anecdote vs antidote

anecdote antidote

Definitions

  • 1) An account which supports an argument, but which is not supported by scientific or statistical analysis.
  • 2) A short account of an incident, often humorous.
  • 3) A previously untold secret account of an incident.
  • 4) A short account of an interesting or humorous incident.
  • 5) Secret or hitherto undivulged particulars of history or biography.
  • 6) A particular or detached incident or fact of an interesting nature; a biographical incident or fragment; a single passage of private life.
  • 7) Unpublished narratives.
  • 8) short account of an incident (especially a biographical one)
  • 9) A short narrative of a particular or detached incident or occurrence of an interesting nature; a biographical incident; a single passage of private life.
  • 10) plural Secret history; facts relating to secret or private affairs, as of governments or of individuals: often used (commonly in the form anecdota) as the title of works treating of such matters.

Definitions

  • 1) Something that counteracts or prevents something harmful.
  • 2) A remedy to counteract the effects of poison (often followed by "against," "for," or "to").
  • 3) An agent that relieves or counteracts.
  • 4) A remedy or other agent used to neutralize or counteract the effects of a poison.
  • 5) Whatever tends to prevent mischievous effects, or to counteract evil which something else might produce.
  • 6) A remedy to counteract the effects of poison, or of anything noxious taken into the stomach; -- used with against, for, or to.
  • 7) a remedy that stops or controls the effects of a poison
  • 8) Synonyms Remedy, cure, counteractive, corrective.
  • 9) A medicine adapted to counteract the effects of poison or an attack of disease.
  • 10) Whatever prevents or tends to prevent or counteract injurious influences or effects, whether physical or mental; a counteracting power or influence of any kind.
  • 11) transitive To counteract as an antidote.
  • 12) To furnish with preservatives; preserve by antidotes; serve as an antidote to; counteract.
  • 13) To relieve or counteract with an antidote.
  • 14) To fortify or preserve by an antidote.
  • 15) To counteract or prevent the effects of, by giving or taking an antidote.

Examples

  • 1) There are many funny anecdotes crammed in here.
  • 2) Some of the most memorable anecdotes are more personal.
  • 3) And it includes personal anecdotes and photographs from her family album which make it all the more interesting.
  • 4) We embark on a seemingly endless series of gently satirical observations and anecdotes about the zany world of activism.
  • 5) And her book is full of funny anecdotes.
  • 6) Think of your funniest anecdote about being at work.
  • 7) You will be saying this is irrelevant personal anecdote.
  • 8) But there is one anecdote that really stuck.
  • 9) His book is a beguiling mosaic of incidents and anecdotes from their time together.
  • 10) Tune in for this and more amusing anecdotes.
  • 11) The wealth of evidence and anecdote means that the pages fly by.
  • 12) This does not mean simply telling personal anecdotes and stories.
  • 13) And one anecdote alone justifies the cover price.
  • 14) This mixture of practical tips and amusing anecdotes is the perfect addition to any kitchen.
  • 15) It became clear to me that most of us prefer anecdote to evidence.
  • 16) Say what you love about the product or give a personal anecdote about it.
  • 17) All we ask is they leave enough time for more than one red chair anecdote.
  • 18) None was funny or erudite or told amusing anecdotes.
  • 19) It comes from a lot of different personal experiences and anecdotes that people have told me.
  • 20) Life is once again a series of amusing anecdotes.
  • 21) The highlight is a personal anecdote about climbing a mountain in the dark to witness the sun rise.
  • 22) Changing the course of one of his anecdotes is like a tug boat heaving at an oil tanker.
  • 23) It's a myth that seems to have been passed by anecdote and folklore.
  • 24) It will also be based soundly on evidence, not anecdote or prejudice.
  • 25) Expect some funny anecdotes from Russell!
  • 26) It's just evidence by anecdote.
  • 27) We laugh a lot and he has many anecdotes, funny, funny stories.
  • 28) Gradually, the term anecdote came to be applied to any short tale utilized to emphasize or illustrate whatever point the author wished to make.
  • 29) Jeep33, the term anecdote means a brief account of a specific incident.
  • 30) If so, this anecdote is an excellent argument for the venerable, oft-derided doctrine of contributory negligence.
  • 31) August 7th, 2004 at 6: 26 am lesson of this anecdote is a valid one, that we sometimes expend a great deal of time, effort, and money to create a “high-tech” solution to a problem, when a perfectly good, cheap, and simple solution is right before our eyes.
  • 32) While I'm aware that the plural of "anecdote" is not "data", I'll still relate from personal professional experience that the reasons why companies I know use options are:
  • 33) Somebody asked why anyone would oppose eVerify, I told him the reasons for my company with a sort of funny anecdote from a few years ago.
  • 34) Somebody asked why anyone would oppose eVerify, I told him the reasons for my company with a sort of funny anecdote from a few yearsago.
  • 35) Sandy MacHoots: But an anecdote is simply an account of an observed incident — or a datum.
  • 36) My favourite engineering anecdote is the one about the old (expensive) engineer who is pensioned off to make the company look young and dynamic.
  • 37) ‘He had led an interesting life and was full of amusing stories and anecdotes, all of which he told with enthusiasm.’
  • 38) ‘No funny stories, no amusing anecdotes just a proud Dad sending his baby off into the big wide world of further education.’
  • 39) ‘It mingles facts and figures with anecdotes and stories in short sections which are listed alphabetically.’
  • 40) ‘The book is full of short, interesting anecdotes which capture a moment in time.’
  • 41) ‘I've made enough speeches to know that you're supposed to connect with the audience by telling a joke or a humorous anecdote or some amusing tale.’
  • 42) ‘Cultural differences are not just amusing anecdotes, but can have a real impact with real consequences.’
  • 43) ‘Full of personal anecdotes and hilarious stories, the exact running order of the show is likely to change on a nightly basis.’
  • 44) ‘The story was based on an anecdote - a true incident that I had heard from Professor B. Buchshtab.’
  • 45) ‘His witty introductions, funny stories and anecdotes kept the crowds smiling throughout.’
  • 46) ‘The train journey from London to the North is described not just a train journey but as a repository of stories and anecdotes.’
  • 47) ‘Though it is an amusing anecdote, this detail touches on a small but potentially crucial peculiarity in the current international emergency.’
  • 48) ‘He was widely known for his warmth, generosity, and modesty, and for his fund of humorous and interesting anecdotes.’
  • 49) ‘It is a fascinating read, full of interesting information and funny anecdotes.’
  • 50) ‘This is staged documentary, its narrative gleaned from personal statements, in essence, a theatre of personal anecdote, performance art on an operatic scale.’
  • 51) ‘The appeal of Resnick's account is enhanced by the lure of Bohemia, which he and Passlof enrich with anecdote and intertwine with aesthetics and social history.’
  • 52) ‘Relying on argument or anecdote for their appeal, these books included only a handful of indifferently reproduced black-and-white plates.’
  • 53) ‘The novel is packed with incident and anecdote and although mainly realist in style borrows some of the familiar techniques of Garcia Marquez's magic realism.’
  • 54) ‘There is satire, particularly in the rather tedious Book II, but there is also all the wit, anecdote and engaging thought of good conversation.’
  • 55) ‘She suggests, more importantly, that public figures like Jonathan Clarke become more comprehensible when connected to domestic and personal memoir and anecdote.’
  • 56) ‘Bennett's memoir is full of crucial technical insights into Broadway and Hollywood practice, but by way of instructive anecdote rather than structured discussion.’
  • 57) ‘The playwright had to approach the struggle to subdue the tangle of confusing anecdote knowing what lesson he wanted it to teach and prepared to discard, distort, and invent in order to present his own version of the meaning of history.’
  • 58) ‘There are areas within the report that we believe are based on untested and unreliable individual anecdotes.’
  • 59) ‘The evidence that supports this theory is hearsay anecdotes going back thousands of years.’
  • 60) ‘3 The form or ‘factitiousness’ of the anecdote provides the shape and the subjectivity of the account.’
  • 61) ‘Hearsay, anecdote and tall tales says that it is possible, that this is just words until it happens to you.’
  • 62) ‘The distance between an amusing anecdote and thing that happened can be measured in kilometres.’
  • 63) ‘Some ‘off licence’ indications are substantiated by some evidence, but its efficacy in several other conditions is based on anecdote and observations made in small numbers of patients.’
  • 64) ‘There was no attempt to relate this experience to the architecture of the seven in any systematic way and Muthesius has to fall back on anecdote - to which I can add my penn'orth.’
  • 65) ‘Natural healthcare tools have included the use of foods, herbs and remedies derived from nature, and their use has evolved independently in diverse cultures using both anecdote and experimentation.’
  • 66) ‘I think this anecdote provides a good example of the limitations confronting a contemporary labour historian who is trying to provide the most honest, accurate account possible.’
  • 67) ‘On the Web site, in the e-mails of targeted professors, one finds a whole fuzzy world of impression and anecdote, of passionate conviction and hurt feelings.’
  • 68) ‘If we could keep to addressing the issues rather than dealing in personalities and anecdote, we probably stand a better chance of not getting moved to the Conversation, literally or metaphorically.’
  • 69) ‘A pupil of Domenichino, he was most in sympathy with classical art, but he also appreciated the Baroque, and enriched his narratives with anecdote and vivid detail.’
  • 70) ‘Burns's handmade tableaux - in style and use of narrative anecdote - are similar to the work of fellow Houstonian, Bill Davenport.’
  • 71) ‘Now, however, we can appreciate the subtlety and unexpectedness of his framing, and the complex interplay he so often achieves between anecdote and form.’
  • 72) ‘He was a huge fan of Dutch art, stuffed with incident and anecdote.’
  • 73) ‘His vision of the landscape was subjected to dreamy sentimentalism and romantic anecdote, rather than being acknowledged for its experimentalism and social content.’
  • 74) ‘In art, the lure of anecdote always presents serious risks, and a good deal of nineteenth century American art succumbed to that drive to explain and amuse.’

Examples

  • 1) As the autumnal weather begins to take hold, skipping abroad to make use of friends with second-home benefits sounds like the perfect antidote.
  • 2) It's the perfect antidote to modern life: a place to inhale the scent of lime trees and feel your mind and body relax.
  • 3) In the UK it is licensed for use in eye drops and as an antidote for paracetamol poisoning, but not for chests.
  • 4) The perfect cynical antidote to all that festive cheer.
  • 5) Good quality contact with fathers is seen as a good antidote to the impact of parental separation.
  • 6) These two books provide a potent antidote.
  • 7) Touch is the most wonderful antidote to stress.
  • 8) The perfect antidote to a night out.
  • 9) The move to physicality is the perfect antidote to a life spent online.
  • 10) Orange is the perfect antidote when a garden looks lacklustre.
  • 11) It is the perfect antidote to celebrity.
  • 12) The surveys may not exactly have been a champagne moment but they were a welcome antidote to the gloom.
  • 13) But just as often it drove him on and he found in batting the perfect antidote to his troubles.
  • 14) She refers to swathes of research that provide an antidote to the self-help element.
  • 15) This was the perfect antidote to finishing Ashes ng and nd?
  • 16) The essential oils were very relaxing - the perfect antidote to a long day.
  • 17) It's the perfect antidote to modern day mediocrity.
  • 18) Both offer the perfect antidote to the bustle of Manhattan.
  • 19) A deep tissue massage is a really good antidote to jet lag.
  • 20) A welcome antidote to the slightly fragile and serious vacuum in which we had existed before his arrival.
  • 21) I think it was a wonderful antidote to Glyndebourne.
  • 22) I've always found it a wonderful antidote to my world.
  • 23) It is grit, above all else, that will provide the antidote.
  • 24) She's a wonderful antidote to playing Harriet.
  • 25) A soft, print jacket is the perfect antidote to spring's structured tailoring.
  • 26) It describes his own winter walk in heavy snow and his encounter with a small bird, whose example provided him with what he called the antidote of fear.
  • 27) In this sense, it could be called the antidote to terrorism.
  • 28) Our foremost antidote is and has been – knowledge.
  • 29) But it gets worse when his antidote is to vote for the explicitly anti-trade Obama!?
  • 30) Having already reached the birthday where you wake up suddenly looking your age, I can tell you the only antidote is another glass of champagne. mimi pompom |
  • 31) It was awful not being able to help, but as you say the only antidote is love.
  • 32) Every popup ad pushing American flags or e-mail spam offering an anthrax antidote is another piece of the picture.
  • 33) The grand antidote is "the full knowledge of our Lord and Saviour," through which we know God the Father, partake of His nature, escape from the pollutions of the world, and have entrance into Christ's kingdom.
  • 34) ‘Don't use charcoal tablets that you can buy from pharmacies to treat poisoning yourself - these are for indigestion and flatulence only and the dose is too small to work as an antidote to poisoning.’
  • 35) ‘We do not know of an antidote to counteract this side effect.’
  • 36) ‘Furthermore, antidotes to poisons and intensive care may not be available.’
  • 37) ‘Rei spoke of her clan and family in the mountains, how her father and mother taught her sister and her to make poison, antidotes, and other medicines from herbs and plants that they could find around their village.’
  • 38) ‘The fruit seems always to have had a curious connection with religion and magic, and a high reputation as medicine, being regarded as an antidote to almost any poison and indeed almost a panacea.’
  • 39) ‘There is no specific antidote to the mushroom poison.’
  • 40) ‘There is currently no antidote to ricin poisoning, but people exposed to moderate doses have recovered.’
  • 41) ‘Before Lain had left the mansion completely she was able to find the antidote to her poison.’
  • 42) ‘Nitrite is also available for human use as an antidote for cyanide poisoning and is used in meat curing.’
  • 43) ‘Tea made from the bark has been used as an antiseptic, an antidote to snakebites, a laxative, and a sedative.’
  • 44) ‘Even toxicity tests were performed by King Mithridates of Persia on both humans and animals to learn more about poisons and their antidotes.’
  • 45) ‘He ran a relentless crusade against the poison antidote formulated by Mithridates, the King of Pontus, Asia Minor, in the first century BC.’
  • 46) ‘The film, and the feeling it communicates, is like an antidote to the poison of ideas based on race, or perhaps like a spirited daydream of the way it could be for all us if we were true to ourselves.’
  • 47) ‘Bezoar stones were found in the intestines of some ruminant animals, especially oriental goats, and like unicorn horn were thought to be an antidote to poison.’
  • 48) ‘He is accused of attempting to sabotage the eradication plan by giving rats an antidote to the poison used in the eradication.’
  • 49) ‘They thought it brought good luck, fertility, and protection from witchcraft, and was an antidote to poison.’
  • 50) ‘It's the antidote to the poison I put in your truffle soup.’
  • 51) ‘It was originally developed as an antidote to mustard gas in chemical warfare.’
  • 52) ‘These antidotes may have toxic side effects themselves so they need to be used appropriately.’
  • 53) ‘Flumazenil is not an antidote for narcotic overdose or for respiratory depression.’
  • 54) ‘As an antidote to this situation, I believe it is necessary to view the Zen world, its hierarchy, and authority figures through a theoretical framework separate from Zen.’
  • 55) ‘The antidote to such a situation is to seek to discover what the total Scriptural teaching on any particular subject is, and also to view it in relation to the other doctrines of Scripture.’
  • 56) ‘This introduces hope - the antidote to stress - into the situation.’
  • 57) ‘Whether used as a weekend antidote to the stresses and strains of city living or purely as an investment, owning a second home may not be as financially straightforward as it might appear.’
  • 58) ‘Board games are also seen as helpful to children's development, able to increase confidence and social skills and a great antidote to the stress of modern life.’
  • 59) ‘It was a brave decision, but it has more than paid off and is proof that teleworking from home can provide an excellent antidote to executive stress.’
  • 60) ‘The calming sound of sea waves lapping the boardwalk, they swear, is the ultimate antidote to urban stress.’
  • 61) ‘It will be a marvellous antidote to the stresses of the past week.’
  • 62) ‘Jake also reckons unicycling is the perfect antidote to exam stress.’
  • 63) ‘Chamomile was used throughout history as a stress antidote to unravel nerves and irritability.’
  • 64) ‘Political correctness may have been originally intended as a mild antidote to prejudice, a mouth-wash to rinse away some of the more dismissive expressions with which we impugn one another.’
  • 65) ‘It is neither polite nor politically correct: but it's a sure antidote to multicultural delusions.’
  • 66) ‘The only antidotes to this situation, then, are both quite difficult to master.’
  • 67) ‘Thinking about Patients is written in an engaging and conversational style and is an antidote to the increasingly leaden approach of the evidence based medicine enthusiasts.’
  • 68) ‘These experiences reinforced my conviction that humanitarian medicine was a powerful antidote to the violations I had read about in Medicine Betrayed.’
  • 69) ‘Dark and disturbing, yet rich in humour, this is the ultimate antidote to mainstream medical drama.’
  • 70) ‘The antidote to genetics as a driver of medicalisation lies in remaining sceptical and level headed.’
  • 71) ‘This book is an antidote to fatalism and provides up to date clinical, microbiological, and public health guidance on responding to possible bioterrorist attacks.’
  • 72) ‘The antidote to the malaise of modern law, it seems, is a leap of faith.’
  • 73) ‘There is such a wealth of ideas, creativity, diverse personalities, and genuine disagreement in this book that it is an antidote to going stale.’
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