fox vs wolf

fox wolf

Definitions

  • 1) Nautical Small cordage made by twisting together two or more strands of tarred yarn.
  • 2) A crafty, sly, or clever person.
  • 3) Any of various carnivorous mammals of the family Canidae and especially of the genus Vulpes, found worldwide and characteristically having upright ears, a pointed snout, and a long bushy tail.
  • 4) Slang A sexually attractive person.
  • 5) Archaic A sword.
  • 6) a disease in which the hair falls off; alopecy.
  • 7) a bolt having a split end to receive a fox wedge.
  • 8) colloq. A sly, cunning fellow.
  • 9) (Zoöl.) The European dragonet.
  • 10) (Bot.) the name of two species of American grapes. The northern fox grape (Vitis Labrusca) is the origin of the varieties called Isabella, Concord, Hartford, etc., and the southern fox grape (Vitis vulpina) has produced the Scuppernong, and probably the Catawba.
  • 11) (Naut.) Rope yarn twisted together, and rubbed with tar; -- used for seizings or mats.
  • 12) (Zoöl.) a large fruit bat of the genus Pteropus, of many species, inhabiting Asia, Africa, and the East Indies, esp. P. medius of India. Some of the species are more than four feet across the outspread wings. See Fruit bat.
  • 13) (Zoöl.) The fox shark or thrasher shark; -- called also sea fox. See Thrasher shark, under Shark.
  • 14) (Zoöl.) the thrasher shark. See Thrasher shark, under Thrasher.
  • 15) (Zoöl.) the tail of a fox.
  • 16) A game with sixteen checkers, or some substitute for them, one of which is called the fox, and the rest the geese; the fox, whose first position is in the middle of the board, endeavors to break through the line of the geese, and the geese to pen up the fox.
  • 17) (Zoöl.) A carnivorous animal of the genus Vulpes, family Canidæ, of many species. The European fox (V. vulgaris or V. vulpes), the American red fox (V. fulvus), the American gray fox (V. Virginianus), and the arctic, white, or blue, fox (V. lagopus) are well-known species.
  • 18) obsolete A sword; -- so called from the stamp of a fox on the blade, or perhaps of a wolf taken for a fox.
  • 19) A horse ridden in a fox chase.
  • 20) (Ethnol.) A tribe of Indians which, with the Sacs, formerly occupied the region about Green Bay, Wisconsin; -- called also Outagamies.
  • 21) Nautical, a seizing made by twisting several rope-yarns together and rubbing them down.
  • 22) One of the northern constellations (Vulpecula), situated between the Constellations Of the Swan and the Dolphin.
  • 23) A drain carried under another watercourse by means of a depressed culvert forming an inverted siphon. Commonly called a dip-culvert or a dive-culvert.
  • 24) The gemmous dragonet: chiefly applied to the females and young males. Also called foxfish. [Local, Eng.]
  • 25) A carnivorous quadruped of the family Canidœ and of the vulpine or alope-coid series of canines, especially of the restricted genus Vulpes, as V. vulgaris of Europe.
  • 26) Hence A sly, cunning fellow.
  • 27) A freshman in a German university.
  • 28) To employ crafty means; act with dissimulation.
  • 29) To intoxicate; fuddle; stupefy.
  • 30) To turn sour: said of beer when it sours in fermenting.
  • 31) To hunt the fox.
  • 32) To become drunk.
  • 33) Tohuntthefox.
  • 34) To become discolored: said of timber or of paper. See foxed, foxfire.
  • 35) To repair, as a shoe, by renewing the front upper-leather; also, to cover the upper of (a shoe) with a piece of ormnamental leather.
  • 36) Tobecomedrunk.
  • 37) To make sour, as beer in fermenting.
  • 38) To steal.
  • 39) Obsolete To intoxicate.
  • 40) To baffle or confuse.
  • 41) To trick or fool by ingenuity or cunning; outwit.
  • 42) To make (beer) sour by fermenting.
  • 43) To repair (a shoe) by attaching a new upper.
  • 44) To turn sour in fermenting. Used of beer.
  • 45) To act slyly or craftily.
  • 46) To turn sour; -- said of beer, etc., when it sours in fermenting.
  • 47) To repair the feet of, as of boots, with new front upper leather, or to piece the upper fronts of.
  • 48) To intoxicate; to stupefy with drink.
  • 49) To make sour, as beer, by causing it to ferment.

Definitions

  • 1) Slang A man who habitually makes aggressive sexual advances to women.
  • 2) Any of various similar or related mammals, such as the hyena.
  • 3) The destructive larva of any of various moths, beetles, or flies.
  • 4) Dissonance in perfect fifths on a keyboard instrument tuned to a system of unequal temperament.
  • 5) Any of several carnivorous mammals of the genus Canis, especially the gray wolf of northern regions, that typically live and hunt in packs.
  • 6) The fur of such an animal.
  • 7) A harshness in some tones of a bowed stringed instrument produced by defective vibration.
  • 8) One that is regarded as predatory, rapacious, and fierce.
  • 9) The harsh, howling sound of some of the chords on an organ or piano tuned by unequal temperament.
  • 10) (Textile Manuf.) A willying machine.
  • 11) (Zoöl.) A black variety of the American gray wolf.
  • 12) (Zoöl.) the Thibetan wolf (Canis laniger); -- called also chanco.
  • 13) to keep away poverty; to prevent starvation. See Wolf, 3, above.
  • 14) (Zoöl.) See in the Vocabulary.
  • 15) (Zoöl.) the striped hyena.
  • 16) Fig.: Any very ravenous, rapacious, or destructive person or thing; especially, want; starvation.
  • 17) (Zoöl.) the coyote.
  • 18) (Zoöl.) an Asiatic wolf (Canis pallipes) which somewhat resembles a jackal. Called also landgak.
  • 19) (Bot.) the tomato, or love apple (Lycopersicum esculentum).
  • 20) (Zoöl.) a wolf fish.
  • 21) In bowed instruments, a harshness due to defective vibration in certain notes of the scale.
  • 22) (Zoöl.) A dog bred between a dog and a wolf, as the Eskimo dog.
  • 23) (Zoöl.) any one of several species of large, voracious marine fishes of the genus Anarrhichas, especially the common species (Anarrhichas lupus) of Europe and North America. These fishes have large teeth and powerful jaws. Called also catfish, sea cat, sea wolf, stone biter, and swinefish.
  • 24) (Zoöl.) Any one of several species of wild and savage carnivores belonging to the genus Canis and closely allied to the common dog. The best-known and most destructive species are the European wolf (Canis lupus), the American gray, or timber, wolf (Canis occidentalis), and the prairie wolf, or coyote. Wolves often hunt in packs, and may thus attack large animals and even man.
  • 25) a kind of net used in fishing, which takes great numbers of fish.
  • 26) (Zoöl.) the zebra wolf.
  • 27) obsolete An eating ulcer or sore. Cf. Lupus.
  • 28) (Zoöl.) the spotted hyena.
  • 29) A white worm, or maggot, which infests granaries.
  • 30) (Zoöl.) One of the destructive, and usually hairy, larvæ of several species of beetles and grain moths.
  • 31) A wooden fence placed across a ditch in the corner of a field, to prevent cattle from straying into another field by means of the ditch.
  • 32) In entomology:
  • 33) The larva of a bot-fly; a warble.
  • 34) A digitigrade carnivorous canine quadruped, Cants lupus, of the lupine or thoöid series of Canidæ; hence, some similar animal.
  • 35) In instruments of the viol class, a discordant or false vibration in a string when stopped at a certain point, usually due to a defect in the structure or adjustment of the instrument. Sometimes called wolf-note.
  • 36) A small naked caterpillar, the larva of Tinea granella, the wolf-moth, which infests granaries.
  • 37) A tuberculous excrescence which rapidly eats away the flesh. See lupus, 3.
  • 38) A person noted for ravenousness, cruelty, cunning, or the like: used in opprobrium.
  • 39) The harsh discord heard in certain chords of keyboard-instruments, especially the organ, when tuned on some system of unequal temperament.
  • 40) A chord or interval in which such a discord appears.
  • 41) Same as willow.
  • 42) Tohuntforwolves.
  • 43) To eat greedily or voraciously.
  • 44) (wolf in sheep's clothing) One who feigns congeniality while actually holding malevolent intentions.
  • 45) (wolf at the door) Creditors or a creditor.

Examples

  • 1) An elderly woman blocked her path and tried to sell her hats of mink and polar fox.
  • 2) Just as she was about to speak the fox warrior got in before her.
  • 3) Clever old fox, supplying him with what, normally, would be his alibi.
  • 4) Yet I heard only the other day of a woman who boasted that she had been among the few "in at the death" one day in fox - hunting, and that when the brush was given to her, her face was _spattered with the blood of the fox_.
  • 5) July 31st, 2006 at 1: 30 pm matthew says: at least a fox is an appropriate annalogy (not REAL foxes mind you, real foxes are cool, I mean the steriotypical-anthropomorphized-media version of the fox)
  • 6) We did not answer, because now, for the first time, it came over all of us, in a rush of blushes and uncomfortableness, that burying a fox is a suspicious act.
  • 7) When he had prepared twenty or more of those pieces of poisoned tallow, he put them in what he called a fox bed, of oat chaff, behind that old barn.
  • 8) The peasants of that country have a small dog, which, from their foxy appearance, they term fox-dogs.
  • 9) "It's what we call a fox-tail skimmer and it's connected to a roller and a squeegee system," he says.
  • 10) The black fox is in fact a red fox which is going through a phase where the colour of its fur is particularly dark.
  • 11) He is free to go and join fox oops fix news or the tea party movement.
  • 12) ‘Eagles, rattlesnakes, deer, pronghorn antelope, foxes, coyotes, and mountain lions roam the area.’
  • 13) ‘There are 36 species of Canidae, including dogs, wolves, coyotes, jackals and foxes.’
  • 14) ‘When raccoons, coatis, foxes, coyotes, skunks, or bears bit the models, they left tooth marks in the plasticine.’
  • 15) ‘All kinds of critters like to dine on poultry, including raccoons, skunks, opossums, weasels, foxes, coyotes, dogs and feral cats.’
  • 16) ‘Coyotes, foxes, bears, mountain lions, and bobcats all prey on livestock.’
  • 17) ‘Eagle owls, the most powerful of strigid owls, can even handle larger mammalian prey such as foxes, young roe deer, and monkeys.’
  • 18) ‘Domestic dogs and cats can pick up the infection if exposed to wild animals with the disease such as foxes, wolves, jackals, skunks, mongooses, raccoons and bats.’
  • 19) ‘The virus is carried by a number of wild animals, including coyotes, foxes, and some wolves.’
  • 20) ‘The other wild attractions in the park include nilgai, chausingha, chital, chinkara, wild boar, foxes and jackals.’
  • 21) ‘Their predators include great horned owls, bobcats, cougars, coyotes, and foxes, so wariness is in their blood.’
  • 22) ‘The genus Dirofilaria includes various species that are natural parasites of dogs, cats, foxes and wild mammals.’
  • 23) ‘Their chief predator is the mink, but while on land they also fall prey to foxes, coyotes and lynx as well as some of the larger avian predators.’
  • 24) ‘There are 105 species of birds in the park and mammals ranging from Andean foxes to pumas that only rarely venture down from their mountain lairs.’
  • 25) ‘Voles are an important source of food for many predators, including snakes, hawks, owls, coyotes, weasels, foxes, mink and badgers.’
  • 26) ‘Most wild cats are preyed upon as young cats by larger predators, such as foxes, wolves, other cats, and large birds of prey, such as owls and hawks.’
  • 27) ‘Mammals such as weasels, foxes, stoats and especially roe deer can wander safely without the risk of being killed by traffic.’
  • 28) ‘Bradford archaeologists are also studying other remains from the site at Lynford, including bones from woolly rhino, brown bears, horses, foxes and hyenas.’
  • 29) ‘He mentioned in passing that as a kid here he could tell the difference between the footprints of foxes, groundhogs and raccoons.’
  • 30) ‘Introduced predators such as rats, cats, dogs, foxes and mongooses are thought to have been responsible for about half of island bird extinctions.’
  • 31) ‘The most significant predators on red foxes are humans, who hunt foxes for their fur and kill them in large numbers as pests.’
  • 32) ‘However, he observed, the old fox was too cunning for them.’
  • 33) ‘Indians cannot tolerate it if the old foxes keep fighting and hamper Bangalore's growth.’
  • 34) ‘It has been quite a century for the old fox, after all.’
  • 35) ‘The Oz, being more of a wily fox, eschewed tabloidism and was much more sympathetic to the fallen leader.’
  • 36) ‘For it would seem that the wily old fox has finally outfoxed himself by falling prey to an inherent weakness that involves opening his mouth precipitately.’
  • 37) ‘So last night ShowBiz Ireland were out in force and waiting outside Vicar Street for the wily old fox to emerge.’
  • 38) ‘The wily old fox of cricket had his guests enthralled by witty conversation, which ran late into the night.’
  • 39) ‘No longer dishing out the Clough edge of his tongue, the best manager never to have led England, remains a wily old fox.’
  • 40) ‘It is veteran versus tyro, wily old fox against bristling young cub, a man who has done it all against a boy who threatens to do it all.’
  • 41) ‘‘It's absolutely superb being in a dust up with the old fox,’ said Smith with a smile as crews completed the first leg.’
  • 42) ‘He may have mellowed with old age - he's 63-but the fire still burns bright in this wily old fox's belly when invited to defy the odds.’
  • 43) ‘They will repurchase the bonds of the ownership of which they have been tricked out by the wily old fox.’
  • 44) ‘What does the poor old fox do, and what are its aims and intentions?’
  • 45) ‘But she throws in a slower serve which foxes the French player.’
  • 46) ‘There are almost humorous situations: when a woman at a medical clinic tries to palm it off to an unsuspecting receptionist, and when an art dealer is foxed by the way his wife has been cheated.’
  • 47) ‘The 22-year-old student admitted the greens had foxed him, but was delighted with his achievement of reaching the final.’
  • 48) ‘The elders were meticulous in their portrayal of the characters and their attention to their costume foxed the judges.’
  • 49) ‘Scoring good marks in most subjects, he is foxed by his inability to do well in maths.’
  • 50) ‘I stake my reputation on the fact that this week's entry will truly fox you.’
  • 51) ‘Your training equips you to recognise much of what you are likely to see, but you rely on specialists around the country for help with those rare pieces that fox you.’
  • 52) ‘It appears blank, having completely foxed the browser.’
  • 53) ‘Its creator never really meant for people to be foxed for that long.’
  • 54) ‘Mid-January to mid-February was the warmest it's been seen 1659 (which is when records began), foxing unwary plants into flowering prematurely, to give the frost something to kill.’
  • 55) ‘What's really foxing the industry over the cyber-attacks is that it is seemingly at odds with normal hacker behaviour.’
  • 56) ‘Autorickshaw drivers, who are otherwise street-smart, are foxed when passengers (usually visitors to the City) ask for destinations with new names.’
  • 57) ‘Everywhere you go, you hear a tale of how someone foxed the council with a fake trip, or how Joe Bloggs had stress from having to answer the phone in the council housing department.’
  • 58) ‘You may be foxed, but science has all the answers.’
  • 59) ‘Apparently this foxed the police for a long time as they couldn't find any links between the murderer and victim.’
  • 60) ‘It'll force the batsmen to use their bats more, while the spinners will be rewarded, deservedly, for foxing the batsmen.’
  • 61) ‘But the presence of a planet in this triple system has foxed astronomers, causing some to suggest that we need to rethink theories of planetary formation.’
  • 62) ‘But he made his disdain clear: as far back as 1954, he complained of his ‘beefing, threatening, foxing and conniving.’’

Examples

  • 1) Their polar bear counterpart appears wolf like.
  • 2) Once loose they'll behave like wolves.
  • 3) Hungry like the wolf, you might say.
  • 4) Bears, wolves and wild boar are common in Russia.
  • 5) An inventor in Finland has devised a new method of keeping dogs safe from wolves: little protective vests.
  • 6) They are like lone wolves and sometimes can be more dangerous as it is not easy to identify them,' said one security official.
  • 7) Especially when he heard the cry of wolves nearby.
  • 8) Wolves hunt better in packs than alone.
  • 9) These almost empty mountains where wolves and bears still roam are remote only because nobody comes.
  • 10) The raven and wolf are important animals to me.
  • 11) While keeping the wolf from the door.
  • 12) We need to teach people that they can eat wolves too and become heroes.
  • 13) Used to hunt wolves who tried to kill our animals.
  • 14) Sleeping with wild wolves is more my sort of terrifying.
  • 15) Another fear is that they will cry wolf once too often and a real illness will be missed.
  • 16) Man is a wolf to man.
  • 17) It has no bears or wolves.
  • 18) They'd cut your skin to look underneath for wolf fur.
  • 19) You are the don, and a bit of a lone wolf.
  • 20) Well, it might if you were a dog or a wolf.
  • 21) In any case, dogs are not wolves.
  • 22) The couple say they have spent thousands of hours training the animals because of wolves' fearsome nature.
  • 23) Wolves pulled one back before half-time.
  • 24) Now the wolf is back.
  • 25) He seems to be doing well, if the food I wolf down when he brings it home is anything to go by.
  • 26) Of all these the grey wolf is the most common, and is _par excellence the wolf_; but there are districts in which individuals of other colours predominate.
  • 27) One howlin 'wolf is awesome enough ... but three???
  • 28) Zenmomma's Garden: One howlin 'wolf is awesome enough ... but three???
  • 29) I think a certain wolf is starting to snarl about it being time for his story.
  • 30) The Lakota say "we are all reletives", the wolf is our brother and deserves our respect.
  • 31) In other words, the wolf is a "persistence predator."
  • 32) ‘Among wild dogs and wolves, the cooperative hunting pack includes both males and females, and they provision both pups and a nursing mother.’
  • 33) ‘Did you know that the last British wolf was shot in Scotland in the Fifteenth Century and that the last wolf living wild in England was trapped and killed nearly a thousand years ago?’
  • 34) ‘Wild dogs, especially the big wild dogs, are famously family oriented, and wolves are no exception.’
  • 35) ‘Their proposal would allow wolves that attack hunting dogs or livestock outside of fenced areas to be shot.’
  • 36) ‘With a blink, his eyes adjusted and decided it was either a wild dog or a wolf or a coyote.’
  • 37) ‘No, it was not a dog's head but probably of one of the wild canines; a wolf or perhaps a jackal.’
  • 38) ‘Everything from saber-toothed carnivores and wolves to flying squirrels and anteaters were produced independently.’
  • 39) ‘The extent of livestock loss to wolves is often overstated, wolves typically prefer their wild prey.’
  • 40) ‘Inukai suggested that the fate of the wolf and wild dog was tied to that of the deer.’
  • 41) ‘In medieval times the area was a hunting forest, roamed by deer, wild bear and wolves.’
  • 42) ‘Dogs can be vaccinated against the virus, but it is not feasible to trap and vaccinate all the wild wolves in Yellowstone, park officials say.’
  • 43) ‘At each site of historical interest he will guide visitors through local folklore and legend, recreating the era thousands of years ago when wild boar and wolves roamed the moors.’
  • 44) ‘Researchers say that wolves in the coastal region are much more genetically variable than wolves elsewhere in North America.’
  • 45) ‘The ability to place young pups as well as older wolves in the wild will inject the population with new genes and increase the numbers of wild wolves.’
  • 46) ‘The wolves that remained wild find themselves all but exterminated in the lower forty-eight states.’
  • 47) ‘We saw predatory birds hunting, which is not uncommon as Transylvania also hosts wild boars and wolves.’
  • 48) ‘Returning west, we take the road through middle Skane, where dense pine forests hide wild boar and even wolves.’
  • 49) ‘It was described as a monster of terrible size but probable only a hungry wolf or wild boar which roamed the area striking terror into the hearts of all the people.’
  • 50) ‘Actually, upon closer examination it seemed to be a cross between a wild boar and a wolf.’
  • 51) ‘Instead, rather intriguingly, it has become a grim battle of the superpowers, both engaged in a hard fight to keep the media wolves from their door.’
  • 52) ‘Who do you feed to the media wolves?’
  • 53) ‘Note that the wolf waits until he gets her into bed before pouncing.’
  • 54) ‘He wolfed food the down, and then drank from the bowl of water that he had.’
  • 55) ‘It was perfect to dip naan bread in, and the pilau rice was wolfed down by Matt who seemed to enthuse about how special the chef's special was with every mouthful.’
  • 56) ‘If I'd have been a real man, I would have bought one of the six pound pie beasts, I would not have wolfed my snack in private.’
  • 57) ‘But in order to try it you may have to stop wolfing the smothered pork chops and grits the person on your left is drooling over, or the curried goat with superb succotash that has made the friend on your right fall suddenly silent.’
  • 58) ‘I dashed outside and wolfed the meat down as fast as I could.’
  • 59) ‘Even David noticed the way she wolfed the cake down.’
  • 60) ‘Tossing the pills into the basket, I heard crunching noises as the creature inside greedily wolfed them down.’
  • 61) ‘Instead of our bodies having to work double-time to sift out the nutrients from food that is wolfed down anxiously, what if we gave our bodies an easier time of it?’
  • 62) ‘I dug into my food, almost wolfed it down, then a sudden thought occurred to me.’
  • 63) ‘Fufu turns out to be one of Schroeder's favorite dishes; he wolfs his plate down heartily, as does Gherardi.’
  • 64) ‘But as we were wolfing our eclairs I noticed that I seemed to have lost their attention and out of the corner of my eye I saw something in powder blue, and I looked up and there she was again!’
  • 65) ‘I start my running class today, so I want to make sure I eat something good and not terribly heavy, and I don't want to be wolfing it down at the last minute.’
  • 66) ‘Cheryl said the children are often trying certain foods for the first time and, despite an initial reticence, they usually end up wolfing it all down.’
  • 67) ‘Instead, it was pancakes all round at Café Chicco D' Oro, Bertie breaking his in two before wolfing them down.’
  • 68) ‘I was operating under the illusion that only I knew how vile this curry was and continued the pretence by enthusiastically wolfing it down.’
  • 69) ‘Their marriage, as well as being a union of celebrities, became the template of an extravagant lifestyle in which one ordered without reflection, wolfed it down without pause and signed the bill without a glance at the total.’
  • 70) ‘Champagne, fine wines, smoked salmon and strawberries have been wolfed down in staggering quantities during the five-day Royal Ascot at York festival.’
  • 71) ‘The cops gave him biscuits and gravy and he wolfed them down.’
  • 72) ‘But, this morning I made him a scrambled egg sandwich and he wolfed it down.’
  • 73) ‘On the verandah I wolfed dinner as hungry walkers do.’
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