peal vs peel

peal peel

Definitions

  • 1) A loud sound, or a succession of loud sounds, as of bells, thunder, cannon, shouts, laughter, of a multitude, etc.
  • 2) A loud burst of noise.
  • 3) A ringing of a set of bells, especially a change or set of changes rung on bells.
  • 4) A set of bells tuned to each other; a chime.
  • 5) A loud sound, or a succession of loud sounds, as of bells, thunder, cannon, shouts, of a multitude, etc.
  • 6) A set of bells tuned to each other according to the diatonic scale; also, the changes rung on a set of bells.
  • 7) (Zoöl.), Prov. Eng. A small salmon; a grilse; a sewin.
  • 8) See under Ring.
  • 9) a deep prolonged sound (as of thunder or large bells)
  • 10) A loud sound, or a succession of loud sounds, as of bells, thunder, cannon, shouts of a multitude, etc.
  • 11) See peel.
  • 12) A musical phrase or figure played on a set of bells, properly a scale or part of a scale played up or down, but also applied to any melodic figure; a change.
  • 13) A set of bells tuned to one another; a chime or carillon; a ring.
  • 14) Appeal; plaint; accusation.
  • 15) A name used in England for different species of the genus Salmo, as S. salar, the salmon, or S. cambricus, a trout found in England, Ireland, and Norway. The latter is also called sewin.
  • 16) intransitive To sound with a peal or peals.
  • 17) transitive To utter or sound loudly.
  • 18) transitive To assail with noise.
  • 19) UK, dialect To pour out.
  • 20) ring recurrently
  • 21) sound loudly and sonorously
  • 22) Toassailwithnoise.
  • 23) Toappeal.
  • 24) Tostiroragitate.
  • 25) To cause to peal.
  • 26) To sound in a peal; ring.
  • 27) To utter or give out loud sounds.
  • 28) obsolete To appeal.
  • 29) To resound; to echo.
  • 30) Prov. Eng. To pour out.
  • 31) To utter or give forth loudly; to cause to give out loud sounds; to noise abroad.
  • 32) To assail with noise or loud sounds.

Definitions

  • 1) obsolete A fence made of stakes; a stockade.
  • 2) A shovel or similar instrument, now especially a pole with a flat disc at the end used for removing loaves of bread from a baker's oven.
  • 3) An equal or match; a draw.
  • 4) obsolete A stake.
  • 5) curling A takeout which removes a stone from play as well as the delivered stone.
  • 6) A T-shaped implement used by printers and bookbinders for hanging wet sheets of paper on lines or poles to dry.
  • 7) archaic, US The blade of an oar.
  • 8) archaic A small tower, fort, or castle; a keep.
  • 9) Printing A T-shaped pole used for hanging up freshly printed sheets of paper to dry.
  • 10) A chemical peel.
  • 11) A long-handled, shovellike tool used by bakers to move bread or pastries into and out of an oven.
  • 12) A fortified house or tower of a kind constructed in the borderland of Scotland and England in the 1500s.
  • 13) The skin or rind of certain fruits and vegetables.
  • 14) Scot. A small tower, fort, or castle; a keep.
  • 15) The skin or rind.
  • 16) A spadelike implement, variously used, as for removing loaves of bread from a baker's oven; also, a T-shaped implement used by printers and bookbinders for hanging wet sheets of paper on lines or poles to dry. Also, the blade of an oar.
  • 17) The wash or blade of an oar, as distinguished from the loom.
  • 18) An equal; a match: as, they were peels at twelve.
  • 19) A fortified tower; a stronghold.
  • 20) In printing, a wooden pole with a short cross-piece at one end, in the form of the letter , used to convey printed sheets to and from the horizontal poles on which they are dried.
  • 21) The skin, bark or rind of anything: as, the peel of an orange.
  • 22) Synonyms Rind, etc. See skin.
  • 23) A kind of wooden shovel with a broad blade and long handle, used by bakers to put bread into or take it out of the oven.
  • 24) A mark resembling a skewer with a large ring (), formerly used in England as a mark for cattle, a signature-mark for persons unable to write, or the like.
  • 25) croquet To send through a hoop (of a ball other than one's own).
  • 26) intransitive To become detached, come away, especially in flakes or strips; to shed skin in such a way.
  • 27) archaic, transitive To plunder; to pillage, rob.
  • 28) transitive To remove from the outer or top layer of.
  • 29) transitive To remove the skin or outer covering of.
  • 30) Common misspelling of peal: to sound loudly.
  • 31) Synonymsseepare,v.t
  • 32) Toundress.
  • 33) To lose or shed skin, bark, or other covering.
  • 34) To come off in thin strips or pieces, as bark, skin, or paint.
  • 35) To strip or cut away the skin, rind, or bark from; pare.
  • 36) To strip away; pull off.
  • 37) nformal To strip naked; to disrobe. Often used with down .
  • 38) To lose the skin, bark, or rind; to come off, as the skin, bark, or rind does; -- often used with an adverb.
  • 39) To strip off the skin, bark, or rind of; to strip by drawing or tearing off the skin, bark, husks, etc.; to flay; to decorticate.
  • 40) obsolete To plunder; to pillage; to rob.
  • 41) To strip or tear off; to remove by stripping, as the skin of an animal, the bark of a tree, etc.

Examples

  • 1) Her limbs, already aching with fatigue, seemed dragged down further by each peal.
  • 2) A peal of thunder followed the lightning with barely a beat intervening.
  • 3) With each peal the bulb's light was becoming more revelatory.
  • 4) By the end of the day, summer thunder would peal through dry mountain canyons, shaking the land down to its granite bones.
  • 5) ‘I'll bet it was welcomed with peals of bells back in 1820.’
  • 6) ‘Several London churches are mentioned in the rhyme, and the original tune mimicked the peals of their bells.’
  • 7) ‘Late one Friday night a note was slipped through his door warning him there would be a non-stop peal of bells for three hours from 10 am the next morning and suggesting he went out.’
  • 8) ‘Normally the peal of eight bells is heard on Tuesday practice nights, on Sundays when services are held and on many Saturdays when weddings take place.’
  • 9) ‘A flag of St George will fly from the church tower and it is hoped that the ribbon-cutting will be marked by a peal of bells from St George's church tower.’
  • 10) ‘For the last 107 years, the passing of every quarter of an hour has been marked by a peal of bells at a South Yorkshire church.’
  • 11) ‘As Sunday worshippers filed into St Mary's, the faint peal of church bells could be heard above the driving rain.’
  • 12) ‘The deep silence here is broken by the peal of the brass bell gently tapped by a devotee praying for a wish to be granted.’
  • 13) ‘About 10 am the ringers of the bells rang two merry peals when the scholars immediately assembled.’
  • 14) ‘The enemy, hearing the sudden peal, concluded that the Austrian army had arrived during the night to defend the town.’
  • 15) ‘The grandfather clock chimed five times, five heavy, drawn-out peals.’
  • 16) ‘And will continue to be so as long as the peal of wedding bells drowns out everything else.’
  • 17) ‘On the conclusion of his remarks, enthusiastic cheers, the thunder of cannon, and the peals of bells welcomed the visitants to the town.’
  • 18) ‘Her grandma was very devout and the peal of bells was a familiar sound to her in the mornings.’
  • 19) ‘In England, the sound of the organ, choirboys and a peal of bells instantly springs to mind.’
  • 20) ‘The heavy peals of a bell rang out before Alex could respond.’
  • 21) ‘My question was answered when the peal of distant bells rang through the misty woods.’
  • 22) ‘The bell rings its monotonous peal of imprisonment, mocking us for being forced to follow its commands.’
  • 23) ‘The bell rings a harsh peal and the girls stop in their tracks.’
  • 24) ‘All the great cities and towns throughout the country entered with joyous spirit into the peace celebrations, while villages and hamlets, too, had their rejoicing and peals of bells.’
  • 25) ‘As the organist plays the Prelude and Fugue in E Flat by Bach, the bells of the Abbey will be rung half-muffled to a peal of Stedman Caters, comprising 5101 changes.’
  • 26) ‘Maxwell Davies's Stedman Caters for chamber ensemble and Stedman Doubles for clarinet and percussion are based on bell peals.’
  • 27) ‘Yesterday, the celebrations continued with a Jubilee service at St Peter's Church, in Malton, which was followed by a peal of the bells in honour of the Queen's 50th year on the Throne.’
  • 28) ‘It has been four-years since members of St James's Church tower ringers have played a full peal of 12 bells.’
  • 29) ‘To celebrate the centenary of the dedication the guild performed a full peal.’
  • 30) ‘27m high and octagonal in plan, the tower contains a full peal of eight bells on its third floor.’
  • 31) ‘25 years ago: A new peal of bells arrived at St Martin's Church, Coney Street, to replace bells damaged when the church was bombed in 1941.’
  • 32) ‘There are only 10 bells, whereas most English cathedrals have a full peal of 12.’
  • 33) ‘The Anglican Cathedral has the longest nave, largest organ and heaviest and highest peal of bells in the world.’
  • 34) ‘The peal of six was cast in London in 1770, the tenor bell, which was the largest, weighing more than 11 cwt.’
  • 35) ‘The service will begin at 7.15 pm, and will be accompanied by the sound of the newly installed peal of church bells at St Andrew's Church.’
  • 36) ‘From the kitchen, she could hear peals of laughter sounding where Robert, the butler, was doubtless entertaining her younger siblings.’
  • 37) ‘These shows only lasted a few seconds but were always followed by thunderous peals of laughter, especially by the ‘artist’ himself.’
  • 38) ‘I was then seized by sudden peals of laughter which echoed and resounded through the rusting steel roof of the building.’
  • 39) ‘I can almost hear the peals of laughter echoing up and down the land.’
  • 40) ‘Massive peals of laughter rang out from the passenger seat.’
  • 41) ‘Soon, her peals of laughter echoed through the trees around them.’
  • 42) ‘Everyone silenced, looking at him standing there, and then, peals of laughter echoed round the table.’
  • 43) ‘Suddenly there was the sound of a branch breaking in the clutter of trees followed by loud peals of laughter.’
  • 44) ‘In his humorous way he sent people into peals of laughter.’
  • 45) ‘This led to peals of laughter from my partner and the two girls.’
  • 46) ‘Friends they visited recalled the peals of laughter that would come from their room.’
  • 47) ‘It is not unusual for him to burst into peals of laughter on and off the track.’
  • 48) ‘The man behind all this is short in height but it is no tall order for him to send people into peals of laughter.’
  • 49) ‘This was considered a top class joke, and always sent the crowd into peals of laughter.’
  • 50) ‘I peeped at her, bursting into peals of laughter.’
  • 51) ‘Finally, you'd say what I wanted to hear, and then I'd feel relieved for a few seconds, and we'd collapse into peals of laughter.’
  • 52) ‘To her chagrin, Nook burst out in peals of unrestrained mirth.’
  • 53) ‘He and Pamela broke into a peal of stifled giggling!’
  • 54) ‘Again, a peal of laugher erupted from the man beside him.’
  • 55) ‘We were getting dressed in our cabin when we heard Peggy starting to laugh next door and she went on and on, peal after peal.’
  • 56) ‘What's more, the chord sequence, which gently reveals itself to be church bells pealing in the distance, is completely and devastatingly the emotional heart of the thing.’
  • 57) ‘Bells pealed across Monaco yesterday as the principality praised Prince Albert II's rise to the throne and bid a final symbolic farewell to his late father Rainier III.’
  • 58) ‘Just a day after the enclave gathered to choose the successor to John Paul II, white smoke plumed from the Vatican's Sistine Chapel and the bells pealed across Rome.’
  • 59) ‘But when Elizabeth heard the bells pealing to celebrate the death of Mary Queen of Scots, she was horrified.’
  • 60) ‘The church bells pealed for the morning nuptial mass and a reception followed.’
  • 61) ‘The sounds of wedding bells pealed through the air.’
  • 62) ‘A bell pealed and echoed out across the lush lawn, and the children scrambled to their feet.’
  • 63) ‘The bells pealed out in York Minster, St Stephen's, Acomb, St Andrew's, Bishopthorpe, and in other church towers across the region yesterday.’
  • 64) ‘The church bells were still ringing, pealing off their notes of joy across the city.’
  • 65) ‘The church was beautiful tonight, and it was all the more wonderful when, at midnight, the bells began to peal and the whole world rejoiced that Christ was born.’
  • 66) ‘The bell that will peal at the end of Sunday's ceremony was salvaged from the ship and usually sits in the foyer of Forum North.’
  • 67) ‘What surer sign that summer is on its way than the sound of wedding bells, pealing across the countryside?’
  • 68) ‘Church bells can be heard pealing through its streetside windows.’
  • 69) ‘On her wrists and ankles, she wore chains of golden bells which pealed quietly, yet daringly as she moved to take centre stage, standing right before the fire where everyone had gathered.’
  • 70) ‘The bell at the door pealed once again, as it had constantly all day.’
  • 71) ‘It pealed like a bell, but the noise it made was so loud, so all-consuming, that she knew it couldn't be a physical bell.’
  • 72) ‘What he saw was the thunder-lights lifting, and the bells pealing an urgent carillon as the glittering gold ship was spotted.’
  • 73) ‘Two more bells will be installed within the week, but it will be some months before they are heard pealing across Lismore.’
  • 74) ‘The bells of the world's only glass and steel belltower will peal for the longest time ever to celebrate the life of a cancer victim.’
  • 75) ‘They summon, they clang, they peal and they boom in a uniquely cacophonous harmony.’
  • 76) ‘By now, the thunderstorm was fully upon them, with thunder pealing across the sky and lightening streaking all around them as a punishing rain fell.’
  • 77) ‘Shasa's face didn't change, but her laughter pealed in their mind's ears.’
  • 78) ‘A short silence reigned for a few seconds before amused female laughter pealed out.’
  • 79) ‘That did it; I pealed with laughter, Kassi joining me.’
  • 80) ‘To the onlookers below, it seemed as if a second sun lurched drunkenly through the sky, from which blazing goddesses descended and ascended while thunderbolts flashed and pealed.’

Examples

  • 1) peel the potatoes and slice them thinly with a sharp knife or mandolin.
  • 2) The architecture is beginning to peel away.
  • 3) Stir-fry until crispy while you peel and finely chop the shallots.
  • 4) peel the skin off the mackerel and put the flesh into a food processor.
  • 5) peel the eggs and slice into quarters.
  • 6) peel the potatoes and cut into quarters.
  • 7) Leave while you peel and finely chop the onion.
  • 8) Mix the beans, sultanas and lemon peel or zest in a bowl and set aside.
  • 9) In a large bowl, mash the peeled bananas with a fork.
  • 10) peel and slice rest of garlic in thin rounds.
  • 11) Your party trick is peeling a banana with your feet.
  • 12) We are in a house with peeling walls and all the cosy charm of a vacant lot.
  • 13) We all eat skins on wedges and jackets so why throw peel away?
  • 14) Repeat until all the pith and peel is removed.
  • 15) Vintage chic used to be all about peeling paint and utilitarian ticking.
  • 16) It was the fruit peel that preceded it that came as a bit of a shock.
  • 17) Wrap in clingfilm until cool and peel off the skin.
  • 18) Slice the peeled eggs in two and add to the salad.
  • 19) Place a large peeled banana on the foil.
  • 20) Dark green paint peeled off the walls.
  • 21) Time peels away what had obscured the future.
  • 22) Older ones need to be peeled to remove the hard skin and cooked.
  • 23) They contain special acids for a face peel at home.
  • 24) Serve the delicious combination with new potatoes tossed with mint and a lettuce salad with thin slices of peeled cucumber and chives.
  • 25) Shake with ice, serve with lemon peel.
  • 26) The walls were utterly bare, the grey paint slightly peeling.
  • 27) Meanwhile, peel and finely chop the shallots and garlic.
  • 28) peel the rind from 1 of the oranges into wide strips and add to the pan.
  • 29) Shake and pour, adding a sliver of lemon peel to the glass.
  • 30) Remove from heat and allow to cool slightly, then peel away the outer skin.
  • 31) Halve, peel and finely chop the onion and garlic.
  • 32) The days of saggy mattresses, shared bathrooms, stained carpets and peeling plaster exist for this generation only in tales told by their parents.
  • 33) "A banana peel is household waste, not fly ash," said Havens.
  • 34) You have these thin sheets of dough, which you have to peel from a stack, and then if the dough gets a little too sticky, you know, the sheets will break.
  • 35) Just gut 'em, sprinkle with a little lemon pepper (on the inside) and place them on the coals ... turning a few times until done, the scales and skin peel right off, and they are very tasty.
  • 36) The thought of Beck slipping on a banana peel is making me laugh like crazy!
  • 37) ‘So I watched spotty boys peel potatoes and old guys scoop haddock so tenderly from the deep fryer.’
  • 38) ‘To peel prawns, twist off their heads and pull off the ‘legs’.’
  • 39) ‘As a child, it was always a great treat to visit her in the cafe and help her: chopping vegetables, peeling potatoes, mixing ice cream.’
  • 40) ‘‘We don't believe that the onus should be on the consumer to wash and peel fruit and vegetables to remove pesticides,’ a spokeswoman said.’
  • 41) ‘‘We try to use as many fresh ingredients as possible and cooks are busy in the morning peeling potatoes and carrots for that day's menu,’ said Mr Marshall.’
  • 42) ‘I spent the day peeling onions and potatoes, chopping carrots, sweeping, and helping with the laundry.’
  • 43) ‘Primary prevention consists of hand washing, drinking only safe water, peeling all fruits and vegetables, and eating well-cooked foods.’
  • 44) ‘If you're eating off the market, peel vegetables and fruit.’
  • 45) ‘While the bird is colouring in the butter you can peel the garlic, trim and cut the celery into short lengths.’
  • 46) ‘They don't have the equipment to peel the carrots and potatoes, and there are nowhere near enough ovens.’
  • 47) ‘As the potatoes are cooking, peel the onion, cut it in half and then into thick slices.’
  • 48) ‘We girls had to help from the time we were real small, with the cooking, peeling potatoes, setting the table and all that.’
  • 49) ‘He was sitting on the quay at a turn in the canal, peeling an orange, dropping bits of skin into the water.’
  • 50) ‘Alternatively, slice off the skin as if you were peeling an apple in a spiral.’
  • 51) ‘Cook some broth, peel the potatoes and cut into slices.’
  • 52) ‘While the squash is roasting, peel the onions and slice them finely.’
  • 53) ‘All the workers had an interesting life story that she or he shares while cutting carrots or peeling potatoes.’
  • 54) ‘I peeled the orange quickly wondering how she got the fruit.’
  • 55) ‘His mother was in the kitchen, peeling potatoes.’
  • 56) ‘He's done every job there from cleaning the kitchen and sweeping floors to peeling potatoes, managing the storeroom and cooking.’
  • 57) ‘After the outer skin is peeled, the sponges (as the fruits now resemble) are soaked in a bath of one part bleach to three parts water.’
  • 58) ‘Halve the papaya, scoop out the seeds, peel the flesh then chop roughly.’
  • 59) ‘I flinched even more than when she was peeling skin off with a sharp tool.’
  • 60) ‘He peeled the rough skin from the bulb and raised it to his mouth.’
  • 61) ‘The skins were peeled from frozen berries to avoid mixing with pulp.’
  • 62) ‘If the skin is thin and unwaxed, you do not need to peel the skin from the cucumber.’
  • 63) ‘He cuts small pieces of bamboo, then peels the skin and creates each letter for the words.’
  • 64) ‘Here's an easy way to peel the parchment skin from garlic: Place the clove on a chopping block and slice off the root end.’
  • 65) ‘The old method of preparing potato juice was to cut the potato into thin slices without peeling the skin and place overnight in a large glass filled with cold water.’
  • 66) ‘As I investigated it, it was like peeling the skin of an onion.’
  • 67) ‘Small, firm, and with a sweet flesh, but its thick skin should be peeled before use.’
  • 68) ‘The fruit peels easily and has a nice balance of tang and sugar.’
  • 69) ‘He watched Trudy as she carefully peeled the coarse linen away and rolled it up like a map.’
  • 70) ‘Tomorrow, weather permitting, the excess silicon will be peeled away and the new glass given a thorough polish.’
  • 71) ‘To avoid this, keep the wings and windshields covered when the plane is at rest so that you can simply peel them away when you're ready to fly.’
  • 72) ‘If using fresh tomatoes, plunge them into boiling water for 30 seconds, then pop in cold water, enabling you to peel the skins away.’
  • 73) ‘When they are cool enough to handle, peel the skin away from the flesh and shred the flesh into rough strips.’
  • 74) ‘Many are believed still to be alive as their skins are peeled away.’
  • 75) ‘It is then laid on a table where the acrylics are peeled away from the paper.’
  • 76) ‘Small round holes were punched on it in a gridlike pattern before the emulsion was peeled away from its paper backing.’
  • 77) ‘As the adhesive is peeled away, each fibril is pulled into tension until it decoheres as shown in Figure 4.’
  • 78) ‘He peeled a couple of bills from his fat, just-got-paid billfold and waved it towards the bartender.’
  • 79) ‘Anne growled as she sat up on her bed and began peeling her gloves off, throwing them carelessly to one side.’
  • 80) ‘I peeled my shorts off and threw them in my car, and then ran to the water holding my surfboard.’
  • 81) ‘The cotton linen of his robe stuck to his skin and I saw his grimace when I peeled it off of him, discarding the clothing in a pile on the floor.’
  • 82) ‘She peeled it off, and threw it in a heap on one of the expensive wooden chairs.’
  • 83) ‘She didn't say anything when he unwound her arms from around him and pulled her shirt over her head, peeled her underwear off and stuck her under the running water.’
  • 84) ‘He came out in a white chef's coat and shorts, but quickly peeled the jacket off to reveal a black and white silk shirt, much more in keeping with the Miami locale.’
  • 85) ‘Then slowly, she grabbed the hem of her shirt and peeled it off of her sweaty skin, exposing a white bra with little yellow/green squares.’
  • 86) ‘‘I'm so hot and sweaty having walked all the way in from home’ she explains as she peels off her jacket.’
  • 87) ‘Higgins promises to return the next day and leaves the room; she peels off her surgical garments and tosses them in a waste bin.’
  • 88) ‘The 28-year old skids to a halt, undoes her safety belt and leaps athletically from the car, slowly peeling off her driving gloves.’
  • 89) ‘The ceiling tiles are waterlogged, the lino is cracked and the walls are peeling.’
  • 90) ‘Today, its exquisite towering antique stained glass windows are broken and covered in layers of dust, its walls are cracked and peeling and the weak wooden balcony cannot support a choir anymore.’
  • 91) ‘Cargo could not see the logic in his friend's words; they were in an empty, shabby, room with walls that were peeling almost as much as the fence outside.’
  • 92) ‘It is a multi-stemmed specimen with glossy amber or golden brown bark that peels in thin strips.’
  • 93) ‘However, the coatings often don't adhere well to the charged surfaces of metals, so they're prone to peeling and flaking.’
  • 94) ‘Watered-down paint soaks into the porous concrete so it won't flake or peel like surface paint does.’
  • 95) ‘The long hallway was much like the first floor had been: everything covered in dust, walls peeling, ceilings cracked, and missing floorboards.’
  • 96) ‘In the other places along the wall it was peeling so much she could see the original color of black.’
  • 97) ‘The walls were not peeling, the furniture wasn't broken, and the floor and ceiling had obviously been fixed by the different shades of wood.’
  • 98) ‘The paper of the wall was peeling; the plaster from the moisture of the weather and the old heritage of the building itself.’
  • 99) ‘Its walls were peeling and it had graffiti all over it, but it was shelter, and it would be better than the streets.’
  • 100) ‘Our kitchen had blue shiny tiles on the floor, and plain white wallpaper peeling on the walls.’
  • 101) ‘The walls are peeling and the windows are broken and I smell what smells like burning hair.’
  • 102) ‘The grain is flat or tangential, and the exterior layers are peeling.’
  • 103) ‘As it peels, paint chips are loosened and can be ingested by children.’
  • 104) ‘The War Museum was a square building, whose white paint was peeling and chipping off around the edges.’
  • 105) ‘The huts were basic, their green paint peeling, and their beds sagging, but the sheets were clean, the sun shining and the fresh mountain air tinged with the smoke of camp fires was invigorating.’
  • 106) ‘Their red paint is peeling, as is that on most of the house.’
  • 107) ‘Likewise, with a wall prone to damp, raw brick can be easier to maintain, avoiding the problems of paint or paper peeling, or plasterwork buckling.’
  • 108) ‘Mine looks slightly different: the paint is peeling, the viewpoint is higher.’
  • 109) ‘Soot-stained paint peeled in great strips from rickety frame buildings, pocked with broken windows that wore rusty, torn screens.’
  • 110) ‘But the years have taken their toll, with paint peeling away, rust setting in and parts going missing.’
  • 111) ‘Throughout the year, curling strips of the cinnamon-red outer bark peel off to reveal the paler young bark beneath.’
  • 112) ‘Striking copper coloured bark on the stems and trunk peels off in large pieces to reveal lighter new bark below making it irresistible to stop and touch.’
  • 113) ‘A carpet devoid of patterns covered the steps, a dark green wallpaper attempting to cover the walls but peeling away as well.’
  • 114) ‘Wallpaper was nearly peeling down the walls, curled with age.’
  • 115) ‘There are cracks spreading in the concrete balconies, paint peeling from the building, and its signs are in disrepair.’
  • 116) ‘He washes his hands repeatedly till the skin starts peeling off.’
  • 117) ‘After six hours working there the skin was peeling off the palms of your hands.’
  • 118) ‘Place all dried fruits, grated apple, mixed peel, cherries, rinds and juices into a large mixing bowl and pour over the brandy/rum and essences.’
  • 119) ‘Sift flour, salt and spice, and add to mixture alternately with dried fruit, mixed peel and zest of lemon.’
  • 120) ‘Grate the apple over the bread, add the dried fruit and peel, stir in the sugar, marmalade, flour, eggs and spices.’
  • 121) ‘The fruit's peel and pit are also of medical use.’
  • 122) ‘The government now says it's OK to eat fruit peel.’
  • 123) ‘You shake off bits of fruit peel from your shoe and march off, victorious.’
  • 124) ‘The pelting water bothers them, so they migrate to the dried fruit peel in the trashcan.’
  • 125) ‘What next, said the Herald, oranges with no peel, potatoes without jackets?’
  • 126) ‘Sugar or honey should be added to taste, and fruit peel can impart bitterness.’
  • 127) ‘Marmalades are soft fruit jellies with small pieces of fruit or citrus peel evenly suspended in a transparent jelly.’
  • 128) ‘The peel of the fruit will darken in the refrigerator but the banana inside will remain firm and delicious.’
  • 129) ‘This is a quality vodka that delivers the aroma and flavour of the juice rather than the harsher peel from the fruit (in this case, lemons).’
  • 130) ‘For example, use the zest - the outermost layer of a citrus fruit's peel - from lemons or limes to liven up your salads and soups.’
  • 131) ‘Shortly before you are ready to serve, cut away the pith and peel of the remaining four oranges.’
  • 132) ‘She pulled a piece of peel away and tossed it at Victor.’
  • 133) ‘For the fruits, I used candied bitter orange peels, green raisins, and dried apricots, figs (black and white), and peach.’
  • 134) ‘By rubbing banana peels over your face, you can soften your skin while protecting it from the sun as well.’
  • 135) ‘Combine the fruit peels with the vodka in a jar, cover and let stand for 1 week.’
  • 136) ‘When I grew up, we were told that our relatives in mainland China had only banana peels to eat.’
  • 137) ‘I began stapling the banana peels to paper rectangles, then gluing the rectangles to the jacket.’
  • 138) ‘A skin peel is a good general treatment for the face.’
  • 139) ‘The surgeon or dermatologist begins the peel by cleansing the skin to remove all oils, dirt and soap traces.’
  • 140) ‘Two years after the peel, her skin looked like an elderly woman's, mottled with brown and red blotches.’
  • 141) ‘It's also possible to renew sun-damaged areas with a peel or microdermabrasion, which lifts surface skin layers.’
  • 142) ‘Would a peel help reduce the risk of skin cancer?’
  • 143) ‘Laser resurfacing uses an ultrapulse laser to scan skin layers deeper than a chemical peel.’
  • 144) ‘For faster fading, your dermatologist may prescribe a stronger lightener, chemical peel, laser treatment or even a combination of the three.’
  • 145) ‘Collagen injection followed laser hair removal, microdermabrasion and chemical peel in the non-surgical overall category.’
  • 146) ‘She obviously looks after her skin, and she may even have had a glycolic peel to remove dull cells and reveal her healthy, radiant skin.’
  • 147) ‘Crucially, the peel strips away some of the skin's ability to protect itself against the sun.’
  • 148) ‘Combination and normal skin types should use a glycolic peel every 1-2 weeks.’
  • 149) ‘At-home body peels also can keep skin even-toned.’
  • 150) ‘Chemical peels smooth out rough skin and minimize fine lines.’
  • 151) ‘I assume that meant that he was making peels, long-handled wooden tools used by bakers to load and unload bread from ovens.’
  • 152) ‘Generously dust a peel or back of a sheet pan with cornmeal and very gently transfer the loaves to the peel or pan.’
  • 153) ‘The Corbridge pele, built of reused Roman stonework, lies on the edge of the churchyard and was the vicar's house.’
  • 154) ‘Heading towards the Borders, at Bemersyde, the garden of the 16th century peel tower to which a mansion house was added in the 17th century, was laid out by Field Marshal Earl Haig.’
  • 155) ‘As a boy, he had dreamt once that he lived in the peel tower at the foot of Strangford Lough.’
  • 156) ‘Since 1966, when together with his brother he sold the island of Eigg, his base was a peel tower in Dumfriesshire.’
  • 157) ‘It was not a castle, did not need moats or peel towers, and had no fortifications, unless the owner in the late 18th cent. had a taste for mock Gothic and battlements.’
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