tied vs tide

tied tide

Definitions

  • 1) sports That resulted in a tie.
  • 2) Connected.
  • 3) fastened with strings or cords
  • 4) bound together by or as if by a strong rope; especially as by a bond of affection
  • 5) of the score in a contest
  • 6) closed with a lace
  • 7) Simple past tense and past participle of tie.

Definitions

  • 1) A large amount or number moving or occurring in a mass.
  • 2) A favorable occasion; an opportunity.
  • 3) Tidal force.
  • 4) A specific occurrence of such a variation.
  • 5) The periodic variation in the surface level of the oceans and of bays, gulfs, inlets, and estuaries, caused by gravitational attraction of the moon and sun.
  • 6) A surge of emotion: synonym: flow.
  • 7) Flood tide.
  • 8) Something that increases, decreases, or fluctuates like the waters of the tide.
  • 9) A time or season. Often used in combination.
  • 10) The alternate rising and falling of the waters of the ocean, and of bays, rivers, etc., connected therewith. The tide ebbs and flows twice in each lunar day, or the space of a little more than twenty-four hours. It is occasioned by the attraction of the sun and moon (the influence of the latter being three times that of the former), acting unequally on the waters in different parts of the earth, thus disturbing their equilibrium. A high tide upon one side of the earth is accompanied by a high tide upon the opposite side. Hence, when the sun and moon are in conjunction or opposition, as at new moon and full moon, their action is such as to produce a greater than the usual tide, called the spring tide, as represented in the cut. When the moon is in the first or third quarter, the sun's attraction in part counteracts the effect of the moon's attraction, thus producing under the moon a smaller tide than usual, called the neap tide.
  • 11) a dial to exhibit the state of the tides at any time.
  • 12) (Naut.) A place where the tide runs with great velocity, as through a gate.
  • 13) Tendency or direction of causes, influences, or events; course; current.
  • 14) a gauge for showing the height of the tide; especially, a contrivance for registering the state of the tide continuously at every instant of time.
  • 15) See under Inferior, a.
  • 16) a lock situated between an inclosed basin, or a canal, and the tide water of a harbor or river, when they are on different levels, so that craft can pass either way at all times of the tide; -- called also guard lock.
  • 17) obsolete Violent confluence.
  • 18) tidal movements of the atmosphere similar to those of the ocean, and produced in the same manner by the attractive forces of the sun and moon.
  • 19) (Mining) The period of twelve hours.
  • 20) obsolescent Time; period; season.
  • 21) A stream; current; flood.
  • 22) the interval between the occurrences of two consecutive maxima of the resultant wave at the same place. Its length varies as the components of sun and moon waves approach to, or recede from, one another. A retardation from this cause is called the lagging of the tide, while the acceleration of the recurrence of high water is termed the priming of the tide. See Lag of the tide, under 2d Lag.
  • 23) (a) A mill for clearing lands from tide water.
  • 24) Time; season.
  • 25) Fit time or season; opportunity.
  • 26) Mass; office; service.
  • 27) The periodical rise and fall of the waters of the ocean and its arms, due to the attraction of the moon and sun.
  • 28) and the same where the moon is in the nadir is
  • 29) A definite period of time; specifically, a day or an hour; in mining, the period of twelve hours.
  • 30) In forestry, a freshet. In the Appalachian region logs are rolled into a stream and a ‘tide’ is awaited to carry them to the boom.
  • 31) Ebb and flow; rise and fall; flux and reflux.
  • 32) Flow; current; stream; flood; torrent.
  • 33) But where the particle as seen from the center of the earth is 90° from the moon, the attraction is a little less than the attraction at the center, being m/(r+ a) in place of m/r, and is also not parallel to the latter; so that it is accelerated downward toward the earth by an amount equal to Compounding these accelerations with the accelerations of the weights of the particles, we see that the resultant for any particle points less toward the moon than the line from the particle to the earth's center. But the surface of the water must be perpendicular to the resultant attraction; hence that surface must bulge out in a prolate form on the line through the centers of the moon and earth. The extreme difference in depth of the water would be about 20 inches, or, substituting the sun for the moon, it would be about 9 inches. If after the prolate form had been produced the disturbing body were to be suddenly annihilated, the ocean, supposing it covered the whole earth, would be thrown into a state of oscillation between a prolate and an oblate form. The time of the oscillations would depend on the depth of the water, and they would gradually die out from viscosity and other resistances. If the moon were to move round the water-covered earth on the equator, similar free oscillations would be set up and would gradually die out, but at the same time other motions would be forced and would not die out. Supposing first, for the sake of simplicity, that the effects of viscosity were very great, the water would be permanently raised all round the equator so as to increase the ellipticity of the surface of the sea, and such an effect, on a minute scale, is in fact produced. But, besides that, the equatorial section of the form of the water would be elliptical, the water continuing to pile up as long as it was at all drawn toward the moon; so that high tide would not be reached until 4 hours 45 minutes after the moon had crossed the meridian. If the resistance is not so great the time of high tide will be earlier or later, according as the natural oscillations are quicker or slower than the forced motion. The resistance will also produce small component oscillations of periods one half and one third of those of the principal oscillations. Every inequality in the motion of the sun and moon produces its own distinct component tide; but the magnitudes of the tides are very different from the magnitudes of the inequalities. The forms of the continents and of the sea-bottom affect the range of the tides in two ways. In the first, place, they form basins in which the waters are susceptible of free stationary oscillations of various periods. Now, it is a known theorem of dynamics that forced vibrations attain large amplitudes when their periods are nearly the same as those of free vibrations, but are very small when their periods are nearly double those of free vibrations. In the second place, the continents in many cases force the ocean into canals, in which the tides take the form of progressive waves of translation, which will be greatly increased by a narrowing and still more by a shoaling of the channel in the direction of their progression. In this case there are distinct cotidal lines. In the North Atlantic the semidiurnal tide is large, but much larger in the eastern and northern parts than on the southern and western sides. The diurnal tides, on the other hand, are remarkably small. High tide occurs in the northern parts three or four hours earlier than in the southern; and between them, about Nantucket, there is little tide, and in many places four tides a day. In the Gulf of Mexico the semidiurnal tides are very small, and the diurnal tides are alone sensible. In a few places, as Tahiti, in the Pacific, and Courtown, in county Wexford, Ireland, the lunar tides almost disappear, so that high tide never occurs many hours from noon or midnight, and near such places there are others where the tides almost altogether vanish.
  • 34) Eccles., a season of the church year; in a narrower sense, a feast-day; a festival: as, Whitsuntide (the whole octave or the day only); Hallowtide.
  • 35) Tohappen;betide.
  • 36) To carry along with the tide.
  • 37) Nautical To drift or ride with the tide.
  • 38) To betide; befall.
  • 39) To rise and fall like the tide.
  • 40) To cause to float with the tide; to drive or carry with the tide or stream.

Examples

  • 1) Perhaps he was a callow fool she didn't want to be tied to for the rest of her life.
  • 2) Her clothes were underneath her, they'd been cut away once she was tied down.
  • 3) He's tied up like a Christmas parcel, he's got his own underpants stuffed in his mouth for a gag.
  • 4) Out of the corner of his eye Wexford read the label tied to the older man's handcase.
  • 5) Some stretchers were being carried to the lift which goes down to the deck of the hospital-ship, on which an officer was ticking off each wounded body after a glance at the label tied to the man's tunic.
  • 6) I dont want an email tied to it, or my name tied to it, but since I go to this school, I have no choice
  • 7) In other words, there would be a label tied to the tree or the hill, as to the hat of the Mad Hatter, with “This Style, 10/6.”
  • 8) In other words, there would be a label tied to the tree or the hill, as to the hat of the Mad Hatter, with "This Style, 10/6."
  • 9) Cowell said the winner would receive a record deal with Syco, a joint venture between Sony Music and Cowell, and the same label tied to Scottish singer Susan Boyle.
  • 10) Fluttering and screaming, the bird made every effort to escape, but not before Dee was aware of a label tied round his neck.
  • 11) Business models that grew up on the basis that words would forever remain tied to nonreplicable physical objects, so that being a writer would be analogous to selling soap or chairs, don't work very well once you can easily copy bits.
  • 12) ‘Abraham and I both stood up as if tied to the same cord.’
  • 13) ‘It was pearly white and sleeveless, and the only thing that held it up was the tied string around my neck.’
  • 14) ‘He first sees her using a butterfly knife to cut the strings of a tied bird, next to a fairy-tale lake in the forest.’
  • 15) ‘I just went to talk to my downstairs neighbour about a tree that fell down in our garden, and she gave me a sprig of rosemary, and a tied bunch of lavender.’
  • 16) ‘Ask for black pepper and it'll come, as was their habit, in a tied leather pouch.’
  • 17) ‘While it appears that the flowers are standing upright without support, the water and tied stems provide just enough oomph to hold the flowers up.’
  • 18) ‘The woman was white, aged 18 to 20, 5ft 10 in with tied back black hair and dark clothing.’
  • 19) ‘What, you weren't expecting a 6-3 point guard to post up late in a tied playoff game?’
  • 20) ‘I don't think we should stick a mike in the huddle during the last minute of a tied basketball game.’
  • 21) ‘So why can't UEFA have the courage of their convictions and decide tied games on the number of cards and fouls awarded?’
  • 22) ‘The team was banking on the odds of playing an outstanding final 20 minutes in a tied game.’
  • 23) ‘Esholt were without game on Saturday but had a tied game with Hartshead Moor on Sunday.’
  • 24) ‘Her dad looks up from his bag of chips on the couch for a moment, then averts his eyes immediately back to the television where a basketball game rages at a tied score.’
  • 25) ‘But he bounced back against the Northerns Titans with 3/40 in a tied game.’
  • 26) ‘With about four minutes remaining in a tied game, he scooped up the puck and began an end-to-end dash for the ages.’
  • 27) ‘This tied match proved pivotal in the overall result.’
  • 28) ‘In the case of a tied score, the scores are reset to zero and an overtime set is played.’
  • 29) ‘This was their brilliant solution to the tied All-Star game.’
  • 30) ‘After a tied vote the spotlight turned to Mr Heseltine in the chair, who cast his vote in favour of allowing deeper quarrying.’
  • 31) ‘It was decided that a correlation would not be informative for this analysis due to the large number of tied scores.’
  • 32) ‘The matter was then referred to full council as a result of a tied vote, and they have since climbed down.’
  • 33) ‘The tied Test match at Brisbane in 1960 was an incredibly satisfying game of cricket.’
  • 34) ‘The commissioners had a tied vote again in July, but left the case active.’
  • 35) ‘In the event of a tied election the President is chosen by a vote in the House of Representatives.’
  • 36) ‘After the first round of voting for the speaker resulted in a tied vote, the house descended into uproar.’
  • 37) ‘It doesn't matter how rubbish you might think they are; all five songs must be ranked, with no tied positions and no omissions.’
  • 38) ‘As veterans from 2003 will know, a tied first position will result in a bonus tie-break round.’
  • 39) ‘A champion of the rural poor, she used her position in Parliament to fight for an end to the power of farmers and rural landholders to evict farm labourers under tied cottage legislation.’
  • 40) ‘And bed and board are beneath the dignity of a tied house.’
  • 41) ‘What do the New Labour spin doctors know about the lives of caretakers who live in tied houses?’
  • 42) ‘The work is hard and physical, but at least they have a tied house and the use of a car.’
  • 43) ‘Now Nudds has been sacked and they will be kicked out of their home, a tied cottage on the Birkbeck estate.’
  • 44) ‘She said if the Watson Bill was passed she stood to lose her job and tied house at a livery yard at Craigie, near Kilmarnock.’
  • 45) ‘This gave the hard working couple the opportunity to rent one of the tied cottages.’
  • 46) ‘Father of three Bryan Robinson, master of the Airedale Beagles, said he could lose his home in the hunt's tied cottage.’
  • 47) ‘The workers, living in tied cottages, often had their gardens invaded by hounds.’
  • 48) ‘Henceforth, she would reside in Speaker's House, which her predecessor had described as ‘the best tied cottage in England’.’
  • 49) ‘Forestry officials were baffled yesterday by reports that an employee battered his wife to death and killed himself over fears they would lose their tied cottage.’
  • 50) ‘I am sure that living in tied accommodation, in almost a feudal situation, is an extra cause of stress.’
  • 51) ‘Huntsmen with tied cottages can still make a living.’
  • 52) ‘My agricultural working class grandparents worked in hunt kennels all their lives and lived in tied cottages.’
  • 53) ‘He lived - and is still living - in a tied cottage on the Lyme Park estate where he is employed as a warden.’
  • 54) ‘Even today many of those employed by the hunt live in tied cottages, dependent on the landlord's good graces for a roof over their heads.’
  • 55) ‘All their other five children had their own homes, while Tony lives in a tied cottage which he will one day have to quit when leaves his job as a warden at Lyme Park, Disley.’
  • 56) ‘Teresa and two other wardens - also made redundant - in other tied flats, have asked for an extension so that they can have more time to find alternative accommodation.’
  • 57) ‘The town - home of Sam Smith's brewery - boasts six tied pubs out of a total of ten.’
  • 58) ‘Until the doors of the new York Brewery pub opened, the nearest pint was served at the Huntsman Inn, Cattal, due to the strict nature of York's tied pubs.’
  • 59) ‘He says that tied pubs don't give landlords the freedom to buy local products.’
  • 60) ‘In addition to its brewing interests it also runs over a thousand tied pubs, which sell the company's own brew at the exclusion of other beers.’
  • 61) ‘An unprecedented number of pubs were available for purchase, as the larger brewers reduced their tied and managed estates in order to comply with the ceilings set by the TEO.’
  • 62) ‘He also agreed to pull a pint of 6X bitter in the former White Lion pub, which is now used to train licensees of the brewery's tied houses.’
  • 63) ‘Suppose that a brewery wants to turn a free house into a tied house.’
  • 64) ‘No longer will we impose our will on poor countries through massive subsidised loans or tied aid payments.’
  • 65) ‘By the 1980s, the World Bank was more or less dictating the country's export and import trade through a system of tied aid.’
  • 66) ‘Nor is she a fan of the World Bank's attempt at tied aid programs.’
  • 67) ‘Until now people seeking financial advice have had two choices - the tied financial adviser and the ‘independent’ adviser.’

Examples

  • 1) Swap one winger for another and hope that will somehow stem the tide.
  • 2) The short link to the island and its lighthouse is submerged at high tide.
  • 3) One voice was still pathetically protesting against the tide of history yesterday.
  • 4) There's a sea cave to play in at low tide.
  • 5) Pebbles in a pond, not a tide in the sea.
  • 6) We needed to stem the tide after a 3-0 defeat in our previous game.
  • 7) It is low tide, which will help to carry the swimmers out.
  • 8) It is thought part of the 40ft cliff crashed down after being weakened by high tides and rain.
  • 9) While deposits continue to disappoint, more such episodes are as inevitable as the ebb and flow of the tide.
  • 10) Except I have to head to the airport because time, tide and airline schedules wait for no one.
  • 11) Swimming through the hole at high tide is a rite of passage.
  • 12) This then is the difficulty with writing a book about tides.
  • 13) The tide has ebbed to find another shore.
  • 14) Those incredible works of art have all been washed away by the tide.
  • 15) There is a strong female tide flowing.
  • 16) There is only one way to turn back the tide.
  • 17) Those concerns have not stemmed the tide of nationalistic sentiment.
  • 18) In fact there was a lull during low tide after lunch the next day.
  • 19) They were covered by the sea at high tide.
  • 20) tide and time wait for no man.
  • 21) Our dad thinks that the winter tides will carry it down the channel.
  • 22) The tide of royal history flows on.
  • 23) But no one was hurt on the beach below because a high tide meant it was inaccessible.
  • 24) There is a tide of complaints about onshore wind farms.
  • 25) Politicians only sensed the anger once the economic tide began to ebb.
  • 26) The tide is flowing slowly but inexorably against him.
  • 27) Punishment cannot hold back the swelling tides of the social chaos that cause this delinquency.
  • 28) At low tide you can make it all the way back to town along the beach.
  • 29) Underlying its mystery is the moon, whose gravitational pull controls all tides on the planet.
  • 30) Be careful of tides and currents, especially around estuaries.
  • 31) 'There is a tide in the affairs of men' -- you know the rest; and you know also that 'tide and time wait for no man. '
  • 32) 1000 Movies in One Year Bama fan and Darrell Hackney groupie attempts the impossible: 1000 movies in one year AL. com's Blog tide, tide, and mo 'tide by the snazzily named Greg Wingo.
  • 33) ‘But access to the port basin lay through channels where the tide fell 32 feet twice daily.’
  • 34) ‘Sibyl glanced back at the rising and falling tides of the English Channel, and sighed with the grace of a heavy heart.’
  • 35) ‘The highest high tides, called the semilunar tides, occur twice a month around the times of the full and new moon.’
  • 36) ‘The ebb and flow of tides, swinging winds, and rising and falling ocean swells create the changing rhythms of a surfer's life.’
  • 37) ‘The rise and fall of tides vary around the world.’
  • 38) ‘For instance he learned the effect of the moon on the tides.’
  • 39) ‘Misconceptions about such things as the moon's effect on tides have contributed to lunar mythology.’
  • 40) ‘As any diver knows, such tides occur only twice a month.’
  • 41) ‘Aborigines explain the relationship of the tides and the moon also.’
  • 42) ‘An arrow indicates whether the tide is rising or falling.’
  • 43) ‘The tide had fallen, which revealed another part of the hidden area.’
  • 44) ‘However, while we had been diving, the tide had fallen.’
  • 45) ‘She fell asleep as the tide slowly climbed, gripping the wet sand with her fingers.’
  • 46) ‘This was a beautiful morning, with a rising tide and no wind.’
  • 47) ‘They must know how the winds and the tides work together.’
  • 48) ‘The vessel departed on the evening tide the following day.’
  • 49) ‘A powerful tide is surging through rural India.’
  • 50) ‘In 1879, a causeway was built to the island, sparing pilgrims and day trippers both the effort of trudging across the sands, and the danger of the fast and powerful local tides.’
  • 51) ‘All day, the Atlantic churned and the tide surged under the narrow strip of land that separates the ocean from the Gulf of Mexico.’
  • 52) ‘Then as the tide turns a surge of muddy water rushes upstream, ever swifter.’
  • 53) ‘The structure would be built over the water, allowing the tide to ebb and flow unhindered.’
  • 54) ‘He related his own experience of how people can get caught out, unaware of the danger because it is the area nearest the shore that gets covered by water first as the tide comes in.’
  • 55) ‘As the tide ebbs the sea water starts to drain from the river, making visible the runs and likely lies of fish just in from the Atlantic.’
  • 56) ‘When the biplane was pushed out of the hangar, the incoming tide covered the tidal flat making it necessary to cancel the flight.’
  • 57) ‘The construction of canals causes an increase in the velocity of incoming tides and also outgoing water, therefore increasing the risk of erosion.’
  • 58) ‘Of course the abductee lives in an ramshackle farmhouse on an island that gets surrounded by water as the tides come in.’
  • 59) ‘This is due to strong tides carrying goodie-laden water to them.’
  • 60) ‘Instead the building could straddle it, getting its feet in the water and feeling the tides.’
  • 61) ‘Weights for bottom fishing need not be too heavy as most of the fishing is done in less that fifteen feet of water and the local tides are not very fierce.’
  • 62) ‘The fast tides and coloured waters of the Severn Estuary pull cod in like bargain hunters to the sales.’
  • 63) ‘When the tide rises and water moves up the channel, the basin fills, and small fish and larvae (food for the birds) enter the pond.’
  • 64) ‘Basically, it's just a dam built across a bay, which opens as the tide is coming in, and then closes and traps the accumulated water as the tide moves out.’
  • 65) ‘After a lot of messing around in the sand and seeing who could get the furthest into the water before the tide came back in, we were completely soaked and decided to crash at my place for the night.’
  • 66) ‘As they go farther into the water, the tide pushes them downstream.’
  • 67) ‘A spray of water from the incoming tide wets us, waking me up from whatever crazy thoughts were consuming me.’
  • 68) ‘They have so many different fish to go for and the fish fight so hard in the tide and shallow water.’
  • 69) ‘Most tope fishing is done either by casting baits uptide away from the boat, or deep dropping baits in areas of fast tides and deep water.’
  • 70) ‘This is to say that if you leave a dingy in shallow water and the tide goes out, leaving your boat on the sand, you have committed an offence which carries a fine.’
  • 71) ‘On another day, light and variable winds, combined with strong tides, affected competition.’
  • 72) ‘They were sitting at the beach, watching the tide as it covered them up to about the waist in its waves every few seconds, and watching the sunset.’
  • 73) ‘It was another bizarre sight but even the half-time whistle, once it finally came, did little to stem the tide of extraordinary events.’
  • 74) ‘On both these occasions, though for very different reasons, the mourners and the mourned were swept together by a powerful tide of emotion.’
  • 75) ‘He's a little man swept up in the tide of big events.’
  • 76) ‘And they are right that the tide of globalization, powerful as the engines driving it may be, can be turned back.’
  • 77) ‘This alliance of irreconcilable economic ideologies was bound to sunder and cede to a powerful tide of neo-liberalism.’
  • 78) ‘The tide of events indeed turned in favour of peace.’
  • 79) ‘Only time will tell how long it can maintain its resilience against the powerful tide of the free market.’
  • 80) ‘The film's portrayal of a powerless woman dragged along by the tide of events doesn't lend itself to edge of the seat plot twists.’
  • 81) ‘We knew, though, that we were a minority swimming against a powerful tide of patriotic pomposity.’
  • 82) ‘I stared at him almost speechless as a tide of emotion surged to me.’
  • 83) ‘Whether alive or dead, young or old, black or white - the tribute tide has surged.’
  • 84) ‘Generally, only those Greek cafes in major recreational and tourist regions have survived the sweeping tide of change.’
  • 85) ‘Ministers hoping to reverse the tide of binge-drinking believe it will bring an end to the 11 pm rush.’
  • 86) ‘If we were to reverse the tide of depression, we needed a society that was well informed about depression.’
  • 87) ‘Mr Thomas is making vigorous efforts to reverse the tide of abuse that has been coming his way recently.’
  • 88) ‘Kerry has pledged to reverse the tide of modern economics by doing exactly this.’
  • 89) ‘He warned that the tide of economic and social change would leave Swindon washed up, stranded and decaying if progress was not made with plans to overhaul the centre soon.’
  • 90) ‘Although increasingly stranded politically by the ebbing tide of socialism, he has refused to tone down his rabble-rousing rhetoric.’
  • 91) ‘Kimmel believes more agents will mean more arrests and more progress against the tide of illegal immigration.’
  • 92) ‘The tide of new developments has seen councillors warning of a melt-down for the town's overstretched infrastructure.’
0

Use Linguix everywhere you write

Be productive and efficient, no matter where and what you write!

Linguix Apps

Get audience-specific corrections, access statistics, and view readability scores.

Browser Extensions

Get your writing checked on millions of websites, including Gmail, Facebook, and Google Docs.

Linguix Keyboard

Make your content read and look better on mobile.

MS Office add-ins

Download Linguix for Microsoft Word and Microsoft Outlook to check grammar, punctuation, and style instantly right in your documents.

This website uses cookies to make Linguix work for you. By using this site, you agree to our cookie policy