bring vs take

bring take

Definitions

  • 1) To be sold for.
  • 2) To cause to occur as a consequence.
  • 3) To cause to occur as a concomitant.
  • 4) To carry, convey, lead, or cause to go along to another place.
  • 5) To cause to become apparent to the mind; recall.
  • 6) To persuade; induce.
  • 7) To advance or set forth (charges) in a court.
  • 8) To lead or force into a specified state, situation, or location.
  • 9) To get the attention of; attract.
  • 10) To carry as an attribute or contribution.
  • 11) (bring down the house) To win overwhelming approval from an audience.
  • 12) (bring down the house) To win overwhelming approval from an audience.
  • 13) (bring home the bacon) To earn a living, especially for a family.
  • 14) (bring up the rear) To be the last in a line or sequence.
  • 15) (bring to terms) To force (another) to agree.
  • 16) (bring home the bacon) To achieve desired results; have success.
  • 17) (bring to bear) To exert; apply.
  • 18) (bring up the rear) To be the last in a line or sequence.
  • 19) (bring to bear) To put (something) to good use.
  • 20) (bring to light) To reveal or disclose.
  • 21) (bring to bear) To put (something) to good use.
  • 22) (bring home the bacon) To achieve desired results; have success.
  • 23) (bring to light) To reveal or disclose.
  • 24) (bring to (one's) knees) To reduce to a position of subservience or submission.
  • 25) (bring to (one's) knees) To reduce to a position of subservience or submission.
  • 26) (bring home) To make perfectly clear.
  • 27) (bring to terms) To force (another) to agree.
  • 28) (bring to bear) To exert; apply.
  • 29) (bring home) To make perfectly clear.
  • 30) (bring home the bacon) To earn a living, especially for a family.

Definitions

  • 1) To commit and apply oneself to the study of.
  • 2) To affect in a strong or sudden manner as if by capturing, as.
  • 3) To study for with success.
  • 4) To use or require (time).
  • 5) To choose and then adopt (a particular route or direction) while on foot or while operating a vehicle.
  • 6) To provide room for; accommodate.
  • 7) To put up with; endure or tolerate.
  • 8) To expose one's body to (healthful or pleasurable treatment, for example).
  • 9) Sports & Games To defeat.
  • 10) To draw in; inhale.
  • 11) To lead or cause to go along to another place.
  • 12) To engage in sex with.
  • 13) To make use of or select for use, as.
  • 14) To accept (something owed, offered, or given) either reluctantly or willingly.
  • 15) To require the use of (something).
  • 16) To receive into a particular relation or association, as into one's care or keeping.
  • 17) To remove or cause to be absent, especially.
  • 18) Sports To catch or receive (a ball or puck).
  • 19) To choose for one's own use; avail oneself of the use of.
  • 20) To perceive or become aware of by one of the senses.
  • 21) To undertake, make, or perform.
  • 22) To assume for oneself.
  • 23) To carry in one's possession.
  • 24) To capture physically; seize.
  • 25) To be as a path or course for; provide a way for.
  • 26) To allow to come in; give access or admission to; admit.
  • 27) To use (something) as a means of safety or refuge.
  • 28) To convey by transportation.
  • 29) To seize with authority or legal right.
  • 30) To cause to die; kill or destroy.
  • 31) To receive into or on the body, as.
  • 32) To move into or assume occupancy of.
  • 33) To grasp or grip.
  • 34) To accept, receive, or assume, as.
  • 35) To subtract.
  • 36) To get into one's hands, control, or possession, especially.
  • 37) To use (something) as a means of conveyance or transportation.
  • 38) To put (food or drink, for example) into the body; eat or drink.
  • 39) To agree to undertake or engage in (a task or duty, for example).
  • 40) To remove with the hands or an instrument.
  • 41) To become saturated or impregnated with (dye, for example).
  • 42) To delight or captivate.
  • 43) To deal a blow to; strike or hit.
  • 44) Sports & Games To acquire in a game or competition; win.
  • 45) To submit to (something inflicted); undergo or suffer.
  • 46) To exact.
  • 47) To catch or affect with a particular action.
  • 48) To get possession of (fish or game, for example) by capturing or killing.

Examples

  • 1) Will the new year bring any better prospects?
  • 2) This brings attendant concerns about shareholder voting.
  • 3) We learn from each other and all have something different to bring to the table.
  • 4) She can pop in and bring other people as well.
  • 5) But the string of scandals has added to pressure to bring in new blood.
  • 6) It will also bring questions about potential conflicts of interest.
  • 7) She says they need to do something drastic to bring back the romance.
  • 8) How long will it be before people can be brought back to life?
  • 9) And walking where you usually drive can bring a new love into your world.
  • 10) Now, it is all about bringing that outdoors in.
  • 11) They are also bringing a whole new culture of collaboration and high performance.
  • 12) Together we will bring about change for a better quality of life and freedom of choice.
  • 13) Where else has a village come together to bring works of literature to life?
  • 14) So far this week six people have been brought down from the mountains.
  • 15) Norwich now face a summer sweat to bring in a new manager.
  • 16) The present downturn has been brought about by a sudden tightening of credit.
  • 17) They come back and bring their friends.
  • 18) It took a lot of people struggling to bring me to this point in history.
  • 19) Interesting new projects could bring financial gains but remember to read all the small print before signing.
  • 20) We all bring something to the table.
  • 21) He is great to watch and brings people to the game.
  • 22) An unusual name from the past brings new luck.
  • 23) They think that they must have done something wrong in bringing him up.
  • 24) But the people who brought me up are my mum and dad.
  • 25) We're seen as wanting to bring about social change.
  • 26) She says: 'It was a dream come true to bring her home.
  • 27) His first veto will bring it down to 29%….second veto will net 28%…..bring on the bills, bring on the vetoes, but by all means bring ‘em on with impeachment proceedings.
  • 28) I was sitting in Ron's when my phone rang. * bring bring* "Hello?"
  • 29) His first veto will bring it down to 29%….second veto will net 28%…..bring on the bills, bring on the vetoes, but by all means bring ‘em on with impeachment proceedings.
  • 30) Mr. and Mrs. Swanson paid me to find you and bring you back; offered a bonus for the ’bring you back’ part.
  • 31) IV. iii.188 (361,1) Let it no more bring out ingrateful man!] [W: out to ungrateful] It is plain that _bring out_ is _bring forth_, with which the following lines correspond so plainly, that the commentator might be suspected of writing his note without reading the whole passage.
  • 32) It called the threat a "bad miscalculation", and appeared to goad Anonymous to action, with the phrase "bring it!"
  • 33) Each of the nine South American countries competing for the title bring five-man rosters.
  • 34) "The civil rights movement had the power to … what I call bring the dirt, the filth from under the American rug out of the cracks and corners, into the light so we can deal with it," said Lewis, a superdelegate who supports Obama, at a forum on faith and civil rights at Washington's National Cathedral.
  • 35) Now that Benjamin Netanyahu was sworn in as the new Israeli Prime Minister, what kind of impact will his new title bring to Mid-East Peace developments?
  • 36) ‘She noticed that I was awake, and brought me a glass of water.’
  • 37) ‘We are bringing you the only guide you need to know what's hot.’
  • 38) ‘He came in a rented vehicle from Tikal, bringing a hired tour guide and a camera.’
  • 39) ‘In an emergency, my son could drive up and bring us home.’
  • 40) ‘Prospective parents can travel to India or arrange for an escort to bring their adopted child home.’
  • 41) ‘Kit brought her wine glass to her lips and took a sip.’
  • 42) ‘Brenna beamed and quickly brought her a glass.’
  • 43) ‘I moved in next door to her and she made me pudding and brought it over to my house.’
  • 44) ‘Tracy lit a fire and poured two glasses of wine and brought them over to Ryan on the couch.’
  • 45) ‘It's always a good idea to bring extra pairs of glasses or lenses if you have them.’
  • 46) ‘He brought gifts with him as befits a visiting uncle.’
  • 47) ‘Let us watch as his twisted assistant brings him foreboding news’
  • 48) ‘Sometimes when Geoff goes shepherding, he brings a novice dog.’
  • 49) ‘To help you get back on track, the magazine brings you the spring guide to complete wellness.’
  • 50) ‘He assisted me in bringing the two into our house.’
  • 51) ‘Now she runs an escort agency bringing men and women together.’
  • 52) ‘Perhaps your friend can conduct units which bring professionals into the classroom to work on interesting projects.’
  • 53) ‘bring a tree field guide to help you distinguish species.’
  • 54) ‘This half-day guided tour will bring them right onto the golden sand dunes of Arabia in four-wheel drives.’
  • 55) ‘We're going to bring you the results in just a few minutes.’
  • 56) ‘That juror apparently printed out the documents and brought them into the jury room as well.’
  • 57) ‘Timothy brought me the rhinoceros-hide whip that decorated the otherwise bare walls of his shed.’
  • 58) ‘There had been talk among their generals to bring her here before, but none had dared to touch her.’
  • 59) ‘This mixture effectively brought me into the feeling of the play.’
  • 60) ‘He's effective in bringing groups of Iraqis together, something he's done for many years.’
  • 61) ‘An Alberta promoter is bringing a new style of festival to Canada.’
  • 62) ‘We just need to create a structure to bring them together.’
  • 63) ‘The collaboration brought father and son closer than ever.’
  • 64) ‘The wizard who brought us here undoubtedly created this place.’
  • 65) ‘The glass roof brought sunlight down and illuminated the blue walls.’
  • 66) ‘For example, what is it about the Philip Glass' music which brings you back to him?’
  • 67) ‘A short drive brings you north to Florence, or south, more energetically, to Bologna or Sienna.’
  • 68) ‘The circulating nurse also suggests that another surgeon be brought in to assist the operating surgeon.’
  • 69) ‘The pilot brought the shuttle gently to rest in the clearing.’
  • 70) ‘While new recruits are being brought in, a lot of more experienced people are getting restless, and gone.’
  • 71) ‘But the reaction Smith received when he brought in the local FBI office was more puzzling.’
  • 72) ‘He dined or drank at The Beet three or four times a week and brought in lots of new customers.’
  • 73) ‘The other acts are going to be brought in through witness testimony.’
  • 74) ‘It had been only a month after they had first been brought in here, and all five had been locked up in the same cell.’
  • 75) ‘But what has been brought in are behavioral experts and demeanor experts.’
  • 76) ‘Whatever reason they did this for, those two guys need to be brought in.’
  • 77) ‘They're not allowed to see each other, so she has to leave, and then he'll be brought in right after this.’
  • 78) ‘Given the acting chops of most of the leads, the stunt doubles should have been brought in for the dramatic bits too.’
  • 79) ‘It also had a sizable fleet of extra buses that could be brought in for emergencies.’
  • 80) ‘I always assumed that a CEO from the outside was going to be brought in.’
  • 81) ‘The joy driving brought me was so great that I was almost thankful I'd left it so long to learn.’
  • 82) ‘The reliever was brought in to secure the victory.’
  • 83) ‘He brings Bart in on a lot of his schemes.’
  • 84) ‘When he was brought in to command the Second Army, he was well received by the men.’
  • 85) ‘Ask yourself, ‘If this scheme is guaranteed to produce spectacular returns, why bring me in on it?’’
  • 86) ‘And consultants from Vietnam would be brought in to advise the government.’
  • 87) ‘Jo was brought in as directorial consultant, whatever that means.’
  • 88) ‘If you can't hire a consultant, then bring someone in and give him the pieces of authority one at a time.’
  • 89) ‘We get into the sport because we are brought in as youngsters.’
  • 90) ‘So Carole was brought in for a proper photo shoot and the now famous photograph was taken.’
  • 91) ‘She was brought in to help the university take the next step in improving its graduate program.’
  • 92) ‘Thousands of inexperienced foreign workers have been brought in.’
  • 93) ‘Couldn't they have been brought in for some clean-up?’
  • 94) ‘The Philharmonia Orchestra has been brought in to underpin the major concerts.’
  • 95) ‘Seagrave is brought in at full back, as Roberts is unavailable.’
  • 96) ‘He could be brought in as a production and distribution partner.’
  • 97) ‘But he wasn't brought in simply for his professionalism.’
  • 98) ‘It's pretty clear he was brought in as an eleventh-hour replacement.’
  • 99) ‘Bilal demanded to know why he had been brought in.’
  • 100) ‘So if they hadn't have brought Anton in to do this I'd have never have found that out.’
  • 101) ‘And finally they brought someone in to help me through that period.’
  • 102) ‘The coffee shops were going to be open even longer as the commuters brought in much money even in the early hours.’
  • 103) ‘With ridership that quickly surpassed expectations, they also brought in profits.’
  • 104) ‘His books brought in an amazing income stream.’
  • 105) ‘This summer is shaping up to bring record amounts of money in ticket sales.’
  • 106) ‘These brought in little income and proved a great headache to manage.’
  • 107) ‘Public lectures, gala events, and renting out premises also brought certain amounts of money.’
  • 108) ‘It brought in money that would likely not have come to Berkeley otherwise.’
  • 109) ‘Over in China a young woman made a movie that hadn't brought in very much money.’
  • 110) ‘Their boxed lunches brought in enough money that Arthur could begin saving again in earnest.’
  • 111) ‘Still, all of her mother's odd jobs never brought in enough money, and her family had to make difficult changes.’
  • 112) ‘They brought in enough money for him to be able to get married.’
  • 113) ‘His job as a fisherman brought in some money, and most was spent on beer.’
  • 114) ‘As of this writing the sale has brought in vastly more money than anticipated.’
  • 115) ‘They may not have liked this, but work brought in money regardless of where or who it came from.’
  • 116) ‘In the short term it brought in some money and it attached the Civil Service to the state.’
  • 117) ‘Asking for an extra 10% isn't at all cheeky if you brought in a lot of extra revenue over the last twelve months.’
  • 118) ‘Turn out lots of crummy products in a short amount of time to bring in some fast money.’
  • 119) ‘If nothing else, the popularity of the television show has brought a large amount of money into the town.’
  • 120) ‘For that reason, certain models in good condition are hard to find and may bring prices that exceed $30,000.’
  • 121) ‘To have your condition labelled as a disease may bring considerable benefit.’
  • 122) ‘If either one of you needs more assistance, bring your hands behind you and interlock fingers with her.’
  • 123) ‘Gail accompanied the tempo, bringing the sword slowly back in both hands.’
  • 124) ‘Gentle traction downward on the head will assist in bringing the anterior shoulder beneath the symphysis.’
  • 125) ‘With speed that only a few could accomplish the girl brought the tip of her sword to the ugly man's neck.’
  • 126) ‘Touched, Lucas brought his arms around his body even tighter - hugging him, kissing him, claiming him.’
  • 127) ‘The four-wheel drive system brings its own background noise, too.’
  • 128) ‘Losing two or more drives brings operations quickly to a halt.’
  • 129) ‘To stand up and not swing brings you great results.’
  • 130) ‘This beautiful and joyful occasion also brings me tears, but for many different reasons.’
  • 131) ‘Monsoons and typhoons, over-riding normal conditions, bring periods of heavy rain.’
  • 132) ‘He also points out that weak conditions can bring advantages, such as buying equipment more cheaply.’
  • 133) ‘Failure to obtain a licence or breach of licensing conditions can bring heavy fines.’
  • 134) ‘The extended period of damage was probably brought on by the cool/wet growing conditions.’
  • 135) ‘Dementia is a progressive and disabling condition that brings turmoil and anguish to those involved.’
  • 136) ‘Whether these conditions exist or not depends on an agent bringing them into existence.’
  • 137) ‘In hard conditions bold and decisive actions of even small groups can bring success.’
  • 138) ‘And obviously if we can assist in bringing stability and relief to the area we will do that.’
  • 139) ‘Big Tech traditionally hasn't been a leader in the drive to bring accountability to health care.’
  • 140) ‘The lower gods can either assist people or bring misfortune to them.’
  • 141) ‘It also brings drive latency down to just two milliseconds.’
  • 142) ‘Some find that certification also brings a sense of accomplishment and greater job satisfaction.’
  • 143) ‘She missed her town, the familiar roads and buildings she drove past brought comfort to her.’
  • 144) ‘They also felt that providing care brought a sense of accomplishment.’
  • 145) ‘Thinkers have developed the diagram to bring the structure of these problems into view.’
  • 146) ‘It created community and brought us together in a common front.’
  • 147) ‘The activities of the organization occasionally brought it into conflict with Government.’
  • 148) ‘The incorporation of film segments from Brooks' career was a nice touch that brings context to the play’
  • 149) ‘A man sits in a square of light, the occasional exploratory movement bringing life to an otherwise empty space.’
  • 150) ‘We have no choice but to bring our science into touch with our conscience.’
  • 151) ‘Will the next generation of leadership bring peace to the volatile situation?’
  • 152) ‘An occasional farmer brought damaged land back to fertility.’
  • 153) ‘The onset of World War I effectively brought clinical research to a standstill in Europe.’
  • 154) ‘Then went on to create a legacy that brought fear, loathing, and shame to anyone associated with it.’
  • 155) ‘Valid criminal charges could be brought against the Church, and prosecuted, now, as I will explain.’
  • 156) ‘There are very different degrees of seriousness to the charges that can be brought against a prisoner.’
  • 157) ‘Until the end of the Second World War, legal proceedings could not be brought against the Crown as of right.’
  • 158) ‘No legal action can be brought against a forest that falls below standards; the only threat is loss of certification.’
  • 159) ‘These will now be examined to see if any charges are to be brought against those served with search warrants.’
  • 160) ‘What tort claims, if any, could be brought against those who were involved in the torture.’
  • 161) ‘An action may also be brought against the Commission for failure to act under Article 232.’
  • 162) ‘If a claim has to be brought against an untraced motorist there are special conditions which apply.’
  • 163) ‘A claim for contribution can only be brought against a person liable in respect of the same damage.’
  • 164) ‘The present proceedings have been brought against the Fund accordingly.’
  • 165) ‘That section is concerned with private law, for example claims in tort brought against doctors.’
  • 166) ‘This is a charge frequently brought against pickets.’
  • 167) ‘Any charge ever brought against him resulted in an acquittal.’
  • 168) ‘But how did that conduct encourage you to bring your action?’
  • 169) ‘On the insolvency, the company brought an action against the bank for knowing receipt.’
  • 170) ‘It created a tribunal to bring war criminals to justice.’
  • 171) ‘The discoveries did not proceed and the present motion was brought resulting in a further delay of 4 months.’
  • 172) ‘Thus I conclude that requirement to serve a demand is a procedural condition precedent to bringing proceedings.’
  • 173) ‘A condition for bringing an annulment action under Article 230 is that the applicant has standing.’
  • 174) ‘Plus, state and federal courts require that civil plaintiffs pay a fee to the court as a condition of bringing the suit.’
  • 175) ‘Similarly, suppose a patient brings a lawsuit that puts her psychiatric condition directly at issue.’
  • 176) ‘I forced the inevitable because I can't bring myself to compromise.’
  • 177) ‘At first she was sure that he couldn't bring himself to mention the letter and let her down gently.’
  • 178) ‘It has half a bad novel inside it so I've never quite brought myself to throw it out.’
  • 179) ‘I do wish she could have brought herself to write at least once, ‘Oh, he makes me so mad!’’
  • 180) ‘He hesitates, looking particularly grave, and finally brings himself to utter the shameful words.’
  • 181) ‘If he brings himself to watch it on video, the answer can be found in the remarkable deeds of 15 men in white.’
  • 182) ‘Meanwhile, Stuart has a hard time bringing himself to use the toilet his dad's ashes were flushed down.’
  • 183) ‘It's like the old car that you just can't bring yourself to give up.’
  • 184) ‘If you can't bring yourself to try out for the talent show, sign up for the backstage crew and learn about lighting.’
  • 185) ‘By the end, you cannot even bring yourself to look into the mirror.’
  • 186) ‘If you can't bring yourself to laugh at violence you should steer clear.’
  • 187) ‘Getting past the cheap shots, you can't bring yourself to dislike this album or write it off completely.’
  • 188) ‘This person is the object of your affection, but you are passive and can't bring yourself to ask them out.’
  • 189) ‘Then be as sweet as you can bring yourself to be, and see if you can take now what's still there.’
  • 190) ‘I say this because so many people cannot bring themselves to formulate an opinion, let alone an informed one.’
  • 191) ‘I appreciate that you agree with my basic premise, but I can't bring myself to agree with yours.’
  • 192) ‘I just can't bring myself to care about you or your stupid tears.’
  • 193) ‘That was a crime, and I cannot bring myself to vote for a criminal.’
  • 194) ‘I can barely bring myself to leave the television turned on when he appears.’
  • 195) ‘No doubt all this is relatively important in its way, but I can't bring myself to get very interested in it.’

Examples

  • 1) She has taken the story beyond its original ending.
  • 2) There are steps businesses can take to protect themselves.
  • 3) Time to get up and take a walk.
  • 4) This enabled an offsetting process to take hold.
  • 5) The parachute money only takes you so far.
  • 6) Last year more than half a million people took part.
  • 7) Yet the persecution might have taken a different form.
  • 8) You have to be mature and take it one step at a time.
  • 9) You understand why certain people can be difficult without taking things personally.
  • 10) World history would have taken a very different turn.
  • 11) Millions take it but until now it had not been proved to work.
  • 12) Politicians show their true mettle only when they take on the business of governing.
  • 13) Taking action to get a better deal is right.
  • 14) This process will usually take five to ten minutes.
  • 15) What lock do you recommend to stop the new one being taken?
  • 16) It was at this point things began to take off.
  • 17) To maintain our tie has taken a certain amount of determination and willingness to bear the cost.
  • 18) My place will be taken by another driver for the closing stages of the journey.
  • 19) We cannot blame ourselves or take responsibility for another person.
  • 20) They take a long time to reach maturity.
  • 21) You want to know the danger signals and the actions you might take.
  • 22) We would have taken a piece of meat to put on the fire.
  • 23) Which fact takes us right into the centre of our task.
  • 24) Their careers have taken rather different paths since.
  • 25) The process took around an hour and preserved my personal data.
  • 26) This is before account is taken of any money spent on home improvements.
  • 27) After the police became suspicious of her story she was taken aside and was able to tell of her ordeal.
  • 28) That such questions mattered always used to be taken for granted and what worries him now is that they no longer are.
  • 29) Chief executives typically take home 4.5 million.
  • 30) ‘Lacey reached forward and took it, her eyes briefly skimming over the first few pages.’
  • 31) ‘As she reached over to take my tray, she frowned then squinted at a glinting object in the seat in front of me.’
  • 32) ‘My mother was reaching out and nervously taking Zachary's hand after my father had released grip of it.’
  • 33) ‘Devon's blue eyes softened almost immediately and he leaned forward to take my hand from my lap.’
  • 34) ‘She reached out and took my hand.’
  • 35) ‘She reached over and took Skyler's hand then raised his chin to look him straight in the eye.’
  • 36) ‘He reached out to take her hand, but halted, his attention turning elsewhere.’
  • 37) ‘Claire reached out to take her arm, shifting carefully on her makeshift lounger.’
  • 38) ‘When she looked up at him he placed a fresh smile upon his lips and reached out to take her hand.’
  • 39) ‘He reaches over, takes my hand, and I just squeeze my eyes tight and try not to hold on too hard.’
  • 40) ‘The giant reached down and took his son by the hand, leading him off to a nearby creek.’
  • 41) ‘She reached over, took the black brush and started to brush her long, silky hair.’
  • 42) ‘He stood up, reaching out and taking her hand so that they walked together from the courtyard.’
  • 43) ‘Ariane smiled taking the reins, reaching over she planted a kiss on the old man's cheek.’
  • 44) ‘She reached out and took his wrist, holding it in place as she wrote her phone number on the back of his hand.’
  • 45) ‘Ben reached across and took her hand and placed it upon the gear and maneuvered it to change it to reverse.’
  • 46) ‘He held out his hand to her and she gnawed on her lip as she reached out and took the extended limb.’
  • 47) ‘I reached my good arm up to Alexei and he took my hand, clutching it reassuringly.’
  • 48) ‘Slowly the girl reached out and took the bowl and started to drink from the rim.’
  • 49) ‘Mack agreed, taking the ticket and placing it in his upper coat pocket so that the edges peeked out.’
  • 50) ‘The victims had been removed from a hospital by members of a Yugoslav army force which had taken Vukovar.’
  • 51) ‘The Soviet forces took more than 30,000 Romanian prisoners and all their equipment.’
  • 52) ‘After the German armies took Prague, Hájek was forced to work for the German armament industry.’
  • 53) ‘Henry Joy McCracken's United Army of Ulster took Larne and Antrim but was defeated.’
  • 54) ‘In fact, the failure of the German army to take Paris was seen as a failure and Moltke was held responsible.’
  • 55) ‘In November 1919 Kiev was briefly taken by the White armies before being occupied by the Red Army.’
  • 56) ‘He had himself proclaimed king at Ravenna in 494 after taking back Italy from Odoacer.’
  • 57) ‘In May 1940 German forces invaded France and had taken Paris by the middle of June.’
  • 58) ‘If, in addition, Russia takes Galicia, an early bath for Austria is on the cards.’
  • 59) ‘He had already taken Cologne, where he was reputed to have massacred 11,000 virgins.’
  • 60) ‘If the declarer succeeds in taking no tricks, the defenders are not penalized.’
  • 61) ‘However, some play that the declarer who takes 8 or more tricks wins nothing at all.’
  • 62) ‘Next, if declarer has taken fewer than 6 tricks he pays a penalty of 20 units to the pot.’
  • 63) ‘Sometimes there is bidding to determine the number of tricks to be taken.’
  • 64) ‘The last trick, taken by West, is irrelevant because it contains no point cards.’
  • 65) ‘If the black king takes the rook, black loses the queen.’
  • 66) ‘It was the sixth time in eight innings that he has taken Lara's wicket.’
  • 67) ‘I see that Shane Warne has taken more wickets in Tests than in other first-class matches.’
  • 68) ‘He took Bradman's wicket on five of the 13 occasions it fell in Tests when they both played.’
  • 69) ‘In the reply Spring View were dismissed for 159 with professional Jon Fielding taking seven wickets.’
  • 70) ‘Have the rival captains ever taken each other's wicket in the same Test?’
  • 71) ‘There always has to be somebody in the tent to prevent thieves from taking the paltry property they have left.’
  • 72) ‘Alarms can deter thieves from not only stealing your van, but also taking items from within it.’
  • 73) ‘Jack is a thief, he takes one card from the top of your opponent's deck and adds it to your hand.’
  • 74) ‘She looked around for the horses, but the highwaymen had obviously taken them.’
  • 75) ‘The third unvirtuous action of the body is stealing, which means taking something that does not belong to us.’
  • 76) ‘Of all things in the house he could have stolen, he'd taken nothing more than a picture of her.’
  • 77) ‘To this date every item that has been stolen was taken from the dwelling of the owner.’
  • 78) ‘Two-thirds of the 282 light commercial vehicles under three years old stolen between November 2001 and November 2002 were taken with their keys.’
  • 79) ‘People using cash machines are being warned to be on the alert, after four customers had their cash cards taken.’
  • 80) ‘Bint also admitted using a credit card taken from an elderly man in Hemel Hempstead Hospital who has since died.’
  • 81) ‘Sections of the churchyard and a whole path were dug up and stones taken in the last two years in six separate raids.’
  • 82) ‘Crimes such as taking something from the office or asking a friend to bend the rules might involve only minor damage, but set up a vicious cycle.’
  • 83) ‘Auditors were called in, but the true amount of money taken by Lucas could not be fully determined.’
  • 84) ‘It was only after he left that his victim realised her money had been taken.’
  • 85) ‘He didn't say whether any money had been taken but he said that he was not hurt.’
  • 86) ‘They had a conversation with him and he later discovered that the money had been taken.’
  • 87) ‘The theft was the third at the shop in the space of only eight weeks, although it is the first in which actual shop stock has been taken.’
  • 88) ‘Anse blesses and resents Addie for dying, and then takes Dewey Dell's money and leaves.’
  • 89) ‘Nothing was stolen from the shop and nothing was taken from Mr Hussain.’
  • 90) ‘It is alleged that nearly £18,000 was taken in the raid when two members of staff were injured.’
  • 91) ‘When it arises as the first branch, it takes the place usually occupied by the brachiocephalic.’
  • 92) ‘I presented my paper at the first session and, relieved it was over, took the nearest free seat.’
  • 93) ‘Lone riders can walk straight to the front of the queue and take the first available seats.’
  • 94) ‘The council meeting takes off as the Mayor clad in ceremonial attire takes the high backed chair on the dais at the stroke of the bell.’
  • 95) ‘While my brother took the first seat, he would occupy the last one, sandwiching me between both of them.’
  • 96) ‘So this was the seat that I took, next to the aisle, and a man was sitting next to me.’
  • 97) ‘She takes her seat and steals a brief glance at the magnificent view to her side.’
  • 98) ‘Just as the show was about to begin the two vacant seats beside me were suddenly taken.’
  • 99) ‘After Nelson's victory at Copenhagen, she considered taking a London house again but feared the expense.’
  • 100) ‘He has agreed to take a total of 48 and they are currently arriving in batches.’
  • 101) ‘take half the sugar, half the cream and half the butter and combine with the dark chocolate in a good, thick-bottomed pan.’
  • 102) ‘Perhaps take a very tiny amount of the ashes and sprinkle it in kitty's food or water.’
  • 103) ‘My father would take a knife, reach up and disembowel the animal with a few flicks of his wrist.’
  • 104) ‘For instance, take the other day when I call Pebbles in Spain and her mom picks up the phone.’
  • 105) ‘Let us take Far Cry for example - a game that uses the Split Frame Rendering technique.’
  • 106) ‘Let's take Georgia where I was campaigning yesterday.’
  • 107) ‘Let's take Germany, for example.’
  • 108) ‘take Indian Wells, a 90-unit desert community for low-income seniors.’
  • 109) ‘The nurse takes the child's vital signs and assesses his or her oral cavity for any excessive bleeding.’
  • 110) ‘It appears that measurements had been taken but not submitted at the previous hearing.’
  • 111) ‘Mr Murphy said they agreed it was a nuisance and were due to return to take further measurements.’
  • 112) ‘She said Miss Ofuri was behaving belligerently and refused to allow her blood pressure to be taken.’
  • 113) ‘In an ideal world it would also link to the collaborative Hydra notes that were taken for pretty much every session.’
  • 114) ‘Kathy took a few more notes before watching the interviews from the back of the room.’
  • 115) ‘By taking notes he wanted Sydney to write down all the important parts and help him make a decision.’
  • 116) ‘He will have watched Celtic play under Dalglish and will have taken enough notes to fill a book on their style of play.’
  • 117) ‘Notes taken at the time were incomplete and a summary of the interview was drawn up only afterwards.’
  • 118) ‘He relied on what volumes he could get and the notes he had taken on the books he had read.’
  • 119) ‘I have a set of notes that I took when I went to see a Maxwell Bates exhibit on Thursday.’
  • 120) ‘Christopher Hitchens may have learned shorthand and taken better notes than the rest of us, but I doubt it.’
  • 121) ‘Either his friend had been taking notes these past several months, or he was a fast learner.’
  • 122) ‘In police custody, his solicitors came with a digital camera and took nineteen photographs of his injuries.’
  • 123) ‘Mo came round today with her digital camera and took a photograph of what will probably be my image on the publicity.’
  • 124) ‘As an additional safeguard, the firearm also contains a tiny camera which takes a photograph every time it is fired.’
  • 125) ‘I raised my camera to take a photograph of this to send to Midland Mainline.’
  • 126) ‘I explained it was a camera and I was taking photographs of what had been going on on the estate.’
  • 127) ‘There is a chance of winning a digital camera for taking the photograph which best captures the spirit of the challenge.’
  • 128) ‘A hidden camera secretly takes a close-up photo of the shopper's face.’
  • 129) ‘This is about artists, and how an artist can be stopped now from taking a photograph.’
  • 130) ‘Unfortunately, we could not stop to take photographs as the bus raced past the scenes.’
  • 131) ‘Incidentally, the camera allows us to take snapshots while it is recording a video.’
  • 132) ‘After the engagement, Basharat had taken some photographs and video clips of the girl.’
  • 133) ‘I took the cheapo digital camera with me, but to be honest - you don't wanna see this place.’
  • 134) ‘Financial help can be given in some cases to assist a visit with us, and photographs can be taken for those unable to travel.’
  • 135) ‘These works, taken by just four photographers, recall the most dazzling time in movie history.’
  • 136) ‘A tube poster featuring this caught my eye, because I recently took a very similar photograph.’
  • 137) ‘The Canon photo management software creates one new directory for each day photographs have been taken.’
  • 138) ‘If clear photographs can be taken, then an efficient counting system is in place.’
  • 139) ‘Camera control also takes some getting used to but after a while I found it intuitive.’
  • 140) ‘These are select photographs from the newspaper that have been taken from different angles.’
  • 141) ‘Garret Westerfield was taken with a seizure or fit.’
  • 142) ‘Stagecoach staff managed to stop him driving off and the police came to take him away in a van.’
  • 143) ‘Travis reached up and took the flower from my mouth and dropped it on the floor carelessly.’
  • 144) ‘He reaches out and takes the pins from her hair, so it loosens in sections, unfolding around her.’
  • 145) ‘He reached out and took the bag from her, turning it so the pills dropped in his hand.’
  • 146) ‘I reached over and took a bottle of milk from its bag and gently put it in its mouth.’
  • 147) ‘The animals will be taken from a national park in Gujarat and released in the forests of Etawah.’
  • 148) ‘Don Broder took it from his brother in 1973 and kept it mounted it on the wall of his family room.’
  • 149) ‘What would happen if everyone took his or her money out of the bank at the same time?’
  • 150) ‘It's like the Daily Star with all the news and sport taken out, only rather less highbrow.’
  • 151) ‘The substance freshly taken from the honeycomb has a distinctive taste, scent, texture, and so on.’
  • 152) ‘Much of the excellent seafood taken from coastal waters is salted and dried and sent inland.’
  • 153) ‘Fluid taken from Mr Wilson's lung contained traces of blood, sometimes evidence of cancer.’
  • 154) ‘They then inserted an extra bovine protein gene taken from a cow cell into the embryos.’
  • 155) ‘The debris taken from the pool is visible to all on the northern bank of the pool.’
  • 156) ‘I am a big fainter when it comes to getting blood taken from me, so this was just ick ick ick.’
  • 157) ‘This is not just water but water taken from the algae-green trough in the field.’
  • 158) ‘Silver took out a key and locked the door, ensuring that the boy couldn't escape.’
  • 159) ‘Blood taken from a donor will tend to coagulate rapidly unless it is mixed with an anticoagulant.’
  • 160) ‘Her husband Stephen had died four years earlier and she fought a long legal battle to use sperm taken from him before he died.’
  • 161) ‘Kellye's son, Bryce, was 17; she'd taken him out of high school the previous year to homeschool him after catching him smoking pot.’
  • 162) ‘take two from four, how many are left?’
  • 163) ‘I have eighteen cents and take away five cents to buy a 'scratch-book,' and have thirteen.’
  • 164) ‘Donations of items to sell can be taken along, or if they are too large call in to arrange collection.’
  • 165) ‘An ambulance was called and Mr Greally was taken to York Hospital and later transferred to Leeds.’
  • 166) ‘They should be taken into the house about the beginning of November and wintered on hay and a few turnips at each end of the day.’
  • 167) ‘She went there on the day she took her Housing Benefit form and she asked for a change in circumstances form.’
  • 168) ‘Once the phone is charged, it can be taken anywhere inside the house as with a cordless phone.’
  • 169) ‘The next morning, the yacht had already been taken to the repair yard.’
  • 170) ‘The injured were taken to City Road Hospital, lately home to the great Dalrymple.’
  • 171) ‘His remains will be taken home for burial in Kilconduff Cemetery after Requiem Mass.’
  • 172) ‘However, King Scallops collected from the area must still be taken to an approved plant for processing.’
  • 173) ‘It was now early evening and I decided that the next lift I accepted would have to take me quite a distance.’
  • 174) ‘The woman was taken to hospital and received treatment for a minor head injury.’
  • 175) ‘Her job took her to New Delhi, London and finally to Chennai, where she had always wanted to be.’
  • 176) ‘After spending time living in Harrow, her job took her to Tokyo where she met her husband Shigetoshi.’
  • 177) ‘Ed's job often takes him to Manchester and London and he has noticed how fashion works in the city and has been shopping for a more modern look in Kendal.’
  • 178) ‘His job routinely takes him to Minnesota, London, Munich, the Netherlands and New York.’
  • 179) ‘Any items for the sale can be taken to the club or the Wiltshire Times offices in Duke Street.’
  • 180) ‘No matter where his mission takes him, he'll never be beyond the reach of God's protection.’
  • 181) ‘He took the ball forward only to fall but McKinnon was well - placed to flick it past keeper Nicky Walker.’
  • 182) ‘Walsh took the ball forward and off loaded to Coulter who had made a blistering run before firing over.’
  • 183) ‘She was taken to a police car and then up to Bradford Royal Infirmary.’
  • 184) ‘His guide took him to visit a forest tribe said to have stopped eating human flesh only five years previously.’
  • 185) ‘Later the guide takes us to a souvenir shop run by a friend of his.’
  • 186) ‘Our guides then took us to a creek that was said to be one of the hardest in Norway.’
  • 187) ‘Reyna Johnson, nice girl extraordinaire, had accepted his offer to take her to homecoming.’
  • 188) ‘Police were sent to the house and Berry was taken to her grandma's by officers.’
  • 189) ‘We believe Sims was waiting for her near the house and took her away to a green area at the back of the house.’
  • 190) ‘Mom was at my sister's house and had to be taken home to prepare a room for Marie.’
  • 191) ‘We exited the lift and were taken through a pitch dark passage into a room full of cages where a strange lady talked to us.’
  • 192) ‘His mother was a devoted Buddhist and she took Teiji, when he was a young child, with her when she went to the temple.’
  • 193) ‘Some parents will get in touch with the service to let them know where their children are to be taken that night.’
  • 194) ‘Each week we will pull out the name of a winner who will receive a voucher to take their friends or family for a meal at Chicago Rock.’
  • 195) ‘If anyone rich reads this, can they please bung me some money so I can take her away for a short holiday?’
  • 196) ‘He also takes Bury Gateway Club members away on adventure weekends every year.’
  • 197) ‘Once you know what is expected, go shopping but take somebody you trust with you.’
  • 198) ‘This morning I went to take Penelope shopping but she was not at all up for it.’
  • 199) ‘One of her chores was taking the family's horses out to pasture, within view of the house.’
  • 200) ‘My task was to take him for a spin and let him cast his expert eye over my driving skills… or lack of them.’
  • 201) ‘I had taken Katie out to dinner and we had a really nice time.’
  • 202) ‘Upon arriving home from work on Friday, I discovered that my wife had taken Zachery out for dinner and shopping, giving me a quiet house and no dinner company.’
  • 203) ‘We took Lucy along because Dad loves to see her and tries in vain to get her to play fetch the ball.’
  • 204) ‘The Nazi regime had taken Germany to war in 1939 and Siegel felt that he could no longer remain in his native land.’
  • 205) ‘They have ridden out the troubles once before and they are determined to do the same again, but this time by taking City into Division Two.’
  • 206) ‘Nothing would give me greater pleasure than to see George Street being taken to new heights.’
  • 207) ‘We wanted to take Park & Ride to the next level and we are delighted they are coming.’
  • 208) ‘Road to Rome takes Battlefield to the next level, with extremely well designed levels.’
  • 209) ‘He takes the Dingwall club from division three to division one in his six-year tenure.’
  • 210) ‘Tony Blair refuses to accept responsibility for taking us to war on a pack of lies.’
  • 211) ‘Campbell was not the first, then, but he was very good at his job and he took the art of spin to new heights, in Britain, at least.’
  • 212) ‘She has a tough job taking Standard Life into profit and holding onto customers that have begun to drift away.’
  • 213) ‘A riveting, Hindi-filmi court case takes the story towards a brilliant finale.’
  • 214) ‘Focused massage itself induces a meditative state in the giver as well as the receiver, taking brain wave patterns into alpha.’
  • 215) ‘Fowler was seen as the man to take City upwards and onwards in the next four years.’
  • 216) ‘These goals need to be met without taking large additional amounts of land into agricultural use.’
  • 217) ‘When Craig Waters makes his statement, we will be taking that live, so stand by for that.’
  • 218) ‘In spite of a spirited comeback that took Tan to within three points, she held on to win comfortably.’
  • 219) ‘The law also could make some boards more cautious about agreeing to take a company private.’
  • 220) ‘They took my 1996 route to the pub, I beat them with my new one, and we had a nice drink in the sunshine.’
  • 221) ‘They take the shortest possible route but do not know the height of their vehicle.’
  • 222) ‘Schoolchildren were instead taking a longer route via Leigh Road and Chestnut Avenue.’
  • 223) ‘We took a First ScotRail train, which has a picturesque route, from Edinburgh to Dunkeld.’
  • 224) ‘So we're taking a rather circuitous route to Waterloo so I can pick them up.’
  • 225) ‘If you only want to get there, you take the quickest route and worry about nothing else.’
  • 226) ‘If not we can expect even more commercial vehicles taking the shortest route through.’
  • 227) ‘It had taken them just about two days to get there taking the most direct route possible.’
  • 228) ‘Unlike the meandering trip into the desert, the return journey takes the most direct route home.’
  • 229) ‘Now the route Les took from the dock to a waiting prison van will be part of a tour on an open day at the courthouse in Bexley Square.’
  • 230) ‘Each and every minute detail was worked out as to which car would enter first and which escape routes we should be taking.’
  • 231) ‘On the way home, he argued with the taxi driver about the route he was taking and the price of the fare.’
  • 232) ‘Without a doubt, this was the most luxurious form of transport I have ever taken.’
  • 233) ‘The youth had been out for the evening in Kingston with friends and had taken the N285 night bus home.’
  • 234) ‘Mr Langdale asked why he was unable to say exactly which route he had taken.’
  • 235) ‘Knowing what the trains are like I deliberately took an earlier train, only to have it run perfectly on time.’
  • 236) ‘We've now worked out the route they took - one went over his fence, and let the other in by the gate.’
  • 237) ‘The route he took was popular with tourists but regarded by locals as treacherous.’
  • 238) ‘We decided on a walk, and thought why not do a real walk, and decided on the route we are taking.’
  • 239) ‘She wanted to approach Genevieve's by the route she had always taken in the past.’
  • 240) ‘We readily accepted, and took delivery of the pilot showreel the next day for an internal focus group.’
  • 241) ‘If they offered you the Irish manager's job would you take it, I ask mischievously.’
  • 242) ‘McCarthy is a good manager, in my opinion, much better now that when he took the job six years ago.’
  • 243) ‘He found his dyslexia made it difficult to get a job and took a string of short-term posts.’
  • 244) ‘Each year City of York Council asks schools if the number of new children they are taking each year is acceptable.’
  • 245) ‘Bookings for travel to the forthcoming games at Coventry and Nottingham Forest are still begin taken.’
  • 246) ‘Crucial is currently quoting as below, with a ten per cent discount for orders taken online.’
  • 247) ‘Initially he took a teaching position at a Latin school in Enkhuizen, North Holland.’
  • 248) ‘Names are now being taken so if interested book a place as soon as possible.’
  • 249) ‘Names are being taken for anyone interested in joining the Mosse brownie pack.’
  • 250) ‘Names will be taken from those who intend travelling on next year's pilgrimage to Lourdes.’
  • 251) ‘With an ever increasing demand for places, names are now being taken for the new year in September.’
  • 252) ‘A lump sum is only achievable by taking a lower pension as a result, literally cashing in part of your retirement income.’
  • 253) ‘Applications are currently being taken for the new course about to start in September.’
  • 254) ‘Barry is torn between kicking out the man who is about to despoil his daughter and taking his much needed rent money.’
  • 255) ‘Boris should have never agreed to take the call or do the show if it required taking that call.’
  • 256) ‘This way, students will not be wasting their number one rankings on jobs that are already taken.’
  • 257) ‘They have already taken a Government assurance when they provided the information.’
  • 258) ‘No away shirts are with the club at the moment but orders in all sizes are being taken.’
  • 259) ‘Orders are now being taken for all sizes and are available in navy blue and black.’
  • 260) ‘I take your point, and agree somewhat, but disagree somewhat.’
  • 261) ‘With that the ascent was started - initially Rich leading and then myself taking the poll position.’
  • 262) ‘With the wind, Pocklington took a seventh minute lead through Kevin Bowling's long penalty.’
  • 263) ‘In any case, Coyle's men did take a first minute lead with Dens defender Bobby Mann at fault.’
  • 264) ‘They took a seventh minute lead with Steve Foster's tap in from Martyn Forrest's cross.’
  • 265) ‘In a fast and attacking game it was King William who took a fifth minute lead through an own goal.’
  • 266) ‘It had all begun very promisingly for Trojans as they almost took a first minute lead.’
  • 267) ‘The only league game played was in division three where Hemingbrough took a fourth minute lead through Ward.’
  • 268) ‘Trojans soon steadied the ship and took a seventh minute lead through top scorer Gareth Goodison.’
  • 269) ‘It may be that he is right, but I believe he is taking an overly materialistic position.’
  • 270) ‘The problem with taking the ideologically pure position is that although what the state does will be bad it may not lead to collapse.’
  • 271) ‘If he follows the statements he has made in the past, he would be taking a far different position.’
  • 272) ‘In taking this position Giddens comes close to American philosopher Richard Rorty.’
  • 273) ‘Not that The Sun is in a position to take the moral high ground on anything.’
  • 274) ‘The modern world takes a strangely ambiguous position on violence.’
  • 275) ‘By mutual consent the couple divorced after a son was born and she took the name Bulbul Abdel Magid.’
  • 276) ‘She and Pa took a steamboat to Greenwich, where she married her love, who had taken the name Rokesmith.’
  • 277) ‘The witness did not, however, condescend to describe the form the cut tobacco took.’
  • 278) ‘As he took his Sedgefield seat in 1983, he looked across the House for lessons in leadership.’
  • 279) ‘If the call takes a sudden emotional or personal turn, get up quietly and signal that you are going out to the waiting room.’
  • 280) ‘Another form luxury fever takes is the appearance of premium versions of everyday products.’
  • 281) ‘What would you say if I told you that the video game industry takes in more money per year than the movie entertainment business?’
  • 282) ‘That means that the government spends less money than it takes in and applies the surplus to the NIB.’
  • 283) ‘It means they can respond quickly to calls, and drivers can take more money with fewer dead miles between jobs.’
  • 284) ‘No Republican has ever won the White House without taking Ohio; Democrats have only done so twice.’
  • 285) ‘Both campaigns believe that whoever wins two out of the three will probably take the White House.’
  • 286) ‘No Republican president has ever made it to the White House without taking Ohio.’
  • 287) ‘William Hurt took best supporting actor for his role in A History of Violence.’
  • 288) ‘Second and third places were taken by, respectively, the Dusit Resort and The City Sriracha.’
  • 289) ‘They can take the two seats if they overcome the risk of dragging each other down.’
  • 290) ‘Fairweather arrived last season when they foiled Albion's clean sweep by taking the District Cup.’
  • 291) ‘So I'm backing the Red Socks to beat the St Louis Cardinals and take the World Series title.’
  • 292) ‘It was a question of persistence paying off for Andrew Peach who took the Programme Presenter award.’
  • 293) ‘Andrus Varnik from Estonia took the silver after reaching 85.17m at his first attempt.’
  • 294) ‘BBC News took the News award for a second time, the only news organisation ever to do so.’
  • 295) ‘Kerry hoped to add to his total with a win in New Hampshire, which Bush barely took in the last election.’
  • 296) ‘My good friend has taken a rather splendid opportunity at work.’
  • 297) ‘For Oxford is a place of seemingly endless opportunities that should be taken and not put off for the sake of your degree.’
  • 298) ‘He accepted the challenge and took his chances and the shots went in.’
  • 299) ‘Of course, it also takes the opportunity to receive digital instructions as to how and when to attack its human master.’
  • 300) ‘When she looks over at me, Gregory takes the opportunity to reach out and grab her wrist.’
  • 301) ‘The steed stopped, and took the opportunity to reach down and grab a quick breakfast.’
  • 302) ‘The manager came in and said it was disappointing but it was a case of Crewe taking their chances and we didn't.’
  • 303) ‘He has not stopped scoring since and all this after taking a 75 per cent pay cut when he moved to Hanover.’
  • 304) ‘To answer the first question we have to ask ourselves who actually takes offence at receiving Christmas cards?’
  • 305) ‘But the slight decline in revenue is good news compared to the loss Sun took in the quarter.’
  • 306) ‘For someone purporting to live in Cumbria he takes a very keen interest in our city…’
  • 307) ‘Scots should take a very keen interest in what happens in our prisons for two reasons, he says.’
  • 308) ‘A regular visitor to Mayo, he takes a very keen interest in GAA affairs in this county.’
  • 309) ‘Long takes a particularly keen interest in developing junior players and has run classes after school and in the holidays.’
  • 310) ‘Jim also took a keen interest in political affairs and loved the atmosphere of election week and count day.’
  • 311) ‘He took pride in a job well done and always gave full commitment to any job he undertook.’
  • 312) ‘As if spurred on by this, Peebles upped the ante, taking two consecutive strikes against the head.’
  • 313) ‘Judging by fans who spoke to the newspaper, the news is not being taken well.’
  • 314) ‘Defeat was taken with dignity.’
  • 315) ‘Those of us with a cynical bent can all too well imagine how this proposal is being taken in the White House.’
  • 316) ‘And then the K1200S takes the corners, like no other bike I’ve ridden.’
  • 317) ‘Seen from a distance, such armed bands were often taken for brigands themselves, and so the panic spread.’
  • 318) ‘I'd advice you take everything I write with a pinch of salt anyway, so to speak.’
  • 319) ‘Don't take anything that Gibson wrote about as gospel on what Voudoun is about.’
  • 320) ‘This should not be taken to mean that military intervention is necessarily illegitimate.’
  • 321) ‘I can tell it's his way of being nice so I take it as a compliment.’
  • 322) ‘Im not quite sure who they are but I take it as a compliment that they liked my site enough to copy parts of it.’
  • 323) ‘take some time to regain confidence after this - or should I take it as a compliment?’
  • 324) ‘They know who she is and there is no question as to whether she should be taken seriously.’
  • 325) ‘Though Jeter takes acting seriously, Krakowski says he knows how to have fun with an audience.’
  • 326) ‘I suggest, however, that statements like these should not be taken too literally.’
  • 327) ‘It was a bold move but Bohr's already high reputation meant that he would be taken seriously.’
  • 328) ‘The article was most certainly not intended to be taken as the sum total or even a summation of my feelings about the CU.’
  • 329) ‘The Bible was taken as literal truth, despite the acceptance by most that the Earth revolved around the sun.’
  • 330) ‘For Sirius this occurs in July and this was taken to be the start of the year.’
  • 331) ‘The cholesterol ratio should not be taken on its own as a predictor of the risk of heart attack or stroke.’
  • 332) ‘All the girls in the office had taken this to mean that I was devastatingly handsome.’
  • 333) ‘He said attacks on shop staff could be taken more seriously at Government level.’
  • 334) ‘So it's a very difficult role, very difficult job and they're taking it very seriously.’
  • 335) ‘The BBC, reporting the event, took this as a reference to the Cardinal's red hat and robes.’
  • 336) ‘At first glance, Shannon looks apathetic but an emotion that could be taken for concern flickers in her eyes.’
  • 337) ‘Elter is taken with the action of Love's Labours Lost, wherein a group of nobles swear off wine, women, and all pleasure in order to pursue their studies.’
  • 338) ‘There were two students at that class I was taken with, one a girl and one a guy.’
  • 339) ‘Roger doesn't notice this, but is taken with how much Carolyn wants to keep David around.’
  • 340) ‘And I have been taken with how Best Mate's triumph has captured the imagination of people who are not interested in racing, but are interested in sport.’
  • 341) ‘Pluto, or Hades, rules the underworld but even he was taken by the power of love and lust, for Proserpine.’
  • 342) ‘While enjoying his new life, Barich is taken by the Irish love of National Hunt racing.’
  • 343) ‘I know Dad loves to see Lucy and I'm sure will be taken with Harvey when he finds out he fetches his toys back when you throw them for him.’
  • 344) ‘One interesting thing: they were taken with the quotation of Keith Johnstone in the Guardian yesterday by Chris Goode, to the effect that our present taboos are benevolence and tenderness.’
  • 345) ‘Peter McDonnell fundraises for charity every year and he and Caroline Boyle, who is a practice nurse in Killala, were taken with the idea of the Western People's Slimathon.’
  • 346) ‘Frontiersmen were taken with the extent to which Native Americans enjoyed freedom as individuals.’
  • 347) ‘Two of them were boys, the one Pip seemed taken with and one he had been standing with.’
  • 348) ‘We found we were suddenly quite taken by the emotion of working together again, like an old couple who meet once more.’
  • 349) ‘It has been three years of patiently taking rejection, accepting smaller parts, non-speaking roles.’
  • 350) ‘She was so sucked into her own lies she took the abuse and accepted it as a way of life.’
  • 351) ‘I have always advocated that players must stand up and take criticism and accept that.’
  • 352) ‘They were prepared to stand there and take what they were given by the police.’
  • 353) ‘It was a moving and impassioned speech, with a few barbs which Blair had to simply stand there and take.’
  • 354) ‘They can usually take what Mother Nature dishes out.’
  • 355) ‘Can I take it that you felt you had assumed a huge responsibility in taking on this awesome story?’
  • 356) ‘By rediscuss, I take it to mean that we're discussing what the salary & benefits would be.’
  • 357) ‘In this particular case, in London, I take it, none of these guys left any indication.’
  • 358) ‘Can I take it then oxygen will be provided in these new circumstances?’
  • 359) ‘These are, I take it, all referees below the Panel and those who officiate countrywide at some 2,000 games a week.’
  • 360) ‘No more details yet, I take it, on when he might be got out of Iraq or when, indeed, he might come back to Australia?’
  • 361) ‘So I take it, you're going to catch up now with the prime minister and then head back to Israel.’
  • 362) ‘So I take it that is not a major concern of yours, that U.S. troops might be caught up in a civil war.’
  • 363) ‘So I take it that Labour will support this bill so that the police don't have to exercise that discretion.’
  • 364) ‘There may be a case to do so if the father was very poor and needed the money to survive with his son, but I take it that this is not so in this case.’
  • 365) ‘The key point, I take it from The Economist, is that a leadership change lies ahead in China.’
  • 366) ‘Do I take it then that Boris supports the repeal of devolution in Scotland & Wales?’
  • 367) ‘Michael, can I take it from your review last week that you wouldn't recommend the Crabwall Manor hotel?’
  • 368) ‘So do I take it that at the launch of the Virdi inquiry very much that training was in vogue but now it has filtered off, or dwindled off?’
  • 369) ‘By now, I take it, the rhythm method of contraception must have passed out of favour.’
  • 370) ‘From your article I take it that the person quoted is a local solicitor who, for some reason, could not be named.’
  • 371) ‘Yes, but do I take it that ACPO does not have a specific view about where it thinks it would be best served?’
  • 372) ‘Do I take it from that that you have not got powers of enforcement of any decision that you feel is appropriate?’
  • 373) ‘Fair enough, but I take it that they are not coming just for a day out at MacDonalds.’
  • 374) ‘What I take it to refer to is the various roles of fire: to lighten, to heat and to destroy.’
  • 375) ‘When he got caught taking other drugs they would increase his methadone script so that he didn't need any other drugs.’
  • 376) ‘This comes down to your personal choice and drugs education, if you take these harder drugs.’
  • 377) ‘She would say that she wanted to get away from the life but the drugs she took controlled everything.’
  • 378) ‘Her family insist authorities knew she and her boyfriend were taking drugs together.’
  • 379) ‘He's a fascinating character, albeit a frustratingly incoherent one when the copious drugs he takes are in full flow.’
  • 380) ‘If only the Army knew, some of their best soldiers in the battalion are taking or have taken drugs.’
  • 381) ‘While taking drugs he was, in effect, harming no one but himself whereas with the alcohol he was a danger to others.’
  • 382) ‘I would like to know what drugs he was taking, such was his endless energy throughout.’
  • 383) ‘For colitis and irritable bowel syndrome, aloe vera can be taken as a drink.’
  • 384) ‘When we arrived at the house, John took a good few pink tablets and drank whiskey and cans of cider.’
  • 385) ‘Was he caught stealing, taking drugs or was he a victim of homosexual abuse?’
  • 386) ‘Young drivers also appear willing to accept lifts from drivers they know to have taken illicit substances.’
  • 387) ‘Mr.A told us that he now realises the danger to himself if he does not continue to abstain from taking illicit drugs.’
  • 388) ‘The years roll by, and you continue to steal, take drugs, and carry and use a blade.’
  • 389) ‘Young smokers are also more likely to drink alcohol or take illicit drugs.’
  • 390) ‘Unfortunately these substances have been taken illicitly by athletes for body-building.’
  • 391) ‘It is thought she and four other women who became ill on the night she died, had taken drugs stolen from a trolley.’
  • 392) ‘Currently insulin cannot be taken in a pill because the hormone is broken down by powerful acids in the stomach.’
  • 393) ‘They work best when taken regularly from the time when either pain or bleeding starts or the day before a period is due.’
  • 394) ‘It is taken by around two million people in the UK - in Germany, it's available on prescription.’
  • 395) ‘So as I opened up a new packet of crayons for my son, I held them up to my nose and took a long deep breath.’
  • 396) ‘Then they took a mock written driving test, which everyone tried his or her best in.’
  • 397) ‘The key stage three English test is the final key stage test, and is taken by 14-year-olds.’
  • 398) ‘The decision to have a very fancy new building at the Holyrood site was taken by the Labour government.’
  • 399) ‘Reliable information indicated that even the staff of the department expressed their bewilderment at some decisions that were taken with respect to the event.’
  • 400) ‘Mr Latham's mayoral decisions, including the capital works, were taken with the support of his council at the time.’
  • 401) ‘Key meetings were not recorded in official minutes and decisions were taken with little consultation of the Cabinet, says the report.’
  • 402) ‘I advanced to him that in understanding that we recognise that sometimes decisions have to be taken.’
  • 403) ‘He seems to assume that it is the same group of bright kids across the board taking AP's.’
  • 404) ‘The decision to strike had been taken on Friday, 48 hours before the bombs fell on Afghanistan.’
  • 405) ‘Maybe the opposition players should be moved back, but the free kick still be taken from the same position?’
  • 406) ‘However, no decisions have yet been taken about how this money should be allocated.’
  • 407) ‘It threatens that if money is not sent within days, steps will be taken to recover the money via the British courts.’
  • 408) ‘If there's any action to be taken [by the club] you'll be the last to know.’
  • 409) ‘This is a prelude to the enforcement steps which can then be taken to compel payment of any arrears.’
  • 410) ‘I expected action to be taken against the club in the form of a heavy fine or ruled out of the competition.’
  • 411) ‘The book outlines simple steps that can be taken to maximise money and help reap the rewards in retirement.’
  • 412) ‘The United Nations received much support for taking robust action against an aggressor nation.’
  • 413) ‘Nurse Debbie McCall has gone back to the job she loves after taking a career break of 18 years.’
  • 414) ‘You're taking a physical and mental break from your work area at least once a day.’
  • 415) ‘If you have friends taking the same subject you could always have an informal chat about an aspect of the subject with your friends.’
  • 416) ‘These can be taken in place of subjects such as history, geography and modern languages.’
  • 417) ‘They were in medieval French, a subject she had never taken at school.’
  • 418) ‘He needs to go back and read his classics studies, if he took that subject in high school.’
  • 419) ‘The year 12 student, who takes clothing as a school subject, aims to fulfill a career in fashion design.’
  • 420) ‘A week or so later I was booked to go for a weekend away somewhere with some people from a creative writing course I was taking.’
  • 421) ‘Soon his confidence in theoretical physics was such that by the second semester he was taking all of Sommerfeld's courses.’
  • 422) ‘They took City and Guild courses in literacy, numeracy and personal skills.’
  • 423) ‘He is taking the A1 assessors course to become an assessor for candidates studying for NVQs in warehousing.’
  • 424) ‘After taking the course Bob was able to assist a passenger experiencing difficulties.’
  • 425) ‘My boss will be taking a special course the first two weeks of July and I'll be in charge of the office, which is fine.’
  • 426) ‘Or dive even deeper by coming a day early and taking a Critical Concerns Course.’
  • 427) ‘Simply no dice, was the school's response, unless he agreed to take piano lessons too.’
  • 428) ‘It first became an issue for Mr Dixon when he was taking a Fine Arts degree at Leeds Metropolitan University.’
  • 429) ‘In order to take the higher degree they have to give up their existing job.’
  • 430) ‘His pleas fell on deaf ears as the jury took less than an hour to find him guilty.’
  • 431) ‘The jury took less than an hour to come to a unanimous decision - insane, unfit to plead.’
  • 432) ‘The jury took just over two hours to return a majority verdict of death by natural causes contributed by neglect.’
  • 433) ‘It gets progressively more demanding, too, taking a good 12 hours of study to absorb.’
  • 434) ‘It takes a good few hours to go through their system, however, so I haven't had a chance to play with all the fun features yet.’
  • 435) ‘The jury took less than two hours to reach a verdict of not guilty of murder but guilty of manslaughter.’
  • 436) ‘Driving or walking that short distance takes an almost equal amount of time.’
  • 437) ‘Anyhow it took Jae over an hour to cut my hair as I went from having curls half way down my back to wearing it cropped like a boy.’
  • 438) ‘It took Inveraray an hour to equalise very much against the run of play.’
  • 439) ‘It took McMartin several more hours to scrape a tunnel in the earth beneath the concrete slab to rescue him.’
  • 440) ‘It took Heather three hours to travel three miles through snow-blocked traffic.’
  • 441) ‘It takes many, many hours to learn a new language and I just never seem to have even a few extra minutes to spare.’
  • 442) ‘The procedure is the same, takes the same amount of time, and the parts are cheaper.’
  • 443) ‘You just have to be organised and even if you just take one or two hours to bounce ideas off somebody else that can be important.’
  • 444) ‘They tied her to a chair and burnt her with petrol over a period of 24 hours, and it took her 12 days to die.’
  • 445) ‘To write each word it takes hours and it has taken Makardhawaja two years to complete two volumes.’
  • 446) ‘It takes about the same amount of time to post the links.’
  • 447) ‘The haircut takes just exactly the amount of time that I have on my car park ticket.’
  • 448) ‘However the scale of the damage means it could take another 72 hours before every service is back.’
  • 449) ‘A jury at Exeter Crown Court took less than two hours to find him guilty.’
  • 450) ‘This task takes time and energy - it should not be done in its entirety after a long day at work.’
  • 451) ‘Installing a heat sink inside the case takes some true flexibility of the fingers.’
  • 452) ‘Unfortunately it does take an Einstein to understand what you are entitled to.’
  • 453) ‘It takes little imagination to understand just why so many ancient legends abound in these parts.’
  • 454) ‘To see complex systems of functional order as order, and not as chaos, takes understanding.’
  • 455) ‘The problem is that a lot of people don't seem to understand what it takes for a good back and forth exchange.’
  • 456) ‘You must get to the root of what it takes for you to get what you want.’
  • 457) ‘It usually takes building a friendship first but evidently not in this day and age.’
  • 458) ‘All it takes is some kind of security sweep at his job for his past to be uncovered.’
  • 459) ‘All it takes is time, a place to gather, and enough money to photocopy fliers or put an ad in the local paper.’
  • 460) ‘All it takes is a little brain bending and creativity to drum up an endless list of affordable dates.’
  • 461) ‘It takes a 51 percent vote of the limited partners to approve a sale of this franchise.’
  • 462) ‘Of course, this is not the whole story about why the violin takes such a lot of practice in order to learn to play it well.’
  • 463) ‘Post Office returned to winning ways against Haxby Town but it took a last minute penalty to settle it.’
  • 464) ‘It takes a World War, diphtheria and blindness to sort it all out.’
  • 465) ‘It seems like it takes a World Cup or an Olympic Games for this country to realise how far behind the rest of the sporting world we are.’
  • 466) ‘It takes little imagination to believe that there is in fact something more sinister in the Government's motives.’
  • 467) ‘Of course, it takes vast amounts of money and effort to pull off a successful lunar mission.’
  • 468) ‘Reaching a final takes guts, but Dennis Wise's Lions did not enjoy a dramatic run full of victories against all odds.’
  • 469) ‘And Carter agrees, It takes a very good horse to win the Arkle and he has everything going for him.’
  • 470) ‘The boat takes twenty guests.’
  • 471) ‘We intend to buy fertilised eggs - the incubator we have bought takes 24 hen eggs but we might start with 12.’
  • 472) ‘Second, he probably no more knows what size the child takes, any more than he knows how to crochet.’
  • 473) ‘The reason I bought it was because my digital camera takes two AA batteries.’
  • 474) ‘The grass has taken and was long and wet in the morning and was full of snails sucking to thick blades.’
  • 475) ‘However unfortunately in the first attempt, the embryo did not take and did not grow.’
  • 476) ‘There is no infallible rule identifying the verbs that take both, but they generally form nouns in tion.’
  • 477) ‘However, some transitive verbs take a prepositional phrase instead of an indirect object.’
  • 478) ‘For example, the open command takes as an argument the name of the file containing the data.’
  • 479) ‘I wanted to keep cool throughout the take and not show that my foot was caught.’
  • 480) ‘I think it was totally different to any animation movie I have seen before, it was another type of take.’
  • 481) ‘When one of them kisses Robbie a little too passionately, Tasha yells out and ruins a take.’
  • 482) ‘There are more clean-ups, and when Wallace is happy, producer Tony Platt calls for a take.’
  • 483) ‘The late Stanley Kubrick, director of Eyes Wide Shut, regularly did 100 takes.’
  • 484) ‘Finally, Jake Gyllenhaal leaned over said that Ang regularly did 15 takes and not to worry.’
  • 485) ‘Getting them to be serious for a minute or two, they reveal that a sheer amount of takes were required for Large Pro to be happy with his vocal performance.’
  • 486) ‘But you want to get it done and do it in the least amount of takes possible.’
  • 487) ‘The number of takes required to complete each scene is said to have rocketed.’
  • 488) ‘He is obviously having fun with his take on a midwestern everyman, but make no mistake, it is a take and little more.’
  • 489) ‘His new takes on the classic tales made us laugh out loud at more than one bedtime.’
  • 490) ‘The main problem with his take on the story is his overwhelming niceness as a director.’
  • 491) ‘Do you think Hollywood is running out of ideas or do you welcome new takes on classic stories?’
  • 492) ‘A modern version of the same book will have a different take on what we should know.’
  • 493) ‘You encourage as many sites as possible to shove up ads in exchange for a take of any revenue driven by those ads.’
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