may vs might

may might

Definitions

  • 1) A hawthorn or its blossoms.
  • 2) The merrymaking of May Day.
  • 3) the first day of May; -- celebrated in the rustic parts of England by the crowning of a May queen with a garland, and by dancing about a May pole.
  • 4) any May-day sport.
  • 5) (Bot.) The flowers of the hawthorn; -- so called from their time of blossoming; also, the hawthorn.
  • 6) (Zoöl.) any one of numerous species of large lamellicorn beetles that appear in the winged state in May. They belong to Melolontha, and allied genera. Called also June beetle.
  • 7) (Zoöl.) any species of Ephemera, and allied genera; -- so called because the mature flies of many species appear in May. See Ephemeral fly, under Ephemeral.
  • 8) (Bot.) a plant that flowers in May; also, its blossom. See Mayflower, in the vocabulary.
  • 9) obsolete A maiden.
  • 10) the queen or lady of May, in old May games.
  • 11) The fifth month of the year, containing thirty-one days.
  • 12) The early part or springtime of life.
  • 13) the morning dew of the first day of May, to which magical properties were attributed.
  • 14) (Bot.) the fruit of an American plant (Podophyllum peltatum). Also, the plant itself (popularly called mandrake), which has two lobed leaves, and bears a single egg-shaped fruit at the forking. The root and leaves, used in medicine, are powerfully drastic.
  • 15) (Bot.) a shrubby species of Spiræa (Spiræa hypericifolia) with many clusters of small white flowers along the slender branches.
  • 16) A maiden; a virgin.
  • 17) Figuratively, the early part or springtime of life.
  • 18) The fifth month of the year, consisting of thirty-one days, reckoned on the continent of Europe and in America as the last month of spring, but in Great Britain commonly as the first of summer.
  • 19) [lowercase] The hawthorn: so called because it blooms in May. Also May-bush.
  • 20) In Cambridge University, England, the Easter-term examination.
  • 21) The festivities or games of May-day.
  • 22) A kinsman.
  • 23) Some other plant, especially species of Spiræa: as, Italian may.
  • 24) are used as equivalent to possibly, perhaps, maybe, by chance, peradventure. See 1st Maybe.
  • 25) Liberty; permission; allowance.
  • 26) Modesty, courtesy, or concession, or a desire to soften a question or remark.
  • 27) Ability, competency, or possibility; -- now oftener expressed by can.
  • 28) Desire or wish, as in prayer, imprecation, benediction, and the like.
  • 29) Contingency or liability; possibility or probability.
  • 30) Inconcessiveclauses.
  • 31) To be obliged, as where rules of construction or legal doctrine call for a specified interpretation of a word used in a law or legal document.
  • 32) Used to indicate a certain measure of likelihood or possibility.
  • 33) Used to express a desire or fervent wish.
  • 34) Used to express contingency, purpose, or result in clauses introduced by that or so that.
  • 35) To be allowed or permitted to.

Definitions

  • 1) uncountable The ability to do something.
  • 2) uncountable Physical strength.
  • 3) uncountable Power, strength, force or influence held by a person or group.
  • 4) Great power or force, as of a nation or army.
  • 5) Physical strength: synonym: strength.
  • 6) See under 2d Main.
  • 7) Force or power of any kind, whether of body or mind; energy or intensity of purpose, feeling, or action; means or resources to effect an object; strength; force; power; ability; capacity.
  • 8) physical strength
  • 9) Preterit of may.
  • 10) The quality of being able; ability to do or act; power; active personal force or strength, physical or mental: as, a man of might; the might of intellect.
  • 11) Power of control or compulsion; ability to wield or direct force; commanding strength: as, the might of empire.
  • 12) Physical force; material energy.
  • 13) obsolete Mighty; powerful; possible.
  • 14) auxiliary Simple past of may. Used to indicate permission in past tense.
  • 15) auxiliary Simple past of may. Used to indicate possibility in past tense.
  • 16) auxiliary Used to indicate conditional or possible actions.
  • 17) imp.ofmay.
  • 18) Used to express a higher degree of deference or politeness than may, ought, or should:
  • 19) Used to express possibility or probability or permission in the past.
  • 20) Used to indicate a possibility or probability that is weaker than may:
  • 21) Used to indicate a condition or state contrary to fact.

Examples

  • 1) You may have to use tough love and stop or limit her seeing these new friends.
  • 2) This may help to explain our result.
  • 3) That may have been true when most jobs were boring and tiring.
  • 4) Shoppers may also face long queues at collection points.
  • 5) The results may not be a surprise.
  • 6) You may use it to provide information to your employee.
  • 7) The same may well be true this time.
  • 8) Yet one may wager that some new answers may not be long in coming.
  • 9) This unlikely couple may have something in common.
  • 10) You may want to go for a gentle run to loosen the muscles and calm the nerves.
  • 11) Such an increase may come from either or both of two sources.
  • 12) The resulting welfare obligations may put an intolerable strain on future generations.
  • 13) But we may use its origins as a reason to hang on to it.
  • 14) He may help us to buy the car.
  • 15) That may or may not be true.
  • 16) Only one application method may be used.
  • 17) You may say it's a coup.
  • 18) Music teachers may say one thing; the school in general may say another.
  • 19) Unless there are any other myths I can dispel, lemme sign off with the reminder that while the feds and/or the state may *may* end up kicking in a share via the enterprise or empowerment zones, the beneficiaries of this deal will not only be these poverty-wage workers, but all of Los Angeles, as lowered poverty brings lowered crime, safer communities, stronger families, less drug use, fewer public health expenditures and more effective schools.
  • 20) While it may provide some immediate easing of the pain and that's a big *may* this is only delaying the inevitable.
  • 21) I think WoW's a hot virus -- it'll burn fast and two years from now WoW may be a ghost town *may* be
  • 22) I think WoW's a hot virus -- it'll burn fast and two years from now WoW may be a ghost town *may* be.
  • 23) Citizens who grew up East of the Tower of London may only *may* - not necessarily have an East End accent, regardless of whether they live north or south of the River Thames.
  • 24) -- The Potential Subjunctive may designate _a mere possibility_ (English auxiliary _may_).
  • 25) Of course it may be intended as compliment-terry; it _may_ mean "always entertaining and ever reddy."
  • 26) By the by, Mary, you may just mention to your mistress that I _may_ perhaps be detained rather later than usual to-day, and she is not to wait dinner for me. '
  • 27) I get a letter to say that the Rifle Brigade may leave for France at any time, and that Donald _may_ get some "leave" on Saturday or
  • 28) Compounds of more than two words may be analyzed thus: +may have been written+ is composed of the compound auxiliary +may have been+ and the participle +written; may have been+ is composed of the compound auxiliary
  • 29) ‘This may well be true and look at the hatred that it has generated in most Western countries.’
  • 30) ‘That may well be true of course, though few have ever stated it so bluntly.’
  • 31) ‘That indeed may well be true but rather than finessing this issue it should surely be addressing it head on.’
  • 32) ‘He confirmed that failure to do so may amount to a breach of election law.’
  • 33) ‘It may be that their stories confirm the public's worst instincts about the music industry.’
  • 34) ‘All of which was further confirmation that Scotland may just have a bit of a star in the making.’
  • 35) ‘Part of this may be that the church is integral to national identity and tradition.’
  • 36) ‘Investigators said this weekend that those reports may prove to be a case of mistaken identity.’
  • 37) ‘Yet their life outside may be as scarring as adult prison if their identities are ever discovered.’
  • 38) ‘If parents were to think about it, they may find it is their own identity they are protecting.’
  • 39) ‘Overlap of bone margins may indicate a dislocation, and a second view should confirm this.’
  • 40) ‘Information such as a watermark in the paper may help identify a place and date of production.’
  • 41) ‘Attitudes are much more difficult to identify and may only be revealed in subtle ways.’
  • 42) ‘In answering these points it may be necessary to identify the object of the contract.’
  • 43) ‘However, this may give an insight into how the legal position was identified.’
  • 44) ‘Many of your readers may disagree, but I feel many more will identify with my observations.’
  • 45) ‘We thought there may be traffic issues but we also identified various ways we could address them.’
  • 46) ‘The two plays may differ in style but their concern is identical, just like the twins.’
  • 47) ‘It may be difficult in such situations to identify the point in time when an arrest occurs.’
  • 48) ‘It may be argued that state and law are not identical, and there can be states without law.’
  • 49) ‘They may not seem important at the time but, trust me, one day they could be more vital than a very vital thing indeed.’
  • 50) ‘It may be deeply important to some people but it is essentially a part of life, it doesn't govern our lives.’
  • 51) ‘It may not have felt like it, and he may not have admitted to it, but Johnson was a pioneering force.’
  • 52) ‘The first duty of any working person is to their family, however important that job may be.’
  • 53) ‘The letter of the law may be important, but it appears that the punctuation is not.’
  • 54) ‘You may have a dozen important things to tell him but the moment of his arrival is not the time.’
  • 55) ‘It may not be important, but maybe if I put it down on paper, it'll make more sense to me.’
  • 56) ‘I may have to admit that you will never be my lover, but you will always be my dearest friend.’
  • 57) ‘That may not seem important to you but without her I think we'd all only read mysteries.’
  • 58) ‘The Montgomery Bus Boycott may have been important but it hardly had media appeal.’
  • 59) ‘She may not have admitted it out loud, but that didn't mean that she didn't know it was true.’
  • 60) ‘The club now says his identity may not be revealed until the end of the month, but insist the deal is still on.’
  • 61) ‘Of course there is a right of appeal, which in some cases may not be exercised without prior permission.’
  • 62) ‘None of the text or images from this site may be reproduced in whole or part without written permission.’
  • 63) ‘I am writing in the hope you may be able to help me with family history research.’
  • 64) ‘It is hoped the British submersible may be able to cut the submarine loose once raised to a suitable depth.’
  • 65) ‘Her husband paid tribute to her as a loving family woman and hopes she may rest in the peace of God.’
  • 66) ‘For the moment it will have to be a honeymoon in hospital, but nurses hope that Linda may be able to go home.’
  • 67) ‘Now he is hoping other fans may follow his lead by using their expertise to aid the cash-strapped club.’
  • 68) ‘He hopes she may be of some comfort to his sister, although he wonders whether he will ever see her smile again.’
  • 69) ‘This time she will stay in north Derbyshire in the hope she may make contact.’
  • 70) ‘Nevertheless, he hopes he may only be a further week away from a return to action.’
  • 71) ‘We also know the direction in which the gunman went and we are hoping this may lead us to new witnesses.’
  • 72) ‘Enough interest was shown in this suggestion to give hope that it may be taken up.’
  • 73) ‘We are writing this because we hope other campaigns may benefit from some of the lessons that we learned.’
  • 74) ‘An epilogue hopes the play may at least have pleased female spectators by its depiction of a good woman.’
  • 75) ‘I just hope that you may see why I believe what I do and why it makes sense to me.’
  • 76) ‘It was a beautiful starlit night and William hoped it may the start of a new life for them both.’
  • 77) ‘It is hoped that a climbing club may be able to use the wall in the future.’
  • 78) ‘Tour operators with summer programmes always struggle to fill the months of may and June.’
  • 79) ‘It is going to give us a good starting point for the month of may but we still have a lot of work to do as does everyone else.’
  • 80) ‘I feel the month of may is the most delightful time to be out and about on the river.’
  • 81) ‘It was the month of may and in those times there was a corncrake in every field and garden.’
  • 82) ‘In may last year the accident-prone pony got stuck in the water before being bailed out.’
  • 83) ‘She was going to jump off the rock into the cold may water and drown just like he did.’
  • 84) ‘The may half-term is a chance to get children out of the house and into the fresh air.’
  • 85) ‘The large number of bills included mean that if there is a may election most are unlikely to become law.’
  • 86) ‘Bank holidays are a real menace for messing up the meat trade and the may weekend has been no exception.’
  • 87) ‘Culture vultures are invited to work with local artists for a unique may celebration.’
  • 88) ‘With the may elections looming, the last thing it wanted was to impose a big tax increase.’
  • 89) ‘Most of the events are free, but because of limited space the may events are ticket only.’
  • 90) ‘I find that the coverage of recent events comes on the heels of the may ratings sweeps.’
  • 91) ‘Dormant dahlia tubers can be potted up this month to get them going before planting out in may or June.’
  • 92) ‘The rains in April and may of that year of 1951 were not too heavy and we were able to get out a bit.’
  • 93) ‘It is now may, when spring is at its peak and hormones seem to have risen to a new level.’
  • 94) ‘I was reminded of that when I turned the corner of the house this bright may morning.’
  • 95) ‘They flower from March to June and disperse mature seeds from may to July in the second year.’
  • 96) ‘These flower from early to late may with single blooms that are finely fringed at the edges.’
  • 97) ‘The second week of may will be one of the driest of the year and one of the sunniest.’

Examples

  • 1) And they encourage people to use ingredients they might not be familiar with.
  • 2) We should ask ourselves too whether on some of her chosen issues she might actually be right.
  • 3) This might force ministers into more spending cuts.
  • 4) The one reform that might make a difference is financial.
  • 5) Hopefully one time in the future we might get a chance to redeem ourselves.
  • 6) There might be something in the midlife crisis cliché.
  • 7) There were 155 passengers and crew members on a plane that might soon be sinking.
  • 8) In the past there might have been one or two contenders but this time there are at least four sides who can win it.
  • 9) Power parting might sound contrived, but it's got to be better than this.
  • 10) This is just to give you some idea of the treatments that might be used.
  • 11) We all joined the service knowing full well what might be expected of us.
  • 12) Perhaps the army might be the making of him.
  • 13) These little details might make a difference.
  • 14) Soon perhaps he might return to normality.
  • 15) In days past he might have been tempted to cash in on his success instantly.
  • 16) She is also worried that the economic downturn might lead to more crime.
  • 17) There remained two respects in which it might affect their rights.
  • 18) Your poor ma and pa may have left something that might be just the thing.
  • 19) The healthy snack might go some way to explaining his stamina as he approaches his tenth decade.
  • 20) You might think that financial meltdown would destroy the arts.
  • 21) Their own bowling strength might be about to come under scrutiny.
  • 22) Though a note from your doc might help in future.
  • 23) The concepts might come in useful in and out of the workplace.
  • 24) The five cups of coffee he drinks each day might also have something to do with it.
  • 25) Our eyes are there to help us discern so we might as well use them.
  • 26) They might be full one way but empty the other.
  • 27) I kind of agree with this, except dogs might *might* be an exception.
  • 28) I might - *might* - consider not buying the manga I'd never heard of before but looks oh-so interesting if I knew any of these were coming out that week:
  • 29) For instance, I can think of one way the Republicans might, just *might*, retain control of both houses: if they impeach and convict Bush and Cheney themselves, before the next election.
  • 30) I wrote about what might–and I emphasize the word *might*–be an indication that some small steps have actually been taken in my Blog-Against-Sexism-Day post.
  • 31) Arizona because it suddenly occurred to me that the police might -- just * might* -- come and take away my computer.
  • 32) All at once the thought struck him that he himself might be the person accused, and the bare idea that such _might_ be the case sent the blood to his heart and a cold shudder through his frame.
  • 33) It might go wrong with you -- only _might_ -- but I want, I must have, your consent.
  • 34) With reasonable care the thing might be done almost with impunity -- though there was never wanting, of course, the not entirely unpleasurable excitement of knowing that you were breaking the law, that somebody _might_ have turned informer, and that at any moment a raid might be made.
  • 35) It might rain tomorrow, and 'sides, it _might_ take us more'n
  • 36) If a woman might not do this, what, in heaven's name, _might_ she do?
  • 37) ‘A Morrison spokesman would not deny a report that the brothers might buy back the company.’
  • 38) ‘A farmer can report what he thinks might be foot and mouth, a vet has to be called, and a blood test done.’
  • 39) ‘A permanent lunar base might then provide a springboard for a trip to Mars.’
  • 40) ‘We are left to wonder what more it might achieve if conditions were better.’
  • 41) ‘They had no choice but to turn around and go back to conditions that might have ended their lives.’
  • 42) ‘We had been optimistic that track conditions might suit us during the race, but that did not happen.’
  • 43) ‘Overall it was a fair performance from the local side who might well have won but for a few crucial errors.’
  • 44) ‘No, she does not, despite the fact his manoeuvre denied her the chance to stand as deputy, a post she might have won.’
  • 45) ‘Had Italy turned pressure into tries they might well have won the match.’
  • 46) ‘Who knows, but if we had won that day we might not have made the changes that we did make to the panel for the league.’
  • 47) ‘I still remember the time my parents steered me clear of any stall where I might have won a goldfish.’
  • 48) ‘I thought the performance against West Brom was good and with a bit more luck we might have won the game.’
  • 49) ‘If this were just a question of her as a reporter that might not have been a problem.’
  • 50) ‘There was a faint possibility she might have died from the resultant fumes.’
  • 51) ‘However, Jesus knew that the law was given so that mankind might understand the purposes of God.’
  • 52) ‘But when a friend suggested the story might not be true she contacted the Advertiser for help.’
  • 53) ‘Powerful minds can project incredibly rich suggestions of what it might feel like, but you don't know.’
  • 54) ‘I was wondering if you have any suggestions as to what might be best for me considering his size.’
  • 55) ‘There is no suggestion that any schools might close or face restructuring.’
  • 56) ‘Suggestions for reforms that might limit house price inflation are plentiful enough.’
  • 57) ‘We have a few suggestions that might work and they can be summed up in one word: layering.’
  • 58) ‘He then asked doctors to phone in with suggestions of what might be wrong with him.’
  • 59) ‘I've made a few suggestions for things she might add to her site and she's always extremely grateful.’
  • 60) ‘My suggestions for what might be happening were treated with, I felt, derision.’
  • 61) ‘Do you have any suggestions as to what might be causing it and what I can do to remedy the problem?’
  • 62) ‘There are also three reasons to kill off news reports because they might impact stability.’
  • 63) ‘Reports that the guns might be destined for sale to the drugs underworld were dismissed as pure speculation.’
  • 64) ‘It might endanger other reporters to have it publicly known that this deception is practised.’
  • 65) ‘I knew they would not be reported missing right away and might never be reported missing.’
  • 66) ‘On the issue of what these common values might be, the report provides no answers.’
  • 67) ‘Some might say his report has extended a similar protection to those who govern us.’
  • 68) ‘There was also deep anger at reports that colleges might be privatised.’
  • 69) ‘That's important, but I have to remain open to the possibility that now might be the time to cut my losses and flee.’
  • 70) ‘Identical reports might elicit different responses from different committees.’
  • 71) ‘They might be basing their charges on some kind of analogy to the cost of the hotel room.’
  • 72) ‘The might of the Indian Army was on display as battle tanks and mounted missiles rolled out.’
  • 73) ‘We must encourage our leaders to use their heads rather than their might.’
  • 74) ‘They should use their might to challenge and change the laws of this land.’
  • 75) ‘It can handle a bit of rough treatment, so kids can use all their might to pull out a stalk.’
  • 76) ‘The authorities told them they were privileged to witness the might of the Soviet military machine.’
  • 77) ‘The might of the Roman Empire came from its wealth in precious metals, not from its productivity.’
  • 78) ‘The might and depth of the team was immediately evident, and with that comes a rise in the pressure on a driver.’
  • 79) ‘He said the pen earlier and now the mouse of the computer is more powerful than the might of the canon.’
  • 80) ‘The empathy was evidently always with the freedom fighter as he took on the might of the oppressor.’
  • 81) ‘Even against the might of the party machines they will be difficult to dislodge.’
  • 82) ‘However, he believes in the might of the pen and claims not to have used a computer.’
  • 83) ‘More than that, he knew his friend would cope against the might of Real Madrid.’
  • 84) ‘Now they face the might of Russia in a qualifier which has huge ramifications for the national side.’
  • 85) ‘There's no doubting that the might and grandeur of big mountains can make you feel very humble.’
  • 86) ‘Nor has it abated since she gave up fiction to challenge the might of the Indian state’
  • 87) ‘With the might of the US behind them, it's as easy as shooting fish in a barrel for them.’
  • 88) ‘What has maintained the old world order has been the might of the omnipotent dollar.’
  • 89) ‘Their security doesn't depend on the might of their individual parts, but their ability to operate as a sum.’
  • 90) ‘She took on not only the might of the oceans, but also the might of reality, and has triumphed gloriously over both.’
  • 91) ‘He called together the remnants of his tribe and the might of the enemy was overturned.’
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