone with insurance and repair companies, trying in vain to get the courtesy car to which she is supposed to be entitled.’
  • 85) ‘He subsequently took a courtesy car to the airport and returned to Spain.’
  • 86) ‘So we've been stuck at home again all day pending the delivery of a courtesy car for the duration of the repairs.’
  • 87) ‘Sadly the courtesy car's seats have been covered more with economy in mind than aesthetics.’
  • 88) ‘Does this policy offer a courtesy car as standard?’
  • 89) ‘In addition, operators of courtesy coach services have raised concerns that the bill will affect the service they provide.’
  • 90) ‘The minibus, a hotel courtesy taxi, was on its way to Manchester Airport with passengers looking forward to flying out for their summer holidays.’
0

Use Linguix everywhere you write

Be productive and efficient, no matter where and what you write!

Linguix Apps

Get audience-specific corrections, access statistics, and view readability scores.

Browser Extensions

Get your writing checked on millions of websites, including Gmail, Facebook, and Google Docs.

Linguix Keyboard

Make your content read and look better on mobile.

MS Office add-ins

Download Linguix for Microsoft Word and Microsoft Outlook to check grammar, punctuation, and style instantly right in your documents.

This website uses cookies to make Linguix work for you. By using this site, you agree to our cookie policy