wail vs whale

wail whale

Definitions

  • 1) Any similar sound as of lamentation; a howl.
  • 2) A prolonged cry, usually high-pitched, especially as of grief or anguish.
  • 3) A long, loud, high-pitched sound.
  • 4) A long, loud, high-pitched cry, as of grief or pain.
  • 5) A loud, bitter protest.
  • 6) Loud weeping; violent lamentation; wailing.
  • 7) a cry of sorrow and grief
  • 8) The act of lamenting aloud; wailing; a moan; a plaintive cry or sound.
  • 9) slang (music) To perform, express emotion in an exceptionally exciting way.
  • 10) To make a noise like mourning or crying.
  • 11) To cry out, as in sorrow or anguish.
  • 12) To weep, lament persistently or bitterly.
  • 13) Seewale.
  • 14) To make a long, loud, high-pitched cry, as in grief, sorrow, or fear. synonym: cry.
  • 15) To make a prolonged, high-pitched sound suggestive of a cry.
  • 16) To lament over; bewail.
  • 17) To express sorrow audibly; to make mournful outcry; to weep.
  • 18) obsolete To choose; to select.
  • 19) To lament; to bewail; to grieve over.

Definitions

  • 1) gambling (In a casino) a person who routinely bets at the maximum limit allowable.
  • 2) figuratively Something, or someone, that is very large.
  • 3) Any of several species of large sea mammals.
  • 4) Any of various marine mammals of the order Cetacea; a cetacean.
  • 5) Informal An impressive example.
  • 6) Any of various larger members of this order, including the blue whale, humpback whale, and right whale, in contrast to the porpoises and dolphins.
  • 7) the fishing for, or occupation of taking, whales.
  • 8) (Zoöl.) A very large harmless shark (Rhinodon typicus) native of the Indian Ocean. It sometimes becomes sixty feet long.
  • 9) (Zoöl.) Any aquatic mammal of the order Cetacea, especially any one of the large species, some of which become nearly one hundred feet long. Whales are hunted chiefly for their oil and baleen, or whalebone.
  • 10) [Obs.] ivory.
  • 11) (Zoöl.) any one of several species of degraded amphipod crustaceans belonging to the genus Cyamus, especially Cyamus ceti. They are parasitic on various cetaceans.
  • 12) the name formerly given to spermaceti.
  • 13) (Zoöl.) a balanoglossus.
  • 14) (Zoöl.), [Canada] The turnstone; -- so called because it lives on the carcasses of whales.
  • 15) (Com.) whalebone.
  • 16) a very large person; impressive in size or qualities
  • 17) any of the larger cetacean mammals having a streamlined body and breathing through a blowhole on the head
  • 18) See blackfish. 2, black-whale, and Globicephalus.
  • 19) B. mysticetus is of circumpolar distribution in the northern hemisphere. It attains a length of from 40 to 50 feet, has no dorsal fin, flippers of medium size, and very long narrow flukes, tapering to a point and somewhat falcate. The greatest girth is about the middle, whence the body tapers rapidly to the comparatively slender root of the tail. The throat is smooth; the head is of great size; and the eye is situated very low down and far back, between the base of the flipper and the corner of the mouth. The profile of the mouth is strongly arched, and its capacity is enormous, exceeding that of the thorax and abdomen together. This cavern is fringed on each side with baleen hanging from the upper jaw; the plates are 350 to 400 on each side, the longest attaining a length of 10 or 12 feet; they are black in color, and finely frayed out along the inner edge into a fringe of long elastic filaments. When the jaws are closed, the baleen serves as a sieve to strain out the multitudes of small mollusks or crustaceans upon which the whale feeds, and which are gulped in with many barrels of water in the act of grazing the surface with open mouth. About 300 of the slabs on each side are merchantable, representing 15 hundredweight of bone from a whale of average size, which yields also 15 tons of oil; but some large individuals render nearly twice as much of both these products.
  • 20) Any member of the mammalian order Cetacea or Cete (which see); an ordinary cetacean, as distinguished from a sirenian, or so-called herbivorous cetacean; a marine mammal of fish-like form and habit, with fore limbs in the form of fin-like flippers, without external trace of hind limbs, and with a naked body tapering to a tail with flukes which are like a fish's caudal fin, but are horizontal instead of vertical; especially, a cetacean of large to the largest size, the small ones being distinctively named dolphins, porpoises, etc.: in popular use applied to any large marine animal. , ,
  • 21) The southern right whale, B. australis, differs from the polar whale in its proportionately shorter and smaller head, greater convexity of the arch of the mouth, shorter baleen, and more numerous vertebræ. ft inhabits both Atlantic and Pacific Oceans in temperate latitudes, and in the former waters was the object of a fishery during the middle ages for the European supply of oil and bone. This industry gave way to the pursuit of the polar whale about the beginning of the seventeenth century. This whale has long been rare in the North Atlantic, but has occasionally stranded on the European coast, and more frequently on that of the United States. A similar if not identical right whale is hunted in temperate North Pacific waters. Right whales are rare and not pursued in tropical seas, but are objects of the chase in various parts of the south temperate ocean. See cuts above, and under Balænidæ.
  • 22) transitive To flog, to beat.
  • 23) intransitive To hunt for whales.
  • 24) hunt for whales
  • 25) Tomovewitheffort.
  • 26) To strike or hit a person or thing repeatedly and forcefully.
  • 27) To strike or hit repeatedly and forcefully; thrash.
  • 28) To swing at a ball with great effort, especially repeatedly.
  • 29) To strike or hit (a ball) with great force.
  • 30) To engage in the hunting of whales.
  • 31) To attack vehemently.

Examples

  • 1) We heard wailing and screaming until sunrise.
  • 2) She was wailing in grief then growling in rage.
  • 3) Women are heard wailing in the background.
  • 4) The whole settlement echoed to the mournful wailing until the sound died away quite suddenly.
  • 5) One day she came home from school to hear agonised wailing.
  • 6) It is my second fast day this week and you can probably hear my stomach wailing.
  • 7) Hearing her wailing down the phone made us feel guilty.
  • 8) And still we hear the wails of pain.
  • 9) They began to weep and wail with such loud grief that once again the film had to be stopped.
  • 10) The opening moments were an onslaught of wailing, rumbling sound that pinned us to our seats.
  • 11) The high-pitched wail made by the cars at speed is another bone of contention.
  • 12) The bumping was getting louder, the wailing more intense.
  • 13) You will have heard the recent wailing coming from across the Channel.
  • 14) People wailing and crying,' he said.
  • 15) But when you're wailing in pain and pleading for assistance, it really is prolonging the agony.
  • 16) He was screaming, his high-pitched wails piercing the clouds of choking plaster dust that were swirling around.
  • 17) They make loud wailing cries, especially in the early morning, they leave foul messes on the roof and their nests block gutters.
  • 18) I cry at songs,' she wails.
  • 19) As I hurried up the stairs, the wailing grew louder.
  • 20) ‘Naaz Hosseini's voice slips from a serene hum to a full-throated wail to a sweet high-pitched lilt, flavored by her roots in Armenia and Persia.’
  • 21) ‘A peacock's sharp wail pierced the music.’
  • 22) ‘This is a column about New Labour's complete failure to publicise its many progressive achievements, while screeching out its reactionary policies in a ceaseless wail.’
  • 23) ‘The sound of a baby's wail echoed down the corridor.’
  • 24) ‘She let out a high-pitched wail and fled to the back of the room.’
  • 25) ‘Last year's plaintive wails about the attacks on A Beautiful Mind are child's play in comparison.’
  • 26) ‘I'll be listening for a few wails of despair from disappointed guys.’
  • 27) ‘Mrs Greenwood recalls hearing the wails and screams of patients in the night and her first death in the wards.’
  • 28) ‘Tate's sobs and the anguished wails of relatives will not do much to change that.’
  • 29) ‘Another wail of agony came from the closed room.’
  • 30) ‘The noise downstairs escalated quickly from whispers and murmuring voices to sobs and wails.’
  • 31) ‘She let out a mighty wail from the pain, and writhed around on the ground.’
  • 32) ‘Screaming guitars and tortured wails were the tools used to pound the passion into each song and the listeners into dejected submission.’
  • 33) ‘More screams and wails of pain hung in the air, and then she heard her name.’
  • 34) ‘The captain threw back his head in a wail of anguish, jostling her body in his pain and frustration.’
  • 35) ‘The choruses consist of some Mark Solomon-like wails, followed by screaming of such ferocity that it is almost disturbing.’
  • 36) ‘You no longer fearfully leap to the scene of every scream - only those with the distinctive wail of pain.’
  • 37) ‘His substitution prompted a wail of anguish from the midfielder and tears to sting his eyes.’
  • 38) ‘The word ‘guilty’ was greeted with an anguished wail from the gallery above.’
  • 39) ‘The end of the working day in the tea garden is marked by the wail of an air-raid siren.’
  • 40) ‘She pressed her remote control gadget and the car burst into siren wails with lights flashing.’
  • 41) ‘The pow-pow-pow of gunshots was a familiar sound, as was the wail of police sirens.’
  • 42) ‘The buzzer near his head sounded off blaring wails of irritating noise.’
  • 43) ‘The bleeping from the life support monitor becomes a monotone wail as it signals the death of the patient connected to it.’
  • 44) ‘They arrived in the capital to the mournful wail of air raid sirens.’
  • 45) ‘Fans with vastly different tastes still get off on its piercing wail, distorted rumbles, or clean and warm sound.’
  • 46) ‘Trees absorb the siren wails, clanging of trash cans, and other sounds of urban life.’
  • 47) ‘The sirens were in full alert, screeching wails filling their ears.’
  • 48) ‘Living in the tobacconists on Dane Street owned by his parents, Amy and Fred, he would often be woken by the wail of the air-raid sirens.’
  • 49) ‘Telephone users in the city these days have been treated to a sound resembling a ghoulish wail, if they inadvertently misplace the receiver.’
  • 50) ‘Suddenly all the indicators began flashing an angry red and several alarm signals went off at once creating a loud cacophony of buzzes, sirens and wails.’
  • 51) ‘In fact, it's so vivid that as her words tumble out in rapid-fire succession, you can almost hear the wail of the ambulances blaring in the background.’
  • 52) ‘But, in general, the wail of jazz trumpets and the melancholy echoes of domestic chaos remind you that Elysian Fields resounds with desperation.’
  • 53) ‘No noise in the sky, but a wail of sirens constantly around the park, so steady that they sounded like air-raid alarms in the London blitz.’
  • 54) ‘The sax sounds on the edge of crazed, pealing off into wails and squeals, which are in fairly marked contrast to the beats/piano that convey something of the air of a polite jazz-funk track.’
  • 55) ‘Their meals in the darkness were often interrupted by the wail of sirens, the sounds of bombs, and the screams of frightened civilians as they rushed to the nearest bunker.’
  • 56) ‘Suddenly amid wails of screaming engines, plumes of smoke and burning rubber, riders and bikes raced down the straight and through the first corner.’
  • 57) ‘Traffic is steady and far off he hears the wail of sirens.’
  • 58) ‘Then more towers of smoke were climbing toward the sky; screams wailed across the fields.’
  • 59) ‘She wailed something in a language I couldn't recognise and struck a pose.’
  • 60) ‘I was standing in the cold, bare hallway of a hospital, listening to my child wail and scream from behind a closed door.’
  • 61) ‘Former work and pensions minister Margaret Hodge wailed it would put 6p on tax.’
  • 62) ‘Women were seen screaming and wailing at the hospital as ambulances ferried the wounded to the emergency department.’
  • 63) ‘In fact, wailing babies are taken for granted on a bus trip.’
  • 64) ‘Screaming, shrieking, wailing, she worked herself into a frenzy.’
  • 65) ‘‘Someone must take responsibility for sorting out the mess,’ he wailed last week.’
  • 66) ‘The distant screaming and wailing I can just about stand.’
  • 67) ‘Somewhere in the room, a baby was howling and wailing.’
  • 68) ‘Isis was so associated with mourning in Egypt, at funeral services women were hired to call out loud wailing lamentations as the body was escorted to the grave.’
  • 69) ‘That means no crying, wailing or temper tantrums.’
  • 70) ‘It was pandemonium, people wailing and screaming.’
  • 71) ‘‘One, two, three,’ screamed Charlotte, as she wailed away into the microphone.’
  • 72) ‘Track three features some silence, some noisy violin screeches, and what I think is a female voice wailing and breathing slowly.’
  • 73) ‘They whine and wail about how we have all retreated into our suburbs and Internet connections and no longer rally around grand national projects that inspire us with a vision of all that government can do.’
  • 74) ‘Was it you who was up in the night wailing like a banshee?’
  • 75) ‘During the speeches a young boy began wailing uncontrollably.’
  • 76) ‘"I'm sorry!" she wailed miserably.’
  • 77) ‘The BBC must have been wailing in despair when they realised the wasted potential of their "Neighbours".’
  • 78) ‘A horrible siren sound wailed across the boat and suddenly, men and weapons erupted on deck.’
  • 79) ‘He really made that guitar wail, though.’
  • 80) ‘If this had been a movie, there would have been a sax wailing in the background.’
  • 81) ‘But when the blizzards wail the Arctic fox curls its tail over its frosty nose and sleeps in the snows.’
  • 82) ‘The wind wails around the buildings and chases the occasional snowflakes falling from the low grey clouds.’
  • 83) ‘The CD began playing, guitar riffs wailed and the lead singer of Poison screamed out his lyrics.’
  • 84) ‘The ambulance wailing, the children screeching, and the stray dogs barking on Underwood Avenue on a rainy day.’
  • 85) ‘Suddenly, alarms wail and lights start flashing all around the regeneration cylinders!’
  • 86) ‘At other times the sea will seem a dark seething green, the wind wailing across the top of its stormy depths.’
  • 87) ‘Police were cordoning off the road as wailing ambulances weaved their way through the traffic.’
  • 88) ‘Convoys of emergency vehicles were still streaming into the city… sirens wailing.’
  • 89) ‘A wooden vessel maneuvered to dock at a pier on Mahakam Ulu River, the sound of its whistle wailing far and wide.’
  • 90) ‘The near dead silence was obliterated as alarms wailed across the loudspeakers.’
  • 91) ‘However, barely a day or night goes by without the sound of a burglar alarm wailing.’
  • 92) ‘Mat Maneri plays some lonesome violin, letting strings weep in blank, tragic beauty, plucking and wailing and sounding like a dying dog.’
  • 93) ‘Shocked bystanders hugged each other, some crying or holding their hands to their faces as ambulances, sirens wailing, evacuated the wounded.’
  • 94) ‘The sound of sirens wails through the apartment but the couple are now used to it.’
  • 95) ‘Sirens wailed and bells sounded in European capitals at noon as leaders and the people observed the tribute to the dead.’
  • 96) ‘He poured out his otherwise ignored feelings into music, making his flute wail with stormy rage, sigh soft dirges, or trill in happy abandon.’
  • 97) ‘When the towers collapsed, my building was shrouded in a debris cloud that shut out the light of day and muffled the sounds of firemen shouting and sirens wailing.’
  • 98) ‘He wrenches his hands in agony, and again again looks up to heaven, wailing his fate.’

Examples

  • 1) It was far too big but we had a whale of a time.
  • 2) New regulations in this country in 1990 made it almost impossible to keep captive dolphins and whales.
  • 3) They could, literally, be having a whale of a time.
  • 4) whale meat said to be from Japan's scientific hunt was being offered for sale around the world.
  • 5) Fascinating footage shows pygmy blue whales and turtles that lay their eggs on local beaches.
  • 6) Only humans and whales live on long after they are able to reproduce.
  • 7) Who do you think eats whale meat?
  • 8) Being out at sea and seeing whales and dolphins in their natural habitat was amazing.
  • 9) The days spent scouring the seas for whales to save are long and dreary.
  • 10) We had a whale of a time.
  • 11) Pilot whales are social creatures and tend to remain with sick members.
  • 12) whale meat does not figure in any calculation of how the world is going to feed itself.
  • 13) The youngster had a whale of a time.
  • 14) But the most exciting sighting was a pod of pilot whales.
  • 15) But it was more than worth it when we caught up with a blue whale mum and youngster.
  • 16) Some countries are destroying stocks of mighty whales, of dolphins and other sea mammals.
  • 17) In its fish tank it has sharks, dolphins and whales.
  • 18) Polar bears and arctic warblers and whales live on the margin: they survive by energy efficiency.
  • 19) When we can see the whale, we certainly care.
  • 20) By and large, the whales are pretty good at running things.
  • 21) There's also wildlife fun with sea turtle and whale watching trips available.
  • 22) Like the blue whale, many aquatic organisms filter plankton.
  • 23) Before the discovery of petrol, it was the oil taken from the heads of whales that kept the lamps of the world burning.
  • 24) A whale is not a fish - a whale is a mammal.
  • 25) But the historical reality that dinosaurs led to birds and mammals produced whales, that's not theory.
  • 26) We can refer meaningfully to whales, to the creatures picked out by the term whale (the name for the kind), without knowing the essential features of whales, features likely to involve subtle biological details.
  • 27) Actually touching a whale is the big aim for all the tourists and they seem to spend many hours trying to do just that.
  • 28) HALL: We had flown into an L.Z. just south of what you call the whale and we had moved into an area after we got off the helicopter, we started receiving fire.
  • 29) She was what they call a whale-boat, fitted for the whale-fishery, pointed at both ends, and steered by an oar; she was not very large, but held seven people comfortably, and she was remarkably well fitted with sails and masts, having two lugs and a mizen.
  • 30) She was what they call a whale-boat, fitted for the whale fishery, pointed at both ends, and steered by an oar; she was not very large, but held seven people comfortably, and she was remarkably well fitted with sails and masts, having two lugs and a mizen.
  • 31) But when you are determined to gain the confidence, you still need to know in detail how large companies buy and how you should prepare for what we call a whale hunt.
  • 32) I think Abrams’ use of the term whale isn’t literal.
  • 33) He concludes by predicting that “the whale is not coming back for a long time, if ever.”
  • 34) The sperm whale is 1 of 6 Gulf whales listed as endangered.
  • 35) ‘Marine mammals include narwhals, beluga whales, walrus, and ringed and bearded seals.’
  • 36) ‘Come face to face with polar bears, walruses, harbour seals and beluga whales.’
  • 37) ‘Sea lions, harbor seals, sea otters, porpoise and whales are common around the islands.’
  • 38) ‘We saw minke whales, hump backed whales, bald eagles, puffins and moose.’
  • 39) ‘Fur seals, elephant seals, and the great whales were all hunted to the brink of extinction.’
  • 40) ‘Up until quite recently we had no idea of the numbers and variety of the whales, dolphins and porpoises round our coast.’
  • 41) ‘Orkney folk are being urged to keep a look out for whales, dolphins and porpoises this weekend.’
  • 42) ‘We were told that whale sharks, whales and dolphins are abundant during the summer, between November and April.’
  • 43) ‘By the Miocene, whales of both lineages are relatively common fossils in many marine deposits.’
  • 44) ‘Acoustical energy generated by the bodies of whales or large schools of fish can be lower still.’
  • 45) ‘Dugongs are one of those sea creatures like porpoises and whales which should be completely protected by law.’
  • 46) ‘These whales have been hunted to near extinction, and only about 2,500 exist today.’
  • 47) ‘However, paleontology as a whole encompasses all life, from bacteria to whales.’
  • 48) ‘How many harbours play host to everything from seahorses and frogfish to whales and dolphins?’
  • 49) ‘It is our hope and prayer that the humpback and other whales will be protected in the West Indies and other parts of the world.’
  • 50) ‘They follow the breaking edge of the summer ice to hunt for seals, and are even known to attack beluga whales in the water.’
  • 51) ‘Laboratory examinations of the heads of the whales showed trauma induced by sound.’
  • 52) ‘Scientists believe that now fewer than a hundred of the whales ply the waters near Alaska.’
  • 53) ‘As many as four generations of whales live together in some of these matrilineal groups.’
  • 54) ‘With that being said, I whaled the hilt off of her skull, and she fell practically lifeless.’
  • 55) ‘He really whaled her, screaming and yelling and carrying on like a demented guy.’
  • 56) ‘I wondered why I should get whaled so, while Nerida, who was older, got off with a You-mustn't-do-that, darling.’
  • 57) ‘They whaled on Chapman before he could rise from his top bunk, shared with some 60 others in close barracks.’
0

Use Linguix everywhere you write

Be productive and efficient, no matter where and what you write!

Linguix Apps

Get audience-specific corrections, access statistics, and view readability scores.

Browser Extensions

Get your writing checked on millions of websites, including Gmail, Facebook, and Google Docs.

Linguix Keyboard

Make your content read and look better on mobile.

MS Office add-ins

Download Linguix for Microsoft Word and Microsoft Outlook to check grammar, punctuation, and style instantly right in your documents.

This website uses cookies to make Linguix work for you. By using this site, you agree to our cookie policy