choir vs chorus

choir chorus

Definitions

  • 1) The part of a church where the choir assembles for song
  • 2) Singing group; group of people who sing together; company of people who are trained to sing together
  • 3) one of the nine ranks or orders of angels
  • 4) A division of some pipe organs, containing pipes suitable for accompanying a choir.
  • 5) One of the orders of angels.
  • 6) An organized group.
  • 7) An organized company of singers, especially one performing church music or singing in a church.
  • 8) The part of the chancel in a cruciform church that is occupied by this company of singers.
  • 9) A group of instruments of the same kind.
  • 10) The part of a church used by such a company of singers.
  • 11) (Arch.) The chancel.
  • 12) A band or organized company of singers, especially in church service.
  • 13) (Arch.) a screen or low wall separating the choir from the aisles.
  • 14) (Mus.) one of the three or five distinct organs included in the full organ, each separable from the rest, but all controlled by one performer; a portion of the full organ, complete in itself, and more practicable for ordinary service and in the accompanying of the vocal choir.
  • 15) (Arch.) a screen or low wall separating the choir from the aisles.
  • 16) (Mus.) one of the three or five distinct organs included in the full organ, each separable from the rest, but all controlled by one performer; a portion of the full organ, complete in itself, and more practicable for ordinary service and in the accompanying of the vocal choir.
  • 17) That part of a church appropriated to the singers.
  • 18) (Arch.) The chancel.
  • 19) the service of singing performed by the choir.
  • 20) a chorus that sings as part of a religious ceremony
  • 21) the area occupied by singers; the part of the chancel between sanctuary and nave
  • 22) a family of similar musical instrument playing together
  • 23) Formerly and still occasionally quire.
  • 24) Any company of singers.
  • 25) That part of a church which is, or is considered as, appropriated for the use of the singers.
  • 26) An organized company of singers. Especially, such a company employed in church service.
  • 27) A group of instruments of the same class or of related organ-stops, as a trombone choir, a diapason choir, etc.
  • 28) A choral society, especially one that performs sacred music. In eight-part music a chorus is divided into first and second choirs. In the Anglican Church, an official body consisting of the minor canons, the choral vicars, and the choristers connected with a cathedral, whose function is to perform the daily choral service. Such a choir is divided into two sections, called decani and cantoris, sitting on the right and left sides respectively; of these the decani side forms the leading or principal section. See cantoris, decani.
  • 29) All that part of a cruciform church which is beyond, eastward of or farther from the main entrance than the transept; the eastern arm of the cross: so named because the choir proper (see def. 3) is usually in that part of the church and occupies nearly all of it.
  • 30) A company; a band, originally of persons dancing to music: loosely applied to an assembly for any ceremonial purpose.
  • 31) sing in a choir
  • 32) To sing in company.
  • 33) Tosingincompany.
  • 34) To sing in chorus.

Definitions

  • 1) A repeated part of a song, also called the refrain.
  • 2) A group of people in a play or performance who recite together.
  • 3) theater An actor who reads the opening and closing lines of a play.
  • 4) A setting or feature in electronic music that makes one voice sound like many.
  • 5) figuratively A group of people or animals who make sounds together
  • 6) theater An actor who reads the opening and closing lines of a play.
  • 7) A group of singers; singing group who perform together.
  • 8) A group of singers and dancers in the religious festivals of ancient Greece
  • 9) figuratively A group of people or animals who make sounds together
  • 10) A group of singers who perform together, usually singing multi-part compositions with more than one singer for each part.
  • 11) A musical composition usually in four or more parts written for a large number of singers.
  • 12) A refrain in a song, especially one in which the soloist is joined by other performers or audience members.
  • 13) A simultaneous utterance by a number of people.
  • 14) An actor in Elizabethan drama who recites the prologue and epilogue to a play and sometimes comments on the action.
  • 15) A group of persons who speak or sing in unison a given part or composition in drama or poetry recitation.
  • 16) The portion of a classical Greek drama consisting of choric dance and song.
  • 17) A speech, song, or other utterance made in concert by many people.
  • 18) A solo section based on the main melody of a popular song and played by a member of the group.
  • 19) A group in a classical Greek drama whose songs and dances present an exposition of or, in later tradition, a disengaged commentary on the action.
  • 20) A group of vocalists and dancers who support the soloists and leading performers in operas, musical comedies, and revues.
  • 21) (Mus.) A composition of two or more parts, each of which is intended to be sung by a number of voices.
  • 22) (Gr. Drama) A company of persons supposed to behold what passed in the acts of a tragedy, and to sing the sentiments which the events suggested in couplets or verses between the acts; also, that which was thus sung by the chorus.
  • 23) (Gr. Drama) A company of persons supposed to behold what passed in the acts of a tragedy, and to sing the sentiments which the events suggested in couplets or verses between the acts; also, that which was thus sung by the chorus.
  • 24) The simultaneous of a company in any noisy demonstration.
  • 25) (Mus.) A company of singers singing in concert.
  • 26) (Mus.) A company of singers singing in concert.
  • 27) (Mus.) Parts of a song or hymn recurring at intervals, as at the end of stanzas; also, a company of singers who join with the singer or choir in singer or choir in singing such parts.
  • 28) (Mus.) A composition of two or more parts, each of which is intended to be sung by a number of voices.
  • 29) obsolete An interpreter in a dumb show or play.
  • 30) (Mus.) Parts of a song or hymn recurring at intervals, as at the end of stanzas; also, a company of singers who join with the singer or choir in singer or choir in singing such parts.
  • 31) obsolete An interpreter in a dumb show or play.
  • 32) (Antiq.) A band of singers and dancers.
  • 33) (Antiq.) A band of singers and dancers.
  • 34) a body of dancers or singers who perform together
  • 35) the part of a song where a soloist is joined by a group of singers
  • 36) a group of people assembled to sing together
  • 37) any utterance produced simultaneously by a group
  • 38) a company of actors who comment (by speaking or singing in unison) on the action in a classical Greek play
  • 39) In zoology, a genus of mollusks.
  • 40) A union of voices or sounds, or a company of persons, resembling a chorus.
  • 41) One of the songs executed by the chorus.
  • 42) A dance. Specifically, in the ancient Greek drama— A dance performed by a number of persons in a ring, in honor of Bacchus, accompanied by the singing of the sacred dithyrambic odes. From this simple rite was developed the Greek drama, In continuation of the early tradition, a company of persons, represented as of age, sex, and estate appropriate to the play, who took part through their leader, the coryphæus, with the actors in the dialogue of a drama, and sang their sentiments at stated intervals when no actor was on the stage.
  • 43) In music: A company of singers, especially an organized company, such as singers in a church or a choral society, In an oratorio, opera, or concert, the general company of singers, as distinguished from the soloists, A part of a song in which the listeners join with the singer; a refrain; also, any recurring refrain or burden, A musical composition intended to be sung in harmony by a company of singers, usually by four voices. A double chorus is for eight voices, The compound or mixture stops of an organ. In the tenth century, an instrument, probably the bagpipe, In the fifteenth century, the drone of a bagpipe or of the accompaniment strings of the crowd. Formerly, in Scotland, a loud trumpet.
  • 44) To echo a particular sentiment.
  • 45) To sing the chorus.
  • 46) utter in unison
  • 47) sing in a choir
  • 48) To sing or join in the chorus of: as, to chorus a song.
  • 49) To exclaim or call out in concert.
  • 50) To sing in chorus; to exclaim simultaneously.
  • 51) (in chorus) All together; in unison.
  • 52) (in chorus) All together; in unison.
  • 53) To sing or utter in chorus.

Examples

  • 1) Singing in a choir accompanied by an orchestra can give you such a high.
  • 2) Then we recorded the choir inside the cathedral, which has gorgeous acoustics.
  • 3) We were in an orchestra run by the council and we also sang in the local church choir - against our will.
  • 4) We are put into school plays or choirs or dance classes, and many of us keep that up through our college years too.
  • 5) His mother, who sang in a church choir, hoped he would become a concert pianist and taught him his scales almost before he could talk.
  • 6) Our choir gives those people a voice.
  • 7) So we got a choir together within the squad and have sung here a lot.
  • 8) It was as if he was in a gospel choir of one.
  • 9) They were forbidden to sing in church choirs.
  • 10) Who will maintain the cathedrals and their choirs?
  • 11) Change the way the choir sings and at what time during the service they sing.
  • 12) He went with the choir one weekend to a cricket match.
  • 13) She sang in her local church choir.
  • 14) Early on she performed in church and various choirs.
  • 15) The skills required for playing the organ and directing choirs are vastly different and rarely found in one individual.
  • 16) Church and school choirs produce singers as happy to sing a Bizet chorus as a folk tune.
  • 17) In common with all groups, a choir is looking for loyalty and commitment.
  • 18) It can cost well over 250,000 a year to run a cathedral choir.
  • 19) Singing in a choir does enhance people 's lives.
  • 20) These sudden dissolves are one of the choir's signature party tricks.
  • 21) In 1970 he began to transform the ailing cathedral choir school.
  • 22) It is not the contestants but others, like people in the choir.
  • 23) We did the same offer last year and school choirs sang carols at homes before handing out bright red plants to members of their audience.
  • 24) Both churches have choir schools.
  • 25) I am the choir he's singing to.
  • 26) We'll leave aside the awful irony and just let the Aussie choir sing.
  • 27) These various names were, in the Middle Ages, mostly superseded by the term choir, which in turn yielded to the modern term sanctuary.
  • 28) Preaching to the choir is a legitimate enterprise.
  • 29) The problem is, the choir is asleep and will not wake up.
  • 30) Nico Muhly's score, layering electronic beats, live ensemble and choir, is a tempest in itself, with textures and colours battering against each other in a dissonant blast.
  • 31) The conductor, head vocalist, and stage hand for this bookish choir is George Murray, who co-founded Bookninja with fellow author Peter Darbyshire back in 2003, when the phrase “book blog” still had to qualified with some form of descriptor for the web-challenged.
  • 32) As on Christmas, he was in choir dress, wearing the white Mozzetta of Eastertide, as well as a new white Easter stole, bearing his own coat of arms.
  • 33) I don't usually blog the pieces that our own choir is doing, mainly because it seems excessively solipsistic, but I was so touched at how this piece by Henry Purcell went that I figure there is a point to drawing your attention to it.
  • 34) ‘Many people sang in school or church choirs or in choral societies.’
  • 35) ‘In addition, few church musicians expose their choirs to the vast choral literature of Psalms settings that is readily available.’
  • 36) ‘And all of these families are the ones who buy the concert tickets, support the performing organizations and sing in their church choirs.’
  • 37) ‘Special thanks to the organist and choirs in both churches and to the children's choir from St. Fiacc's NS and the young musicians from Killeshin.’
  • 38) ‘Petitioners point to music fees that may prevent youth or community orchestras, or church choirs, from performing some 20th century music.’
  • 39) ‘As usual, a number of visiting choirs will perform at church services on Sunday - the final day of the festival.’
  • 40) ‘I had been invited to sing in a church choir by my friend, the organist's daughter.’
  • 41) ‘She is currently teaching at WVU's Community Music School and is a church organist / choir director.’
  • 42) ‘Perhaps the majority of her inspiration came from her mother, who was a soloist in the church choir and a skilled musical theater performer.’
  • 43) ‘There will be gospel singers and choirs and the service will close with a freefall parachute display.’
  • 44) ‘He soon became our church organist and also helped with the church choir.’
  • 45) ‘She would have insisted on having an elaborate church service with a choir, minister and a thousand attendees.’
  • 46) ‘For the services the church choir, as usual, was second to none.’
  • 47) ‘Ever had been voted the strongest singer in the church choir last year.’
  • 48) ‘Now there are all kinds of arguments for and against having adult women singers in a church choir.’
  • 49) ‘To supplement his income, he taught private voice lessons in his home and sang in a church choir.’
  • 50) ‘At the back of the church were a robed choir and musicians making a quartet of stringed instruments.’
  • 51) ‘Most performing choruses are male, although there are also women's choirs that sing at church services.’
  • 52) ‘Blackwell has degrees in physics and in divinity, and practical musical experience in directing a church choir.’
  • 53) ‘Ms Dow believed that you should sing everything and that sometimes involved working with church choirs.’
  • 54) ‘A well-known but comparatively rare example in English music is Tallis's Spem in alium, for 40 voices in eight five-part choirs.’
  • 55) ‘As well as performing items from their own repertoires, both choirs will sing together on two pieces.’
  • 56) ‘Barbara T remembers the St Patrick's concert at which the choirs from the Catholic schools sang together dressed in long white muslin frocks with green shamrock crowns on their heads.’
  • 57) ‘Choral hymns sung in four-part harmony by church choirs are commonly performed during secular and church-related events.’
  • 58) ‘There was possibly a sense that in comparison to the magnificent new transepts and nave the choir itself, once so widely acclaimed, was no longer splendid enough.’
  • 59) ‘Brown also does not know the difference between a nave and a choir in church architecture.’
  • 60) ‘It was a French architect, William of Sens, who was called in to rebuild the choir of Canterbury Cathedral after the fire of 1174.’
  • 61) ‘The beauty of a cathedral choir offers sanctuary from the moisture and texture of a cobbled street.’
  • 62) ‘His final commission, in the last years of his life, was for the eight bronze torch-bearing angels in the choir of the Cathedral.’
  • 63) ‘To the west, extending into the modern graveyard, are parts of the nave and choir, while north of the church is the site of the twelve-sided chapter house and the cloisters.’
  • 64) ‘Women, he warned, should not approach the altar in the choir - except to take Communion.’
  • 65) ‘As in the east screen at Naumburg, doors leading into the choir flank the altar.’
  • 66) ‘One of the abbey's most famous features is the 14th century Washington Window, which is to be found high up in the choir area near the high altar.’
  • 67) ‘The new choir and organ loft will create a useful space underneath for a vestry with a secure area for valuables, kitchens, toilets and storage space.’
  • 68) ‘And the clerestory windows of the choir, glazed with large standing figures, are virtually intact.’
  • 69) ‘The will of the college's founder, Henry VI, specified steps and stated that the high altar should be raised three feet above the choir floor.’
  • 70) ‘It's nothing like the movies where the monks have an ancient cathedral with stain glass and a choir.’
  • 71) ‘With the rest of my mind however, I stared into the pools of color cast in the choir loft by the stained glass window and let my thoughts go where they would.’
  • 72) ‘They are on original instruments with small choirs, wonderfully balanced, and some of the finest Bach available.’
  • 73) ‘The company intends for the mics to be used on acoustic instruments and choirs, as well as drum overheads and percussion.’
  • 74) ‘The host school itself has six groups taking part a brass band, brass ensemble, junior brass trio and brass quintet, as well as a wind band and a clarinet choir.’
  • 75) ‘They had clarinet choir today and he hated the fact that this had to happen to their Contra Player and not him, who it was intended for, but she seemed to be fine.’
  • 76) ‘The children, who are either orphans or are from very poor families, are lucky to be chosen to join the choir with more than 1,000 auditioning to join.’
  • 77) ‘Tuition is available in all instruments, cello and Irish Harp now available, choir and orchestra, from 4 year olds to adults.’
  • 78) ‘Next to his commitment to his children, grandchildren and family, his golf and his choir practice were two very important elements of a very active life.’
  • 79) ‘I made my way around the room, hugging goodbye to various choir people, debaters, and soccer players and family, of course.’

Examples

  • 1) He invited the audience to join the chorus in song.
  • 2) The chorus of people saying the same thing in conferences around the world is deafening.
  • 3) The crowd showed their disapproval with a chorus of boos at the end.
  • 4) It was then left to a chorus member to sing the part from the wings.
  • 5) The dawn chorus is getting louder and more insistent.
  • 6) The chorus of disapproval is sure to grow.
  • 7) But there were good tunes and convincing pop chorus hooks woven into the musical fabric as well.
  • 8) Do you not love me enough to sing my choruses?
  • 9) Now he has joined the dawn chorus as well.
  • 10) The chorus of disapproval is as diverse as the new law is excluding.
  • 11) Imagine unbridled joy when band and thousands of fans belt out the feel-good chorus in perfect unison.
  • 12) There is no rousing chorus, and the performance will last up to three hours.
  • 13) Germany led a chorus of criticism by European governments.
  • 14) Its rousing chorus was delivered with a honeyed growl and accompanied by hip-hop style hand gestures.
  • 15) An increasing chorus of social criticism in recent years has called attention to men's personal isolation.
  • 16) He is known for his oversized sunglasses and his songs' catchy choruses.
  • 17) He hopes to go better this time, but simultaneously joins the chorus giving warning against setting expectations too high too soon.
  • 18) I was one of the people in the chorus, the worst role.
  • 19) A blizzard of verses and choruses came wedged together in bundles so slick and fast that it was like watching a non-stop cabaret medley.
  • 20) The second goal kept the home fans happy, but they were still not convinced and there was no rousing chorus in support of their under-fire manager.
  • 21) The sound of their springing to life in chorus is the sign that the electricity has been cut again.
  • 22) "Do read some more," came in chorus from the girls, who were highly amused.
  • 23) To the chorus is added the mode of giving thanks, by a sacrifice and joyful singing
  • 24) To the chorus is added, as a reason for praise, an example of the extreme distress from which they had been delivered -- extreme hunger, the severest privation of a journey in the desert.
  • 25) A commentary the next day on Sri Lankan state TV network, ITN, written by the editor of a state newspaper, Mahinda Abeysundara, said a businessman had bet about 18,000 dollars on a Pakistan victory and that there had therefore been what he called a "chorus to change the game".
  • 26) A chorus is beginning to develop against more Fed action, which has come to be known as quantitative easing (QE).
  • 27) The chorus is still familiar to many people, but the verses are not as well known: (A “Lucifer” was a brand of match and a “fag,” of course, was a cigarette.)
  • 28) ‘An anthemic song with a big chorus, and an infectious spring in its step, the number demonstrated Rooster's readiness to have fun with a big riff.’
  • 29) ‘These are real songs here, with choruses and verses and vocals wrapped around each other.’
  • 30) ‘Short and sweet, the songs spin around catchy choruses; witty verses are largely absent.’
  • 31) ‘Martin and Jack played for almost two hours, and then they started repeating the chorus of the last song, except with free-styled lyrics, over and over and over again.’
  • 32) ‘There are verses and choruses, and the songs are tightly edited, and rarely ramble.’
  • 33) ‘This means you won't find any verse/chorus/verse / chorus three-minute pop songs here ladies and gentlemen.’
  • 34) ‘This one is old school Coldplay again, all lovey-dovey lyrics and big sweeping anthemic choruses.’
  • 35) ‘The song's arrangement is nearly perfect with Branch slowly building the first verse into a bombastic chorus in which she asks the song's title repeatedly.’
  • 36) ‘Anne wasn't familiar with the song, but by the third time the chorus was repeated, she was able to join in.’
  • 37) ‘I could sing the first verse and the chorus of the song, I could remember her husband's name.’
  • 38) ‘The hymn should be no more than three verses - although writers can have a chorus which is repeated after each of the three verses.’
  • 39) ‘For me, the highlight of the song was neither in the verses nor the chorus, but rather in the interlude featuring Al Green.’
  • 40) ‘It's interesting too, that people remember the chorus rather than the verses of popular songs.’
  • 41) ‘But much worse than this, lurking in the depths of my mind are all sorts of verses and choruses from show tunes and, in weak moments, I find myself singing them under my breath.’
  • 42) ‘It's a powerful song, whose repeat chorus has done more against police brutality than a quorum of ombudsmen could have achieved.’
  • 43) ‘Big sing-a-long choruses and catchy lyrics drive this effort.’
  • 44) ‘Their choruses are charming sing-along rhymes that will repeat themselves endlessly in your head after only one listening.’
  • 45) ‘But it is a rock sound, with balladic verses and powerful harmonised choruses, that wins through.’
  • 46) ‘The group does not try to cram three verses and choruses into the frame of each song; they experiment freely with song structure.’
  • 47) ‘They realize the inherent reliability of hooks and melody and of strong verses and even stronger choruses.’
  • 48) ‘For most people these days, melody is not a cool thing, but for me, the Stones, Fleetwood Mac, Aerosmith, they were all about big choruses.’
  • 49) ‘Also, the music is more sectional, with clearly defined arias, ensemble pieces, and choruses.’
  • 50) ‘The Leonin pieces alternate ensemble choruses of chant with organum passages which feature a solo voice floating melodic lines over the drone.’
  • 51) ‘Although also without recitative, there were arioso pieces and instrumental symphonies, with choruses which included chorales.’
  • 52) ‘There are some great arias, fine ensemble pieces, and choruses whose effect is visceral.’
  • 53) ‘The music is superb, noble and inspiring, especially the choruses which form the backbone of the work.’
  • 54) ‘And when the patron informed me that yes, he did have a room for tonight, the chorus from Handel's Messiah erupted in my head.’
  • 55) ‘The music is based on incidental choruses Bernstein composed for an adaptation of the Jean Anouilh play, The Lark, about the trial of Joan of Arc.’
  • 56) ‘Three of the Latin choruses are directly followed by Lutheran chorales (their tunes taken from the St Matthew and St John Passions).’
  • 57) ‘Further out, up to her waist, an elderly matron in a voluminous one-piece holds a walkman in upraised arms and belts out the chorus to an opera.’
  • 58) ‘These words had already been heard in many an opera (notably in a beautiful chorus from Rameau's Pygmalion).’
  • 59) ‘In their tenderness and intimacy, their heartfelt experience of Jesus' final hours, and their prayerful, awestruck participation in the mercy poured out in him, the chorales and choruses became prayer.’
  • 60) ‘‘Der Erste Psalm’ is a joyous and intrinsically motivated work with some memorable string writing and big bold choruses that are surely written to stick in the memory!’
  • 61) ‘The big choruses in The Creation are utterly magnificent, but so much else is so brilliantly executed it's hard to single out highlights.’
  • 62) ‘Short choruses were an important element in the masque and Restoration stage works, and it was on this tradition that Handel built his new genre, the English oratorio.’
  • 63) ‘She wrote choruses that were sung in her church.’
  • 64) ‘Worship is a mix of the good old traditional hymns and the more modern choruses led by the music group.’
  • 65) ‘Some use musical instruments while others do not; some sing only Psalms while others use hymns and choruses.’
  • 66) ‘Worship is a mix of 'good-old' hymns and the more modern choruses led by the music group, suitable for all ages.’
  • 67) ‘He photocopied the conference selected Hymns given to him and taught his congregation to sing hymns and not choruses.’
  • 68) ‘They are the ones who find it difficult to stand through chorus after chorus.’
  • 69) ‘We went from these rich hymns to Gospel songs with even less Bible, and then on to choruses which have even less Bible.’
  • 70) ‘It is also our intention to include a section at the back of the book consisting of songs and choruses.’
  • 71) ‘The twentieth century has seen a revolution in Christian music, with the rise almost to ubiquity of new kinds of worship song and chorus.’
  • 72) ‘The challenge that new, emerging forms of church present for the mainline is not as simple as how we might integrate praise choruses into the 11:00 A.M. service.’
  • 73) ‘Would he prefer high-church liturgy or low-church choruses?’
  • 74) ‘When they return to the front of the church, they sing this chorus.’
  • 75) ‘For them, pop praise choruses and a chatty atmosphere have become normal.’
  • 76) ‘The chorus 'I love to worship you' was composed by Paul Cowderoy and performed by the worship team of the Centre.’
  • 77) ‘Classes began with a 'circle-up' time where everyone often held hands standing in a big circle, sang a simple worship chorus, shared prayer requests, and prayed.’
  • 78) ‘The singers, choruses and orchestras that Britten conducts are among the finest that were ever recorded with a veritable array of British talent that one only dreams of assembling.’
  • 79) ‘Under Mackerras's direction, singers, the huge chorus and orchestra played this in convincing, passionate fashion.’
  • 80) ‘The balance between the orchestra, the choruses, and the soloists is excellent - the engineering helps.’
  • 81) ‘Look at the failures of conductors and orchestras and choruses to perform the Missa Solemnis.’
  • 82) ‘Rossini expert Scimone makes a good case for the score, and the chorus and orchestra add to the professionalism.’
  • 83) ‘The choruses and orchestra are well-drilled - too prim, really, for Bizet's drama, which needs more grit.’
  • 84) ‘The chorus and orchestra of La Chapelle Royale directed by Philippe Herreweghe reveal the intrinsic delight of dedicated performers.’
  • 85) ‘The chorus and distant orchestra are also very much up to Frandsen's fast tempi, very difficult in a live performance of such a demanding work.’
  • 86) ‘The chorus and orchestra respond well to Gergiev's baton, as usual, and Philips' sound is the best in the series so far.’
  • 87) ‘From 1786, they presented an oratorio each year, either at Lent or Christmas, for which the chorus and orchestra of the court were engaged.’
  • 88) ‘He reportedly disliked the Turin chorus and orchestra, and so it was supplemented by singers and musicians from La Scala.’
  • 89) ‘The two-hour work demands almost 500 performers, including five sopranos, eight other soloists, an augmented orchestra and massed choruses (four of them in this new recording).’
  • 90) ‘The orchestra, soloists and chorus certainly earned those cheers.’
  • 91) ‘I suspect he was waiting for the right chorus and choral director; he found them both in Robert Shaw and his Chorale.’
  • 92) ‘As well as the music, the barbershop chorus will also hold a raffle in The Strand to raise funds for equipment and uniforms for the coming year.’
  • 93) ‘Danielpour demands much from his chorus in this piece, asking them to convey a range of passions associated with human suffering.’
  • 94) ‘The Druids' choral scenes were given rousing voice by a splendid chorus.’
  • 95) ‘Last year I saw this rather elaborate piece that had a chorus in addition to a full orchestra.’
  • 96) ‘The chorus negotiated Britten's difficult choral lines with conviction and the orchestra rose to the challenge of interpreting Britten's demanding score.’
  • 97) ‘Back in Prague for a couple of days, we heard the male chorus in Smetana's opera The Bartered Bride sing its praises.’
  • 98) ‘A native of the town is bringing together special guests, choruses and dancers to perform all the big hits from the West End musicals.’
  • 99) ‘They made 42nd Street - the story of a girl plucked from the chorus to the lead role in a Broadway musical - more than just a fluffy fairy tale.’
  • 100) ‘She was unique in her day because most female dancers danced in the chorus and there were very few female solo performers.’
  • 101) ‘It was a truly great performance from the former student who once filled the ranks of the chorus in a musical put on in the local school.’
  • 102) ‘Large choruses of dancers, their individuality consumed in replicas of the sculptured, stylized masks, cut swathes of movement patterns across the levels and widths of the stage.’
  • 103) ‘With an excellent chorus, good female support and two dazzling male leads I cannot fault this show.’
  • 104) ‘All the dancers in a chorus take up the last line.’
  • 105) ‘Some of the dancers in the chorus do have the appropriate raunchiness, and all are technically up to the task.’
  • 106) ‘When both the chorus and the dancers are on the steps they cannot be told apart.’
  • 107) ‘They were hatcheck and cigarette girls, dancers in chorus lines, singers with small bands and combos, and glamorous frequenters of night spots.’
  • 108) ‘The amateur dramatic society are desperately seeking men for the chorus of its April musical Anything Goes.’
  • 109) ‘With delightful support from a gorgeous cast of Munchkins, dancers and chorus, this Yellow Brick Road is well worth a journey.’
  • 110) ‘Then the kids all have to vote on whether a girl who hits a boy who talks trash to her can still be in the chorus of the spring musical.’
  • 111) ‘The most masterfully executed, Reflex Action also has the largest cast and includes, among other things, a musical number and a chorus line.’
  • 112) ‘Marty puts her on stage, all right - as a chorus dancer.’
  • 113) ‘Hollywood today mourned the death of actress Joan Crawford, the chorus dancer who became a glamour queen.’
  • 114) ‘Simon is now several years and several pantos down the road from his 1984 debut as a chorus dancer.’
  • 115) ‘Now, with special guests, chorus and dancers, he is once again taking centre stage in his own professional show which features many of the classics from the West End musicals.’
  • 116) ‘Bright, colourful and entertaining with an excellent cast, chorus and dancers and the Sunbeams are, as always delightful and almost steal the show.’
  • 117) ‘Those on stage were excellent, from Carney and Brennan in the lead roles, to the chorus line of servants in the upper-crust Lord household.’
  • 118) ‘But the chorus of whines about interference in the internal affairs of the country is 90 per cent arrant hypocrisy.’
  • 119) ‘We beeline to Church Street and do the same thing, blowing through red lights and garnering a chorus of catcalls from the local street life.’
  • 120) ‘American novelists have done their bit to swell the chorus of lamentation.’
  • 121) ‘The chorus of wails prepared me for the arduous battles which lay ahead.’
  • 122) ‘Refusing to add her voice to the chorus of disapproval against the singer's foray into children's books she admitted she couldn't see it being a major contender to Harry Potter.’
  • 123) ‘I wish to add my voice to the growing chorus of protest at the damage our Prime Minister is causing to the country's image as a tolerant, egalitarian and fair society.’
  • 124) ‘German international Lothar Matthaus added his voice to the chorus of approval.’
  • 125) ‘Some Labour backbenchers have added their voices to the chorus of condemnation.’
  • 126) ‘North Wiltshire MP James Gray has added his voice to the growing chorus of dismay over plans to build a tunnel under the M4 from Swindon to Wootton Bassett.’
  • 127) ‘Experts on each of the topics covered add their voices to the rising chorus of resistance to commodification, deregulation and global corporatization.’
  • 128) ‘Bill saw the tank thundering towards his outfit and heard his own voice join a chorus of warning cries as its guns began firing.’
  • 129) ‘This morning, the President added his voice to the chorus of caution against New Orleans moving too fast.’
  • 130) ‘On Monday, the company added its voice to the growing chorus of dissent.’
  • 131) ‘Bank of England governor Sir Eddie George added his voice to the growing chorus of optimism.’
  • 132) ‘If you love your freedom and your rights, you will add your voice to the growing chorus of opposition.’
  • 133) ‘Young people are adding their voice to the chorus of anger over plans to axe Swindon post offices.’
  • 134) ‘The moderator of the Church of Scotland has added his voice to the chorus of concern.’
  • 135) ‘Failing to achieve this task in rhythm to the music releases a chorus of boos and jeers, and if it continues for too long, ends your game immediately.’
  • 136) ‘Dr Rycroft, an expert in classical music, joined the chorus against a statutory limit on the volume of orchestras.’
  • 137) ‘The Times joined a growing chorus of support.’
  • 138) ‘In Greek tragedy the chorus commented on the action, but in Feathers of Peace there is no commentator giving moral comment.’
  • 139) ‘All Greek tragedies have choruses, who take on the roles of observers, narrators, commentators and critics.’
  • 140) ‘In Greek theatre the chorus always marched onto stage in a square, but danced in circular mode.’
  • 141) ‘Maricas was an attack on Hyperbolus, comparable with Aristophanes's attack on Cleon in Knights; like Aristophanes' Lysistrata, it had two opposed choruses.’
  • 142) ‘In addition, Wagner is also quite explicit in describing his eloquent orchestra as having a role, in its commentary on the action, as equivalent to that of the chorus in Greek drama.’
  • 143) ‘The play begins with a sonnet spoken by the chorus and in its poetry, language, and plot reflects the sonnet craze of the 1590s, from which period Shakespeare's own sequence dates.’
  • 144) ‘Four individual characters and a chorus add flesh and blood to Sircar's play.’
  • 145) ‘He is also accustomed to introduce a character as a sort of chorus, to detail the progress of events to his audience.’
  • 146) ‘So rhetorical techniques, such as choruses and verses and meter have always been very important.’
  • 147) ‘The film version is slightly expurgated (eliminating the play's chorus), but otherwise faithfully maintains Marlowe's poetry.’
  • 148) ‘The play's second chorus, with its explicit denunciation of ‘rash’ and ‘heady’ conclusion, resonates significantly beyond the specific circumstance of ‘this tale of Herod's end’.’
  • 149) ‘I've been thinking of doing a play, mostly in prose with verse choruses, and have got bits of the story mapped out.’
  • 150) ‘The only thing that places it as an early 80s artifact is the sound of guitars squeezed through chorus pedals.’
  • 151) ‘In those days, it always had a bit of chorus pedal on it, which made the bass sound a little thicker.’
  • 152) ‘Lead singer enjoyed using her chorus pedal while the lead guitarist couldn't stop creating textures and backward-sounding leads with his volume pedal.’
  • 153) ‘An effects section with chorus, flanging and delay can accommodate external signals in addition to those generated by the synth.’
  • 154) ‘The crowd, chorusing its approval, evidently felt it was safe to start the customary Mexican wave, and Pierce, basking in her new - found serenity, scored herself a few brownie points by joining in.’
  • 155) ‘More than 40,000 chorused it back at them when Kris Boyd regained his scoring touch to give the home side a lead they never squandered.’
  • 156) ‘Caught up in the enthusiasm, we all chorused a hearty ‘Hallelujah!’’
  • 157) ‘Many of the others chorused similar responses.’
  • 158) ‘‘Thanks for inviting us, Lee,’ Connie added, and the others chorused their thanks as well.’
  • 159) ‘Meanwhile, the London School of Economics and the Institute of Directors have also chorused their disapproval of the Bill over the last week.’
  • 160) ‘The council has also been criticised by many for repeatedly chorusing its catchphrase of making Hull a Top Ten city.’
  • 161) ‘At White Hart Lane, the fans chorused their support for Ferguson.’
  • 162) ‘‘Amen,’ everyone chorused as John began to play the chorus ‘Shout to the Lord’’
  • 163) ‘On my first trip to an American academic conference I asked a group of scholars what was the latest critical fashion. ‘New Historicism’ they chorused; read Greenblatt.’
  • 164) ‘Inspired by the mushrooming millionaires of Silicon Valley and the soaring Nasdaq stock market in the U.S., experts and officials chorused that Asia's future was on the Internet.’
  • 165) ‘‘Oh,’ they chorused, faces bright with recognition.’
  • 166) ‘‘It has been a very rewarding experience for us,’ they chorused.’
  • 167) ‘‘You've only been open a week,’ all four of us chorused.’
  • 168) ‘‘Bye, Vicky,’ the rest of the carriage chorused, almost as one.’
  • 169) ‘‘Long Live the Pope,’ the crowd chorused as the Pontiff passed by.’
  • 170) ‘They bemoaned their failure to pick up English as fast as their children could, plaintively chorusing, ‘Spanish is written the way you say it!’’
  • 171) ‘Goodbyes were still chorusing through her apartment as she walked down the hall.’
  • 172) ‘‘Thank you uncle, thank you uncle,’ they chorused.’
  • 173) ‘‘Don't worry, Father,’ they chorused in unison.’
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