way vs weigh

way weigh

Definitions

  • 1) Nature or category.
  • 2) A course of conduct or action.
  • 3) An aspect, particular, or feature.
  • 4) An aptitude or facility.
  • 5) Opportunity to advance.
  • 6) A participant. Often used in combination.
  • 7) A longitudinal strip on a surface that serves to guide a moving machine part.
  • 8) Informal Distance.
  • 9) Used with a personal pro as the object of various verbs to indicate progress toward an objective.
  • 10) An individual or personal manner of behaving, acting, or doing.
  • 11) Freedom to do as one wishes.
  • 12) A road, path, or highway affording passage from one place to another.
  • 13) Progress or travel along a certain route or in a specific direction.
  • 14) An opening affording passage.
  • 15) Vicinity.
  • 16) A state or condition.
  • 17) Nautical The structure on which a ship is built and from which it slides when launched.
  • 18) Space to proceed.
  • 19) A specific direction.
  • 20) A usual or habitual manner or mode of being, living, or acting.
  • 21) A manner or method of doing something: synonym: method.
  • 22) A course that is or may be used in going from one place to another.
  • 23) Informal From this place; away.
  • 24) Informal By a great distance or to a great degree; far.
  • 25) Slang Very; extremely.
  • 26) Informal Used in response to no way to indicate affirmation contradicting a negative assertion.
  • 27) (on the way) On the route of a journey.
  • 28) (in a way) From one point of view.
  • 29) (in a way) To a certain extent; with reservations.
  • 30) (out of the way) Of an unusual character; remarkable.
  • 31) (out of the way) In such a position as not to obstruct, hinder, or interfere.
  • 32) (under way) In motion or operation.
  • 33) (out of the way) Improper; amiss.
  • 34) (by way of) Through; via.
  • 35) (by the way) Incidentally.
  • 36) (no way) Certainly not.
  • 37) ((one's)/the) In the process of coming, going, or traveling.
  • 38) (all the way) From beginning to end; completely.
  • 39) (out of the way) In a remote location.
  • 40) ((one's)/the) To inconvenience oneself in doing something beyond what is required.
  • 41) (out of the way) Taken care of; disposed of.
  • 42) (by way of) As a means of.
  • 43) (in the way) In a position to obstruct, hinder, or interfere.
  • 44) (the way) In the manner that.

Definitions

  • 1) Way. Used in the phrase under weigh.
  • 2) A certain quantity estimated by weight; an English measure of weight. See wey.
  • 3) (Naut.) A corruption of way, used only in the phrase under weigh.
  • 4) A misspelling of way, in the phrase under way, due to confusion with the phrase to weigh anchor.
  • 5) A certain quantity or measure, estimated by weight; a measure of weight (compare wey); in the South Wales coal-fields, a weight of ten tons.
  • 6) In cotton manufacturing, any given quantity of yarn delivered to an operative, for example, a winder, upon which wages are based.
  • 7) See wegh.
  • 8) Toconsider;reflect.
  • 9) Nautical To raise anchor.
  • 10) Nautical To raise (anchor).
  • 11) To balance in the mind in order to make a choice; ponder or evaluate.
  • 12) To be of a specific weight.
  • 13) To determine the weight of, as with a scale.
  • 14) To be burdensome or oppressive. Used with on or upon:
  • 15) To cause to bend heavily by added weight. Used with on or upon:
  • 16) To measure or apportion (a certain quantity) by weight. Often used with out:
  • 17) To have consequence or importance.
  • 18) To choose carefully or deliberately.
  • 19) rare To judge; to estimate.
  • 20) To have weight; to be heavy.
  • 21) to sink by its own weight.
  • 22) To be considered as important; to have weight in the intellectual balance.
  • 23) To bear heavily; to press hard.
  • 24) To examine or test as if by the balance; to ponder in the mind; to consider or examine for the purpose of forming an opinion or coming to a conclusion; to estimate deliberately and maturely; to balance.
  • 25) To be equivalent to in weight; to counterbalance; to have the heaviness of.
  • 26) To bear up; to raise; to lift into the air; to swing up.
  • 27) To examine by the balance; to ascertain the weight of, that is, the force with which a thing tends to the center of the earth; to determine the heaviness, or quantity of matter of
  • 28) To oppress with weight; to overburden; to depress.
  • 29) To pay, allot, take, or give by weight.
  • 30) Obs. or Archaic To consider as worthy of notice; to regard.

Examples

  • 1) He promised to make an effort but he was soon back to his old ways.
  • 2) Your love chart is packed with surprises just the way you like it.
  • 3) The way you make people feel good about themselves wins support for your home plans.
  • 4) The bad news is that they could go all the way back down again.
  • 5) Perhaps this is one way to add years to our life and life to our years.
  • 6) There is no better way to make something unspeakable than not to name it.
  • 7) They always look a little bit saucy and a long way away from school uniform tights.
  • 8) Things have not gone her way this season but there have been excuses.
  • 9) Your thoughts go deep and you find a way to talk and listen that really encourages others.
  • 10) An alternative way of transferring money from one generation to another is to make what are called regular gifts from income.
  • 11) This is just the way it is here.
  • 12) The establishment has to give way to youth.
  • 13) This is a surefire way to save money on fuel.
  • 14) It was important to get to back to winning ways today.
  • 15) There was only one way to find out what these differences meant in practice.
  • 16) Protestants had already established school systems and colleges in this way.
  • 17) So this is our way of giving something back.
  • 18) We are a long way away from that.
  • 19) The sense that they could go either way is increasingly unavoidable.
  • 20) You have to find a way of turning them around and awaiting your opportunity.
  • 21) In no way is this film disrespectful.
  • 22) Some one was hurriedly forcing his way through this group and coming toward him.
  • 23) The way the different areas link together.
  • 24) Was there a way to make tourist accommodation unique yet universally available?
  • 25) You can talk about money in a calm and factual way that ensures people listen.
  • 26) We still have a long way to go.
  • 27) Though by far the best way of getting from end to end is to walk.
  • 28) This represents a change in the way we think about cancer.
  • 29) There are double standards in the way footballers and other sportsmen are perceived and portrayed.
  • 30) You may be surprised that guys with lower averages are some way above those with more impressive figures.
  • 31) As it makes its way across the city, passengers can be seen furiously pedalling on exercise bikes.
  • 32) I thought writing might be a good way to deal with it all.
  • 33) That said, looking at this crowd, I think it was way, * way* more than the published guestimate of 200,000.
  • 34) August 24, 2009 at 11:28 am hee hee. ai had to go bak and reed taht agin. taht is purty funnee. ***waves grey floofy paw inna way ober der across the us way***
  • 35) He just lies there, in his quiet pillow man way, on top of my lilac duvet (~because you always liked it best on top in your not so quiet way~)
  • 36) I don't wanna be this way, but I really do not know any other way~ and yet, then why am I so afraid to die?
  • 37) Fifteen years ago maybe they would have had the clout to start pushing digital reading devices something that's way, _way_ overdue, and not because it's a terrible idea at its root like the flying car, but they probably don't now.
  • 38) They had so many dead bodies coming from the Ninth Ward up our way and they had people that was drowned up my way, [I was] pushing them out the way….
  • 39) But things have a funny way of going the opposite way…
  • 40) I got the kickback ten minutes later, and the scene went from way off to way, _way_ off.
  • 41) QUOTATION: Upon the standard to which the wise and honest will now repair it is written: “You have lived the easy way; henceforth, you will live the hard way….
  • 42) "In some way she had found out that Jerry Belknap was a man to be bought; she obtained an interview with him, and offered him two thousand dollars if he would _get John Burrill out of her way_!"
  • 43) ‘People are going to find a way to enjoy themselves, even if it means breaking the law.’
  • 44) ‘When we get there we'll find a way to survey the property and figure out a plan of action.’
  • 45) ‘We had to find a way to help and it was fantastic to be able to do so.’
  • 46) ‘I also have to find a way of fitting all my Christmas presents in the car whilst managing to leave room for Lisa.’
  • 47) ‘They will listen then encourage you to find a way to achieve what you want.’
  • 48) ‘But if he wants a gold medal, he will have to find a way of beating the French.’
  • 49) ‘So I think in the interim we need to find a way of helping the people that we have already promoted who are not good at this.’
  • 50) ‘Since there is no guarantee that these machines will be benign, it is vital we find a way to remain in control.’
  • 51) ‘Of course I don't do that; I try to find a way to please everyone, which is impossible.’
  • 52) ‘If we want the arts to be meaningful, we have to find a way to reintegrate art into our lives.’
  • 53) ‘One day I hope we may find a way but it will require work on my mother's part as well as mine.’
  • 54) ‘Wilson is amongst a growing number of entrepreneurs trying to find a way of charging for music on the net.’
  • 55) ‘The children must find a way to get rid of him before their parents get home.’
  • 56) ‘I hope they made it the way you like it.’
  • 57) ‘You made it the way you wanted to make it.’
  • 58) ‘At what point is one allowed to say a religion is a threat to one's way of life?’
  • 59) ‘This is a most practical way of helping people who are less fortunate than ourselves.’
  • 60) ‘I think there are different ways of interpreting the characters.’
  • 61) ‘Play and creative expression are ways in which children cope with and try to make sense of their experiences and of the world.’
  • 62) ‘They offer a wonderful chance to explore the medium of dance and find new ways of expression.’
  • 63) ‘My excuse is that while I'm working, it's the most convenient way of getting a good meal.’
  • 64) ‘He has nothing but awe for his mother; is his behaviour his way of trying to be worthy of her?’
  • 65) ‘It was the most spectacular way in which a poor boy could achieve fame and fortune.’
  • 66) ‘Professor Hills said there was no easy way of predicting which view would prevail.’
  • 67) ‘God's ways are not our ways, and God's methods are not always our methods.’
  • 68) ‘They challenge human standards, because God's ways are not our ways.’
  • 69) ‘I hope it results in them changing their ways and showing greater respect to other cultures.’
  • 70) ‘It would be easy to rest on our laurels, but that isn't my way - and it isn't public television's, either.’
  • 71) ‘I am not in any way saying this to be antagonistic, nor to disparage anyone's beliefs; that isn't my way, or my purpose in starting this.’
  • 72) ‘She is reliable and efficient and, in her sweet way, shows the people around her how much she cares about them.’
  • 73) ‘All three plays were enjoyable and engaging in their own eccentric ways and all three directors deserve praise.’
  • 74) ‘They remained determined to practise the ways of their ancestors.’
  • 75) ‘Morgana was happy to see that some people still respected the old ways and the reign that was so rightly hers.’
  • 76) ‘With a large British community living in Cyprus the hospitable islanders are well used to British ways.’
  • 77) ‘We have a tradition of discretion on the island but perhaps he isn't quite used to island ways.’
  • 78) ‘I just rang my brother to ask his advice but, as is always the way when you really want to speak to someone, he's out!’
  • 79) ‘Perhaps this has always been the way and the public was just more naive then.’
  • 80) ‘That's always the way when an accomplished team gets into that position of strength.’
  • 81) ‘It was also a serious step because we know both Bob and Kate to some degree and respect them in many ways.’
  • 82) ‘Although the book is excellent in many ways, some aspects of it are troubling.’
  • 83) ‘On the one hand, those are things we still respect in many ways.’
  • 84) ‘Yet, this is in many ways a very careful revision as Young's personality is preserved.’
  • 85) ‘In some ways, it's a victim of its own success.’
  • 86) ‘In some ways, it doesn't work.’
  • 87) ‘It's all rather messy in lots of ways.’
  • 88) ‘They are splendid in every way.’
  • 89) ‘Even Drake, who was far from a child when he first met Hon Shun, had grown up in many ways these past months.’
  • 90) ‘The concept alone is offensive in at least half a dozen different ways, so you have to admire the sheer gall of the Media Lunch team.’
  • 91) ‘Their strengths are complementary in numerous ways: all they have to do is team up in a more productive fashion.’
  • 92) ‘So clearly if he's alive, he's in a bad way.’
  • 93) ‘The vessel is in a poor way and its listing is getting worse.’
  • 94) ‘The West Highland way is second only to the Pennine way in the hall of fame of British long-distance footpaths.’
  • 95) ‘At the end of the road turn left and continue along Drovers' way and the property to be sold is the last house on the left-hand side.’
  • 96) ‘At this time it is unclear as to whether the Walton way was a salt way or rather the best route to a convenient crossing of the Trent.’
  • 97) ‘In the past the Great Silk Road was not only a trade way but also an important road between East and West, North and South.’
  • 98) ‘A Scottish cycle route sign pointed the way and we decided to take some pictures.’
  • 99) ‘The red dots of paint with which Cretan walkers have marked the way are not always easy to spot.’
  • 100) ‘Police sealed off main roads along the way to allow the protesters to march through.’
  • 101) ‘Can you tell me the way to Wapping?’
  • 102) ‘Excuse me, which way is it to the nearest town?’
  • 103) ‘He slept most of the way there and back.’
  • 104) ‘Is this the way to Donaghcloney?’
  • 105) ‘We went part of the way by bus, and walked the rest.’
  • 106) ‘We kept a good pace and started using our own routes to make our way to checkpoints.’
  • 107) ‘When they got in there they signed in for their teacher and kept on talking all the way to ninth period math class.’
  • 108) ‘It's not very well signposted, and we lost our way trying to reach it, but the hunt was well worth while.’
  • 109) ‘Mr Rickwood said they will be planning the details of the route along the way.’
  • 110) ‘Sadly, the man wasn't going our way but he was very friendly.’
  • 111) ‘I peeked across the cafeteria toward Emmett, grateful that he wasn't looking my way.’
  • 112) ‘Which way was he facing?’
  • 113) ‘You met him in Newgate Street; Which way was he going?’
  • 114) ‘‘Tell you what though, there's a couple of flashlights in the control room. We'll pop out the back way, grab them and come back and give you a hand!’’
  • 115) ‘That evening, when Gary was done closing up for the night, he bid Mr. McCullough goodbye, stepped out the back way, mounted his bike, and headed home.’
  • 116) ‘There is a second way in at the back.’
  • 117) ‘It was a ways off in the distance and it was hard to get an estimate as to how far away it was.’
  • 118) ‘A short while later they where standing on a hill with the city a short ways behind them.’
  • 119) ‘I walked a little ways back up the drive and paced back and forth under the chestnut tree.’
  • 120) ‘You can see in the aviation-mishap status update below that we have quite a ways to go to reach our goal.’
  • 121) ‘Once I had reached a little ways beyond the last place I checked I decided to turn around.’
  • 122) ‘They reached a good ways down the tunnel when Caleb felt his weakness starting to finally take over.’
  • 123) ‘If you have to go to Reading or Glastonbury, it's quite a way to travel from the north of England.’
  • 124) ‘Does he really need to go all the way to the North of England to find this out?’
  • 125) ‘Yes really, we travelled all the way from Glasgow to Lake Molveno in northern Italy on a bus.’
  • 126) ‘A short way further along the passage they came to a steel ladder, bolted into the wall and running up through a lightless shaft to the upper levels.’
  • 127) ‘So, as long as we've got them, we don't have to worry about William becoming king, because that's quite a long way off.’
  • 128) ‘Spring is a long way off.’
  • 129) ‘It seemed such a long way off, and now, suddenly, the wedding is imminent.’
  • 130) ‘Travelling at the same speed as lorries, we lost count of the number trying to bully us out of their way.’
  • 131) ‘While it's uncertain whether the protest and subsequent meeting will prevent cuts, the way the governor's staff handled the whole affair is instructive: I'm told that technically they could have been arrested for blocking the way.’
  • 132) ‘That is why I was standing in the way at the door.’
  • 133) ‘They asked me to get out of the way so they could take photographs of her alone.’
  • 134) ‘There he was standing in my way in the hallway.’
  • 135) ‘They forced their way through a wall of brush and then took wire cutters to a rusting barbed wire fence that stood in their way.’
  • 136) ‘Bradford is clawing its way up the recycling ladder.’
  • 137) ‘I wend my way through the crowd before the artist interview begins.’
  • 138) ‘Adam wormed his way through the crowd to his hut.’
  • 139) ‘Her uncle weaves his way through the maze of chairs to reach her.’
  • 140) ‘Della must have gone already, I think as I inch my way down the hall.’
  • 141) ‘I nodded and watched as Alex weaved his way through the throng of people that were emerging from D block.’
  • 142) ‘Seeing that she seemed uncomfortable with the situation, he began to worm his way to the door.’
  • 143) ‘An uncomfortable thought wormed its way to the front of my brain.’
  • 144) ‘So we get back in the car and start inching our way up the hill.’
  • 145) ‘I climbed up and navigated my way over the top of the bales unsteadily.’
  • 146) ‘The truly outstanding athlete always fights his way to the top, no matter what the odds.’
  • 147) ‘Hey, you know Sellersville isn't all that far from Philly, for anyone who's down that way, and I will be there too.’
  • 148) ‘I really value the comments from the people who live up that way.’
  • 149) ‘He’s over Bristol way to see about some wrought iron.’
  • 150) ‘I might be coming up your way in a short while!’
  • 151) ‘Under the scheme, the cost of the property would be divided three ways between the buyer, a bank or building society and Government.’
  • 152) ‘Policymakers at the Bank of England were split three ways for the second consecutive month when they held interest rates at 5% two weeks ago.’
  • 153) ‘Children under the age of 10 must wear a specified personal flotation device at all times on any vessel when the vessel is under way and they are in an open area of the vessel.’
  • 154) ‘The vessel under way is bound to keep clear of another at anchor.’
  • 155) ‘The ball is rolled to Baxter who has a pop from a distance and shoots way over the bar.’
  • 156) ‘This has changed, and the grey bar now heads way off to the right of the screen.’
  • 157) ‘She can also smoke, drink and indulge way beyond the limits of human endurance.’
  • 158) ‘In every region of England the Greens were way ahead of them in European elections.’
  • 159) ‘There is no doubt that the United States is way ahead of the United Kingdom in so many ways.’
  • 160) ‘The great problem is that the effect of the disease has been felt way outside of agriculture.’
  • 161) ‘We lay on her bed with our arms round each other and just talked and kissed till way past two.’
  • 162) ‘If he is moving along too fast or seems to like you way more than you like him, let him go.’
  • 163) ‘They find it hard to charge for their services; they usually give way more than they ask for, and this means they scrape by.’
  • 164) ‘You should just become a rocker; it would be easier to explain and looks way cooler.’
  • 165) ‘I'd actually always thought she was way cooler than him, and was keen to hang out.’
  • 166) ‘People may mock, but it's way better than my real social life.’
  • 167) ‘I wanted to pay some appreciation to some way cool blog people - I don't know these people beyond the blog, but I appreciate their presence around here!’
  • 168) ‘‘Dad, you never told me we had any way cool relatives!’’

Examples

  • 1) New romance waits where items are weighed or measured.
  • 2) Regulatory costs weigh heavily on bank profitability.
  • 3) This teeming mass weighs about three pounds and it is known as your microbiome.
  • 4) Each weighed about the same as the average pet cat.
  • 5) During the thousands of miles he still had to walk, the death weighed heavily.
  • 6) It weighs a little more than 10 pounds.
  • 7) A priority is to make the England shirt weigh less heavily on players.
  • 8) We only considered the most massive ones, which weigh about 100 million solar masses or more.
  • 9) The shrapnel weighs heavy in my pocket.
  • 10) We are talking about identifying and weighing one grain of sand in a desert.
  • 11) That would have weighed heavily on him in these five hours.
  • 12) The outlook weighed a little on the pound and government borrowing costs.
  • 13) We wait to be weighed and measured before meeting the military men training us.
  • 14) Think about weighing food before cooking it.
  • 15) History will soon weigh heavily in our pockets.
  • 16) That much power in a car that weighs little more than a slipper?
  • 17) We need to weigh and measure the models and ask them relevant questions.
  • 18) The privacy implications are also carefully weighed up.
  • 19) He also said that bank lending fragility could still weigh heavily.
  • 20) It could mean airliners that weigh little more than the fuel and passengers they carry.
  • 21) The government has to weigh carefully the chances and risks of securing their freedom.
  • 22) Did that financial pressure to succeed weigh heavily on you?
  • 23) Her key pointers are to weigh and measure your food and always use fresh ingredients.
  • 24) Not weighing the ingredients carefully when making cakes.
  • 25) These observations must now be considered and weighed in the balance against the undoubted harmful effects of screening.
  • 26) Much has been made of the fear factor and how the shirt weighs heavy on our star players.
  • 27) But the more time you spend with it the more it begins to weigh heavy on your mind.
  • 28) The stone church weighs about 750 tonnes.
  • 29) ‘The buckets were then weighed and the heaviest amount won.’
  • 30) ‘Many industries developed their own very specific scales designed to weigh particular items.’
  • 31) ‘Michael, who was so large his GP's scales could not weigh him, has lost almost 20 inches from his waist - and he's still shrinking.’
  • 32) ‘The Australian gold rush of the 1850s generated a huge demand for accurate scales to weigh precious metals and guns to protect the gold bullion.’
  • 33) ‘Scales to weigh the bags were part of the mills' equipment.’
  • 34) ‘He said he used the scales to weigh drugs before buying them.’
  • 35) ‘We finally find a larger scale to weigh the crop.’
  • 36) ‘We have a scale and offer to weigh members if they choose.’
  • 37) ‘The jury should infer that the applicant had used the scales in order to weigh the drugs before supplying them.’
  • 38) ‘A blonde goes into a pharmacy and asks to use the baby scale to weigh the child she has in her arms.’
  • 39) ‘Stallholders weigh produce on scales strung from a notched rod, balanced on one finger.’
  • 40) ‘The smith weighs each coin on a little scale.’
  • 41) ‘weighing the infant can be accurate if an electronic scale is used.’
  • 42) ‘We weighed our athletes with accurate scales before a training session, and then again on completion of the session.’
  • 43) ‘I shall in future weigh, not guess, quantities of rice and pasta.’
  • 44) ‘Olivia was born weighing a healthy 5lb 12 oz.’
  • 45) ‘Luke is born prematurely weighing only one pound and four ounces.’
  • 46) ‘The calf weighed a healthy 30 pounds and was 3 feet long.’
  • 47) ‘The baby born in 1988 weighed only one pound and four ounces.’
  • 48) ‘Maybe I can weigh another 13 pounds less by this coming July.’
  • 49) ‘The book weighs almost ten pounds.’
  • 50) ‘The real beauty of this rifle is that it weighs a mere 3.9 pounds!’
  • 51) ‘She weighs a few pounds less than she did in '61, and is, if anything, even stronger and more trim.’
  • 52) ‘A slight boy, standing 5 feet 5 inches and weighing a mere 115 pounds, Weider became easy prey for local thugs.’
  • 53) ‘I was never a ‘fat’ kid, but I remember weighing a good 10 pounds more than my classmates did.’
  • 54) ‘We were about to enter our sophomore year, and he still weighed the 100 pounds he always had.’
  • 55) ‘I lost 70 pounds over the next two years, and I now weigh a healthy 125 pounds.’
  • 56) ‘They are heavy weapons made of steel and weigh a lot.’
  • 57) ‘He lifted me as easily as if I weighed nothing.’
  • 58) ‘Pulling out a rather large bag of gold pieces, he held it out, weighing it out in his hand.’
  • 59) ‘Flour, sugar, rice and other dry goods and plain biscuits were weighed out into brown paper bags.’
  • 60) ‘Every act must be carefully weighed before a decision is made to see whether it meets the strict ethical criteria.’
  • 61) ‘The positive and negative aspects need to be weighed and then a decision is to be taken.’
  • 62) ‘The selection of a particular value for a benefit-cost or net benefit analysis must be carefully weighed against the objectives of the analysis.’
  • 63) ‘Nonetheless, he stressed that the matter would have to be carefully weighed by the government before any final decision could be made.’
  • 64) ‘But this long-term view has to be weighed against all the work that needs to be undertaken now.’
  • 65) ‘There was nothing impulsive about her; she weighed everything, from decisions to her own feelings.’
  • 66) ‘He is a reserved man who prefers action to words, weighs those he uses carefully, and is not given to shows of emotion.’
  • 67) ‘There is something quiet and assured about her, and when she talks it seems as if she is carefully weighing each of her words before letting them go.’
  • 68) ‘On sensitive subjects my words have to be weighed carefully.’
  • 69) ‘Professional opportunities and options are to be weighed and considered before a clear decision can be taken.’
  • 70) ‘The totality of the evidence needs to be weighed and assessed.’
  • 71) ‘These several costs must be weighed carefully.’
  • 72) ‘Even in instances in which the likelihood of harm appears low, the costs, demands, risks, and benefits must be carefully weighed.’
  • 73) ‘Risks and benefits associated with the use of aspirin have to be weighed carefully in any recommendations made by health care professionals.’
  • 74) ‘Proposed reforms, therefore, ought to be weighed carefully as to whether they are necessary and whether they are worth the costs.’
  • 75) ‘Each issue, whether it involved an individual or an entire community, was weighed carefully.’
  • 76) ‘How is the court to weigh and balance all these claims?’
  • 77) ‘In each case trial judges must weigh and balance a catalogue of relevant factors.’
  • 78) ‘Their points of view have been listened to carefully, balanced, and weighed.’
  • 79) ‘Because they are stupid, they do not know how to weigh benefits against risk?’
  • 80) ‘Instead, the writer forces us to hold these two characteristics in our mind at the same time. We have to balance them, weigh them against each other, compare and contrast them.’
  • 81) ‘Should patients have a choice to base their decision on whether or not to take a drug by weighing the risks against the benefits?’
  • 82) ‘It now appears to be a choice of weighing the risks against the benefits.’
  • 83) ‘Although Claire was thrilled to receive tenure at the university where she teaches, she felt her promotion had a certain hollow quality when she weighed its importance against the satisfaction of being a parent.’
  • 84) ‘The FDA is advising doctors to weigh the benefits against risks when prescribing Cox - 2 inhibitors for their patients.’
  • 85) ‘Although the agency didn't ban these drugs, they did say doctors should weigh the benefits against risks for individual patients.’
  • 86) ‘As always, try to understand the relevant protocols and weigh the risks against the benefits.’
  • 87) ‘Even if vaccines cause some adverse reactions in some people, even serious reactions, you still have to weigh their benefit against their harm.’
  • 88) ‘What you have to do is weigh the costs against the benefits.’
  • 89) ‘In evaluating the justness of any military venture, it's critical to weigh the anticipated benefits against the expected costs.’
  • 90) ‘Should not any intervention be assessed with care, weighing costs against benefits?’
  • 91) ‘Exercising free will, individuals calculate the net benefit simply by weighing potential gains against potential losses.’
  • 92) ‘But we need to weigh these downsides against the benefits.’
  • 93) ‘So before putting money down, weigh the costs against the potential benefits.’
  • 94) ‘But I couldn't begin to weigh the potential bloodshed against the potential benefits.’
  • 95) ‘This is a balancing test where the risk of the device is weighed against the benefits of such a device.’
  • 96) ‘The project was a balancing act of weighing options against the project's time.’
  • 97) ‘Once a jury renders a guilty verdict for murder in the first degree, mitigating factors are weighed against aggravating circumstances to decide the defendant's fate.’
  • 98) ‘We all need to be more resourceful in helping people weigh the risks against the potential consequences of their actions.’
  • 99) ‘The evidence of human history weighs heavily against it.’
  • 100) ‘The epidemiological evidence weighs heavily against such a link.’
  • 101) ‘Street lighting was discussed but the unsuitability in a rural area and the question of cost weighed against any benefit.’
  • 102) ‘Since assumed jurisdiction would not accord with such standards, nor with the law of the defendant's home, this factor weighed against assuming jurisdiction.’
  • 103) ‘Some of the Internationals might be experienced soldiers, Bligh noted, but their age weighed against them for work like this.’
  • 104) ‘However, ironically, it was its apparent lack of objectivity that weighed against it for most North American psychologists.’
  • 105) ‘The idea of adding a hard drive to a handset isn't new, but so far disk sizes and reliability issues have weighed against their incorporation into mobiles.’
  • 106) ‘TNT submitted that this process weighed against the legitimacy of the claims.’
  • 107) ‘Two factors weighed against any widespread acceptance of the classical version of atomism.’
  • 108) ‘Clearly, the principle of freedom doesn't weigh heavily in his decision making.’
  • 109) ‘The fact that Cipollini is 36 and has not been at his best since the start of the season weighed heavily on our decision.’
  • 110) ‘Iowa's emphasis on public education weighed heavily on their decision to move their young family here.’
  • 111) ‘The guilt was slowly lifting, but her fear of making the wrong decision still weighed heavily.’
  • 112) ‘Challenges to official director slates will likely be rare, but the mere threat of them could weigh heavily on management decisions.’
  • 113) ‘Unfortunately, the stress of the job has weighed heavily on him.’
  • 114) ‘This kind of schedule has one very important consequence, one that weighs more heavily on me now than it used to.’
  • 115) ‘Decisions we make today will surely weigh heavily on the shape of the world we eventually leave.’
  • 116) ‘Given the recent attacks on his web site, it isn't very difficult to see why these matters weigh heavily with him.’
  • 117) ‘He could see Captain Mason supervising his crew, and once under weigh, saw him wave and salute.’
  • 118) ‘At 10 a.m. got under weigh and turned out of Port Chalky At 4 p.m. came to an anchor in Preservation Bay.’
  • 119) ‘A ship is under weigh when she has weighed her anchor… As soon as she gathers way she is under way.’
  • 120) ‘Don't be alarmed, ma'am; as soon as we're under weigh we'll hoist the cow up, and get the piano down.’
  • 121) ‘After we had been under weigh for some 20 minutes, we should have reached our destination in just that time.’
  • 122) ‘Got under weigh and stood down the harbour but unfortunately the water being low the vessel got aground.’
  • 123) ‘At 9 A. M., three of their brigs got under weigh, and stood down the bay, supposed to be on the look out.’
  • 124) ‘The plan did not get under weigh for almost two years after the end of fighting.’
  • 125) ‘His presence was by no means necessary in getting the ship under weigh, and steering her well out to sea.’
  • 126) ‘My last letter closed at the commencement of our voyage, since which we have been constantly under weigh, with the exception of short interruptions on the coast of Norfolk, in Yarmouth roads.’
  • 127) I weigh more than 70 kilograms
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