myth vs legend

myth legend

Definitions

  • 1) A person or thing held in excessive or quasi-religious awe or admiration based on popular legend
  • 2) uncountable such stories as a genre
  • 3) A traditional story which embodies a belief regarding some fact or phenomenon of experience, and in which often the forces of nature and of the soul are personified; a sacred narrative regarding a god, a hero, the origin of the world or of a people, etc.
  • 4) A commonly-held but false belief, a common misconception; a fictitious or imaginary person or thing; a popular conception about a real person or event which exaggerates or idealizes reality.
  • 5) A popular belief or story that has become associated with a person, institution, or occurrence, especially one considered to illustrate a cultural ideal.
  • 6) A traditional, typically ancient story dealing with supernatural beings, ancestors, or heroes that serves as a fundamental type in the worldview of a people, as by explaining aspects of the natural world or delineating the psychology, customs, or ideals of society.
  • 7) Such stories considered as a group.
  • 8) A fictitious story, person, or thing.
  • 9) A fiction or half-truth, especially one that forms part of an ideology.
  • 10) history made of, or mixed with, myths.
  • 11) A story of great but unknown age which originally embodied a belief regarding some fact or phenomenon of experience, and in which often the forces of nature and of the soul are personified; an ancient legend of a god, a hero, the origin of a race, etc.; a wonder story of prehistoric origin; a popular fable which is, or has been, received as historical.
  • 12) A person or thing existing only in imagination, or whose actual existence is not verifiable.
  • 13) a traditional story accepted as history; serves to explain the world view of a people
  • 14) A traditional story in which the operations of natural forces and occurrences in human history are represented as the actions of individual living beings, especially of men, or of imaginary extra-human beings acting like men; a tale handed down from primitive times, and in form historical, but in reality involving elements of early religious views, as respecting the origin of things, the powers of nature and their workings, the rise of institutions, the history of races and communities, and the like; a legend of cosmogony, of gods and heroes, and of animals possessing wondrous gifts.
  • 15) In a looser sense, an invented story; something purely fabulous or having no existence in fact; an imaginary or fictitious individual or object: as, his wealthy relative was a mere myth; his having gone to Paris is a myth. Myth is thus often used as a euphemism for falsehood or lie.
  • 16) A landmark for directing the course of a vessel through a channel, or along a dangerous shore.
  • 17) An abbreviation of mythological, mythology.

Definitions

  • 1) The text on a coin.
  • 2) A story in which a kernel of truth is embellished to an unlikely degree.
  • 3) A person of extraordinary accomplishment.
  • 4) A key to the symbols and color codes on a map, chart, etc.
  • 5) A fabricated backstory for a spy, with associated documents and records; a cover story.
  • 6) UK, Ireland, Australia, New Zealand, colloquial, slang A cool, nice or helpful person, especially one who is male.
  • 7) A leading protagonist in a historical legend.
  • 8) A story of unknown origin describing plausible but extraordinary past events.
  • 9) An unverified story handed down from earlier times, especially one popularly believed to be historical.
  • 10) An explanatory caption accompanying an illustration.
  • 11) An inscription or title on an object, such as a coin.
  • 12) One that inspires legends or achieves legendary fame.
  • 13) An explanatory table or list of the symbols appearing on a map or chart.
  • 14) A body or collection of such stories.
  • 15) An inscription, motto, or title, esp. one surrounding the field in a medal or coin, or placed upon an heraldic shield or beneath an engraving or illustration.
  • 16) See under Golden.
  • 17) That which is appointed to be read; especially, a chronicle or register of the lives of saints, formerly read at matins, and in the refectories of religious houses.
  • 18) Any wonderful story coming down from the past, but not verifiable by historical record; a myth; a fable.
  • 19) A story respecting saints; especially, one of a marvelous nature.
  • 20) brief description accompanying an illustration
  • 21) a story about mythical or supernatural beings or events
  • 22) In the early church, a selection of readings from Scripture appointed for use at divine service; later, and more especially, the chronicle or register of the lives of the saints, formerly read at matins and in the refectories of religious houses.
  • 23) A roll; list; book.
  • 24) An entertaining story, especially in early times one relating to wonders or miracles told of a saint; hence, any unauthentic and improbable or non-historical narrative handed down from early times; a tradition.
  • 25) A musical composition set to a poetical story, or intended to express such a story without words.
  • 26) In numismatics, the words or letters stamped on the obverse or the reverse of a coin or medal: sometimes differentiated from, inscription as the reading around the circumference of a coin or medal, and sometimes as all that is inscribed excepting the name of the sovereign or other person represented.
  • 27) An inscription or device of any kind; particularly, the inscription on a shield or coat or arms, or the explanatory inscription on a monument or under a plan or drawing, or the inscription which accompanies a picture, whether descriptive or supposed to stand for words used by the persons represented in the picture.
  • 28) archaic, transitive To tell or narrate; to recount.
  • 29) To tell or narrate, as a legend.

Examples

  • 1) One of the myths of the past six years is that Britain has imposed far more austerity than America.
  • 2) To say that a story is a myth is not to say that it is necessarily fictional.
  • 3) Places that seemed full of myth and magic.
  • 4) Why is it that there is a myth that old people are sickly?
  • 5) One of the great myths about modern football is that it is purely a results business.
  • 6) It is the kind of myth an ancient people might make to explain celestial phenomena.
  • 7) The idea that criminals generally avoid leaving their fingerprints behind by wiping them away or wearing gloves is a modern myth.
  • 8) Religion is not myth or magic.
  • 9) That message has seeped through to such an extent that popular myth encourages the notion that sporting greatness is open to anyone.
  • 10) One of the myths of our age is that we all need more choice, more freedom.
  • 11) It is a religious book, full of myths and parables.
  • 12) Equally important is hearing the stories, sagas and myths about past and present managers.
  • 13) But he also sought refuge in history, allegory and myth.
  • 14) Today we cannot hope to understand completely just what the myths meant to the Northern peoples.
  • 15) The rock's great antiquity means fanciful myths have grown around it.
  • 16) History of myth and magic?
  • 17) One of the most curious aspects to his story is the myths that accrued, myths that he fought hard to keep alive.
  • 18) The Russian Revolution has proven itself to be fertile ground for allegory and myth.
  • 19) The beauty myth tells a story: The quality called "beauty" objectively and universally exists.
  • 20) The myth may be engaged in the transmission of a narrative of early deeds and events, having a foundation in truth, which truth, however, has been greatly distorted and perverted by the omission or introduction of circumstances and personages, and then it constitutes the _historical myth_.
  • 21) Many use the term myth in a pejorative sense to mean that the stories described are not factually true.
  • 22) It's being discovered that much of the Clinton-supporters-moving-to-McCain myth is being stoked by Republicans trying to weaken the Democratic Party.
  • 23) As the term myth may suggest, it is something which is absurd or fictional.
  • 24) Among the biggest battles the union is fighting is what it calls the myth that federal workers are overpaid and don't work hard.
  • 25) Still another myth is the so-called “generous offer” turned down by Palestinian President Arafat at Camp David in 2000.
  • 26) At a hearing Thursday, Rep. Scott Garrett R-N.J., chairman of a House Financial Services subcommittee, disputed what he called a "myth" that the agency has been starved for funds.
  • 27) ‘Classic Norse myth is rife with stories concerning Loki's attempts to subvert Odin's authority, and Odin's retaliatory actions.’
  • 28) ‘In later Greek myth Hecate is presented as the daughter of Hera and Zeus.’
  • 29) ‘I think the timocratic structure of divinity in early Greek myth might be quite a good thing to apply to the tale of Eris, the apple and the Trojan War.’
  • 30) ‘In Greek myth, the story of the Crab is not a tale of heroic glory, but rather a celebration of loyalty, persistence and determination.’
  • 31) ‘Its legend in Norse myth shows how Odin won it for the Gods and tells that it was brewed from the blood of Kvasir, the poet.’
  • 32) ‘The proposed link between the grail episode and early Celtic myth was not the only suggestion put forward to explain the grail.’
  • 33) ‘One of the most widely believed myths in America today is the belief that corporations are an inherent part of capitalism.’
  • 34) ‘Allow me to dispel a few popular myths about US taxes.’
  • 35) ‘He said the average customers were men who gambled at weekends, dispelling the popular myth that housewives were behind the rise in the popularity of poker.’
  • 36) ‘These myths were widely believed because they seemed to support the idea of evolutionary naturalism.’
  • 37) ‘This chapter should help to dispel the popular myth of ‘genetic determinism’, the view that our genes determine our phenotype.’
  • 38) ‘But, then, ignorance of the facts is a great aid to belief in myths.’
  • 39) ‘Among the most common myths is the belief that it is contagious or caused by poor hygiene.’
  • 40) ‘However, Kay wants to expose this belief as a fashion myth.’
  • 41) ‘As such, this book attempts to burst the bubble of the super-mom myth, the idea that one can juggle both tasks, and succeed at both.’
  • 42) ‘It aims at creating awareness about the snakes among the rural populace and also to dispel the many myths surrounding the reptiles.’
  • 43) ‘At the top of their list of myths was the idea that males are primarily interested in objects and females are primarily interested in people.’
  • 44) ‘It's one of the great myths, this idea that you can directly derive a creature's temperament from its diet.’
  • 45) ‘For example, how widely were hunting myths like these spread throughout Europe?’
  • 46) ‘Of course it was a myth, but the idea gave people hope.’
  • 47) ‘It is widely regarded as a myth, but could it actually be true?’
  • 48) ‘Nonetheless, it is a myth that persists as widely accepted conventional wisdom.’
  • 49) ‘The myth consists in the belief that only deflation entails unequal and arbitrary burdens for the citizens.’
  • 50) ‘In a neat twist, the myth is now so widely believed that many people really are changing their behaviour as a result.’
  • 51) ‘In addition, she said there was a need to dispel some of the myths around cocaine such as the notion that it is relatively safe and relatively clean.’
  • 52) ‘Both major political parties propagate myths about young people.’
  • 53) ‘In more recent times, myths and fabrications were used to justify America and Britain's Gulf War of 1991.’
  • 54) ‘I hope to see a few myths and untruths put to bed in 2004, but first a confession.’
  • 55) ‘By the time the number of examples of myths, false assertions and cases of deliberate disinformation had reached 40 I reckoned it was time to publish them.’
  • 56) ‘His analyses of objects, media and other signs often seek to debunk the myths, or false representations, that surround them and appear natural.’
  • 57) ‘His secret masters of the world may be a myth, but imagining they exist can make for an enjoyable reading experience.’
  • 58) ‘It should not surprise anyone if it turns out that Jean Houston's autobiography is a piece of fiction, a heroic myth spun by her imagination out of the fabric of her desires.’
  • 59) ‘Idealized, regressive myths of a better, more magical time and place are a poor platform for making art.’
  • 60) ‘There are myths and distorted concepts out there that may not be true.’
  • 61) ‘Racial conflicts are being encouraged with vastly exaggerated figures and myths.’
  • 62) ‘The film is a myth about idealism and adulthood.’
  • 63) ‘I guess it was an exaggeration of the collective myths all families spin around themselves.’
  • 64) ‘Well, I think, to some extent, the liberal media was always a myth and exaggeration.’
  • 65) ‘Pati demolishes the myth of a monolithic Christianity by presenting the details of the rebellion of the Mundas of Gangpur, a princely state.’
  • 66) ‘The obvious answer is that this new meme spread so fast because it piggybacks with a very old meme, the myth of Christian persecution.’
  • 67) ‘And then the third one, the Christian myth about perfectibility not here and now in this world, but in some future time and place.’
  • 68) ‘Here we encounter the second major difference between the science and the myth.’
  • 69) ‘The Western myth looms large in the American imagination, but the place and its people are not well understood.’

Examples

  • 1) To become a legend at the club you need to stay for a long time.
  • 2) I'd like you to become a legend.
  • 3) legend says :'It was great to work with people who are at the top of their field.
  • 4) But it was a batting performance which thrust him into cricketing legend.
  • 5) They could be from myths and legends.
  • 6) Certainly his was a life made for legend.
  • 7) Maybe that way it can become legend.
  • 8) We have lost a true legend of the game.
  • 9) The lack of video evidence meant the tour became the stuff of music myth and legend.
  • 10) It says that you can become a terrace legend.
  • 11) He knows his stuff and is a true legend.
  • 12) He is a true legend of horse racing.
  • 13) Bull may be a legend in these parts but that does not mean he is immune to the banter.
  • 14) These are our myths and legends.
  • 15) In ancient times, legends were passed on through crude drawings on walls.
  • 16) It's a new sound for the legends and fans may be surprised by funk overtones.
  • 17) The life and legend of the jazz baroness 272pp.
  • 18) She has become a legend because of Strictly and she is loving it.
  • 19) The main beneficiaries are the vultures, who fly so high that local legends say they are able to see into the future.
  • 20) The Motown legend plays two London shows.
  • 21) Those who did the killing challenged centuries of legend, which says that those who kill a sacred white stag bring down a curse upon their heads.
  • 22) The only knowledge they had of an outside world was the legend of an ancient king's arrival, when the island was settled.
  • 23) MARADONA the legend of football my most adorable football legend~ Full name: Diego
  • 24) It conjures the Orpheus legend from myriad oblique angles — the long, elusive Ashbery poem the mezzo-soprano sings (Kristen Hoff, showing a clear-stream tone and superb diction) gives snapshots of the story while questioning both its very essence and whether living on in legend is really living at all.
  • 25) Under the term legend the modern concept would include every untrue tale.
  • 26) The term legend, of course, is a fairly flexible one in sports broadcasting, but The Shankly Years, the first in the series, boasted a font of great anecdotes about the eponymous genuine article.
  • 27) February 16th, 2010 at 2: 18 pm wildwilly1111 (I - Bank of America Merrill Lynch) says: cch sharpton, a legend is his own mind.
  • 28) Ms. BOB used the word "legend" to describe Ms. Elias, without knowing that Ms. Elias actually is a legend in the opera world, having performed at the Met 686 times since making her debut there in 1954.
  • 29) Just inside the legend is an encircling pair of olive branches, crossed and tied at the bottom but slightly apart at the top.
  • 30) A final observation of the legend is the emphasis placed on maize (which is indigenous to the New World).
  • 31) ‘The legend of Tristan and Isolde, one of the most popular, was tacked on to Arthur's.’
  • 32) ‘This was pretty much the starting point of the Arthurian legends with regard to the Holy Grail.’
  • 33) ‘Whatever historical events underlie the legend of the Trojan War did not occur as depicted here.’
  • 34) ‘His early interest in European legends resulted in a Master's Degree on the Grail legend.’
  • 35) ‘These ancient people bring us the legend of King Arthur and the Holy Grail.’
  • 36) ‘It consists of a systematic survey of the lake monster theme in the legends and popular folklore of Québec.’
  • 37) ‘They presently have a wide variety of books, including a section on mythology and the legend of King Arthur.’
  • 38) ‘The chapter ends by providing numerous excerpts from historical legends and folklore that mention the robin.’
  • 39) ‘It is difficult to distinguish authentic historical information from legends within the accounts given.’
  • 40) ‘All the ethnic groups of Uganda have a rich oral tradition of tales, legends, stories, proverbs, and riddles.’
  • 41) ‘Welsh culture was based on an oral tradition of legends, myths, and folktales passed down from generation to generation.’
  • 42) ‘Oral histories and legends abound, but how reliable are they?’
  • 43) ‘However, there is a strong oral tradition consisting of stories, legends, fables, poems, riddles, and songs.’
  • 44) ‘These decades of collecting and collating myths, legends and historical snippets are clearly reflected in breadth and depth of the book.’
  • 45) ‘It is an interesting survey, and shows how creative people still continue to mine myths, legends and traditional culture for material.’
  • 46) ‘Children were once told fairytales, myths, legends and fables because they had a meaning, a moral or a special psychological relevance.’
  • 47) ‘Born in Huddersfield, the 45-year-old is the son of a draughtsman and a mother with a passion for historical myths and legends.’
  • 48) ‘To most people, the old myths and legends are quaint reminders of a bygone and superstitious age, and have nothing much to tell us anymore.’
  • 49) ‘The legend of Romulus and Remus gives the impression that Rome was created very quickly; the truth was very different.’
  • 50) ‘Every culture has its own body of folklore, myths, legends, song, poetry, stories, and parables.’
  • 51) ‘The legend of the notable Saint Anton is connected to plague victims and all diseases.’
  • 52) ‘These local religious festivals usually center on a particular saint or legend.’
  • 53) ‘One of legends concerning Saint George is the famous dragon story, with which he is invariably portrayed.’
  • 54) ‘A book that explores the Catholic faith and Mexican culture is The Lady of Guadalupe, the legend of the patron saint of Mexico.’
  • 55) ‘That is the true meaning of the legend of Saint George.’
  • 56) ‘We'll ask a living legend of broadcast journalism, Walter Cronkite, the former CBS News anchor.’
  • 57) ‘How does he feel sharing the stage with a living legend?’
  • 58) ‘Oliver ‘Smokey’ Charles, 79, is a living legend when it comes to football in St Lucia.’
  • 59) ‘The artist, who has become a legend in his own lifetime, is also currently working on a permanent Jewish holocaust memorial in Manhattan.’
  • 60) ‘Paying tribute to his colleague on Monday, Killarney Jarvey Association spokesman, Pat O'Sullivan, said Mick was a legend in his own lifetime.’
  • 61) ‘Rob Roy succeeded in becoming a legend in his own lifetime of 63 years and was compared with Robin Hood while he was still alive.’
  • 62) ‘John was a legend in his own lifetime, and was exceptionally popular in the locality where he had lived.’
  • 63) ‘And yet it would be one of those ‘tiny observable effects’ that turned Einstein into a living legend.’
  • 64) ‘Growing up as the legacy of a living legend isn't easy.’
  • 65) ‘When Sidney Kidman left his Norwood home, he was thirteen years old and eventually would become ‘a legend in his own lifetime’.’
  • 66) ‘Charcot became a legend in his own lifetime and was elected to several major medical and neurologic societies in Europe and accorded many honors.’
  • 67) ‘Florence Nightingale's pioneering development of military and civilian nursing and of hospital care, made her a legend in her own lifetime.’
  • 68) ‘Indeed he is a living legend in the tennis world.’
  • 69) ‘But he was also bigger than life, a living legend who at age 33 could swim faster than he had at 21.’
  • 70) ‘He is a living legend, as his achievements testify.’
  • 71) ‘The coach who helped guide Amir Khan to an Olympic silver medal says the Bolton teenager can become a boxing legend.’
  • 72) ‘Edward Ryan Aikau was a Hawaiian surfer, lifeguard and legend that dedicated his life to the ocean and ocean safety.’
  • 73) ‘Mikey Sheehy, one of Kerry's footballing legends, has eight All-Ireland medals after his exploits in the Green and Gold.’
  • 74) ‘But being handed a gold medal by the swimming legend this summer has been the highlight so far of the 12-year-old's fledgling career in the pool.’
  • 75) ‘Even jazz legend Louis Armstrong makes a cameo appearance as the Harmonia Gardens' bandleader, singing the film's title track.’
  • 76) ‘The obverse of all denominations bore a harp, along with the legend Saorstat Eireann and the date the coin was struck.’
  • 77) ‘Around the lower border is the same legend as on the gold coin.’
  • 78) ‘The 200 baht coins have the same legend as the 100 baht coin.’
  • 79) ‘Captions or legends must be submitted with all photographs, drawings, and tables.’
  • 80) ‘By improving legends and headings, authors will entice readers to learn more of their story; ultimately, more, not less, text will be read.’
  • 81) ‘The abbreviations are explained in the inset legend to Figure 3.’
  • 82) ‘Species are referred to by symbols in the legend.’
  • 83) ‘All abbreviations are explained in the legend to Fig 1.’
  • 84) ‘The figure contains two subfigures, each composed of three graphs, which are explained in the legend for figure 14.’
  • 85) ‘Include glossaries or legends as helpful tools.’
  • 86) ‘The length of such multimers is specified in the legend to Fig.2.’
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