ceramic vs porcelain

ceramic porcelain

Definitions

  • 1) countable An object made of this material
  • 2) uncountable A hard brittle material that is produced through burning of nonmetallic minerals at high temperatures
  • 3) An object, such as earthenware, porcelain, or tile, made of ceramic.
  • 4) Any of various hard, brittle, heat-resistant and corrosion-resistant materials made by shaping and then firing a nonmetallic mineral, such as clay, at a high temperature.
  • 5) The art or technique of making objects of ceramic, especially from fired clay.
  • 6) an artifact made of hard brittle material produced from nonmetallic minerals by firing at high temperatures
  • 7) made of material produced by the high temperature firing of inorganic, nonmetallic rocks and minerals.
  • 8) Of or pertaining to pottery; relating to the art of making earthenware.
  • 9) of or relating to or made from a ceramic
  • 10) Of or belonging to pottery or to the fictile arts; pertaining to the manufacture of porcelain, stoneware, earthenware, and terra-cotta: as, ceramic decoration.

Definitions

  • 1) A hard, white, translucent ceramic that is made by firing kaolin and other materials; china.
  • 2) Anything manufactured from this material..
  • 3) An object made of this substance.
  • 4) A hard, white, translucent ceramic made by firing a pure clay and then glazing it with variously colored fusible materials; china.
  • 5) the transferring of an impression of an engraving to porcelain.
  • 6) (Min.) See Porcelanite.
  • 7) (Zoöl.) a cowry.
  • 8) (Zoöl.) any crab of the genus Porcellana and allied genera (family Porcellanidæ). They have a smooth, polished carapace.
  • 9) A fine translucent or semitransculent kind of earthenware, made first in China and Japan, but now also in Europe and America; -- called also China, or China ware.
  • 10) (Bot.), obsolete Purslain.
  • 11) porcelain with a surface like ivory, produced by depolishing. See Depolishing.
  • 12) ceramic ware made of a more or less translucent ceramic
  • 13) Greenpoint porcelain, a name given to the hard-paste porcelain produced at the Union Porcelain Works, at Greenpoint, New York, from 1865 to the present time. The principal product has been hardware furnishings, but a large amount of decorative ware, in the form of vases, figures, groups, and busts, has also been produced there.
  • 14) Hemphill porcelain, a hard-paste porcelain made in Philadelphia from 1832 to 1837. See Tucker porcelain, below.
  • 15) Carr porcelain, soft-paste porcelain and Parian ware produced by James Carr, of New York city, from about 1876 until 1885.
  • 16) A ceramic ware having a translucent body, and when glazed (see biscuit, 3) a translucent glaze also.
  • 17) A modern porcelain, of which the variety best known is unglazed works of art, such as statuettes and groups. Thorwaldsen's works, especially, have been copied in this ware.
  • 18) A hard-paste porcelain made in the early part of the nineteenth century.
  • 19) Cartlidge porcelain, soft-paste porcelain and Parian, made by Charles Cartlidge, at Greenpoint, New York, from 1848 to 1856. Among his products were table-services, door-plates and hardware furnishings artistically painted, and Parian portraits, plaques, and busts of eminent men.
  • 20) Less properly, when the decoration is produced by casting or pressing the whole surface before the color is applied.
  • 21) Mead porcelain, a fine quality of soft-paste porcelain made by Dr. Mead, in New York city, during the second decade of the nineteenth century: the first soft-paste porcelain that is known to have been produced in the United States. Known vases of this manufacture are entirely white, with handles modeled in the forms of winged female figures.
  • 22) An obsolete form of purslane.
  • 23) (10) Smith-Fife porcelain, hard-paste porcelain made in Philadelphia about 1830, somewhat resembling the Tucker porcelain of the same period, in body, decorations, and shapes, but of a more yellowish tint of paste.
  • 24) Carved Belleek, a variety of Belleek porcelain made at Trenton, New Jersey, and carved in artistic low-relief designs while in the dry clay state, before burning. Vases and lamp-shades have been made in this style, the effect of the varying thickness of the walls, when artificial light is introduced, being that of a lithophane.
  • 25) A hard-paste porcelain made from 1779 to the present day. The kaolin was obtained from St. Yrieix in the neighborhood, and the ware was especially brilliant and translucent as long as this alone was used. The modern porcelain includes much of the most important ceramic production of modern France.
  • 26) (11) Tucker porcelain, a true hard-paste porcelain, with a small percentage of bone-ash, of a bluish tint, made by William Ellis Tucker, of Philadelphia, from 1825 to 1832. The earliest products were decorated with brown or sepia landscapes. In 1828 Thomas Hulme formed a copartnership with Tucker, under the style of Tucker & Hulme, but retired from the firm in about one year. In 1832 Joseph Hemphill was admitted as a partner, and a few months later Mr. Tucker died. The business was then carried on by Hemphill alone for several years. In 1837, Thomas Tucker, a brother of the founder, became sole proprietor, but in the following year the manufacture ceased. During Hemphill's proprietorship the ware was greatly improved. Potters and decorators were brought from Europe, and for a few years the manufacture was eminently successful. The ware resembled the French hard-paste porcelain of the same period, in body, shapes, and painted decorations. During the best period landscapes and wreaths of flowers were painted on the glaze in refined colorings, and the quality of the gilding was superior to that of the imported wares. The products of the factory were table-services, decorative jugs, vases in the French style, fruit-baskets, ornamental figures, ornate cologne-bottles, night-lamps, and a multiplicity of shapes, both useful and ornamental. This was the first hard-paste procelain produced in America, and in many respects it has not since been surpassed.
  • 27) A hard-paste porcelain made from 1769, in consequence of the discovery of deposits of kaolin in France. This manufacture has reached greater merit of late years than before the revolution: in size and perfection the pieces surpass anything produced elsewhere, and the painting shows unparalleled skill and mastery of the material, whatever may be thought of its appropriateness and good taste as decoration. The mark under the kings of the old régime was always the royal cipher L L, front to front, crossing above and below, and within the space so inclosed a letter denoting the year of manufacture, a double alphabet beginning in 1778. AA, etc. Under the republic, the word Sèvres, and R. F. for République Francaise, were used; under the empire, M. Imple. de Sevres, sometimes with the imperial eagle, was used. The restored kings used a cipher of LL and one of CC; Louis Philippe, a cipher L. P., and often the name of the palace for which the ware was made. The 1848 republic restored the R. F.; and the second empire, a crowned N, with S for Sèvres, and the date, as 56. 57. But since about 1830 all pieces are marked before decorating with the letter S, and a date in green included in a cartouche, and, when the piece is sold undecorated, this mark is cut through by a touch to a grinding-wheel.
  • 28) Kurlbaum and Schwartz porcelain, hard-paste porcelain manufactured in Philadelphia from about 1851 to 1855. This product was of the finest quality of body and mechanical execution, the decorations being carefully painted in gold.
  • 29) See Petit porcelain.
  • 30) Hulme porcelain, hard-paste porcelain produced in Philadelphia in 1828. See Tucker porcelain, below.

Examples

  • 1) Put in a glass or ceramic bowl.
  • 2) The actual ceramic object that you use is a lavatory (or loo).
  • 3) Soon we will not make ceramics or glass.
  • 4) Carbon ceramic brakes are standard and more than good enough.
  • 5) He has done much to open up the now fashionable territory where ceramics and sculpture meet.
  • 6) Includes ceramics and glass demos and a sculpture garden.
  • 7) And the carbon ceramic brakes are your insurance policy.
  • 8) Glass and ceramics from those periods are particularly popular but in the past have often been discarded.
  • 9) These are often smaller objects like ceramics or glass but it could be anything from a bygone era.
  • 10) They make exquisite decorative blue ceramic vases by pressing flowers on to them and exposing them to ultraviolet light.
  • 11) She has had successful exhibitions of her ceramics and sculptures and has a sense of having her identity back.
  • 12) The highly patterned compositions are inspired by vintage textiles and ceramics in the V&A.
  • 13) This textured ceramic vase is part of the Scratch collection of organically shaped bowls and vessels.
  • 14) Finally, it is worth looking at at least some of the countless vases and assorted ceramics.
  • 15) We stepped into numerous shops, browsing the art and the ceramics as we climbed higher through the medieval village.
  • 16) The bonnet and boot lid are carbon fibre and the brakes carbon ceramic Why should I care?
  • 17) Until fairly recently, these materials were made from naturally occurring mineral aggregates: the word ceramic comes from the Greek for “potter’s clay.”
  • 18) This is a micro thin ceramic coating that prevents a high percentage of carbon and bullet metal from adherring to your bore.
  • 19) Now available in ceramic, the mug has gone from an on-the-street treat to an at-home companion.
  • 20) A few minutes later, EMB was bringing two new drinks - in ceramic mugs - to our table.
  • 21) This spirit native to India boasts a 90% alcohol content and is made by fermenting the mash of sugar cane pulp in ceramic containers.
  • 22) Working in ceramic, Irene Aguilar Alcantara depicts the itinerant fruit vendors seen everyday in Mexican towns.
  • 23) ‘Remove from heat, pour into a ceramic bowl, add fifteen drops each of the lavender and sandalwood essential oil and beat until cool and creamy.’
  • 24) ‘We've translated this ancient ceramic art to polymer clay to produce pieces that are individually unique in design and colors.’
  • 25) ‘Clay or ceramic pots are the best choice for cacti.’
  • 26) ‘I liked the negative space in the birdbath, and had been using it to drape clay slabs for large ceramic plates in my personal work.’
  • 27) ‘The inspiration for this clay project came from ceramic dishes that I purchased on a family trip to Greece.’
  • 28) ‘At night, they turned their talents to making pots and ceramic sculpture from Blossburg clay.’
  • 29) ‘In 2001, Kallmeyer and another engineer, Rich McCray, began working on a specialized case to hold a ceramic heat exchanger.’
  • 30) ‘By heating with glass or ceramic containers, you achieve the same result without the dioxin contamination.’
  • 31) ‘It arrived in a small ceramic pot heated by a candle, along with a variety of fruit, including banana, strawberry and pineapple.’
  • 32) ‘A nest box with heat lamp or ceramic heater should always be provided if birds are left outside at night or on rainy days.’
  • 33) ‘You could also use smaller glazed ceramic bowls from the nursery as coolers.’
  • 34) ‘At the age of 13 he began contributing to the family income by taking jobs calling for artistic talent, such as decorating ceramic cups, bowls and vases.’
  • 35) ‘We decided on a blueprint, which included a March date for a banquet where we would sell ceramic bowls, made by students, filled with soup, also made by students.’
  • 36) ‘Place mush (which may now be brown) into a cool ceramic bowl.’
  • 37) ‘To make your mouth wash, place one handful of fresh rosemary leaves, one peppermint tea bag, and 10 cloves in a ceramic bowl, then pour two cups of boiling water over them.’
  • 38) ‘To make the cologne, first add two cups of tightly packed lemon balm leaves to a ceramic bowl, pour in 600 ml boiling water, cover and allow to steep overnight.’
  • 39) ‘To make a herb bag, mix together, in a ceramic bowl, four tablespoons of dried lavender, half a teaspoon of orrisroot powder and three drops of lavender essential oil.’
  • 40) ‘A ceramic bowl spills over with a hearty stew of calamari, shrimp, flanks of fish, mussels and scallops in a mild and vaguely sweet tomato-fennel sauce.’
  • 41) ‘My companions tried Baked Bacon, and Baked Cheese, dishes that also weighed in at 450g and were served sizzling hot in ceramic bowls.’
  • 42) ‘Then, he scooped some of the stew into a ceramic bowl.’
  • 43) ‘Display pieces can bring a sense of drama to the table, and Dublin-based ceramic artist and designer Michele Hannan's creations are both decorative and functional.’
  • 44) ‘Emphasis was also placed upon developing an understanding and appreciation of the work of past and contemporary designs in the ceramic field.’
  • 45) ‘He studied medical design and later ceramic design at the University of Practical Art in Vienna.’
  • 46) ‘A blue logo, bearing the label Government of Iraq, stands beneath a photo of three little ceramic designs.’
  • 47) ‘Most recently she has begun to introduce glass into her ceramic designs, to stunning effect.’
  • 48) ‘Her ceramics were made with clay that was baked in a kiln to make it permanent.’
  • 49) ‘Waterford Wedgwood is expected to invest in troubled British ceramics maker Royal Doulton to prevent the dilution of its stake.’
  • 50) ‘For us to make good ceramics we need to heat them and use a lot of fuel.’
  • 51) ‘Included in the show are carpets, ceramics, lacquerware, metal works and book arts.’
  • 52) ‘Tucked away throughout the city, tiny workshops turn out delicate ceramics, lacquer ware and exquisite folding fans.’
  • 53) ‘May I add a note to Kenneth E. Silver's sterling article on Picasso's ceramics?’
  • 54) ‘The only way we know how to make ceramics is high temperature kilns.’
  • 55) ‘He also made other types of ceramics, among them copies of Dutch Delft and Raku wares.’
  • 56) ‘The ceramics of Josiah Wedgwood and Josiah Spode also date back to that time.’
  • 57) ‘The exhibition should appeal to anyone with an interest in art or garden design, and you don't have to be the Lord of the Manor to display ceramics or stoneware.’
  • 58) ‘It was part of an enormous collection of metalwork, glass, ceramics and miniatures belonging to Ralph Bernal, a lawyer and MP.’
  • 59) ‘Franklin's recognition of ceramics and silver as potent symbols of worldly success rang true.’
  • 60) ‘The arched cupboards flanking the fireplace held the silver and best ceramics and glass in the house.’
  • 61) ‘Apart from chests and jugs, investors also love to collect clocks, silverware and ceramics.’
  • 62) ‘The Nicaraguan tradition of producing utilitarian and decorative ceramics and earthenware continues.’
  • 63) ‘The production of ceramics is located in areas where clay with a high percentage of kaolin is available.’
  • 64) ‘You may also make money collecting antique ceramics and glassware.’
  • 65) ‘Thousands of artworks, ranging from painting to glassware, ceramics and sculpture, are up for grabs.’
  • 66) ‘There has never been a better time to invest in certain types of furniture, silver, clocks, ceramics and glass.’
  • 67) ‘The Hopis were producers as well, manufacturing large quantities of cotton cloth and ceramics for the trade.’
  • 68) ‘With ceramics, the purely decorative is its default position.’
  • 69) ‘In her spare time she has taken up crochet and ceramics, while finalising plans for her latest business ventures and the return of St Martha.’
  • 70) ‘The craft of ceramics has been cosying up to the art world for a long time.’
  • 71) ‘I also love ceramics; shaping the clay and painting the finished product are very enjoyable.’
  • 72) ‘I feared her cunning, her strength, the way she could manipulate me like clay in ceramics class.’
  • 73) ‘The Institute is also planning to add new courses like photography, sculpture, pottery, glass ware and ceramics soon.’
  • 74) ‘At York City Art Gallery you can find out all about the science of pottery and ceramics or learn how the development of pigments changed the history of art.’
  • 75) ‘Yet despite his great affinity with the art of ceramics, pottery wasn't Tony's first career choice.’
  • 76) ‘Faenza is a city that has always been involved in ceramics and is famous for its pottery.’
  • 77) ‘The role of Pablo Picasso in the world of ceramics has recently been the subject of scholarly inquiry and of exhibitions.’
  • 78) ‘In Rhode Island, I taught a ceramics course for master's degree candidates.’
  • 79) ‘This usually means I take a nap and do my homework at school in one of the many classes we don't do much in, like ceramics or French, since our French teacher has been out so long.’
  • 80) ‘The bottle can be made of clay or ceramics and hardened in an oven.’
  • 81) ‘If you are still using soft ceramics to produce shapeless clay jars or bowls, you are lagging behind the city's latest trend.’
  • 82) ‘They come in a variety of materials: ceramics, brass, bone china and cut glass.’
  • 83) ‘The clay is the material that gives ceramics the ability to be molded and worked into various shapes and forms.’
  • 84) ‘Well, we're probably all used to the use of ceramics in white wares and are very familiar with those.’
  • 85) ‘The Keronite layer is a complex oxide ceramic consisting of hard crystalline phases dislocated in a matrix of softer phases of oxide.’
  • 86) ‘Among the materials now under study are titanium- or nickel-based alloys and silicon carbide ceramic reinforced with carbon fibers.’
  • 87) ‘Both Altham and Shatrov argue that the Keronite process is superior to hard anodizing and plasma spray ceramics.’
  • 88) ‘Such nanocrystalline ceramics are particularly hard, but they're brittle and fracture easily.’
  • 89) ‘In alumina ceramics, what is the function of the ceramic component?’

Examples

  • 1) Those porcelain cups and saucers are just crying out to be enjoyed with dainty pastries.
  • 2) Her dark curls framed her porcelain skin and full lips.
  • 3) The bathroom suite is white against beige porcelain tiles.
  • 4) They cut down teeth and go for a full sweep of white porcelain.
  • 5) Everyone coveted a fine porcelain cup and saucer.
  • 6) He got an interior designer to put white porcelain tiles in his bathroom.
  • 7) Inside he displayed a huge collection of Chinese porcelain.
  • 8) Yet they are porcelain dolls, with a refinement just too remote.
  • 9) Times have changed and many of the world's most beautiful women have gorgeous porcelain skin.
  • 10) She has porcelain skin, rosy lips and a tiny waist.
  • 11) Her face was ghostly white, like porcelain.
  • 12) If you have a family, you can always put the bath onto planks of wood or porcelain floor tiles.
  • 13) Apply your chosen shade all over your eyelids and underneath your lower lash line to make your eyes stand out and give skin a porcelain finish.
  • 14) I had this big porcelain doll.
  • 15) It beat the previous world record for Chinese porcelain of 20million.
  • 16) If you can't afford parquet wood flooring, fake it with porcelain tiles.
  • 17) Her porcelain skin is tightly pulled and obviously scarred, but she's beautiful.
  • 18) Portraits were hanging on the walls, and near the white porcelain stove stood two large Chinese vases with lions on the covers.
  • 19) ‘She dipped the tips of her fingers into the scented water that had been laid before her, in china and porcelain bowls as white as the cloth upon which all the dishes had been placed.’
  • 20) ‘The unusually fine clay yielded a porcelain china that was translucent with a glass-like finish.’
  • 21) ‘Use a pot of white porcelain or glazed earthenware, with its edge partly serrated and provided with a lid, the skirt of which fits loosely inside’
  • 22) ‘The factory continues to make porcelain and bone china today.’
  • 23) ‘She is a writer who energizes whatever she gives her attention to, an orange shriveling in the sun, an ink stain on a table, the white porcelain of a salad bowl.’
  • 24) ‘Each is well appointed, with freestanding roll-top cast-iron baths, step-in shower cubicles and Staffordshire porcelain ceramic ware.’
  • 25) ‘Finally, was the cup made of bone china or ordinary porcelain?’
  • 26) ‘The exact purple hues have been mixed in small blue and white loose-lidded porcelain dishes, brought by a pilot son from Hong Kong.’
  • 27) ‘White porcelain dishes with your own butter knife, small touches, but they all add up in fine dining experiences.’
  • 28) ‘There in a small blue and white porcelain dish sat the scarab ring.’
  • 29) ‘The imperfections are then cleaned off with tools and the casting is put in the kiln at 1225 cone 6 and becomes vitrified porcelain.’
  • 30) ‘Auguste Rodin is world famous for his sculpture, but his work as a ceramicist at the Sevres porcelain manufactory is less well known.’
  • 31) ‘My poached asparagus and ricotta looked rather minimalistic on the white porcelain plate when it arrived.’
  • 32) ‘Besides Imari, the most famous names for porcelain are Arita, Kutani, Hirado, Kakiemon and Satsuma.’
  • 33) ‘On the cloth I set porcelain bowls and dished out the first course.’
  • 34) ‘From then on, glazed but undecorated white porcelain was made, along with the red stoneware Bottger had invented a few years earlier.’
  • 35) ‘I also enjoy ceramic and porcelain vessels that have the shapes of gourds, vegetables and the like.’
  • 36) ‘She withdrew her green rubber pony tail holder pulling her hair away from her face into a tight pony tail, revealing her porcelain china doll like face.’
  • 37) ‘These grandly baroque pieces in polished red stoneware are precursors of the white porcelain that was to follow in the 1730s and 40s.’
  • 38) ‘The majority of work is stoneware and porcelain tableware.’
  • 39) ‘He decorated the gallery walls and populated vitrines with avian paintings, porcelains, books and prints.’
  • 40) ‘In addition to original colors and exactly reproduced textiles, almost all of the furnishings, including furniture, silver, porcelains, and portraits, belonged to Andrew Jackson.’
  • 41) ‘Living in Sydney, he has had time to recall childhood experiences such as pressing his nose up against windows in the Summer Palace of the Forbidden City to see the antique porcelains contained within.’
  • 42) ‘This international exhibition includes some 200 paintings, sculptures, prints, porcelains and other objects that were created in Florence between 1537 and 1631.’
  • 43) ‘The latter had a knack for persuading descendants of Chinese nobles to part with their inherited treasures, including rare paintings and porcelains with imperial provenances.’
  • 44) ‘It comprises more than seventy objects, including porcelains, paintings, watercolors, furniture, bronzes, screens, and jewelry.’
  • 45) ‘His acquisitions included Chinese porcelains, medieval and Renaissance paintings, and rare books, especially on religion.’
  • 46) ‘The five-day show will offer porcelains painted by Gu Linsheng, a famous Chinese painter, wines from different countries, about 300 kinds of coffee imported from Europe, America and Oceania.’
  • 47) ‘On Saturday, Sept.17, a crew of four spent the day cleaning, wrapping and packing a collection of Japanese Imari and Chinese blue-and-white porcelains stored there on tiered metal shelving.’
  • 48) ‘Today it stands half-forgotten in the woods behind the Chateau de Rambouillet, in Rambouillet, denuded of its furnishings, its elegant porcelains, and most of its sculptures.’
  • 49) ‘The founding fathers and mothers had deep fascination with the stylish Chinese porcelains, tea gear, silk, and books on China and Chinese political economy.’
  • 50) ‘There were a grand staircase, a succession of public rooms overlooking the garden, painted and gilded paneling, and furniture and porcelains in the best taste.’
  • 51) ‘The earthenware works are hand-built of pads of clay and the porcelains of neater rectangular slabs; all show the pressure marks of fingers.’
  • 52) ‘It acted rather like a superior form of name-tag, and enabled rights of possession to be marked centuries later, as the porcelains in this book are.’
  • 53) ‘It is no longer just porcelains decorated with colourful enamels and with mark and period that make the huge prices.’
  • 54) ‘Although it is merely sixty pages long, and lamentably lacks footnotes, it is nonetheless the best and most up-to-date capsule history of Chinese porcelains made for the European and American markets available.’
  • 55) ‘Among the most highly prized exotic imports were porcelains.’
  • 56) ‘An unusual surface treatment of the clear glass in the three panels recalls Chinese Kraak porcelains.’
  • 57) ‘Chinese porcelains produced for export are among the most revered of all ceramics.’
  • 58) ‘Among the imports were decorative objects such as fans, prints, screens, and pottery and porcelains.’
  • 59) ‘These will include articles of wood, porcelain, jewellery, and a wide variety of gift and handmade items.’
  • 60) ‘Wonderful collections of porcelain, pictures and furniture seemed to greet us in every room.’
  • 61) ‘It is lavishly furnished with outstanding collections such as Chinese porcelain and Renaissance paintings.’
  • 62) ‘In addition, the museum features important collections of porcelain, enamels, ivories, arms, tapestries and furniture.’
  • 63) ‘August assembled unrivalled collections of porcelain, and patronized Johann Friederich Boettger, who founded the Meissen factory in 1710.’
  • 64) ‘Again, many of these objects were inspired by the peerless collection of Chinese porcelain amassed by the Sultans and housed in the Topkapi, the best outside China.’
  • 65) ‘Today there is not a single large collection of Vincennes-Sevres porcelain that does not contain pieces painted by Dodin.’
  • 66) ‘One of the largest collections of 18th century porcelain yet found in Britain has been excavated in Hounslow, West London.’
  • 67) ‘Holderness was an enthusiastic connoisseur of art and music and his Dutch wife assembled a distinguished collection of porcelain.’
  • 68) ‘In particular he had a fine collection of eighteenth century paintings, and a collection of Chinese porcelain.’
  • 69) ‘But Bowood also has a very fine collection of watercolours and porcelain collected by the family.’
  • 70) ‘When Railpen invested in art it bought a wide collection that spanned Chinese porcelain to African tribal paintings.’
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