dingo vs dog

dingo dog

Definitions

  • 1) Canis lupus dingo, a wild dog native to Australia.
  • 2) A wild dog (Canis lupus subsp. dingo) of Australia and Southeast Asia, having a reddish-brown or yellowish-brown coat.
  • 3) (Zoöl.) A wild dog found in Australia, but supposed to have introduced at a very early period. It has a wolflike face, bushy tail, and a reddish brown color.
  • 4) (Zoöl.) A wild dog found in Australia, but supposed to have introduced at a very early period. It has a wolflike face, bushy tail, and a reddish brown color.
  • 5) wolflike yellowish-brown wild dog of Australia
  • 6) The Australian dog, Canis dingo, of wolf-like appearance and extremely fierce.

Definitions

  • 1) Slang A hot dog; a wiener.
  • 2) Slang The feet.
  • 3) An investment that produces a low return or a loss.
  • 4) A person regarded as contemptible.
  • 5) Something of inferior or low quality.
  • 6) A person regarded as unattractive or uninteresting.
  • 7) Slang The feet.
  • 8) Slang A hot dog; a wiener.
  • 9) Any of various hooked or U-shaped metallic devices used for gripping or holding heavy objects.
  • 10) Any of various other animals, such as the prairie dog.
  • 11) A male animal of the family Canidae, especially of a fox or a domesticated breed.
  • 12) A person.
  • 13) Astronomy A sundog.
  • 14) Astronomy A sundog.
  • 15) A domesticated carnivorous mammal (Canis familiaris syn. Canis lupus subsp. familiaris) occurring as a wide variety of breeds, many of which are traditionally used for hunting, herding, drawing sleds, and other tasks, and are kept as pets.
  • 16) Any of various carnivorous mammals of the family Canidae, such as the dingo.
  • 17) A gay or rakish man, especially if young; a sport or gallant: applied, usually with an epithet (young, impudent, etc.), in mild or humorous reprobation.
  • 18) plural The set-screws which adjust the bed-tool of a punching-press.
  • 19) A quadruped of the genus Canis, C. familiaris.
  • 20) A grab used to grasp well-tubes or -tools, to withdraw them from bored, drilled, or driven wells.
  • 21) Same as dog-head, 1.
  • 22) A name of various mechanical devices, tools, and pieces of machinery.
  • 23) In astronomy: [capitalized] One of two ancient constellations lying south of the zodiac, known as Canis Major and Canis Minor. See Canis.
  • 24) A short, heavy piece of steel, bent and pointed at one end and with an eye or ring at the other. It is used for many purposes in logging, and is sometimes so shaped that a blow directly against the line of draft will loosen it. Also called tail-hook.
  • 25) plural In ship-building, the final supports which are knocked aside when a ship is launched; a dogshore.
  • 26) A mean, worthless fellow; a currish or sneaking scoundrel: applied in reproach or contempt.
  • 27) Any part of a machine acting as a claw or clutch, as the carrier of a lathe, or an adjustable stop to change the motion of a machine-tool.
  • 28) In agriculture, an implement for dragging brush, roots, and poles out of the ground; a brush-puller.
  • 29) The dogfish.
  • 30) A grappling-iron which lifts the monkey or hammer of a pile-driver.
  • 31) The dog-star.
  • 32) An iron with fangs for fastening a log in a saw-pit or on the carriage of a saw-mill.
  • 33) The prairie-dog.
  • 34) plural Canine quadrupeds in general; the family Canidœ (which see).
  • 35) In a lock, a tooth, projection, tusk, or jag which acts as a detent.
  • 36) In distinguishing sex, a male dog, as opposed to bitch; hence sometimes used in composition for the male of other animals, as in dog-fox, dog-ape.
  • 37) A click or pallet to restrain the back-action of a ratchet-wheel by engaging the teeth; a pawl.
  • 38) A sort of iron hook or bar, with one or more sharp fangs or claws at one end, which may be fastened into a piece of wood or other heavy article, for the purpose of moving it: used with various specific prefixes, See cut.
  • 39) Totally; completely. Often used in combination.
  • 40) To follow like a dog; follow with or as with dogs, as in hunting with dogs; hunt; follow pertinaciously or maliciously; keep at the heels of; worry with importunity: as, to dog deer; to dog a person's footsteps.
  • 41) Nautical, to grip, as a rope, to a spar or cable so that the parts bind on each other, to prevent slipping, and causing it to cling.
  • 42) To fasten, as a log by means of a dog (see dog, n., 9 ), for sawing.
  • 43) To hold or fasten with a mechanical device.
  • 44) To be persistently or inescapably associated with:
  • 45) To be recurrently or persistently in the mind; haunt.
  • 46) To track or trail persistently.
  • 47) (go to the dogs) To go to ruin; degenerate.
  • 48) (put on the dog) To make an ostentatious display of elegance, wealth, or culture.
  • 49) (put on the dog) To make an ostentatious display of elegance, wealth, or culture.
  • 50) (go to the dogs) To go to ruin; degenerate.
  • 51) (dog it) To fail to expend the effort needed to do or accomplish something.
  • 52) (dog it) To fail to expend the effort needed to do or accomplish something.

Examples

  • 1) The whole ugly question lurked like an incontinent dingo on the high street of my intentions.
  • 2) ‘Because they prey on calves and sheep, dingoes and wild dogs are viewed as a threat to livestock.’
  • 3) ‘The dingo, a wild dog, is thought to have contributed to the tiger's demise on mainland Australia and in Papua New Guinea.’
  • 4) ‘Australia has long battled its native wild dog the dingo, but now domestic hunting dogs have bred with dingoes to produce a larger, aggressive feral dog.’
  • 5) ‘New DNA research has found that Australia's iconic wild dog, the dingo, probably descended from a family pet brought to the continent 5,000 years ago.’
  • 6) ‘The bureau defines ‘wild dogs’ as domestic dogs gone wild, dingoes, and their hybrids.’
  • 7) ‘She has always maintained that a dingo - a wild dog - took her baby.’
  • 8) ‘Police marksmen with Aborigine trackers were hunting for two dingoes or wild dogs who attacked the boys on Fraser Island, scene of a spate of attacks in recent years.’
  • 9) ‘This is settled but authentically wild, with koala in tall, thick gum trees, shy but visible wallabies and a black dingo, a bush dog that glares balefully at visitors but never approaches.’
  • 10) ‘Aborigines used dingoes as hunting dogs, and valued them as companions.’
  • 11) ‘What he realised is that the Australian dingo is the original canid that formed an alliance with humans.’
  • 12) ‘Some species live in light woodlands, although most generally prefer open country where their great speed is an advantage in escaping dangers such as Australia's wild native dog, the dingo.’
  • 13) ‘The only possible predators - the dingo and the Tasmanian wolf - were already being shot and kept in check by the sheep ranchers.’
  • 14) ‘I've made sure he is not dead, in a coma, in a witness relocation program, been carried off and devoured by wild dingos, suffering from amnesia or has recently been kidnapped by aliens.’
  • 15) ‘Meanwhile, the wild dingo living in the outback existed on a diet that ranged from kangaroos to small rodents.’
  • 16) ‘This muscle is infrequent in humans but is commonly found in the dog, fox, wolf, jackal, panther, and the dingo.’
  • 17) ‘Apart from being chased by a wild dingo, nothing has disturbed the gentle pattern of his existence.’
  • 18) ‘We chose dingoes because they are more vocal than foxes.’
  • 19) ‘The dingo, one of Australia's many indigenous animals, is also, like the kangaroo, something of a national mascot.’
  • 20) ‘By the campfire at night we'll hear the wild dingos call’
  • 21) ‘But it was generally agreed that the dingoes were keeping the wild pigs away.’
  • 22) ‘I complied with their decision, but I have always felt that I dingoed it.’
  • 23) ‘It would look like we'd dingoed it if we transferred now.’
  • 24) ‘You ain't dingoing it, are you? You can't toss in the towel now.’
  • 25) ‘Rumours circulated among other Australian units that the tanks had “dingoed” it.’
  • 26) ‘It is inconceivable that they would have dingoed when faced with a by-election opportunity.’

Examples

  • 1) Survivors recall eating leaves and grass or gnawing on bones left out for the dogs.
  • 2) The recordings were then played to ten puppies and ten older dogs in a different room.
  • 3) Universal said it also opens the door for albums aimed at horses and dogs.
  • 4) This time dogs and cats had been welcome.
  • 5) In fact, they had just bought a dog together.
  • 6) The animal released the dog and he realised that it was a cougar, or mountain lion.
  • 7) Miss Dean thinks it was probably a rabbit hole as the others would be large enough for a small dog to get out of.
  • 8) That he is trying to teach old dogs new tricks.
  • 9) Many cat and dog treats are just as calorific as the junk food made for their owners.
  • 10) People who have dogs live longer and are less prone to heart attacks.
  • 11) There was only one dog in there.
  • 12) Which is a lot of being chased by dogs.
  • 13) Now he has been released early from jail and is anxious to be top dog again.
  • 14) We know that horses and dogs are superb in reading body language.
  • 15) The family had both dogs put down following the attack.
  • 16) It is just as likely to come from a dog fox.
  • 17) Another bundle may include three hot dogs and two bags of potato chips.
  • 18) This year the emphasis is on the health benefits of dog ownership.
  • 19) dogs or other animals are not permitted on any walk unless otherwise specified.
  • 20) Wild animals must rescue their dog friend from a gang of pets.
  • 21) Yet science and social history do not explain the emotional bond between man and dog.
  • 22) Having the dog is a great interest outside football.
  • 23) The royal dogs made out like bandits.
  • 24) Questions about a lack of speed that have dogged his career were answered in that instant.
  • 25) So he asked a friend who made biscuits for dogs how to go about it.
  • 26) Others talk more wildly of the threat to dogs and cats.
  • 27) The letter appeared during what some of us regarded as a bad week for dogs.
  • 28) IT'S hard for a bloke to carry a small dog around without looking a bit daft.
  • 29) Presumably he wanted to express something about there being life in the old dog yet.
  • 30) Presumably if personal trainers are deemed a business then others too could find themselves being charged including dog walkers.
  • 31) PEOPLE see dogs as the healthier option.
  • 32) When our dogs get ill, we have to fit visits to the vet and bouts of succour around the working day.
  • 33) To illustrate, consider a sentence like ˜A dog barked™, and suppose that ˜dog™ denotes the set X,
  • 34) For example, in ˜Every dog is a mammal™, both ˜dog™ and ˜mammal™ have personal supposition.
  • 35) We had a dog, true it was a different one, a ferocious dog…
  • 36) At the present time, there is not a concert or an opera at Darmstadt to which Mr. S---- and his wonderful dog are not invited; or, at least, _the dog_.
  • 37) It's where a dog can be a dog®, and is designed to provide the highest levels of fun, safety and service for campers, and peace of mind for their parents.
  • 38) "'Well, no,' admitted Sykes; 'I see plenty of pieces, but I guess that dog _as a dog_, ain't of much account.'
  • 39) The term "dog days" was coined by the ancient Romans, who called these hot and humid days caniculares dies or "days of the dogs" after the star Sirius -- Canis Majoris, the "Greater dog," which is one of the hunting dogs of Orion.
  • 40) "This is the reason the term dog days of August was invented," said Hollywood.com analyst Paul Dergarabedian.
  • 41) He is demonstrating abstract thinking when he assigns the word dog to what is clearly not a real dog.
  • 42) ‘‘All dogs have an intense sense of smell, and every dog likes to sniff,’ Smith said.’
  • 43) ‘Her size makes it impractical to use her as a patrol dog, but her sense of smell is so keen she can detect even trace amounts of drugs.’
  • 44) ‘Domesticated dogs arose from wolves that somehow became accustomed to living among people.’
  • 45) ‘She heard a car door shut and a muffled voice calming the dog who now went from barking to a whine.’
  • 46) ‘I think it's okay to keep pet dogs on a leash and birds in a cage.’
  • 47) ‘Secondly, rabid stray dogs do not observe boundaries.’
  • 48) ‘Mr. Mason's hunting dogs weren't barking their heads off for once, which was new.’
  • 49) ‘The neighbor's dog barked relentlessly, giving the night a heartbeat to add to his own.’
  • 50) ‘A woman in Hastings is walking a small dog on a leash.’
  • 51) ‘However, there have been several instances where citizens have been bitten by stray dogs.’
  • 52) ‘People let their dogs foul in public places and leave it for somebody else to worry about.’
  • 53) ‘Don't overlook books and videos on training hunting dogs.’
  • 54) ‘The enamel carried a scene of hunting dogs chasing a hare.’
  • 55) ‘The top five dogs of each breed are invited to attend.’
  • 56) ‘He said, ‘It's kind of like a hound dog chasing a rabbit.’’
  • 57) ‘Her attack dog is a mutt, and, as everyone knows, mongrels are healthier than pedigreed dogs.’
  • 58) ‘He could almost feel them out there; it was time to call the dogs to heel.’
  • 59) ‘The sun shone, people were walking the dog, airing the child, spring cleaning their souls.’
  • 60) ‘We watched the wild cats and dogs frolicking in the winter sunlight.’
  • 61) ‘Teufel-hunden were originally known as the wild, ferocious mountain dogs of Bavarian folklore.’
  • 62) ‘In most mammals, adult play is rare, but it is common in dolphins, members of the dog family, great apes and, of course, humans.’
  • 63) ‘Among dogs, the family that preys together stays together.’
  • 64) ‘The thing is Robyn we've got the numbers here and as you said it's quite a large proportion if you like of Wild African dogs in captivity in Australia.’
  • 65) ‘Last night I watched a documentary on the Golden Jackals of Africa - dogs nearly identical to Jasper.’
  • 66) ‘In this matter of going, readily do dogs, jackals and the like, know when they move on that they are moving.’
  • 67) ‘To all dog owners, the call goes out, keep you dogs under control day and night, as the lambing season is upon us now and many have been savaged by roaming dogs in some areas already.’
  • 68) ‘The male dog otter measured 41.5 inches in length with a girth of 26 inches.’
  • 69) ‘A male, or dog, otter can range over six to eight miles, far further than a female.’
  • 70) ‘A member of the waterworks department shot a fine dog otter on the lower Rivington reservoir.’
  • 71) ‘The big dog otter probably got as much of a fright as he did, it about-turned and leapt into the water.’
  • 72) ‘‘I am looking for a young animal, either a dog or a bitch, that has a bit of attitude,’ he said.’
  • 73) ‘As I made my way back to my car, a dog fox trotted across the road in front of me, stopped, looked me up and down and then carried on, completely unconcerned.’
  • 74) ‘In the Landrover in which I was travelling was a large dog fox.’
  • 75) ‘With his hair tinged by the sun's rays, he looked like a dog fox who'd out-witted his pursuers once again.’
  • 76) ‘It is obvious therefore that not only pregnant and nursing vixens are killed, but also the dog fox, on whom the vixen and cubs often rely for food.’
  • 77) ‘People went to football in the afternoon, went to the dogs in the evening and took the train home.’
  • 78) ‘By the way, you can keep the pun you wretched journalistic dogs.’
  • 79) ‘He got up with his hand wrapped around her little waist… that lucky dog!’
  • 80) ‘If that next race is the bottom of the new grade, this lucky dog might have a chance of stumbling into the money again.’
  • 81) ‘It's true - I'm a lucky dog.’
  • 82) ‘There's not much more to be said about it other than she's a lucky dog.’
  • 83) ‘I thought My God, if all the scenes are as scary as this one; I'm really a lucky dog.’
  • 84) ‘The schools are good so there's no need to work like a dog to pay school fees.’
  • 85) ‘Do you think this helps explain why today's corporate bosses are treating American workers like dogs?’
  • 86) ‘They were treated as dogs, they were hungry, and the goddess of justice refused to review their plight.’
  • 87) ‘She talked about the prisoners being treated like dogs by the general.’
  • 88) ‘‘To say that they treated Victoria like a dog would be wholly unfair,’ he said.’
  • 89) ‘The fact is that Addis was not treated like a dog.’
  • 90) ‘During the Second World War, he treated Sinclair like a dog.’
  • 91) ‘Why the hell did these cops treat me like a dog in the street?’
  • 92) ‘The actor plays a guy who is sort of - he's treated like a dog by this gangster, his master.’
  • 93) ‘Jackie loved my father and my father treated him like a dog.’
  • 94) ‘In order to get him to commit you have to treat him like a dog.’
  • 95) ‘I can work like a dog when I have to; as long as my energy is directed at the race car, I can be fairly competitive.’
  • 96) ‘I say it's cruel for us to be treated like dogs in here.’
  • 97) ‘Those people put their lives up for this country - and for them - and they are being forced out into the gutter and being treated like dogs.’
  • 98) ‘It was appalling to see those broken bodies, human beings treated worse than dogs.’
  • 99) ‘He continued by declaring, ‘the dictator must die like a dog, because he deserves it.’’
  • 100) ‘I was already treated worse than a dog, letting her see me shed tears, only gave her more opportunities to despise me.’
  • 101) ‘Tash had enough self-respect to dislike being treated like a stray dog.’
  • 102) ‘Well if I hired my old headmaster, I'd treat him like a dog.’
  • 103) ‘The poor Prime Minister, the dog hasn't even got a bone to show for his efforts.’
  • 104) ‘Move too early, and you might end up backing a dog of a technology.’
  • 105) ‘If he understands that it's a dog of a deal, why do you think he'd consider supporting it?’
  • 106) ‘With a lead clenched less than firmly in his sweaty palm, he then contrived to play a dog of a game in the middle of the second set.’
  • 107) ‘There is also an ugly betrayal of Cammie's trust, and, as befits a dog of a play, a shaggy-dog ending.’
  • 108) ‘It's been a dog of a market in the past few months compared with the rest of Asia, but we are still overweight there.’
  • 109) ‘Never a truer word as, after a dog of a first half, the second period ran rampant on the back of abject defending.’
  • 110) ‘So how do you choose from the plethora of contracts on offer to ensure you don't get stuck with a dog of a contract?’
  • 111) ‘It is a dog of a day, relentless rain and biting cold fraying the nerve ends of men who like to be in perpetual motion.’
  • 112) ‘I personally still think it is a dog of a deal but I am glad that he has taken the stand that he has.’
  • 113) ‘The only question New Zealand First really wants to ask the Minister is why he came to the House for the first reading with such a dog of a bill.’
  • 114) ‘One of the great mysteries of Australian political life is why a man who is about to dump a dog of a tax system on an unsuspecting public should appear so smug?’
  • 115) ‘Through the select committee process we changed what had been a dog of a bill into a much-improved bill.’
  • 116) ‘Sounds like a real dog of a human being to have to deal with.’
  • 117) ‘That's why we try to write articles about how to crush on a cutie, find a BF and, yikes, get rid of a dog of a dude before he turns your heart into a pancake.’
  • 118) ‘When you have a leader of his passion and effectiveness, you have a media that's very much tracking him and dogging him and trying to find what they can about him.’
  • 119) ‘He laughs about how the police are still - and probably forever - on his tail, even dogging him on his recent US book tour.’
  • 120) ‘Since Sally was the only member of the group who would acknowledge Yap's existence, the little gnome dogged her every step, chattering excitedly.’
  • 121) ‘If something's upsetting her on the home front, she might be trying to get her moms attention - even if it means dogging her.’
  • 122) ‘I mean, they seem to be dogging you throughout this entire investigation.’
  • 123) ‘Whenever the Democrat arrives in the Midwestern state, he is dogged by a volunteer from the rival campaign dressed as a giant ear of corn.’
  • 124) ‘He is dogged by the determined trio of regional leaders, who want to grab as much from the largest pie as possible.’
  • 125) ‘The senator complained that he was dogged all week by opponents of the White House plan who dominated news coverage.’
  • 126) ‘Rumours that it may be bought by a private equity group or trade buyer or combination of the two have dogged Allen since the company's formation in 2004.’
  • 127) ‘That fellow is going to dog him to the gates of St Peters.’
  • 128) ‘Doyle hopes to prove his new pet theories on the existence of the supernatural, but when a murder takes place, his own drowned ghost reappears to dog him.’
  • 129) ‘When Sampras was taking his first steps to greatness, he had a small gang of hopefuls dogging his footsteps.’
  • 130) ‘The riverborne portion of his annual journey was normally its safest part, but this year was different, for someone - or something - was dogging his heels.’
  • 131) ‘It was picture perfect: the sunshine, the breeze, the companionship… and of course, the annoyingly obnoxious group behind us dogging our heels.’
  • 132) ‘Two NBC guys who have spent four months in the desert dogging the division confirmed that this was a very good thing for reporters who want to report on the action.’
  • 133) ‘Now, by Cavanaugh's estimate, 75 companies were dogging the buyer for the national store account.’
  • 134) ‘The spurned woman shows up on the cruise as well, dogging the newlyweds' footsteps.’
  • 135) ‘Her mother dogged her heels, asking more about her day.’
  • 136) ‘For the last 5-1/2 years this process has been dogged by problem after problem.’
  • 137) ‘The school - which has a police officer stationed on site - has been on special measures for five years and has been dogged by problems.’
  • 138) ‘The system has been dogged with problems since it came on line in 1999.’
  • 139) ‘Shoals of words have been written about the problems dogging our fishing industry - a key generator of revenue.’
  • 140) ‘Sadly, his retirement was dogged by health problems.’
  • 141) ‘Ever thereafter - following his trip to China in 1972 - he was dogged by the fear of assassination.’
  • 142) ‘Loneliness, grief and despair dogged her at every turn, seemed to follow always in her wake, just out of sight.’
  • 143) ‘A war that ended 30 years ago still dogs us shaping our debates about fighting an entirely different war.’
  • 144) ‘The trick, you see, is to put what's dogging you into the proper perspective.’
  • 145) ‘One tournament win doesn't inspire confidence but his play this week has been exceptional, a total contrast to the self-doubt that dogged him in recent times.’
  • 146) ‘This criticism dogged him for his entire career.’
  • 147) ‘I'm looking for ways to tackle this constant state of feeling tired all the time, which has dogged me for years.’
  • 148) ‘And I'm concerned about making a bad first impression, because that could dog me for months.’
  • 149) ‘These allegations are going to dog him on his final campaign bus tour and he didn't want that.’
  • 150) ‘She said one of her hopes was complete recovery from the illness that has dogged her.’
  • 151) ‘As for the criticism which has dogged him all season he replied that as long as the manager believed in him he was happy.’
  • 152) ‘It has dogged him all his life, and has, at different times, overwhelmed and almost broken him.’
  • 153) ‘Although he was acquitted in 1991, the incident has dogged him ever since.’
  • 154) ‘I have to admit that this issue has dogged me most of this week.’
  • 155) ‘But again and again, he was dogged by scandals of his own making that made him as much of an embarrassment as an asset to the party he served.’
  • 156) ‘He entered the season with a reputation for dogging it when he wasn't the primary receiver.’
  • 157) ‘He loved the game and didn't mind ragging on the players when they were dogging it.’
  • 158) ‘The Americans actually were dogging it late in the third as the Germans led 67-65, but Pierce sank a 10-spot on their heads as a part of a 12-0 run to close the quarter.’
  • 159) ‘The disturbing thing is, they aren't even really trying here, and you can tell they're already dogging it a bit in favor of dull, formulaic jazzy folk that would later be their poison.’
  • 160) ‘But his effort indicated he certainly wasn't dogging it.’
  • 161) ‘Maybe he has been dogging it all these months in hopes of getting a lot of attention and an extra ration of sympathy kibble.’
  • 162) ‘What sticks out is his Santa Claus ability to know who is working hard and who is dogging it.’
  • 163) ‘Inside the Ravens' building, the consensus is the running back is not dogging it.’
  • 164) ‘His position coach already has said he expects more effort; and he knows folks in St. Louis still say he dogged it last year.’
  • 165) ‘There were more clashes with the coach after his trade to the Nuggets, including an accusation that he dogged it through his first season in Denver.’
  • 166) ‘I know a lot of people made a big deal out of Jones in the national media, but believe me, he dogged it a lot and didn't seem real eager when he had the chance to run routes and line up at tight end.’
  • 167) ‘Pavel led the league in goals for the second straight year with 59, even though he dogged it for long portions of the schedule.’
  • 168) ‘He has dogged it by refusing to debate his ready opponent on the Seven Network this Sunday evening.’
  • 169) ‘I'd rather have the hassle for dogging it than put up with that.’
  • 170) ‘Its convex shape and dogging mechanism made it look as though it were an enlarged part of a submarine, scavenged from some terrestrial scrap yard and grafted onto the bulkhead.’
  • 171) ‘There was a muted boom as the Captain closed and dogged the ships inner lock shut behind us.’
  • 172) ‘She places the child inside the engineering space before stepping through herself and dogging the hatch behind her.’
  • 173) ‘Now, as he stood within the hyperbaric chamber of the minisub, he watched as Clark went about dogging the hatches.’
  • 174) ‘These leaks can sometimes be stopped, at opening ports, anyway, by dogging them down tighter.’
  • 175) ‘She steps through, and closes the hatch, dogging it tightly.’
  • 176) ‘They reached a hatch and wasted no time in dogging it down behind them.’
  • 177) ‘The hatch closed, they dogged it, and checked to make sure everyone was in the seats lining the walls.’
  • 178) ‘If your maintainers open a hatch, be sure they dog it down.’
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