pique vs peak vs peek

pique peak peek

Definitions

  • 1) A durable ribbed fabric made from cotton, rayon, or silk.
  • 2) A feeling of enmity between two entities; ill-feeling, animosity; a transient feeling of wounded pride.
  • 3) A feeling of irritation or resentment, awakened by a social slight or injury; offence, especially taken in an emotional sense with little thought or consideration.
  • 4) A chigger or jigger, Tunga penetrans.
  • 5) In piquet, the right of the elder hand to count thirty in hand, or to play before the adversary counts one.
  • 6) A state of vexation caused by a perceived slight or indignity; a feeling of wounded pride.
  • 7) (Zoöl.) The jigger. See jigger.
  • 8) Keenly felt desire; a longing.
  • 9) (Card Playing) In piquet, the right of the elder hand to count thirty in hand, or to play before the adversary counts one.
  • 10) A feeling of hurt, vexation, or resentment, awakened by a social slight or injury; irritation of the feelings, as through wounded pride; stinging vexation.
  • 11) tightly woven fabric with raised cords
  • 12) a sudden outburst of anger
  • 13) Synonyms Pique and umbrage differ from the words compared under animosily (which see) in that they are not necessarily or generally attended by a desire to injure the person toward whom the feeling is entertained. They are both purely personal. Pique is more likely to be a matter of injured self-respect or self-conceit; it is a quick feeling, and is more fugitive in character. Umbrage is founded upon the idea of being thrown into the shade or overshadowed; hence, it has the sense of offense at being slighted or not sufficiently recognized; it is indefinite as to the strength or the permanence of the feeling.
  • 14) A point of conduct; punctilio.
  • 15) A point or peak.
  • 16) A feeling of anger, irritation, displeasure, or resentment arising from wounded pride, vanity, or self-love; wounded pride; slight umbrage or offense taken.
  • 17) A blind tick, Argas nigra, capable of causing painful sores on cattle and men. See Argas.
  • 18) In the game of piquet, the winning of thirty points before one's opponent scores at all in the same deal, entitling the winner to add thirty more to his score.
  • 19) The jigger, chigoe, or chique. See Sarcopsylla.
  • 20) A quarrel; dispute; strife.
  • 21) transitive To excite (someone) to action by causing resentment or jealousy; to stimulate (a feeling, emotion); to offend by slighting.
  • 22) reflexive To take pride in; to pride oneself on.
  • 23) transitive To wound the pride of; to sting; to nettle; to irritate; to fret; to excite to anger.
  • 24) cause to feel resentment or indignation
  • 25) To cause annoyance or irritation.
  • 26) To pride (oneself).
  • 27) To provoke; arouse.
  • 28) To cause to feel resentment or indignation.
  • 29) To excite to action by causing resentment or jealousy; to stimulate; to prick.
  • 30) To wound the pride of; to sting; to nettle; to irritate; to fret; to offend; to excite to anger.
  • 31) To pride or value; -- used reflexively.

Definitions

  • 1) The point of a beard.
  • 2) The point of greatest development, value, or intensity: synonym: summit.
  • 3) The upper aft corner of a fore-and-aft sail.
  • 4) Physics The highest value attained by a varying quantity.
  • 5) The outermost end of a gaff.
  • 6) A widow's peak.
  • 7) The pointed summit of a mountain.
  • 8) The narrow portion of a ship's hull at the bow or stern.
  • 9) The mountain itself.
  • 10) A tapering, projecting point; a pointed extremity.
  • 11) The narrow part of a vessel's bow, or the hold within it.
  • 12) The upper aftermost corner of a fore-and-aft sail; -- used in many combinations
  • 13) The top, or one of the tops, of a hill, mountain, or range, ending in a point; often, the whole hill or mountain, esp. when isolated.
  • 14) A point; the sharp end or top of anything that terminates in a point.
  • 15) The extremity of an anchor fluke; the bill.
  • 16) In mech., a heavy load; the heaviest load (on an engine or generator): so called because a peak or protruding point is formed in the line traced by the point of a recording dynamometer at the time of the heavy load or of a maximum load. See load, 8, and peak-load.
  • 17) The maximum of a load-curve.
  • 18) Nautical: The upper corner of a sail which is extended by a gaff; also, the extremity of the gaff. See cut under gaff.
  • 19) In turpentining, the angle formed by the meeting of the two streaks on the face.
  • 20) A precipitous mountain; a mountain with steeply inclined sides, or one which is particularly conspicuous on account of its height above the adjacent region, or because more or less isolated.
  • 21) Same as pee.
  • 22) The contracted part of a ship's hold at the extremities, for ward or aft. The peak forward is called the forepeak; that aft, the after-peak. Also spelled peek.
  • 23) [capitalized] A name applied to a village at one of the corners or extreme boundaries of a township: as, Derry Peak, on the eastern boundary of Derry.
  • 24) See peag.
  • 25) A projecting point; the end of anything that terminates in a point.
  • 26) The high sharp ridge-bone of the head of a setter-dog.
  • 27) Specifically— A projecting part of a head-covering; the leather vizor projecting in front of a cap.
  • 28) Approaching or constituting the maximum.
  • 29) Toriseupwardasapeak.
  • 30) Toaccentuate.
  • 31) To become sickly, emaciated, or pale.
  • 32) To bring to a maximum of development, value, or intensity.
  • 33) To achieve a maximum of development, value, or intensity.
  • 34) To be formed into a peak or peaks.
  • 35) Nautical To raise (a gaff) above the horizontal.
  • 36) To rise or extend into a peak or point; to form, or appear as, a peak.
  • 37) To acquire sharpness of figure or features; hence, to look thin or sickly.
  • 38) (Arch.) a pointed or Gothic arch.
  • 39) archaic To pry; to peep slyly.
  • 40) To achieve a maximum of numerical value, intensity of activity, popularity, or other characteristic, followed by a decline.

Definitions

  • 1) A brief or furtive look.
  • 2) a secret look
  • 3) A woodpecker.
  • 4) An obsolete or nautical spelling of peak.
  • 5) To be only slightly, partially visible, as if peering out from a hiding place.
  • 6) computing, transitive To retrieve (a value) from a memory address.
  • 7) To look slyly, or with the eyes half closed, or through a crevice; to peep.
  • 8) throw a glance at; take a brief look at
  • 9) Topeep;lookpryingly.
  • 10) To be only partially visible, as if peering or emerging from hiding.
  • 11) To look or peer furtively, as from a place of concealment.
  • 12) To glance quickly.
  • 13) colloq. To look surreptitiously, or with the eyes half closed, or through a crevice; to peep.

Examples

  • 1) The fourth I can see scrambling and hear fizzing with a little pique.
  • 2) As to ----, your doing anything in 'pique' is quite unworthy of you, and it only recoils on yourself; the harder we strike, whether in revenge or justice, it comes back upon ourselves with far more pain than we have wished to inflict.
  • 3) These are nasty birds and pique is too delicate a word to describe what burns inside them.
  • 4) Holding that kind of work up out of pique is really and truly outrageous and deserves to be described as such unleavened by strained efforts to hit both sides.
  • 5) "To pique" is a French word meaning to anger or to excite or arouse a feeling in someone.
  • 6) The line from the Clinton aide about McCain, in retrospect, breaking with his party in 2000-2 because of personal pique is interesting.
  • 7) What emerged from that little pique is this multifaceted portrait of a vivacious lady who channeled the excitement of mid-20th century politics and social issues into her own jazzy drawings.
  • 8) The spade, or pique as it was known in France where it originated, probably evolved from the German leaf, although the word pique means sword.
  • 9) Would the Arab governments reject such an offer flatly, in pique, and turn UNRWA over to the Russians?
  • 10) ‘So I think senior colleagues made the wrong decision - but I can't say they made the decision in a fit of pique or envy.’
  • 11) ‘They left two-weeks ago after selling their house in a fit of pique over the fact that their grandchildren were not welcome in the complex's communal backyard.’
  • 12) ‘The president, apparently in a fit of pique, in October abruptly postpones a long-planned summit with Britain.’
  • 13) ‘Better, I suppose, that I flame on about flaming out, rather than just quit in a fit of pique after biting my tongue bloody for a month.’
  • 14) ‘That's worse than having him blurt out some threats in a fit of pique, he actually thought he could bring New Europe to heel.’
  • 15) ‘Are Europeans going on a buyer's strike in a fit of pique over Iraq?’
  • 16) ‘It was then that in a fit of pique, the deputy smoked three cigarettes in the bar as a ‘protest’.’
  • 17) ‘Keel killed the pay-raise bill with a last-minute point of order in a fit of pique.’
  • 18) ‘Speaking at a Belfast news conference, Mr Ervine denied that his party had left the talks in a fit of pique.’
  • 19) ‘Last night, in a fit of pique, just to show me up for a liar, she took her first steps with the cane.’
  • 20) ‘President Theodore Roosevelt, who in a fit of pique coined the term ‘muckraking’, called him a potent influence for evil.’
  • 21) ‘I may, in a fit of pique, for no apparent reason that either of us can see, have ‘stuffed’ these carrots behind the water pipes.’
  • 22) ‘To leave now would suggest that he'd gone in a fit of pique.’
  • 23) ‘Certainly in France it was an educated decision: it was not one taken in a fit of pique or absent-mindedness.’
  • 24) ‘She abused passengers and crew then stripped off in a fit of pique.’
  • 25) ‘What exasperated driver hasn't wanted to scream at the person in the passenger seat and snatch the map in a fit of pique?’
  • 26) ‘That way, when you've done the deed, your spurned lover can't burn your stuff in a fit of pique.’
  • 27) ‘Some have accused Stoiber of deliberately trying to sabotage Merkel in a fit of pique at her rapid rise.’
  • 28) ‘Of course it didn't happen and I went out in a fit of pique in the next hand.’
  • 29) ‘They have invested too much in this season to throw it away in a fit of pique.’
  • 30) ‘Curiosity piqued my harbored interest and I stole a glance at myself, to see what others saw of me.’
  • 31) ‘This piques my scientific curiosity and I make a mental note to ask my rather strange-looking hostess about it.’
  • 32) ‘Even those with only a passing interest in the subject matter should find something to pique their curiosity within.’
  • 33) ‘Event planners aim to give those varied interests plenty to pique their partiality.’
  • 34) ‘When she was in high school, Lisa Pietrusza took a social studies course that piqued her curiosity about politics.’
  • 35) ‘But our little dialogue is supposed to pique people's interest.’
  • 36) ‘The other guys will notice how much those guys enjoy your company - it might pique their interest.’
  • 37) ‘Hopefully with the press we'll pique some people's interest and they'll come see what it's all about.’
  • 38) ‘It's something that piques people's interest.’
  • 39) ‘Of course this time it's ‘Chinese-Canadian’ Gen-X angst that piques my interest.’
  • 40) ‘I mean, it's action and it piques people's interest but beforehand we were worried that there wasn't really enough going on.’
  • 41) ‘Well, all right - it's not exactly a Thanksgiving story that warms your heart… or even piques your interest.’
  • 42) ‘But in addition to the election-oriented questions, there were some other answers that piqued my interest.’
  • 43) ‘It is the tax relief measures, however, that would most pique the interest of the public.’
  • 44) ‘She says yes, and adds ‘I suppose when my scientific curiosity is piqued, I lose all fear.’’
  • 45) ‘Plenty of other would-be candidates, however, are piquing the interest of municipal veterans.’
  • 46) ‘Yet he should be chuffed at how history is filling our newspapers, sparking debate, piquing our interest.’
  • 47) ‘If that sort of bluntness piques your interest, then the debut LP from Milwaukee's finest is made for you.’
  • 48) ‘When some information is revealed about somebody, what piques your interest?’
  • 49) ‘But when they wrote about ‘little Gong Li,’ it piqued interest.’
  • 50) ‘‘Play it yourself then,’ said Liszt, rising from the piano, rather piqued.’
  • 51) ‘So eggheaded am I about much of what I watch, I was rather piqued that I couldn't have both sets of subtitles on the screen at the same time.’
  • 52) ‘‘I can still ride okay,’ he said, sounding piqued.’
  • 53) ‘The nub of the problem is the term District which allows clubs to transfer every season if they wish and move simply because of personality clashes or piqued perhaps at disciplinary decision.’
  • 54) ‘The management finally took up the matter with the Housing Minister, M.C. Sampath, who apparently felt piqued at the official attitude.’
  • 55) ‘Since it's now 11 pm, I'm a bit piqued at wasting an entire evening.’
  • 56) ‘Turns out that swingers are just like the rest of us: happy to bury their heads in the bush and then become piqued at people's lack of honesty in retrospect.’
  • 57) ‘If they ask Congress for more troops and more money, will the American people not get a bit piqued and take it out on their President?’
  • 58) ‘They may be even more piqued to find that Jim Wallace knew of the First Minister's heart problem three days before any of Dewar's Labour colleagues.’
  • 59) ‘One does attempt to make the government actually represent us by demonstrating and the like, but Aaronovitch seems to get piqued when people do that.’
  • 60) ‘It doesn't bother me now, but for years I have to say I was a bit piqued at the lack of ceremony surrounding my arrival.’
  • 61) ‘However, what the promoters feel piqued about, is the brand value of Colorplus mentioned in the report.’
  • 62) ‘He never touched her: until one night, piqued that he hadn't made a move, she climbed over the bolster herself.’
  • 63) ‘I was a bit piqued because I wanted to be known as the funny student.’
  • 64) ‘Broughan is hardly alone in feeling piqued at the dearth of vision amongst the suits at Queen Margaret Drive.’
  • 65) ‘Like when Maradona went in a huff with Pele, piqued at not getting player of the 20th century.’
  • 66) ‘And she really looked a bit piqued, and I said, ‘What's up?’’
  • 67) ‘Apparently piqued, the NYSE gave the report to Grasso and to the media, which soon put it online, giving it to the rest of the world, too.’
  • 68) ‘Kelley, piqued, took her purse from him, setting the teacup carefully down.’
  • 69) ‘He was a little piqued when I brought it back with a few bullet holes, the antenna shot off and one rudder cable severed.’
  • 70) ‘He piqued himself on being so with them more than with any one else.’
  • 71) ‘He piqued himself, indeed, upon his courtesy.’
  • 72) ‘Bloomies' spring hats range from fun and practical (how about a red Lacoste rain hat or a pink cotton piqué cap?) to stylish straws and felts.’
  • 73) ‘Pink Lacoste or Ralph Lauren piqué polo shirts were probably the biggest sellers and they reflected the image of a distinguished and well-mannered preppy boy.’
  • 74) ‘Whether you're going to work or hitting hole-in-ones with your buddies, polo piqué T-shirts are where it's at.’
  • 75) ‘Wear them to your next polo match with a polo piqué, a fine pair of khakis and your boat shoes.’

Examples

  • 1) Whisk the egg whites until stiff peaks form.
  • 2) In peak season it could take an hour to go one way.
  • 3) This one is still at peak performance three months in.
  • 4) This is intended to speed up sales processing and provide better service online regardless of demand peaks during busy trading periods.
  • 5) So peaks just above the mountain classification of 2,000ft may now be a few inches too short.
  • 6) At the peak of his career in the mid-1960s he was so busy that he rarely had time to go home.
  • 7) Autumn has reached its peak.
  • 8) He added:'Exactly when the peaks in activity occur can vary.
  • 9) peak demand now came on summer days rather than winter nights.
  • 10) To wake up and see lochs and mountain peaks gliding past is to feel still more so.
  • 11) It will be especially useful for areas with peak use.
  • 12) Whisk to soft peaks then set aside.
  • 13) Whisk egg whites to form soft peaks and fold in to yolk and prawn mix.
  • 14) The great actor had serious struggles with choking while at the peak of his career.
  • 15) We rolled along towards the white towns looking like summer snow caps atop the peaks.
  • 16) The optimal solution is found when you have reached a peak on the utility surface.
  • 17) Twenty years is enough time for troughs and peaks.
  • 18) Most of the passengers closed their eyes and prayed as the aircraft lurched above the peaks.
  • 19) We offer multiple connections during peak turnover times.
  • 20) That is why hoping that the peak of the crisis is past does not make it so.
  • 21) How much of peak demand should its service system be designed to satisfy?
  • 22) The warm haze of the metropolis beyond spreads low over the base of a mountain peak.
  • 23) That was the peak of his career.
  • 24) Signs of strain suggest that the smartphone segment has perhaps reached its peak.
  • 25) The wheat or mustard should be dug up and burned just before the end of these peak periods.
  • 26) It can also suck cheap electricity from the grid in the middle of the night for use in peak daytime hours.
  • 27) The subsequent slump wiped out 49% of peak values.
  • 28) More often than not, companies face higher costs during peak periods, which can explain the higher prices charged.
  • 29) A generation which should have peaked at the World Cup was allowed to become an egotistical rabble.
  • 30) ‘It winds up through rolling hills with stands of poplar trees, distant views of lakes and snowy mountain peaks strung along the horizon.’
  • 31) ‘The visitor is mesmerized by its sunny beaches, snowy mountain peaks, endless plains where black bulls graze, shimmering lakes and mountain streams.’
  • 32) ‘How it ended up on the peak of a snowy mountain (located over a crocodile lake and through a blue tunnel) is a question we'll have to save for another day.’
  • 33) ‘Recently, my wife and I experienced the snowy white peaks of Maine's mountains illuminated by pink dawns and golden sunsets.’
  • 34) ‘And the giant mountains with their snowy peaks and endless trees remind me of you.’
  • 35) ‘Beyond these cities stood the snowy peaks of this spectacular mountain range.’
  • 36) ‘White clouds cling to lofty mountain peaks, which rise vertically from out of glacial basins, stretching all the way back to the Southern Alps.’
  • 37) ‘Beyond the farmhouse and its protective line of trees, lie rising foothills and distant mountain peaks.’
  • 38) ‘Behind him the skyline was still dominated by the White Mountains, their snowy peaks glistening in the afternoon sun.’
  • 39) ‘It could be the top of a tower, or a mountain peak, or a cliff.’
  • 40) ‘Running down each side of the valley are mountain peaks dotted with dormant volcanoes.’
  • 41) ‘Finally the flood waters fell and mountain peaks emerged.’
  • 42) ‘At the exact moment she touched the tallest peak of the mountain, the birds all rose into the air.’
  • 43) ‘The weather in southwestern Germany, with its mountain peaks and rolling hills, can turn nasty in a hurry.’
  • 44) ‘Apart from the cliffs and headwalls at the peak, the mountain requires a lot of straight skiing to maintain speed.’
  • 45) ‘Far off in the horizon, the peaks of various mountains were visible.’
  • 46) ‘The forest below and the sky above clashed on the horizon with jagged peaks of mountains.’
  • 47) ‘The county has some of the most mountainous terrain in the state, including Virginia's highest mountain peaks, which made transportation difficult.’
  • 48) ‘The moorland is screened by the peaks of mountains.’
  • 49) ‘Mountain peaks surround the lake and protect it.’
  • 50) ‘The highest peak is Mount Apo in Mindanao at 9,689 feet.’
  • 51) ‘The over 100 volcanic peaks in the range, some over 3,000 metres in elevation, include more than a dozen which are considered active.’
  • 52) ‘Where the White Mountains come to an end is the great peak of Mount Mindolluin.’
  • 53) ‘Its world wonders range from Andean peaks to Amazonian wilderness; from the endless horizons of the pampas to the awesome glaciers of Patagonia.’
  • 54) ‘The views to the East and South are dominated with blue skies and the snow covered peaks of Mount Adams and Mount Hood.’
  • 55) ‘Five other peaks in the range have long been opened for international mountaineering.’
  • 56) ‘The canyons between the peaks seemed bottomless and forbidding, and the mountain range stretched on for unseen miles in both directions.’
  • 57) ‘The highlands of this park are forested with the peak of Mount Meru rising above the forests to dominate the area.’
  • 58) ‘Make an early start and allow ample time if you want to see the best reflections in Lake Matheson of Mount Cook and Mount Tasman, impressive peaks in the Southern Alps.’
  • 59) ‘On a steep site facing south-east overlooking the peaks of the Vardousia range across the valley, it is arranged as a little three-storey tower.’
  • 60) ‘The sky is turquoise, though clouds are bunching up against the peaks of the Absaroka Range in the Washakie Wilderness, where we are headed.’
  • 61) ‘From the summits of the peaks, you can even glimpse Mount Whitney on a clear day.’
  • 62) ‘The Transylvanian Alps in the central region contain the highest peak, Mount Moldoveanu.’
  • 63) ‘The peaks above them rose high, much higher than any mountain had before.’
  • 64) ‘Trim to a triangular shape, leaving the peak as high as possible.’
  • 65) ‘Every tree seems to me to be shaped as a peak uniquely designed for the very spot it stands in.’
  • 66) ‘The shapes of the peaks are broader and less asymmetric.’
  • 67) ‘Its shape has characteristic peaks and troughs.’
  • 68) ‘The position and shape of the peaks did not change with increasing time of incubation.’
  • 69) ‘The paint, like whipped egg-whites, can hold peaks, and dry in the same shape in which it is applied.’
  • 70) ‘We named our phenomenal prominence Igloo since the peak of it was shaped like an ice dome.’
  • 71) ‘Beat the egg whites to stiff peaks, then fold through gently.’
  • 72) ‘Beat four of the egg whites to stiff peaks with the salt.’
  • 73) ‘It is cone shaped with a depression scooped out of its peak.’
  • 74) ‘Beat egg whites until stiff peaks form and fold into batter.’
  • 75) ‘Whip the egg whites to stiff peaks and fold gently into the batter with a spatula.’
  • 76) ‘Whip cream into soft peaks and fold in egg white mixture.’
  • 77) ‘If you look closely, the peaks resemble a sleeping chief.’
  • 78) ‘He noticed Hunter and Brandon heading up a slight incline to the peak of a small mound, and chased after them.’
  • 79) ‘Before I quite realized what was happening, one rose up in an oddly shaped peak and slapped me on the side of the head.’
  • 80) ‘He had a case too, and his was shaped like a pyramid with a rounded peak.’
  • 81) ‘Beat the egg whites until they stand in soft peaks.’
  • 82) ‘In a separate bowl, whisk egg whites to soft peaks and fold into the mixture.’
  • 83) ‘Whisk the egg whites until they make soft peaks then fold into the chocolate mixture.’
  • 84) ‘Kitted out in his team-issue polo shirt, the peak of his baseball cap shading his outdoor complexion, short sleeves revealing the power in his forearms still.’
  • 85) ‘A ponytail of strawberry blond hair hung casually below the reversed peak of her baseball cap.’
  • 86) ‘In addition there was a fellow in a brown bowler hat, another in a shapeless cloth cap with a peak, and both added their encouragements, turning to Waistcoat in a laconic collusion.’
  • 87) ‘Tamely scooting up and down for hours on end is a poor substitute for triple loops and double back flips while still holding on to the peak of your baseball cap with one hand.’
  • 88) ‘My hand sort of began to creep up to the peak of the hat - I felt a salute coming on.’
  • 89) ‘I along with many other men occasionally wear a hat with a peak to protect my eyes from the sun's rays.’
  • 90) ‘It looked like an ornament, like something at the front peak of a ship, a statue of some sort.’
  • 91) ‘But as time passed, he no longer was at his peak, and the quality of his troops declined, while his enemies had learned their lessons.’
  • 92) ‘At their peak, cassette sales alone brought in an estimated $50 million annually.’
  • 93) ‘At his peak he was almost unstoppable and only the quality of competition limited his Scotland appearances to two.’
  • 94) ‘The activity hits a peak and then comes back down around six months.’
  • 95) ‘My muscles, then at their peak, seemed to just explode with energy when called upon.’
  • 96) ‘By April 6, 1919, the agitations were at their peak.’
  • 97) ‘He's happy. ‘Ricky's just about at his peak, now and over the next couple of years.’
  • 98) ‘‘They are at their peak,’ petitions the Celtic manager.’
  • 99) ‘At their peak in 1998, the shares were worth £17.68.’
  • 100) ‘His shares rode the dotcom boom all the way up to $130, making his 30,000 free share options worth almost $4 million at their peak.’
  • 101) ‘His personal assets stood at more than 600 million yuan at their peak.’
  • 102) ‘But at his peak, from 1947-1955, he dominated the box office and television ratings.’
  • 103) ‘At the peak of the project it employed 167 people.’
  • 104) ‘The project at peak employed some 3,500 workers; more than fifty percent of the current workforce is from Point Fortin.’
  • 105) ‘At the peak of the 18-month project more than 600 workers were employed on site and over one million construction hours worked.’
  • 106) ‘At its peak, there were 3,439 workers on the project and tradesmen queued for the chance of a job.’
  • 107) ‘At its peak, about 60 workers were involved with the project, which took a little over a year to complete.’
  • 108) ‘It would take time to get back to my physical peak.’
  • 109) ‘I was 27 years old at the peak of my physical abilities.’
  • 110) ‘He's at his physical peak now and has the great inner confidence that comes with winning the world championship.’
  • 111) ‘What happens in all these cases is that a small number of CDs or whatever sell in enormous quantities, forming a peak on the graph.’
  • 112) ‘The inset shows the second differential curves calculated from peaks 7 and 8 of the quinone spectra.’
  • 113) ‘As expected, loop regions show more motion than helical regions, which is reflected in the larger deviations from the starting point as indicated by peaks in the graph.’
  • 114) ‘The peaks in the graph represent changes in power due to pairwise LD between the two neutral markers.’
  • 115) ‘Also evident and of concern is the fact that the peak of the graph occurs at 5 SED.’
  • 116) ‘A peak in the graph is expected to be centered around a site containing a balanced polymorphism.’
  • 117) ‘When the data is returned to Earth, the measurements are displayed in graphs as peaks, with the most abundant mineral boasting the tallest peak.’
  • 118) ‘This essentially gives them sensitivity curves with very broad peaks, so their visual systems are nearly spectrally neutral.’
  • 119) ‘For example, some oil production curves have multiple peaks.’
  • 120) ‘It can be noted that the curve shows close peaks on chromosomes 1, 2, 3, and 6.’
  • 121) ‘However, cell cycle length was unaffected by this treatment, notwithstanding the presence of a small peak in the curve at 14 h.’
  • 122) ‘The sweet spot is defined by two lines near the peak of the curve.’
  • 123) ‘The average likelihood shows a bell-shaped curve with the peak at the QTL position.’
  • 124) ‘The height of these characteristic peaks indicates the quantity of each element present.’
  • 125) ‘The next step is to chop the copies into different lengths, and these, when graphed, give the peaks that are the profile of the bacteria in that soil.’
  • 126) ‘Many sets of phones have a response curve featuring peaks and valleys with high amplitude but low bandwidth.’
  • 127) ‘When high hardness is the ultimate need, the material must be treated in such a way that the peak of the curve is reached.’
  • 128) ‘Eventually, however, the peak of the curve is reached, and further increases in stress cause a decline in performance.’
  • 129) ‘It is taken as the point at which the curve exhibits a peak or maintains a continuous displacement increase with no further increase in pull.’
  • 130) ‘Figure 2a shows a comparison of the ratios of the two peaks of luminescence obtained from full datasets for two separate experiments.’
  • 131) ‘In 1980, the suicide rate in Denmark peaked and reached a level that was among the highest in the world, with 34 suicides per 100 000 inhabitants.’
  • 132) ‘Values for vineyards peaked in 2000 in the range of $85,000 to $180,000 per acre, but sales activity in 2003 was virtually nil.’
  • 133) ‘Farther out, some see rates peaking at 5.25 per cent in the first half of 2005.’
  • 134) ‘The inflation rate which peaked at 8.8 per cent in late September dropped steeply from December to below 5 per cent in January.’
  • 135) ‘Economists now believe interest rates could peak at 5.5 per cent or rise even sharper if the housing market and borrowing fail to slow.’
  • 136) ‘The history of sheep is often left in the 1870s, when the value of wool exported peaked at over £3 million.’
  • 137) ‘The unemployment rate peaked at 8.9 percent in the spring and dropped to 8.4 percent by the end of the year.’
  • 138) ‘British interest rates are likely to peak at 5.25 per cent in 2005, up from the current 4.25 per cent.’
  • 139) ‘At worst, rates will peak at 4 per cent in 2006 before they start falling again.’
  • 140) ‘As the decade wore on, organised employment increased marginally, peaking in 1997.’
  • 141) ‘Consumption went along with an increase in global growth in 2004, which peaked at about 4.5 per cent.’
  • 142) ‘The province has finally broken the 50 percent barrier - in 1996 the pass rate peaked at 50 percent, but dropped off again.’
  • 143) ‘The bazaar will usually last for between three and five nights, peaking in popularity and attendance on the first and last nights.’
  • 144) ‘Respiratory and pulmonary diseases peaked in cold weather.’
  • 145) ‘In the early part of the last century, most diseases peaked and were subsiding before medicine discovered the cure.’
  • 146) ‘The increases in both cases peaked after the recession was over, the result of the time it takes to enact and implement taxes.’
  • 147) ‘Although oil's price increases may peak in the short-term, the global energy industry is in the throes of a structural transformation.’
  • 148) ‘The first wave of killings started over the summer 2003, peaking in early 2004.’
  • 149) ‘As summer temperatures peak, however, most people are wearing the bare minimum that decency allows.’
  • 150) ‘The birth rate peaked in March 1947, long before government intervention took effect.’
  • 151) ‘Actually, yes, it is possible to hold a high, but not peak, level of fitness for a long time.’
  • 152) ‘PC manufacturers developed state-of-the-art thermal solutions to ensure that notebooks run at the peak performance level under normal conditions.’
  • 153) ‘The text is addressed to all performers, athletes, business people, trial lawyers and anyone else who needs guidance on how to work at their peak performance level.’
  • 154) ‘He had worked himself up to the highest level of peak performance he thought he could - yet a mere boy who had never in his life even thought of being bioenhanced had defeated him.’
  • 155) ‘Consequently you can loose your motivation to continue to train hard and end up in a difficult place, not able to recover your peak performance level.’
  • 156) ‘The Swiss crowd always spurs me to perform at peak level.’
  • 157) ‘The bullpen is the only area of the team operating at or near peak level.’
  • 158) ‘When someone wins, it's because all facets of the organization are working at a peak level.’
  • 159) ‘Flush toxins from your body and keep metabolic processes humming along at peak levels.’
  • 160) ‘Also, peak levels of both can be maintained with a limited amount of training.’
  • 161) ‘Now, however, they have retreated six to eight percentage points from their peak levels.’
  • 162) ‘Kerr, in is usual fashion, declined to reveal his team selection after Ireland completed their preparations yesterday on a Lansdowne Road pitch that is in peak condition.’
  • 163) ‘White, meanwhile, continues his battle for peak fitness and a Yorkshire recall after impressing with an innings of 121 against the Yorkshire Academy last Sunday.’
  • 164) ‘As the horse was at peak fitness and would have been full of himself, Sheeran prescribed mild sedation to avoid the risk of the horse injuring himself when undergoing treatment in the hydrotherapy unit.’
  • 165) ‘But while the Georgian house has been kept in peak condition, the 260 acres of landscaped grounds have become overgrown and wild.’
  • 166) ‘It's in peak condition and with a facility like this on our own doorstep, it would be a pity not to use it.’
  • 167) ‘With the World Championships in Helsinki starting only two weeks after this meeting, all our top athletes should be in peak condition.’
  • 168) ‘Thin on top and thick around the thighs, the striker's career has been one long worry about weight, knee complaints and the fight to find the peak condition that comes so easily to others.’
  • 169) ‘‘I watch from a distance now and am disappointed neither club is in peak condition,’ he said with understatement.’
  • 170) ‘And should he come into the ring in peak condition and mindful of the game-plan of his excellent trainer, a very good contest this may well be.’
  • 171) ‘The facility's energy strategies will result in a 67 percent reduction in electric energy use during peak demand hours.’
  • 172) ‘People will use their cars less as a result, reducing air pollution, decreasing traffic congestion and lessening peak period demands on public transport.’
  • 173) ‘The plan also calls on employers to consider introducing flexi-times, so that the effect of the peak demand by traffic on the road network can be diluted.’
  • 174) ‘You can really tell when the traffic peak hours are.’
  • 175) ‘While the inner ring road has peak hour traffic of 12,000 vehicles, the intermediate ring road has 7,000.’
  • 176) ‘At present the city struggles to keep traffic moving at peak hours.’
  • 177) ‘During peak hours, traffic is at its highest and it is next to impossible to traverse the road.’
  • 178) ‘Even outside the peak hours, the traffic heading between the north and south of the city is tailing back.’
  • 179) ‘The lethal combination of peak hour traffic and rain had resulted in chaos on the roads.’
  • 180) ‘Meanwhile, the peak demand in the city is 226 MW.’
  • 181) ‘As a result there have been some changes to shift patterns to better meet demands at peak times.’
  • 182) ‘He has a skill as an electrician which is in peak demand.’
  • 183) ‘There are options worth exploring to reduce this peak demand.’
  • 184) ‘A third car will also be available for times of peak demand.’
  • 185) ‘Due to the nature of the position, flexibility is required to meet peak season demands and festive occasions.’
  • 186) ‘The early evening is a peak period when demand is exceptionally high.’
  • 187) ‘I would be surprised if we got back to the peak level of 1999-2000.’
  • 188) ‘The initiative involves tackling alcohol-fuelled violence in town centres involving extra levels of policing at peak times.’
  • 189) ‘Despite having the best network defenses, enterprises were helpless to maintain their peak level of operation.’
  • 190) ‘Brewers also found 2003 a bitter year as sales of beer and stout continued to decline from the peak levels of 1999 and 2000.’

Examples

  • 1) Take a peek and pop the pounds and pennies back in your purse.
  • 2) While her audience gets a peek into her reality, there is still a great deal of planning.
  • 3) We had a sneaky peek and were blown away.
  • 4) The band was lucky to get a sneak peek when it was still in its early stages.
  • 5) We get to peek behind the scenes of two illustrious gardens tonight.
  • 6) The video evidence from our experiment proves just how bad men are at taking a sneaky peek.
  • 7) Getting a peek inside is not easy.
  • 8) Sounds to us like she was having a sneaky peek in advance.
  • 9) Get a sneak peek on the right.
  • 10) Get a sneak peek of her investigations at thesundaytimes.
  • 11) Few can resist a quick peek at the spines on a bookcase and making some pretty bold generalisations based on them.
  • 12) Search for the video online for an exclusive peek at what's in store.
  • 13) Women were more circumspect, with only one in ten admitting having a sneaky peek.
  • 14) We'd love a sneaky peek into your wardrobe.
  • 15) This will allow humankind to peek up to two metres beneath the Martian surface for the first time.
  • 16) The packages look great but a quick peek behind the pricing shows the cheapest deals don't include flights.
  • 17) FANCY a peek inside exclusive and hidden gardens of London?
  • 18) It was because of this that I sneaked a peek at episode two.
  • 19) We take a peek (from behind the sofa).
  • 20) I'd had a quick peek at the menu online and knew the credit card was going to take a hammering.
  • 21) Extras include cast and crew interviews, a peek behind the scenes and the UK trailer.
  • 22) This week, I bring you an exclusive peek at the future of video games.
  • 23) Maybe I should take a peek into my wife's bag after all.
  • 24) Very recently, I finally allowed myself to be vulnerable with my husband and let him get a quick peek.
  • 25) Elsewhere, we go behind the scenes at Strictly for an exclusive peek into what the stars get up to backstage on o the day of the show.
  • 26) ‘Judy bit her lip, opened the door to the operating room just a crack, and quickly peeked inside.’
  • 27) ‘I wait for Diania to wake and dress, then I slip out of the storage facility and, still twitching, peek out into the room.’
  • 28) ‘She peeks under the wrapping quickly then sets it back.’
  • 29) ‘He quickly peeked around the corner of the kitchen to check that he hadn't been heard.’
  • 30) ‘Griffin quickly peeked into the tent and saw the armoury, he was smiling from ear to ear.’
  • 31) ‘She quickly peeked into the pot and gave a disappointed sigh before rushing to open the door.’
  • 32) ‘She just wanted to peek inside quickly to see who it was, then she would gladly leave with Josh.’
  • 33) ‘I stayed behind after classes were over for the day and peeked into the detention room.’
  • 34) ‘All we need is to be allowed to peek behind the curtain.’
  • 35) ‘I'm glad our wedding photographer didn't make us peek out coyly from behind a tree or some such nonsense.’
  • 36) ‘He peeks inside a room and then enters, turning on the lights.’
  • 37) ‘He peeks behind the curtains, an amateurish move on his part, but nothing too bad.’
  • 38) ‘Ms. Robbs cracked the door of her son's room, peeking in at his sleeping face.’
  • 39) ‘Leanne called softly, walking throughout the house, peeking into all the rooms.’
  • 40) ‘She crouched behind a tent, peeking out to see if there was any way through.’
  • 41) ‘Lynn walked right on by, peeking into Jessie's room to make sure she was alone.’
  • 42) ‘On my way back, I paused by the open door of the spare room, peeking into it with interest.’
  • 43) ‘From there she peeked into the family room, where the prince was sleeping soundly.’
  • 44) ‘Then a little blond head peeked out from behind the door and wobbled toward me.’
  • 45) ‘She peeked at me from behind her fingers and laughed miserably.’
  • 46) ‘The distant rays of the sun had just begun to peek slightly over the horizon.’
  • 47) ‘He noticed one of her toes peeking out of a shoe - covered with dust, just like his own bare toes.’
  • 48) ‘They did, and when I walked, the tips of the toes peeked out beneath the folds of silk.’
  • 49) ‘I looked down into her face: teeth peeking through in a slight grin and muscles locked with determination.’
  • 50) ‘Roots begin to creep out from the bottom of the pot around drainage holes or they peek through the top soil.’
  • 51) ‘Huge shoals of orange anthias sway in and out of the colourful soft corals while honeycomb moray eels peek out from holes in the coral gap.’
  • 52) ‘Baby emperor penguins peek out from pouches just over their fathers' feet.’
  • 53) ‘From the street, the new interventions poke and peek out slyly above rooftops and through gaps in the street frontage.’
  • 54) ‘Ads already peek up at successful putters from inside golf holes.’
  • 55) ‘The toes of her little Cinderella feet peeked out from under the frills of her nightgown.’
  • 56) ‘She was covered head to toe in mud and bits of vegetation peeked out of her wind blown ponytail.’
  • 57) ‘His hair cascaded down his face, obscuring his eyes but allowing the slightest hint of a frown to peek through.’
  • 58) ‘Moonlight peeked in through the gaping hole in the roof and the stars winked down at them.’
  • 59) ‘The trees loomed high above their heads, the moon peeking through the small clearings from the leaves.’
  • 60) ‘The sun was threatening to peek over the horizon, and Darion reluctantly stood to go.’
  • 61) ‘Use scissors to trim the sticks so that the candies peek out above the edge of the cake.’
  • 62) ‘Every now and then he heard a mumble or something else that caused him to sneak a quick peek at her.’
  • 63) ‘He dared to sneak a quick peek at the judge and saw that there were tears in her eyes.’
  • 64) ‘It started to rain inside the classroom although (after a quick peek at the window) it was sunny outside.’
  • 65) ‘Smiling, she got out of bed, taking a quick peek out the window; it was still dark.’
  • 66) ‘‘But I was dying to find our more, so seeing the lid was missing I thought I'd risk a quick peek,’ he said.’
  • 67) ‘It's worth staying there to experience the sheer extravagance at first hand, or you could, of course, just ask the friendly reception staff for a quick peek.’
  • 68) ‘What I'm trying to say here is, you might want to take a quick peek at his column if you haven't already.’
  • 69) ‘Even with a quick peek into a guest bathroom, he'll pause for a second to straighten the bottles of liquid hand soap.’
  • 70) ‘As I walk in I notice that the previous name has not been removed so I take a quick peek.’
  • 71) ‘I rarely got stuck, but when I did, a quick peek in the answer book enabled me to work backwards.’
  • 72) ‘After a quick peek toward the supervisor, I looked at the aircraft and instantly was sickened.’
  • 73) ‘There are two trailers on the website that provide a quick peek at the movie.’
  • 74) ‘He took a quick peek at his friend, that love sick look splattered oh so plainly across his face.’
  • 75) ‘He glanced at his wife - a quick, despondent peek - and then looked at me pitifully.’
  • 76) ‘She took a quick peek on the other side of the street.’
  • 77) ‘I took this chance to take a quick peek at her name tag.’
  • 78) ‘He planned to take a quick peek and size up the situation.’
  • 79) ‘I take a quick peek at the card to my left and read the name.’
  • 80) ‘One art lesson Darren had a quick peek at what she was doing.’
  • 81) ‘A quick peek at his watch showed the hour steadily approaching two.’
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