transcription vs translation

transcription translation

Definitions

  • 1) Something that has been transcribed, including:
  • 2) genetics The synthesis of RNA under the direction of DNA.
  • 3) The act or process of transcribing.
  • 4) Genetics The synthesis of messenger RNA from a DNA template through the formation of base pairs, resulting in a transfer of genetic information that codes for amino acid sequences composing proteins.
  • 5) Music An adaptation of a composition.
  • 6) Linguistics A representation of speech sounds in phonetic symbols.
  • 7) A recorded radio or television program.
  • 8) Something that has been transcribed, especially.
  • 9) The act or process of transcribing, or copying.
  • 10) (Mus.) An arrangement of a composition for some other instrument or voice than that for which it was originally written, as the translating of a song, a vocal or instrumental quartet, or even an orchestral work, into a piece for the piano; an adaptation; an arrangement; -- a name applied by modern composers for the piano to a more or less fanciful and ornate reproduction on their own instrument of a song or other piece not originally intended for it.
  • 11) A copy; a transcript.
  • 12) the act of making a record (especially an audio record)
  • 13) (genetics) the organic process whereby the DNA sequence in a gene is copied into mRNA; the process whereby a base sequence of messenger RNA is synthesized on a template of complementary DNA
  • 14) something written, especially copied from one medium to another, as a typewritten version of dictation
  • 15) the act of arranging and adapting a piece of music
  • 16) a sound or television recording (e.g., from a broadcast to a tape recording)
  • 17) The act of transcribing or copying: as, errors of transcription.
  • 18) In music, the arrangement (usually with more or less modification or variation) of a composition for some instrument or voice other than that for which it was originally composed. Also called scoring.

Definitions

  • 1) physics Translation of forces in a gearbox.
  • 2) countable The end result of translating text.
  • 3) uncountable The act of converting or translating (text from one language to another).
  • 4) countable, mathematics, physics Motion of a body on a linear path, without deformation or rotation, i.e. such that every part of the body moves at the same speed and in the same direction; also (in physics), the linear motion of a body considered independently of its rotation.
  • 5) genetics A process occurring in the ribosome, in which a strand of messenger RNA (mRNA) guides assembly of a sequence of amino acids to make a protein.
  • 6) The act or process of translating, especially from one language into another.
  • 7) The state of being translated.
  • 8) A translated version of a text.
  • 9) Biology The process by which messenger RNA directs the amino acid sequence of a growing polypeptide during protein synthesis.
  • 10) Physics Motion of a body in which every point of the body moves parallel to and the same distance as every other point of the body.
  • 11) That which is obtained by translating something a version.
  • 12) The act of rendering into another language; interpretation.
  • 13) (Kinematics) Motion in which all the points of the moving body have at any instant the same velocity and direction of motion; -- opposed to rotation.
  • 14) (Metaph.) Transfer of meaning by association; association of ideas.
  • 15) The act of translating, removing, or transferring; removal; also, the state of being translated or removed.
  • 16) (Rhet.), obsolete A transfer of meaning in a word or phrase, a metaphor; a tralation.
  • 17) (genetics) the process whereby genetic information coded in messenger RNA directs the formation of a specific protein at a ribosome in the cytoplasm
  • 18) the act of changing in form or shape or appearance
  • 19) a uniform movement without rotation
  • 20) (mathematics) a transformation in which the origin of the coordinate system is moved to another position but the direction of each axis remains the same
  • 21) the act of uniform movement
  • 22) rewording something in less technical terminology
  • 23) Synonyms Translation, Version, rendering. Translation and version are often the same in meaning. Translation is rather the standard word. Version is more likely to be employed in proportion to the antiquity of the work: as, the Syriac version; Dryden's version of the Nun's Priest's Tale; it is also more commonly used of the Bible than of other books: as, a comparison of the authorized with the revised version. Where translations differ, they are often spoken of as versions, as Lord Derby's and Mr. Bryant's translations or versions of Homer. Version applies more to the meaning, translation more to the style. Each has meanings not shared by the other.
  • 24) In medicine, a change in the seat of a disease; metastasis.
  • 25) In rhetoric, transference of the meaning of a word or phrase; metaphor.
  • 26) The removal of a person from one office to another, or from one sphere of duty to another; specifically, the removal of a bishop from one see to another; in Scotland, the removal of a clergyman from one pastoral charge to another.
  • 27) The act of translating.
  • 28) The process of manufacturing from old material.
  • 29) The act of turning into another language; interpretation.
  • 30) That which is produced by turning into another language; a version; the reproduction of a literary composition in a language foreign to that of the original.
  • 31) In telegraphy, the automatic retransmission of a message received on one line over another, or over a continuation of the same line.
  • 32) The removal of a person to heaven without death.
  • 33) In meck., motion in which there is no rotation; rotation round an infinitely distant axis.

Examples

  • 1) The transcription of her recordings was such a note.
  • 2) There is a voicemail transcription service so you can see what people want you for when in a meeting.
  • 3) The audience becomes gradually and wonderfully aware that the musical process is an almost direct transcription of the physical one.
  • 4) The transcription service would be handy for the voicemail's sender and its receiver.
  • 5) It checks bank account numbers before accepting them and will detect many common transcription errors, including incorrectly entered and transposed characters.
  • 6) Second, apologies to Experian for a transcription error that put it down the table.
  • 7) Through processes called transcription and translation, ingenious devices take the DNA blueprint and manufacture the protein.
  • 8) ‘Quotes in this article were derived from tape transcriptions or written notes compiled during interviews.’
  • 9) ‘Instead of transcriptions of what he wrote, the book is scanned pages of his journals.’
  • 10) ‘Adams changes that to a simple ‘has’ and passes off his version as a word-perfect transcription.’
  • 11) ‘The transcriptions that follow are written out as a drama script.’
  • 12) ‘The whole is well written, with liberal transcriptions of much of the source material.’
  • 13) ‘The process involved transcribing, analyzing data, and member checking for both the transcription and written analyses after each pair of interviews.’
  • 14) ‘This makes it easier to write out an accurate transcription.’
  • 15) ‘It was almost as if she had dictated it verbally and then had the transcription written up.’
  • 16) ‘The denial above is only true if we make a distinction between facsimiles of the documents and text transcriptions of the phony documents.’
  • 17) ‘Those reports were based on the notorious forged documents, in some cases they were text transcriptions of the documents.’
  • 18) ‘Trial records are literal transcriptions, but people can only speak through the stories they understand.’
  • 19) ‘All qualitative approaches were recorded through the transcription of notes and, if possible quotations, immediately after the interview.’
  • 20) ‘Perhaps if one had a complete transcription of the subtitles and a week to study, he might glean a thread of understanding.’
  • 21) ‘Interviews were tape recorded, and completed transcriptions were used as the basis for data analysis.’
  • 22) ‘Qualitative data collection can take many forms, including interviews, participant observation, questionnaires, and video recordings and transcriptions of everyday language.’
  • 23) ‘The book includes a short introduction to the Soviet-Finnish War, the after-action meeting transcriptions, a list of the participants with short biographies, and a few relevant maps.’
  • 24) ‘The interviews lasted approximately 60-90 minutes, were tape recorded and fully transcribed and the transcriptions were content-analysed.’
  • 25) ‘When we compared these lists to meeting agenda, field workers' notes, and meeting transcriptions for the sample period, coverage was deemed adequate.’
  • 26) ‘In order to substantiate and expand the known information, she checked published transcriptions while combing through archives for new documents.’
  • 27) ‘The electronic medium enables them to include a large array of images, including facsimiles of original documents with transcriptions.’
  • 28) ‘The academic claims to have found 24 transcription errors in one poem and an average of 12 mistakes per page, which he says distort the meaning.’
  • 29) ‘Hand written prescription sheets can contribute to drug errors in that they may be illegible, incomplete, or subject to transcription errors when rewritten.’
  • 30) ‘SMS text messages are written, unambiguous records of important data and are free of the kind of transcription errors that can occur while dictating results or other information over the telephone.’
  • 31) ‘Customer service and sales professionals no longer have to spend time on the phone trying to repair transcription errors and match reconciliation reports.’
  • 32) ‘The official returns differ from the Register in several places because of typographical or transcription errors in the Register.’
  • 33) ‘These were provided by the trial's first author on handwritten sheets, which we entered on to computer, making appropriate checks to avoid transcription errors.’
  • 34) ‘The authors independently abstracted data in duplicate and cross checked for transcription errors and discrepancies.’
  • 35) ‘There were several minor transcription errors, but clinical details were correctly recorded in every case.’
  • 36) ‘The date of 1492 in the reconstructed inscription might result from an error in transcription.’
  • 37) ‘My hat is off to those who persevere through the tedious transcription process necessary to publish such works for us.’
  • 38) ‘The data were constantly reviewed beginning with the interview and transcription process.’
  • 39) ‘By employing transcription software, we could do the job in one-and-a-half years with a team of 40 doctors and a handful of patent examiners and technical experts.’
  • 40) ‘Specialised software has been developed to allow computer-aided transcription technology to be used in the broadcasting industry.’
  • 41) ‘Have some interview transcription left to do, but no deadline and no huge sense of urgency; and nothing to do at all Web-wise until the last bits of material come my way.’
  • 42) ‘Will the institution be able to loan you hardware such as tape recorders and transcription machines if you need to record and transcribe your interviews?’
  • 43) ‘However, errors in transcription may be more common than the above reasoning might lead us to suppose.’
  • 44) ‘One common cause of post-analytic error for this and all other surveys is incorrect transcription of the data onto the submission forms.’
  • 45) ‘This aspect minimizes the number of errors that may occur in transcription.’
  • 46) ‘But her style is often clumsy, particularly when she discusses generalities, and I was worried by apparently unjustified discrepancies in transcription of schwa.’
  • 47) ‘The Japanese word zen is the phonetic transcription of the Chinese character chan, which means meditation.’
  • 48) ‘In some cases this machine has been known as TMB, incorrectly due to a transcription of the Cyrillic character into Latin script.’
  • 49) ‘The pieces in Musicks Hand-maide are transcriptions of such music, played here on the virginals.’
  • 50) ‘Yet several works were commissioned for smart urban dance, music-theatre and performance-art events; five of the 22 tracks are clever transcriptions of Shostakovich piano pieces.’
  • 51) ‘The pieces were a Schubert-Liszt transcription and a study by Scriabin.’
  • 52) ‘The transcription of music for the piano developed in two directions.’
  • 53) ‘It specialises in Italian instrumental music from the nineteenth century, mostly previously unpublished, plus transcriptions and arrangements for unusual ensembles.’
  • 54) ‘Due to the lack of large orchestras, people flocked to town halls in order to hear the virtuosi of the day play their own transcriptions of music that was popular at the time.’
  • 55) ‘This is far enough removed from Bach to mean that we can't know whether it is a faithful copy of a work for solo organ, or of a transcription of a string piece, or indeed, by Bach at all.’
  • 56) ‘Taped pipe organ music played a Josquin transcription softly as the group seated themselves.’
  • 57) ‘In an age before recorded music, transcriptions enabled music lovers to more easily access orchestral and operatic repertoire and virtuosos to display their wit and ferocious keyboard talent.’
  • 58) ‘These virtuoso transcriptions of Gershwin songs should hold no terrors for lovers of romantic repertoire, though the writing is full of subtle underminings.’
  • 59) ‘The Scriabin piano pieces go well in these viola transcriptions.’
  • 60) ‘Liszt's transcriptions of other composers' music are as highly regarded as his original piano works.’
  • 61) ‘The same goes for the Tannhäuser pieces, though Liszt's transcriptions work better here.’
  • 62) ‘The first piece we played was a transcription of Beethoven's Egmont Overture.’
  • 63) ‘At this point a comparison between the original facsimile score and any of the modern transcriptions would shed light on issues of editing early music.’
  • 64) ‘Of course, some will assert that the inclusion of these transcriptions in this cycle is completely unnecessary, since the music is more Beethoven's than Liszt's.’
  • 65) ‘As a trumpeter, I have played a number of trumpet tunes and voluntaries that were transcriptions of original baroque organ works.’
  • 66) ‘Intronic SSRs can affect gene transcription, mRNA splicing, or export to cytoplasm.’
  • 67) ‘The gene could be mutated during transcription into the genetic code, and could perhaps make any genetic problem even worse.’
  • 68) ‘This mutation does not prevent transcription of the gene since we were able to obtain full-length mutant cDNA.’
  • 69) ‘A protein binding to the promoter region could cause steric occlusion and prevent RNA polymerase from initiating transcription.’
  • 70) ‘Subsequently, recombination was also shown to be stimulated by RNA polymerase II-driven transcription.’

Examples

  • 1) They can then talk back to the phone - and you will hear the English translation.
  • 2) The company already provides a text translation system via its website.
  • 3) It reads as if it is a literal translation from a foreign language.
  • 4) It also allows language learners to copy blocks of text for translation into the app with instant results.
  • 5) To say that there are distinct conceptual schemes is to say that there are languages without translation between them.
  • 6) This was one of our biggest software companies, specialising in language translation and content management.
  • 7) International visitors will also have access to language translation units that can be carried around like an iPod.
  • 8) Transfer talk has a unique language, so here is a translation of stock phrases said during the window.
  • 9) Will Bible translation work be interrupted?
  • 10) The translation system, which usually works perfectly, collapsed early on.
  • 11) Introduced in 1973, the new translation drew mixed verdicts.
  • 12) Many use American translations of the Bible.
  • 13) There are also handy translations for phrases such as'Can I have a beer please?
  • 14) ‘The English text - in translation from the Japanese - was carefully edited by Victor Hauge, a staff member of the United States Embassy in Tokyo.’
  • 15) ‘Three Arabic texts are presented in translation.’
  • 16) ‘But experts reading those words, whether in translation or in the original Arabic, describe the language as divisive and militant.’
  • 17) ‘The women who have spoken are illiterate but their words, even in translation, emerge like fresh sprouts from a rich soil.’
  • 18) ‘Her beautiful descriptive poetic language, even in translation, goes some way to helping this happen.’
  • 19) ‘Arabic is said to be a powerfully lyric language, so perhaps the above snatches lose something in translation.’
  • 20) ‘The French, as always, must have a word for it, yet surely something is lost in translation?’
  • 21) ‘More radical, and more decisive, developments in translation theory took place in Europe.’
  • 22) ‘Proceedings were mostly conducted in English, but there was simultaneous translation into six official languages.’
  • 23) ‘Most sessions were translated into English and Hindi, and some offered simultaneous translation into other languages.’
  • 24) ‘For those who do not speak English, there are 60 booths for simultaneous language translation.’
  • 25) ‘That for as much as I love publishing, I no longer have too many earnest conversations about literature or translation, I quit smoking and I wear far more pink than black.’
  • 26) ‘Helen's mastery of translation flowed from several converging sources that made her unique.’
  • 27) ‘Hence the purpose of translation was for performance, though the published version gives no hint about that.’
  • 28) ‘In the colonial context, translation acted as a mediating agency between conquest and conversion.’
  • 29) ‘His wife spoke no English, and, despite translation, I was aware that none of our conversations was entirely successful.’
  • 30) ‘They were simple conversations, ultimately hamstrung by translation.’
  • 31) ‘Many of the problems of getting an accurate model to render properly can be traced to what happens during translation to those formats.’
  • 32) ‘Still, he reckons it's taught him a lot about translation, and how it is more often the simplicity than the complexity of language that is lost.’
  • 33) ‘After months of applying for research or translation work, Maryan took a job in a new dry cleaning shop.’
  • 34) ‘Here he describes some of the fables and some of the reality, based on research and translation work that he has done in his sixteen years in Japan.’
  • 35) ‘In light of the findings of this analysis, as well as the previously mentioned translation research, a number of implications need to be addressed.’
  • 36) ‘As translations of literary texts into other languages go, it is not unexpected that poetry prevails.’
  • 37) ‘He also revived or bought several publishers for different editions and translations of the book.’
  • 38) ‘It has been translated into 15 different languages, with further translations planned.’
  • 39) ‘He added that booklets with the English translations will be available on the night.’
  • 40) ‘The literal English translation is simply ungrammatical, and most readers would find it incoherent.’
  • 41) ‘The book includes literal English translations of idioms, but behind them are idiomatic meanings.’
  • 42) ‘His voice was inaudible, but an announcer read an Arabic translation of his words.’
  • 43) ‘If you know French, you can read French translations of his collected works, which are great fun.’
  • 44) ‘Before he went there al-Biruni already knew of Indian astronomy and mathematics from Arabic translations of some Sanskrit texts.’
  • 45) ‘After a short while, the computer finally gave him a rough translation of the text.’
  • 46) ‘We published a collection of English and French translations of 50 poems written by Afghan women.’
  • 47) ‘Even though some institutions provide for language study, all have to provide translations of foreign texts.’
  • 48) ‘Should we provide translations of our campaign literature?’
  • 49) ‘In 1816 the Analytical Society produced a translation of a book of Lacroix in the differential and integral calculus.’
  • 50) ‘Some editions include a translation of the Gospel of Thomas as an appendix.’
  • 51) ‘My basic attitude is respect for anyone who's published a translation of Homer.’
  • 52) ‘New editions of the texts in the original languages and new translations have been published.’
  • 53) ‘A Slovak translation appeared in what was Czechoslovakia in 1959.’
  • 54) ‘Over the centuries numerous translations have appeared in many languages.’
  • 55) ‘He has published more than 25 translations of poetry from eight languages.’
  • 56) ‘This kind of thinking also brings out the way in which the balance of a novel can be shifted by the very nature of translation between mediums governed by differing generic conventions.’
  • 57) ‘We need to promote our accomplishments, identify gaps in our translation of research to educational practice and develop strategies for change where necessary.’
  • 58) ‘Some differences between the paintings and the sculptures are necessary consequences of the translation from one medium to another.’
  • 59) ‘We also contend that policies and procedures implemented in basic research facilitate their successful translation into preventive intervention programs.’
  • 60) ‘It's up to them, but there are several other classic modules that would lend themselves to translation to a computer version.’
  • 61) ‘However, translation of genomic research discoveries to improved clinical outcomes can occur only with an informed professional workforce.’
  • 62) ‘One obvious solution to this incompatible babble of bits would be special translation programs for converting from one format to another.’
  • 63) ‘The translation of such a miserable message into the medium of film has only been accomplished three times.’
  • 64) ‘This program will enhance interactions between scientists and clinicians in order to accelerate the translation of research findings into medical applications.’
  • 65) ‘Clinical trials on patients are vital to the translation of new research into clinical practice, but they are in decline.’
  • 66) ‘One area of scientific responsibility that psychologists need to take more seriously is the translation of their research results.’
  • 67) ‘The novel aspect of the research is the translation of an algorithm - the basic method underlying a computer program - into the process of crystal growth.’
  • 68) ‘The lack of capacity for research will stop the translation of discoveries in basic science into clinical practice.’
  • 69) ‘Although pomp loses something in the translation to the small screen - on my vintage set, anyway.’
  • 70) ‘A gene, by the way, is a portion of DNA responsible for encoding messenger RNA for translation into protein.’
  • 71) ‘The mRNA containing the amber codon then leaves the nucleus and travels to the ribosome where it serves as a template for translation of a specific protein.’
  • 72) ‘The nucleotide sequence and the polypeptide translation of the insert is shown in Fig.1.’
  • 73) ‘All these proteins are synthesized by translation of preformed maternal mRNA.’
  • 74) ‘Protein synthesis inhibitors can rapidly block translation elongation and cause release of truncated polypeptide chains.’
  • 75) ‘Bishops might preach at church consecrations or at the translation of relics, or go on occasional preaching tours, particularly to promote crusading fervour.’
  • 76) ‘These alternative S4 movements, translation and rotation, are not mutually exclusive.’
  • 77) ‘The common motions are rotation and translation across the discontinuities.’
  • 78) ‘There seems to be a movement to direct translation.’
  • 79) ‘A maneuvering body undergoes translation or rotation as opposed to a stable body in which the sum of all forces and all turning moments are zero.’
  • 80) ‘Cartesian coordinate fluctuations for all heavy atoms were calculated after subtraction of overall translation and rotation.’
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