comparable vs comparative

comparable comparative

Definitions

  • 1) Something suitable for comparison
  • 2) grammar Said of an that has a comparative and superlative form.
  • 3) Able to be compared (to).
  • 4) mathematics Constituting a pair in a particular partial order.
  • 5) Similar (to); like.
  • 6) Admitting of comparison with another or others.
  • 7) Similar or equivalent.
  • 8) Capable of being compared; worthy of comparison.
  • 9) able to be compared or worthy of comparison
  • 10) Worthy of comparison; being of equal regard; worthy to be ranked with.
  • 11) Capable of being compared.

Definitions

  • 1) obsolete An equal; a rival; a compeer.
  • 2) grammar A construction showing a relative quality, in English usually formed by adding more or appending -er. For example, the comparative of green is greener; of evil, more evil.
  • 3) grammar A word in the comparative form.
  • 4) obsolete One who makes comparisons; one who affects wit.
  • 5) The comparative degree.
  • 6) An adjective or adverb expressing the comparative degree.
  • 7) (Gram.) The comparative degree of adjectives and adverbs; also, the form by which the comparative degree is expressed.
  • 8) the comparative form of an adjective or adverb
  • 9) In grammar, the comparative degree, or a word expressing it. See I., 5.
  • 10) One who is equal or pretends to be an equal; a rival; a competitor.
  • 11) Using comparison as a method of study, or founded on something using it.
  • 12) Approximated by comparison; relative.
  • 13) Of or relating to comparison.
  • 14) obsolete Comparable; bearing comparison.
  • 15) Grammar Of, relating to, or being the intermediate degree of comparison of s, as better, sweeter, or more wonderful, or adverbs, as more softly.
  • 16) Of or relating to the scientific or historical comparison of different phenomena, institutions, or objects, such as languages, legal systems, or anatomical structures, in an effort to understand their origins or relationships.
  • 17) Estimated by comparison; relative.
  • 18) Relating to, based on, or involving comparison.
  • 19) (Gram.) Expressing a degree greater or less than the positive degree of the quality denoted by an or adverb. The comparative degree is formed from the positive by the use of -er, more, or less.
  • 20) Proceeding from, or by the method of, comparison.
  • 21) those which are based on a comprehensive comparison of the range of objects or facts in any branch or department, and which aim to study out and treat of the fundamental laws or systems of relation pervading them; as, comparative anatomy, comparative physiology, comparative philology.
  • 22) Estimated by comparison; relative; not positive or absolute, as compared with another thing or state.
  • 23) Of or pertaining to comparison.
  • 24) relating to or based on or involving comparison
  • 25) Proceeding by comparison; founded on comparison; especially, founded on the comparison or the parallel pursuit of different branches of the same science or study: as, comparative anatomy; comparative grammar.
  • 26) In grammar, implying comparison; denoting a higher degree of a quality, relation, etc., as belonging to one object or set of objects as compared with another.
  • 27) Estimated by comparison; not positive or absolute; relative.
  • 28) Having the power of comparing; capable of noting similarities and differences.
  • 29) Making use of comparison or the comparative method.

Examples

  • 1) Few cities today can boast a riverside setting of comparable historic value and beauty.
  • 2) Results are not strictly comparable as a result.
  • 3) There is no comparable figure for the previous year.
  • 4) The figures were not comparable as different forces disclosed different information.
  • 5) It was all the more impressive because the comparable figure for the previous year had been so strong.
  • 6) This theory might lead to the hypothesis that salaried women will earn less money then men who are doing comparable work.
  • 7) Recent comparable net income is up 5.2 per cent.
  • 8) The results are comparable with other techniques, but it is very time consuming.
  • 9) None of these companies is directly comparable; but few are anywhere.
  • 10) The second part surveyed the works in comparable detail, largely on the basis of secondary sources.
  • 11) There are no comparable figures available for Scotland.
  • 12) The comparable figure for last year was 10 per cent.
  • 13) Quite the contrary: he swims on in the modern political bloodstream more than any comparable figure.
  • 14) If the resulting earthquake is comparable in size to today's shock it is also likely to spawn a huge tsunami.
  • 15) Although they are not directly comparable, prices of houses in the rest of the exclusive close were less than half that.
  • 16) I don't think that there is any comparable figure to him.
  • 17) But they were pretty, and at under a euro each, far better value than anything comparable over here.
  • 18) Sounds in the oceans are not directly comparable to those in the air, but a jet taking off would emit about 140 decibels.
  • 19) Those who decide to make the leap will find themselves working in a comparable office, which is close to the port in Barcelona.
  • 20) In the UK the comparable figure was one, a single death in that whole year.
  • 21) With so few transactions taking place, it's hard to get a clear idea of the value of comparable properties in the local area.
  • 22) The first – to his boss, Fred Fielding, on Feb. 3, 1984 – denounced the notion of equal pay for comparable worth, saying “It is difficult to exaggerate the perniciousness of the ‘comparable worth’ theory.
  • 23) When the late Canadian radio host Peter Gzowski had a competition to come up with a phrase comparable to “American as apple pie,” the winner was “As Canadian as possible, under the circumstances.”
  • 24) From there, they're going to look at other properties in the neighborhood that have sold, and use those as what we call comparable sales, to compare to the property, to say if the sale sold for X amount of dollars, what should the subject property sell for in the open markets?
  • 25) KING: He wrote in his autobiography ten years ago he started dating you to escape cocaine which he described as comparable to jumping in a lake to avoid getting wet.
  • 26) U.S. District Judge Denny Chin cited the unprecedented nature of the multibillion-dollar fraud as he sentenced Madoff to the maximum of 150 years in prison, a term comparable only to those given in the past to terrorists, traitors and the most violent criminals.
  • 27) Direct Equal Employment Opportunity Commission to compare pay scales in job categories held mostly by women or mostly by men, and then enforce wage control to equalize wages according to the feminists 'subjective definition of what they call comparable worth.
  • 28) It was the largest employment decrease since the agency began keeping what it described as comparable figures in 1976.
  • 29) They have signs indicating rates of about 650 pesos which is considerably less expensive than staying in comparable places in Laredo.
  • 30) ‘Why religious affiliation should be comparable to ethnic origin escapes me, however.’
  • 31) ‘His record in work that is comparable to what's on offer here is decidedly more mixed.’
  • 32) ‘It was a large wooden fort comparable to Disney's Magic Castle of today.’
  • 33) ‘Such silk fibre was comparable to an iron fibre of the same measure, Dr. Sebastian said.’
  • 34) ‘The ratio of domestic to international air traffic in China is comparable to the US.’
  • 35) ‘Indeed, it claims that the physical energy gained by sleeping is comparable to that gained by eating an apple.’
  • 36) ‘The population of Seattle has stayed around half a million, broadly comparable to that of Glasgow.’
  • 37) ‘One, hitting analysis is not comparable to the analysis needed in a contact sport.’
  • 38) ‘The number of cameras in Bolton is comparable to other boroughs in Greater Manchester of a similar size.’
  • 39) ‘Prices are not yet finalised, but should be comparable to existing cars and will be announced next month.’
  • 40) ‘Equally, saving a life that will exist in the future seems morally comparable to creating a future life.’
  • 41) ‘Most bands these days end up being an experience comparable to chewing on a lemon.’
  • 42) ‘Is this going to be comparable to the previous three oil shocks, or worse, or easier?’
  • 43) ‘They have the further advantage of being comparable to the Home Office data.’
  • 44) ‘When the capacitor discharges those volts, it delivers an amperage comparable to stun guns.’
  • 45) ‘The steering provides feel comparable to running your fingers over the road.’
  • 46) ‘The weather at last constant, fixed in purpose and content, comparable to a summer's day.’
  • 47) ‘Neither of these are comparable to fake medicines in terms of the harm they can do.’
  • 48) ‘The basic pay rates of staff in private prisons are comparable to publicly paid prison officers.’
  • 49) ‘The amount of books she sells in a year is comparable to how many people read a semi-decent blog in a good week.’
  • 50) ‘I was expecting quality comparable with a DVD or Sky Digital, which we had in the UK.’
  • 51) ‘Bad mistake, comparable with that of the citizens of Troy who thought they were getting that horse as a bargain too.’
  • 52) ‘The team now aim to improve the quality of the tissue grown in the lab, to make it more comparable with that of a young animal.’
  • 53) ‘It is an action movie with stunts comparable with the best in the martial arts genre.’
  • 54) ‘They act as a safety net, comparable with the safety net of a trapeze artist.’
  • 55) ‘A good bag of fish that was comparable with past weights but the composition of the catch was completely different.’
  • 56) ‘She was comparable with HMS Invincible in firepower and speed but had superior protection.’
  • 57) ‘The best of their wines are serious and comparable in quality to those from good wine-makers in Baden.’
  • 58) ‘Had his team possessed a striker of comparable qualities, the tournament would have been theirs.’
  • 59) ‘Despite this, the team was able to produce an image with sharpness comparable to that of Hubble's.’
  • 60) ‘His tone was brilliant and the interpretation comparable to the best performances known.’
  • 61) ‘He knows his experience is not comparable to Shackleton's feat of endurance.’
  • 62) ‘The course is in top class condition and comparable to any golf club in the country.’
  • 63) ‘The experiences I have described are in no way comparable to what we have to contend with in London.’
  • 64) ‘His achievements are certainly comparable to those of the greatest figures in history.’
  • 65) ‘It is not classed as a beauty therapy, nor is it comparable to Indian head massage.’
  • 66) ‘Ben yelled as he brought down the sword with force comparable to that of a minor cyclone.’
  • 67) ‘Beware of the hype because no matter what you hear, no hand-held is comparable to a laptop.’
  • 68) ‘Being the third or fourth user of the system is not comparable to being the first user.’
  • 69) ‘The best produces distinguished wine, comparable to that of the Rheingau.’

Examples

  • 1) Or rather the comparative lack of it.
  • 2) Rarely have we enjoyed so long a period of comparative safety.
  • 3) Is there a polymath out there who might tackle a comparative study of all three?
  • 4) They will do this with comparative ease.
  • 5) The company pointed out that it had been up against strong comparative trading in the final quarter of last year.
  • 6) He thinks the comparative lack of urgency around the condition is due to a fatal combination of embarrassment and machismo.
  • 7) It's clear that a relationship that fl owed with such comparative ease was new for her.
  • 8) For many young people in inner cities, there is no alternative to the comparative safety of gang life.
  • 9) Most importantly, a generation of comparative peace enabled the whole population to recover from a decade of war.
  • 10) It is an area of vital importance to modern historians, but they are restricted by a comparative lack of hard evidence.
  • 11) All was calm as we studied a pride of lions from the comparative safety of our Land Rover.
  • 12) This is particularly important if such times follow long years of comparative calm, ease, and predictability.
  • 13) The police cannot protect them from gangs, either; there is often no alternative to the comparative safety of gang life.
  • 14) This was against tough comparative figures and means that it has grown 20 per cent on like-for-like basis over the past three years.
  • 15) The decline in unit sales was widely expected and reflected tough comparatives because of the launch of the iPhone 6 a year earlier.
  • 16) According to Egyptian law, presidential approval is required for any new church to be built but mosques tend to spring up with comparative ease.
  • 17) ‘Dan has also some very good posts up on US-China trade relations and the comparative efficiency of knowledge-based economies.’
  • 18) ‘This issue is given more specific attention below in relation to the comparative design.’
  • 19) ‘But we trust while no blame is cast on the heroes of the day, there will be no allusion to any attempt to estimate the comparative services of that day in the spirit of a dispute which has lately arisen about it.’
  • 20) ‘Avoiding these two biases of company inclusion and time periods, results in comparative estimates of returns that are lower than they would otherwise have been.’
  • 21) ‘What is the estimated comparative risk associated with regular lipstick use, as opposed to using dietary supplements such as bitter orange?’
  • 22) ‘At the outbreak of the Revolution in 1917, the family was compelled to leave Russia, and they eventually settled just outside Brussels, where they managed to lead a life of comparative comfort.’
  • 23) ‘Thereafter, with Watt's machine and innumerable knock-offs of his invention, copies were made relatively quickly with comparative ease and minimal costs.’
  • 24) ‘Other revenue, which includes commissions and fees, was recorded at $162.9 million, which remained relatively flat over the comparative period one year ago.’
  • 25) ‘Several general practitioners and some service users expressed concern about the impact of the publication of comparative information on the relationship between patients and their doctors.’
  • 26) ‘We do not compile a cumulative box score for each firm because of the comparative nature of consultant-client relationships.’
  • 27) ‘Even concepts for completely factual comparative ads were carefully judged by the candidate's sense of fair play.’
  • 28) ‘Now that we have the actual contracts, this comparative exercise is relatively straightforward.’
  • 29) ‘A new Anglo-Dutch benchmark estimate of comparative per capita income for the early nineteenth century would now be very useful.’
  • 30) ‘One useful comparative measure of economic inequalities is the ratio of the income of the top 10 per cent of households to the poorest 10 per cent of households.’
  • 31) ‘But the most recent encounter was back in 1992, and apparently a decade is a long time when it comes to measuring the comparative merits of the Scottish and Canadian squads.’
  • 32) ‘The barge, moored off Langney Point after being towed from Norway, rode out the storm, but turned turtle in the comparative quiet of the next day, dropping all that granite to the seabed.’
  • 33) ‘We know relatively little about the comparative effectiveness of different lipid lowering drugs because studies that make direct comparisons of the drugs are uncommon.’
  • 34) ‘The survey, which covers 144 cities, measures the comparative cost of more than 200 items in each location.’
  • 35) ‘They provide comparative indicators of the relative well-being of various socioeconomic groups.’
  • 36) ‘Particular attention is required in relation to a comparative view of accounting historiographies.’
  • 37) ‘Studying comparative religion, he developed an interest in Christian Science and converted.’
  • 38) ‘We didn't go out and study comparative religion, right?’
  • 39) ‘He studied English and comparative religion at the West Sussex Institute, followed by teacher training and other postgraduate studies.’
  • 40) ‘And then she's always wanted to study comparative religions at university or train as a counsellor.’
  • 41) ‘The church and more recently the study of comparative religions were of great importance to him.’
  • 42) ‘I majored in both comparative literature and religious studies, which meant that I far exceeded the daily recommended allowance of theory.’
  • 43) ‘Let's teach them in a comparative religion class, a social studies class, a philosophy class, but not in science, because mainstream science does not accept alternatives.’
  • 44) ‘Religious studies courses in secular schools may be laudable exercises in comparative religion, but they don't provide in-depth textual knowledge or the language tuition, say in Hebrew or Arabic.’
  • 45) ‘But if it is, it should be taught as part of a comparative world religions curriculum - not as science.’
  • 46) ‘I think it's relevant that studies in comparative anatomy and genetics show just the patterns of similarities and differences that would be necessary for evolution to be a viable theory.’
  • 47) ‘In this way, he was - whether we agree with his theory or not - perhaps the first developer of what would later be called comparative economic systems analysis.’
  • 48) ‘Over the next four years, we also hope to include subjects such as human rights, international environmental law, comparative cultural studies and research methodology.’
  • 49) ‘More recently, they've branched out to studies of comparative acting techniques, such as exploring the hand gestures of Chinese dance.’
  • 50) ‘Perhaps the guest columnist for the newspaper is confusing his Saids with his Chomksys, or he sees comparative literature as a branch of linguistics.’
  • 51) ‘The money was spent to fund comparative studies in foreign countries and consultations with scholars as well as to outline the bills and make them available to the public.’
  • 52) ‘This work now involves electron microscopy and comparative molecular biology to estimate relationships.’
  • 53) ‘The other chapters employ different explanatory theories developed in the study of international relations, comparative politics, and public policy.’
  • 54) ‘Back at Rutgers, he completed all but his dissertation in pursuit of a doctoral degree in comparative literature.’
  • 55) ‘However, he was displeased with the quality of teaching, especially in comparative anatomy.’
  • 56) ‘She attended the University of California, Berkeley, earning several degrees including a B.A. in comparative literature and an M.F.A. in studio art.’
  • 57) ‘Why didn't he just say so, instead of exposing himself to the Escherian complexities of the comparative construction?’
  • 58) ‘The referent of the Mexican postmaster's comparative metaphor is itself left unspoken.’
  • 59) ‘The particle H serves to provide a disjunctive or comparative conjunction between separate ideas or convictions.’
  • 60) ‘As an example, note the following comparative sentences.’
  • 61) ‘There is much silliness abroad on the ‘logic’ governing the use of comparatives and superlatives.’
  • 62) ‘As Geoff points out in his book, the/li r/at the end of ‘nuclear’ isn't at all unfamiliar to or difficult for speakers of English: comparatives like pricklier are unproblematic and show no inclination towards being reshaped.’
  • 63) ‘But the trouble is, comparatives don't always need a ‘second part’ introduced by ‘than’.’
  • 64) ‘Most common of all the overloaded comparatives and superlatives are ungainly shades of well-known, which display complete ignorance of the good-better-best, bad-worse-worst gradations.’
  • 65) ‘Whether the adjective is a superlative or a comparative it requires more candidates than the two who have tied at the top.’
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