mute vs moot

mute moot

Definitions

  • 1) A plosive; a stop.
  • 2) Law A defendant who declines to enter a plea to a criminal charge.
  • 3) Offensive One who is incapable of speech.
  • 4) Music Any of various devices used to muffle or soften the tone of an instrument.
  • 5) A silent letter.
  • 6) The dung of birds.
  • 7) See the quotation.
  • 8) The cry of hounds.
  • 9) A person who is speechless or silent; one who does not speak, from physical inability, unwillingness, forbearance, obligation. etc.
  • 10) In grammar and philology, an alphabetic utterance involving a complete closure of the mouth-organs; a. check; a stop; an explosive.
  • 11) A pack of hounds.
  • 12) The dung of fowls.
  • 13) In some Eastern countries, a dumb porter or doorkeeper, usually one who has been deprived of speech.
  • 14) In music:
  • 15) In theaters, one whose part is confined to dumb-show; also, a spectator; a looker-on.
  • 16) In stringed musical instruments of the viol family, a clip or weight of brass, wood, or ivory that can be slipped over the bridge so as to deaden the resonance without touching the strings; a sordino.
  • 17) In law, a person who makes no response when arraigned and called on to plead or answer.
  • 18) In metal wind-instruments, a pear-shaped leathern pad which can be inserted into the bell to check the emission of the tone.
  • 19) A mew for hawks.
  • 20) Not pronounced; silent, as the e in the word house.
  • 21) Law Declining to enter a plea to a criminal charge.
  • 22) Expressed without speech; unspoken.
  • 23) Unable to vocalize, as certain animals.
  • 24) Offensive Unable to speak.
  • 25) Pronounced with a temporary stoppage of breath, as the sounds (p) and (b); plosive; stopped.
  • 26) Refraining from producing speech or vocal sound.
  • 27) Not speaking; uttering no sound; silent.
  • 28) To eject the contents of the bowels; -- said of birds.
  • 29) To soften or muffle the sound of.
  • 30) To soften the tone, color, shade, or hue of.
  • 31) To cast off; to molt.

Definitions

  • 1) Australia Vagina.
  • 2) The discussion or argument of a hypothetical case by law students as an exercise.
  • 3) An ancient English meeting, especially a representative meeting of the freemen of a shire.
  • 4) A hypothetical case used for such a discussion or argument.
  • 5) a case or question to be mooted; a disputable case; an unsettled question.
  • 6) A discussion or debate; especially, a discussion of fictitious causes by way of practice.
  • 7) A meeting for discussion and deliberation; esp., a meeting of the people of a village or district, in Anglo-Saxon times, for the discussion and settlement of matters of common interest; -- usually in composition.
  • 8) a point or question to be debated; a doubtful question.
  • 9) a mock court, such as is held by students of law for practicing the conduct of law cases.
  • 10) to render moot{2}; to moot{3}.
  • 11) (Shipbuilding) A ring for gauging wooden pins.
  • 12) In early English history, a court formed by assembling the men of the village or tun, the hundred, or the kingdom, or their representatives.
  • 13) The place of such a meeting.
  • 14) In ship-building:
  • 15) Dispute; debate; discussion; specifically, in law, an argument on a hypothetical case by way of practice.
  • 16) A ring used to gage the diameter of treenails.
  • 17) An obsolete variant of mot.
  • 18) A piece of hard wood bound with iron at both ends, used in making blocks.
  • 19) A meeting; a formal assembly.
  • 20) North America Having no practical impact or relevance.
  • 21) UK Subject to discussion (originally at a moot); arguable, debatable, unsolved or impossible to solve.
  • 22) Of no legal significance; hypothetical.
  • 23) Of no practical importance; irrelevant.
  • 24) Not presenting an open legal question, as a result of the occurrence of some event definitively resolving the issue, or the absence of a genuine case or controversy.
  • 25) Subject to debate; arguable or unsettled.
  • 26) Of purely theoretical or academic interest; having no practical consequence.
  • 27) Subject, or open, to argument or discussion; undecided; debatable; mooted.
  • 28) obsolete See 1st mot.
  • 29) Toargue;dispute.
  • 30) Specifically
  • 31) Todig.
  • 32) Tospeak;utter.
  • 33) To argue or plead in a supposed case.
  • 34) To render (a subject or issue) irrelevant.
  • 35) To bring up (a subject) for discussion or debate. synonym: broach.
  • 36) To argue (a case) in a moot court.
  • 37) To render (a legal issue or question) irrelevant.
  • 38) To discuss or debate.
  • 39) To render inconsequential, as having no effect on the practical outcome; to render academic.
  • 40) Specifically: To discuss by way of exercise; to argue for practice; to propound and discuss in a mock court.
  • 41) To argue for and against; to debate; to discuss; to propose for discussion.

Examples

  • 1) Her eyes clung to him, her expression mute in its appeal.
  • 2) On account of the great progress made, especially during the last century, in the education of deaf-mutes, by which a large percentage are taught to speak, the term mute is also omitted when speaking of matters pertaining to that class formerly designated as
  • 3) "It is what we call a mute 'e'; but it exercises a modifying influence on the preceding vowel."
  • 4) And why the deafen silence of the normally vocal Republicans remain mute, with no loud attacks on everything the Media Imperial President has done, with no rhetorical shouting points repeated ad nauseum, just taking the high road with a few reasonable discussions over actual policy points?
  • 5) She laid her hand in mute appeal upon the back of his, which turned over and became a prison.
  • 6) Now it happened that while his centre of amativeness was pronounced, it had lain mute and passive during the years he lived on moose and salmon and chased glowing
  • 7) GLSEN — the Gay, Lesbian and Straight Education Network — is organizing the 15th annual Day of Silence for April 16, encouraging students to remain mute during classes to call attention to verbal and physical abuse of gay students.
  • 8) ‘Police officers remained mute spectators as pedestrians, bikers, car drivers, autodrivers and other road users waited out the jams under a bright January sun.’
  • 9) ‘The director appears in the last shot of all the stories, a mute spectator who is a symbol of society, which is portrayed as having become insensitive to everything.’
  • 10) ‘In both the cases, the public remained mute spectators.’
  • 11) ‘These intensive singing sessions are exactly that as I discovered one Tuesday evening recently, sitting in mute admiration.’
  • 12) ‘They stood mute spectators when irate employees chased the Vice-Chancellor of a university around the State Assembly.’
  • 13) ‘At first, the watchers, except the most determined walkers and the really serious lovers, remain mute spectators.’
  • 14) ‘Perhaps, accustomed as he was to hearing such queries and taunts by the driver, the conductor remained a mute spectator.’
  • 15) ‘The police were mute spectators to the entire incident which took place right outside the KEM hospital.’
  • 16) ‘All the while the police remained a mute spectator only trying to ensure that fatal injuries were not inflicted.’
  • 17) ‘I was thereafter keen to attend the classes with my brother, if only as a mute spectator.’
  • 18) ‘‘She used to be big as a horse,’ one of the officers said to a colleague, who nodded in mute admiration.’
  • 19) ‘The rest of the crowded carriage watched in mute silence.’
  • 20) ‘With this anti-intellectual attitude, I ought to be mute every time I detect scientific ignorance in a movie's story or set design.’
  • 21) ‘In the ground floor restaurants, every meal attracts a crowd of kids who press their faces against the glass in a mute appeal for food.’
  • 22) ‘Mrs. Willis rolled her eyes toward Heaven in a mute appeal for help, while Adam laughed, put down a bag, and pushed the door open.’
  • 23) ‘He crumbles before the mute appeal in his fellow musician's eye: ‘It felt like kicking a spaniel.’’
  • 24) ‘He looked at me in mute appeal as if I was a rope held out to a falling person.’
  • 25) ‘I've seen, as have we all, theft, fraud, intimidation, malversation - and seen it with such regularity that its absence provokes not comment but mute wonder.’
  • 26) ‘Sara stared down at the letter in mute astonishment.’
  • 27) ‘These beliefs may be wrong - the innocent who are indicted nevertheless may sit by in mute horror, and husbands who lose their families in one fell swoop may be frozen in depression as a result.’
  • 28) ‘Of course, there was the flood of hormones which evoked embarrassed silence (and mute curses) from him; but more importantly, he knew nothing about her.’
  • 29) ‘The range was unique in that every golf range I've ever been to has golf balls lying around within a dozen feet or so of the practice tees - mute evidence of the ineptitude of those whaling away.’
  • 30) ‘Dean Stockwell is often overlooked in his portrayal of Walt, but he has a difficult job here, playing off Travis's mute determination, and he succeeds admirably.’
  • 31) ‘It is easy to imagine the fear and rage and grief of the combatants, harder to see it in the cool press briefings of the leaders who make war and the often mute suffering of the populations who must endure and support it.’
  • 32) ‘With mute excitement I quickly snapped it up, paid and exited the store - only to suddenly realise that Durgnat wasn't the author I had in mind when I whipped his book off the shelf.’
  • 33) ‘When they returned home two hours later, they discovered Chris's mattress on the floor and almost in the hallway, mute testimony to the haste with which he grabbed his son out of bed.’
  • 34) ‘He stomped his foot to the floor and quite suddenly drew a gun to the air - the former chuckles from the crowd instantly transformed to a collectively mute distress.’
  • 35) ‘So she constructs a fantastic house of cards as a mute statement - an apparent attempt to connect with her family and explain her annoying behavior.’
  • 36) ‘They opposed the 16th century Spanish conquest and remained in a state of mute resistance over the years, exploding in rebellion at the end of the 18th century.’
  • 37) ‘We stood and stared blankly at it in mute amazement.’
  • 38) ‘She stood in mute shock, dresses draped over her arm.’
  • 39) ‘An uncomfortable silence fell over the room and Andy quietly sat, her chin lifted in mute defiance, as her mother and stepfather stared at her.’
  • 40) ‘But many of the faithful, concluding that there is no smoke without fire, are simply averting their gaze in mute despair.’
  • 41) ‘We are not here to consider the appeal of mute ruins, the hollowness of reason, the veneer of American order.’
  • 42) ‘He didn't bother lifting his hand to search the extensive marble wall for the light switch as he removed his boots and his bare feet dragged slowly into the massive mute darkness before him.’
  • 43) ‘Above him, attached to the wall, were 25 manual typewriters with rusted and missing parts, mute relics of an antiquated era in communication.’
  • 44) ‘As she climbs she warily eyes dozens of tiny, mute silhouettes outlined against the windowpanes - flies awaiting the warmth of the day.’
  • 45) ‘They do not write; and unlike mutes, or monks under vows of silence, they do not use any signs or other devices in place of speaking.’
  • 46) ‘Assuming you aren't a mute, what will we talk about on our date?’
  • 47) ‘At one point it was believed she was incapable of speech and nearly labeled a mute.’
  • 48) ‘And she's like twenty-two and practically a mute.’
  • 49) ‘For several weeks after it happened, she didn't speak a word, virtually becoming a mute.’
  • 50) ‘He had a deep-seated loathing of the panoply of the Victorian funeral: mummers, mutes, plumes, palls, and all.’
  • 51) ‘He said there was the possibility that the disappearance of the items, which also included four red and blue glitter hats, several brass mutes and three wooden music rests, was a mistake.’
  • 52) ‘The cash paid for music, a PA system and mutes for the brass section.’
  • 53) ‘On woodwinds, a cloth bag has sometimes been tied over the instrument, and small pear-shaped wooden mutes were made to fit into 18th-century oboe bells.’
  • 54) ‘She laughed at how they were both carrying trumpets, only one had a mute in the other hand.’
  • 55) ‘The cone-shaped device looks like a trumpet mute.’
  • 56) ‘He then quietly crept downstairs to get himself a drink, consciousness now having taken a hold on him, and then he flicked around the television channels on mute until his parents woke up.’
  • 57) ‘The twenty-three year old man was going through photos, the television on mute as he picked up a magazine.’
  • 58) ‘Aimée nodded absently and sat down beside her friend just as she heard the front door open, but ignored it and took the mute off the television.’
  • 59) ‘The larger screen served at the moment as a television outlet on mute.’
  • 60) ‘Now she speaks but without a sound, like the television personalities on mute.’
  • 61) ‘It's so close, again, that when you hear the crowds roar on the television and then hit mute, you can still hear the crowds roar, even through closed windows.’
  • 62) ‘Then the show came back on and the television was taken off mute.’
  • 63) ‘I was in my room, alone in the house once again, watching the television on mute.’
  • 64) ‘It's also important to put your television on mute to make the most of the experience.’
  • 65) ‘After getting hurriedly dressed, she went to the television, put the sound on mute, and headed to a loud rock channel.’
  • 66) ‘There are also in-use indicator lights for both talk and mute, and when mute is engaged, the user hears a ‘beep’ as an audible reminder.’
  • 67) ‘Now I know that the sound of a TV on mute is an ultra high frequency sound.’
  • 68) ‘‘Him’, I point at the screen as I grab the remote to turn the mute off.’
  • 69) ‘The T.V. went to commercial and Jaime grabbed the remote to turn the mute on.’
  • 70) ‘It has volume control, mute and push-to-talk buttons all within one housing.’
  • 71) ‘I had the television - a football game halftime show - on mute in my room.’
  • 72) ‘Tony flicked on the TV too, but kept the sound on mute as he entered the chat room for the scheduled hack.’
  • 73) ‘Maximillian watched her until she disappeared into the lift before he took the mute off the sound system.’
  • 74) ‘The cars, the people, even birds flying through the sky were moving at a super fast pace, but the sound was on mute.’
  • 75) ‘Sounds are muted with dull explosions and gunfire, and the music is very dreary.’
  • 76) ‘‘The thick curtains also help mute the sound of our son's rock band rehearsals,’ says Hertz.’
  • 77) ‘The third can at least be muted by some dampening, and by putting sufficient thought into case design and component layout to minimise sympathetic vibrations.’
  • 78) ‘Words were difficult to pick out, muted by the thick metal door.’
  • 79) ‘This mutes equipment noise and greatly reduces heat loss.’
  • 80) ‘But, of course, when we cook there is no sound mixer to mute the sounds of the bacon sizzling or the sauce gurgling.’
  • 81) ‘The shutter locked into place, muting sounds of the waking town.’
  • 82) ‘Vaguely, he heard church bells from the city strike their hours, their clear sound muted by the snow and by the rose curtain draped partially over the study window.’
  • 83) ‘Then again, it was a pretty windy day, and voices were muted by the sound of the wind.’
  • 84) ‘So you may not be able to completely mute the sound of the ticking clock or the voices telling you you don't know what you're doing.’
  • 85) ‘She screamed into the pillow pulled over her head to mute the sound.’
  • 86) ‘The ground was hard and brown and rocky, parched, but the caw of birds from a nearby grove of olive trees muted the sound of my footsteps.’
  • 87) ‘For a moment, every sound was muted by the pressure of the water, of bubbles kicked up by her uninvited presence.’
  • 88) ‘Instead, she fell face-first into her pillow, let out a small shriek of delight that she hoped the pillow would mute, and finally looked up.’
  • 89) ‘His mouth covered hers again, muting all but her most desperate of squeaks.’
  • 90) ‘Use a keyboard which has shortcut keys for instantly muting the sound though.’
  • 91) ‘To keep the drums from becoming overpowering onstage and in the mix, they were muted with a set of SoundOff drum set silencers.’
  • 92) ‘The guitarists spend much of the show muting their strings and one of them actually sits out on a few songs, sparing the music of any clutter.’
  • 93) ‘The ‘buff stop’ on harpsichords and early pianos, operated by a hand-lever or a pedal, mutes the strings by pressing pads of felt or leather against the them.’
  • 94) ‘By using blue filters that mute the intensity of bright colors, he gives his film a stark, wintry feel.’
  • 95) ‘It is too early to tell if such aggressive measures will mute the violence or stoke it.’
  • 96) ‘Surprisingly Jack was a subtle presence; muting her usual impact and actually helping them do their jobs.’
  • 97) ‘The reduced attention to politics mutes the most important way in which individual human agency drives human experience.’
  • 98) ‘He has aged remarkably well, his manic oddness (which I have always been utterly charmed by) muted by experience and dry wit.’
  • 99) ‘Thankfully, the painkillers were muting the pain in my belly down to a dull ache.’
  • 100) ‘You probably don't want to go too light on the effect here, because the next steps will soften the grain and mute its effect.’
  • 101) ‘Any exuberence felt was muted by that dull pain of having hurt someone I care deeply for.’
  • 102) ‘An author can be in danger of stifling and muting their own work, taking from it any autonomous identity.’
  • 103) ‘Right now, they don't think they can win this fight so they're muting their attacks on Roberts.’
  • 104) ‘My relief at learning that I'd be staying in the same place as previous years was muted by the realization that this was the end of the line.’
  • 105) ‘But he muted his enthusiasm when it appeared that the stance might hurt his party in the elections.’
  • 106) ‘But the celebrations were muted by news that they are unlikely ever to see their children again.’
  • 107) ‘He ordered them to stay the proceedings for the recovery of a horse with a saddle and bridle, a hat, a cloak, a ring, a cup, and a mute of hounds.’
  • 108) ‘Wellington's modest mute of hounds accompanied their owner on his journey.’
  • 109) ‘This mute of hounds, dashing all over the pace, split the morning air with enough hideous din to frighten any fox out of the commune.’

Examples

  • 1) What such a restless writer does next is a moot point.
  • 2) This is a moot point after the muddle of this winter.
  • 3) That may be a moot point.
  • 4) Whether or not that is the case is a moot point.
  • 5) Why this should be so is a moot point.
  • 6) The price mooted is higher than originally expected.
  • 7) Whether it will prove popular is a moot question.
  • 8) There are many ideas being mooted that demand serious consideration.
  • 9) The fact that dogs can detect cancer has long been mooted.
  • 10) Some applications will be dismissed because the case is now moot.
  • 11) Whether they will be allowed to do so for much longer is a moot point.
  • 12) Whether these sources offer any significant new insight seems a moot point.
  • 13) The government first mooted a charge on domestic waste last year in an attempt to encourage more people to recycle.
  • 14) The mooted price is double that.
  • 15) When plans were mooted for just such an enterprise in America it provoked a furious reaction.
  • 16) The idea was first mooted in 1862 but it has always drawn criticism.
  • 17) Plans were first mooted 14 years ago.
  • 18) No price had been mooted.
  • 19) Other rescue ideas were mooted.
  • 20) A tie-up between the two groups has long been mooted.
  • 21) When the deal was first mooted in January, the landscape looked rather different.
  • 22) Whether Price will be heading Waitrose for as long is a moot point.
  • 23) ‘The motion explained that the company and the union had already reached an agreement on the retiree health benefit issue that made the previous dispute a moot point.’
  • 24) ‘How much the appeal of this movie derives from its subject and how much from Spacey is a moot point, I suppose.’
  • 25) ‘Which of the two camps was having a better time may be a moot point, but there can be no dispute as to which was living most successfully in the here and now.’
  • 26) ‘Still, it's a moot point and one that lawyers will enjoy debating if they're given the chance.’
  • 27) ‘How great a comedian he was remains a moot point, inevitably subjective, and increasingly difficult to separate from the mythology.’
  • 28) ‘How neurological the problem is, or how politically expedient, is a moot point.’
  • 29) ‘Whether he is too softly spoken for the top job remains a moot point, but no-one can question his dedication because he spends six days of the week at Irish's training ground.’
  • 30) ‘Founded six years ago and comprising nine core sports, it is essentially a support service to 244 elite athletes, though whether Scotland can really claim to have that many elite athletes is a moot point.’
  • 31) ‘While conservation of ecology and bio-diversity have been a moot point on television and newspapers, Kartik feels that ecological studies are yet to get their due in the country.’
  • 32) ‘Whether or not the broadcaster's blindness has made his hearing more acute is a moot point, but what can't be denied is that his ability to describe his remaining senses is second to none.’
  • 33) ‘Whether or not that support will be forthcoming in the numbers expected is a moot point following revelations about the parlous state of Britain's armed forces.’
  • 34) ‘To what extent we are acculturated to human sound even before birth, given that the inner ear is formed so early in gestation, is a moot point.’
  • 35) ‘But, how well they are maintained or how far heritage preservation efforts are encouraged is a moot point.’
  • 36) ‘Whether this defence will be accepted by the political sources who are the lifeblood of any newspaper is, for the time being, a moot point.’
  • 37) ‘It is a moot point that all serious coaches follow a particular style of play that becomes their signature or hallmark.’
  • 38) ‘But whether the industry can absorb all the qualified architects is a moot point.’
  • 39) ‘Whether such a system can remain in place in the increasingly competitive world of global car making remains a moot point.’
  • 40) ‘I recognize, however, that the relationship between the content of this literature and actual management accounting practice remains moot.’
  • 41) ‘Thus, it is a moot question whether a child who learns all about traffic rules and signs through textbooks and in such parks, will abide by them, or instead imitate their elders.’
  • 42) ‘As a poet, he is now unfashionable, so it is a moot question whether a play based on him can be of any current interest.’
  • 43) ‘At some point, this whole debate may be rendered moot.’
  • 44) ‘But the time may be fast approaching when this debate becomes moot.’
  • 45) ‘If a foetus is not human, then it is not protected under the law and the entire abortion debate is moot.’
  • 46) ‘The question of whether slavery preceded racism or vice versa thus appears - if not exactly moot, then at least largely irrelevant.’
  • 47) ‘I might or might not ever have children, so this might be a moot point.’
  • 48) ‘But now it's a moot point - the tickets have been sold, and I'm not going.’
  • 49) ‘It was months later when the Court produced its reasoning, and given the defendants had already been executed, it seemed a moot point.’
  • 50) ‘One possibility, which has increasingly been mooted, is the idea of a Universal Court for Human Rights.’
  • 51) ‘When Richard first mooted the idea of his book to his brother two years ago, David advised him on the business end of publishing.’
  • 52) ‘It was he who first mooted the idea of a reunion seven years ago.’
  • 53) ‘Once the idea was mooted, it struck a chord with other regional stock exchanges.’
  • 54) ‘He has already had his first meeting with the upper sixth council during which a number of suggestions were mooted.’
  • 55) ‘Supporters have been waiting for a new stadium since the idea was first mooted more than 10 years ago.’
  • 56) ‘The idea has been mooted before but this time there's actually money flowing into the pot.’
  • 57) ‘The marina project has divided the town since the idea was first mooted.’
  • 58) ‘The idea was mooted by locals and, at the end, very well supported by them.’
  • 59) ‘However, some ideas being mooted include a water fountain and football area.’
  • 60) ‘The proposals were first mooted in 1997 and since then the scheme has suffered a series of different set backs.’
  • 61) ‘The proposals were mooted at a heated meeting in Wexford yesterday afternoon.’
  • 62) ‘A proposal has also been mooted to market the products through a cooperative set-up.’
  • 63) ‘The idea of a German market was first mooted by city chiefs three years ago.’
  • 64) ‘Plans for a residents-only parking scheme have been mooted in a bid to tackle the problem.’
  • 65) ‘More funds and heavier investment in the training of teachers was also mooted.’
  • 66) ‘A number of projects have been mooted for the power station but there is nothing definite to date.’
  • 67) ‘However, since the plans were first mooted three years ago the development has attracted a lot of criticism.’
  • 68) ‘There is talk of landowners denying the armed forces access to their firing ranges and a blockade of London is mooted.’
  • 69) ‘It's been a decade since the project was mooted and it has gone through a maze of approvals and reviews.’
  • 70) ‘Even if, as some have supposed, the manor court, or hall moot, had Anglo-Saxon forebears, it was an institution that must have changed out of all recognition after 1100.’
  • 71) ‘After the mid-16th century Reformation, when religious guilds were dissolved, it was used as a market cross and as a moot hall.’
  • 72) ‘Joseph Gerrald, after all, had proposed the Convention, likening it to the folk moot of Saxon England.’
  • 73) ‘I heard the pagans hang out there for moots.’
  • 74) ‘Get to know as many people in the Pagan community as you can by going to moots, meetings, camps, festivals and so on.’
  • 75) ‘Basically they are people who follow the path on their own without the need for moots or covens.’
  • 76) ‘This is why I tend to be an advocate for joining groups - not only magical ‘working’ groups but going along to pagan moots and the like too.’
  • 77) ‘I attended a moot in my town a couple of times, but always felt on the outside looking in.’
  • 78) ‘The last time I was there, nearly a decade ago, I was a law student competing in the Jessup International Law moot.’
  • 79) ‘Thanks do not go out to my alarm clocks, which failed to work this morning resulting in my awakening in absolute panic at 2 pm, with only one third of the moot prepared.’
  • 80) ‘The moot is tomorrow, my point of law absurdly impossible to argue, and the prospect of sleep tonight absurdly impossible to contemplate.’
  • 81) ‘I won the moot, despite having to argue an unwinnable point of law.’
  • 82) ‘I had never studied international law before the gruelling four months of my life that the moot eventually consumed.’
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