counsel vs council

counsel council

Definitions

  • 1) Advice or guidance so given
  • 2) The exchange of opinions and advice; consultation
  • 3) A lawyer, as in Queen's Counsel (QC)
  • 4) Advice or guidance, especially as solicited from a knowledgeable person. synonym: advice.
  • 5) Private, guarded thoughts or opinions.
  • 6) The act of exchanging opinions and ideas; consultation.
  • 7) A lawyer or group of lawyers giving legal advice and especially conducting a case in court.
  • 8) Examination of consequences; exercise of deliberate judgment; prudence.
  • 9) [Obs.] in secret.
  • 10) Result of consultation; advice; instruction.
  • 11) to keep one's thoughts, purposes, etc., undisclosed.
  • 12) Deliberate purpose; design; intent; scheme; plan.
  • 13) Interchange of opinions; mutual advising; consultation.
  • 14) One who gives advice, especially in legal matters; one professionally engaged in the trial or management of a cause in court; also, collectively, the legal advocates united in the management of a case.
  • 15) A secret opinion or purpose; a private matter.
  • 16) A private or secret opinion or purpose; consultation in secret; concealment.
  • 17) Prudence; due consideration; wise and cautious exercise of judgment; examination of consequences.
  • 18) Same as council, but properly a different word, the two being confused. See council.
  • 19) One who gives counsel, especially in matters of law; a counselor or advocate, or several such, engaged in the direction or the trial of a cause in court: as, the plaintiff's or defendant's counsel.
  • 20) Advice; opinion or instruction given, as the result of consultation or request; aid or instruction given in directing the judgment or conduct of another.
  • 21) Consultation; deliberation; mutual advising or interchange of opinions.
  • 22) To recommend
  • 23) To give advice, especially professional advice.
  • 24) To give counsel or advice to; advise; admonish; instruct.
  • 25) To advise or recommend; urge the adoption of.
  • 26) To consult; take counsel; deliberate.
  • 27) To give counsel to; advise.
  • 28) To give or take advice.
  • 29) To advise or recommend, as an act or course.
  • 30) To give advice to; to advice, admonish, or instruct, as a person.

Definitions

  • 1) A committee that leads or governs (e.g. city council, student council)
  • 2) discussion or deliberation
  • 3) An assembly of persons called together for consultation, deliberation, or discussion.
  • 4) An assembly of church officials and theologians convened for regulating matters of doctrine and discipline.
  • 5) A body of people elected or appointed to serve as administrators, legislators, or advisers.
  • 6) The discussion or deliberation that takes place in such an assembly or body.
  • 7) an assembly of officers of high rank, called to consult with the commander in chief in regard to measures or importance or nesessity.
  • 8) the table round which a council holds consultation; also, the council itself in deliberation.
  • 9) [U.S.] the ceremonial fire kept burning while the Indians hold their councils.
  • 10) See under Common.
  • 11) the room or apartment in which a council meets.
  • 12) Act of deliberating; deliberation; consultation.
  • 13) [U.S.] a body of men elected as advisers of the chief magistrate, whether of a State or the nation.
  • 14) See under Aulic.
  • 15) [Eng.] See under Privy.
  • 16) See under Cabinet.
  • 17) (Eccl.) an assembly of prelates or divines convened from the whole body of the church to regulate matters of doctrine or discipline.
  • 18) the legislative branch of a city government, usually consisting of a board of aldermen and common council, but sometimes otherwise constituted.
  • 19) the upper house of a legislature, usually called the senate.
  • 20) A body of man elected or appointed to constitute an advisory or a legislative assembly.
  • 21) An assembly of men summoned or convened for consultation, deliberation, or advice.
  • 22) (Christianity) an assembly of theologians and bishops and other representatives of different churches or dioceses that is convened to regulate matters of discipline or doctrine
  • 23) a meeting of people for consultation
  • 24) a body serving in an administrative capacity
  • 25) A Lutheran body organized in the United States in 1866 by the Pennsylvania synod and others which were not in sympathy with the attitude of the general synod toward the Augsburg Confession. The council proclaimed strict adherence to the Lutheran faith.
  • 26) In ecclesiastical history: An assembly of prelates and theologians convened for the purpose of regulating matters of doctrine and discipline in the church.
  • 27) Same as counsel. See counsel.
  • 28) A body of men specially designated or selected to advise a sovereign in the administration of the government; a privy council: as, the president of the council; in English history, an order in council. See privy council, below.
  • 29) A common council. See below.
  • 30) In the Territories of the United States, the upper branch of the legislature. The term was used to denote a kind of upper house during the colonial period, and was retained in this sense for a few years by some of the States.
  • 31) In many of the British colonies, a body assisting the governor in either an executive or a legislative capacity, or in both.
  • 32) In the New Testament, the Sanhedrim, a Jewish court or parliament, with functions partly judicial, partly legislative, and partly ecclesiastical. See Sanhedrim.
  • 33) Any assembly of persons summoned or convened for consultation, deliberation, or advice: as, a council of physicians; a family council.
  • 34) Any body or group of persons wielding political power.

Examples

  • 1) Walter looked at a loss in his own home; at a Bar table there would have been papers to shuffle, junior counsel to consult.
  • 2) I suppose that's something we have to look at, learned counsel.
  • 3) A novice defending counsel could get you off on the grounds of mental incapacity!
  • 4) Regardless, Pam was responding well to the advice and counsel of her new friend.
  • 5) ‘As for the European Union, the situation is really bad, though wiser counsels may prevail in the next week or so.’
  • 6) ‘In fact, this is only one of many wise counsels to the cautious buyer who fears being landed with a freshly minted or happily married antique.’
  • 7) ‘To the spiritually minded he was rich in wise counsels.’
  • 8) ‘Who among us would then be content with the counsels of patience and delay?’
  • 9) ‘One knows not to question the wisdom of the Delphic seers, those voices of prescience whose cryptic counsels were so poorly interpreted by their clientele.’
  • 10) ‘Forced to live a life on the run, he seeks counsel from an old mystic, who explains that his actions have spawned an immortal incarnation of Fate, known as the Dahaka.’
  • 11) ‘Civilians hang on their every utterance, politicians seek their counsel, and party-givers stroke them.’
  • 12) ‘Sometimes it is better to seek counsel from a stranger.’
  • 13) ‘For a small fee, punters can seek out my counsel on these matters and I will gladly offer my expertise!’
  • 14) ‘He would make himself available at any time of day or night to anyone seeking his help or counsel.’
  • 15) ‘If you seek counsel of other kinds, I will be perfectly glad to help in any way that I can.’
  • 16) ‘He sought counsel on how to do improvisational comedy.’
  • 17) ‘Some bishops will increasingly seek and rely on counsel in these matters, but whether they ask for it from those offering to give it remains to be seen.’
  • 18) ‘You'd be smart, however, to seek expert counsel before committing to a long-term payment plan.’
  • 19) ‘They were sought for counsel as to the timing for a party's movement.’
  • 20) ‘Did you seek counsel from other business leaders as to how to deal with the downturn?’
  • 21) ‘It is crucial that facility executives seek counsel to address specific questions of liability.’
  • 22) ‘I am sure that in the time he remains a member of this House he will, if you seek it, offer counsel.’
  • 23) ‘It is a pity that he died at an age when he could have been a rich source of consultancy and counsel to the youthful leaders of this country.’
  • 24) ‘But common misconceptions about financial planners prevent many from seeking their counsel.’
  • 25) ‘Your role as a defence counsel is to fearlessly advocate for the person you are representing.’
  • 26) ‘In other words, the efforts of the defence counsel on a partial indemnity basis are justified.’
  • 27) ‘Defence counsel and the accused waive this date for jury selection and trial.’
  • 28) ‘Indisputably an appellant solicitor or counsel can conduct his own appeal.’
  • 29) ‘It was taken at trial in the sense that the learned judge was asked by defence counsel for a special verdict to be considered.’
  • 30) ‘We order a representation order for leading counsel, junior counsel and a solicitor for the retrial.’
  • 31) ‘As I said before, the defence counsel's submission was legally correct, and his Honour should not have told the jury to put it to one side.’
  • 32) ‘We are told that the defence counsel was dismissed or did not see the trial through and that a solicitor had to do the best he could in the circumstances.’
  • 33) ‘Defence counsel replied that he would be calling evidence to the contrary in regard to that charge.’
  • 34) ‘As a result, our legal counsel advised us to collect an original, signed waiver with each membership application or renewal.’
  • 35) ‘No company in its right mind sends out a prospectus or press release without getting its counsel to do some legal vetting first.’
  • 36) ‘I have reduced junior counsels ' fees since it is my view that the time spent in preparation for the motion and the Bill of Costs was excessive and no doubt this was due, at least partly, to inexperience in dealing with estate matters.’
  • 37) ‘The committee counsels are scheduled to testify at the morning session, and it's standard practice for Congressional committees to hear from their counsels before taking testimony from outside witnesses.’
  • 38) ‘Lead counsels are also the ones who build the team by recruiting people for each aspect of the case.’
  • 39) ‘However, the apex court has not given any date on hearing the matter so far, according to counsels here.’
  • 40) ‘He claimed he could never consult with his counsel privately without a correctional services official being present and that they insisted on reading privileged documents.’
  • 41) ‘He obviously would have consulted with counsel and they would have told them not to destroy any evidence, first of all, because he'd make matters worse.’
  • 42) ‘I have still to consult with counsel in this matter, my Lord.’
  • 43) ‘Our clients therefore intend to appear before the court on Monday through counsel to seek an order that the application be dismissed with costs.’
  • 44) ‘No doubt, all counsel seek to enter a caveat of the kind just entered.’
  • 45) ‘I would expect police officers to counsel the drivers on what is to be acquired.’
  • 46) ‘In these new circumstances, he has counselled writers and intellectuals to be cautious.’
  • 47) ‘In fact, she was counseled to remove her ear hoop for the forum, but she refused.’
  • 48) ‘It would also help to counsel families on making informed decisions about their educational choices.’
  • 49) ‘It's time to stop counselling these young people, and to start challenging them instead.’
  • 50) ‘Just try and explain to an outsider what it is you really do in the part of your job where you directly counsel kids.’
  • 51) ‘It is not desirable, but while not condoning the behaviour you try and counsel her and direct her to the parents.’
  • 52) ‘I believe he will do as the law instructs him to and we will certainly counsel him to obey the law.’
  • 53) ‘Another frequent recommendation counsels scientists to set up collaborations with groups of scientists at different institutions.’
  • 54) ‘Lee spends a lot of time counseling young people, encouraging them to build strong foundations not just in the gym, but in all aspects of life.’
  • 55) ‘He spends many hours weekly counseling young people about their future, and teaching a marriage class.’
  • 56) ‘I can't even remember what advice I was seeking from him but he did counsel me over the phone (for whatever it was) and then promised to visit me.’
  • 57) ‘But obviously, I would counsel her, and talk to her, and support her on whatever decision she'd make.’
  • 58) ‘The chair has to counsel the president on the timing and presentation of information for the board.’
  • 59) ‘It is easy to give advice, but I find it very difficult to counsel these kids as to how to go about getting out of trouble.’
  • 60) ‘Maybe in an effort to offer people something tangible to do, he counselled citizens to prepare for the worst and ensure that every home had its own personal preparedness plan.’
  • 61) ‘Company executives should counsel their marketing professionals to underpromise and overdeliver.’
  • 62) ‘Workers should be counseled about personal hygiene, and management personnel should be advised about proper handwashing agents.’
  • 63) ‘I had to be the strong point within this group of people, and help counsel them.’
  • 64) ‘They observe and mentor the students, provide them feedback, counsel them, and assist them with their professional and personal development.’
  • 65) ‘If professionals fail to counsel patients in the way recognized by their peers as appropriate they may be negligent.’
  • 66) ‘His wife is a psychologist who counsels cancer patients for a living.’
  • 67) ‘She estimated that she's counselled about 400 people, almost all of them women, since founding the organisation.’
  • 68) ‘I hope, as head of the foundation, to raise £1m in funding, which will be used to pay for the dedicated team of people who counsel the children who need help.’
  • 69) ‘She is the staff psychologist who counsels patients in many areas including changes in family dynamics and grief brought on by cancer.’
  • 70) ‘She is a Sydney-based consultant psychologist who has counselled many people who have been caught up in bank robberies.’
  • 71) ‘Health professionals also have a role in counseling patients about safe and effective weight loss and weight maintenance programs.’
  • 72) ‘Beyond counseling families, the residents are also helping professionals working with families.’
  • 73) ‘He volunteers two days of his time a week, counselling clients on a one-to-one basis and facilitating group psychotherapy and healing sessions.’
  • 74) ‘The woman sitting next to me had counseled children facing severe emotional and physical abuse for 20 years.’
  • 75) ‘The psychologists at the camp have also come forward to counsel the students and their parents over the next two days.’
  • 76) ‘Dozens of psychologists and social workers were on hand to counsel students in distress.’
  • 77) ‘She now wants to use her qualifications to be able to counsel other people who suffer with clinical depression.’
  • 78) ‘Now these offenders, the vast majority of them men, pose peculiar dilemmas for the professionals counselling them.’
  • 79) ‘Nine psychologists, some of whom have counselled the women, are prepared to give evidence of the emotional and personal damage inflicted on the two officials.’
  • 80) ‘With this information, health professionals at the point of diagnosis can actually counsel families and the patients about what will happen to them.’
  • 81) ‘I am not aware of different psychological therapies besides counseling both the patient and the partner.’
  • 82) ‘They counselled me and suggested I be involved in a support group.’
  • 83) ‘It's important to educate and counsel women about genetic information and cancer risk.’
  • 84) ‘For now, clinicians need to use caution in interpreting available information and in counseling their patients.’
  • 85) ‘In fact, commanders counselled caution and warned that hasty judgements by the media would be premature!’
  • 86) ‘The national development agency's study, which counselled caution, examined housing prices in 35 cities and urged authorities to prevent developing price distortions.’
  • 87) ‘At most it counsels caution, prudence and a little more scepticism.’
  • 88) ‘Her style of investigation is practical, and she counsels caution when deducing daily life from what has been found in tombs.’
  • 89) ‘It is not surprising that he has already counselled caution about the chances of resuming the constitutional talks.’
  • 90) ‘While they continue to counsel caution and bipartisanship on the part of Democrats, other senators are leaping into action.’
  • 91) ‘While the big oil companies continue to counsel caution, analysts believe they will take a more liberal view if prices remain strong for any significant period.’
  • 92) ‘He knows to counsel caution more than anybody.’
  • 93) ‘These are not reasons for inaction but they counsel caution and careful planning.’
  • 94) ‘He counselled caution from the beginning, using much the same arguments he had four years previously.’
  • 95) ‘He is only the latest to have counselled caution.’
  • 96) ‘Although no one questions the statistical rigour of the Michigan survey, or of its equivalents elsewhere in the world, experts counsel caution when jumping to economic conclusions.’
  • 97) ‘But there are some serious - though hard to quantify - risks that counsel caution.’
  • 98) ‘But he counsels caution, and insists that patients should be able to make a free and informed decision before undergoing the treatment.’
  • 99) ‘At one level, he is wise to counsel caution when it comes to generalizing about which side of the political debate is religious.’
  • 100) ‘Of course, he did not counsel indifference, let alone abstention, from the economic struggles of the working class.’
  • 101) ‘And I would prefer that patience be counseled and that the process take its course.’
  • 102) ‘My father had been the only family member to counsel personal happiness over ancestral duty.’
  • 103) ‘Others, more hopeful, counselled patience and resolve.’
  • 104) ‘"You don't want to get rusty, " she counseled sagely.’

Examples

  • 1) Not surprisingly, Adrina's first appearance at the war council caused a stir, even more than Tristan's inclusion.
  • 2) It's all I can do to squeeze enough out of the council to run the scout cars.
  • 3) He wasn't particularly surprised at the idea of corruption on the local council.
  • 4) That night the people held a council to decide what they should do.
  • 5) ‘When papers were served on the council, officials took steps to find a place for the boy.’
  • 6) ‘A report was given on the council meeting which was attended by two members of the guild.’
  • 7) ‘She is scheduled to formally open the advisory council's standing committee meeting on Thursday.’
  • 8) ‘Stepping up the pressure on the council, White House officials said they wanted negotiations wrapped up quickly.’
  • 9) ‘There will be four experts on the council, from the Ministry of Forestry, the University of Indonesia and Gadjah Mada University.’
  • 10) ‘He went on to call on the council officials to also support the campaign.’
  • 11) ‘The advisory council's annual meeting, normally held in Kuala Lumpur, is being hosted for the first time in Bayan Lepas.’
  • 12) ‘Although nominally only an advisory body, the council's decisions are viewed in practice as binding and ignored by the government at its own peril.’
  • 13) ‘He has less than a year to consolidate his position on the council, so he'll have to make his presence felt and get as much publicity as he can to boost his profile.’
  • 14) ‘The staffing of the facility and the ongoing monitoring and reporting costs will also represent a continuing draw on the council's resources.’
  • 15) ‘He said that he had been on the council for 37 years and no issue had ever received as much consultation and debate.’
  • 16) ‘They deny that they served on the council.’
  • 17) ‘This marked the first time Ireland had served on the council since 1981.’
  • 18) ‘What really did he discover at the University of Western Australia, where he had studied and also was on the council?’
  • 19) ‘While dissenting voices are certainly needed on the council they should be those that espouse a coherent ethical view.’
  • 20) ‘He is on the council of the Albert Hall.’
  • 21) ‘He said it had not been possible to find a source of substantial funding to operate the vessel and, as a result, it would place a big burden on the council.’
  • 22) ‘South Africa would ably represent the continent on the council.’
  • 23) ‘A few hours after the letter was posted on the council's Web site, someone decided to take it down.’
  • 24) ‘That would put the onus on the council to determine small applications within a 40-day period.’
  • 25) ‘Local government consists of elected county and municipal councils.’
  • 26) ‘City and district councils are at the forefront of dog control.’
  • 27) ‘Mayors and municipal councils are elected directly by the local community.’
  • 28) ‘On 25 May there were elections all over Spain for regional parliaments and municipal councils.’
  • 29) ‘Lack of transport and funds for the city and municipal councils lead to huge piles of garbage.’
  • 30) ‘Sometimes there is a deadlock in a city and district, and regional councils and mayors have to show leadership and give a casting vote.’
  • 31) ‘The people elect local councils to govern their districts and municipalities.’
  • 32) ‘These 1,500 men had a right to elect the city council which governed the city's 13,000 people.’
  • 33) ‘But district councils said the county council could have done more to highlight the chance to get extra roads gritted.’
  • 34) ‘The third tier of government, municipal councils, has an electoral system which varies from state to state.’
  • 35) ‘Within each county there are also towns with mayors, city councils, police chiefs, and fire departments.’
  • 36) ‘The mayor must present to the council his administrative actions based on the council's decisions.’
  • 37) ‘If the mayor has limited clout on the council, it's partly because he has little constituency support in the city.’
  • 38) ‘She thanked all the officials and remarked that her five years on the council gave her an insight into how the county runs.’
  • 39) ‘There is a representative of our 30 townlands on the council.’
  • 40) ‘The parish of Clonegal has only one man going forward for a seat on the council and he has proved that no matter what your political views he has done all in his power to help the locals.’
  • 41) ‘I don't want to place the blame for that on the council because they must act in the interests of the whole town.’
  • 42) ‘Incredibly, however, many on the council still refused to admit that the whole problem was the hundred acre coal fire merrily burning beneath the town.’
  • 43) ‘He served on the council until 1979, when he decided not to run for re-election.’
  • 44) ‘He has considerable years of experience on the council; I feel he could do an excellent job as mayor.’
  • 45) ‘She would like to speak to any youngster, whether living at home, in private rent or council accommodation.’
  • 46) ‘Without the alternative of new council housing for rent, record numbers are now homeless and in temporary flats and slum hotels.’
  • 47) ‘It does indeed have an excellent record for providing council housing services.’
  • 48) ‘Many opted to stay, moving into new Home Housing properties as their council homes were demolished.’
  • 49) ‘Housing associations that have taken on former council homes under the transfer scheme have raised billions of pounds of private money to repair these properties.’
  • 50) ‘It knows transferring council housing to other landlords is an emotive issue on estates - with tenants in several areas rejecting such a move earlier this year.’
  • 51) ‘Since 1980, council housing has been sold at a heavy discount.’
  • 52) ‘They insist that all council housing be handed over to the private sector or the government will not give money for the refurbishment of them.’
  • 53) ‘He was exposed to asbestos dust when working as a joiner in the 1970s on the construction of council housing.’
  • 54) ‘Most recently I wrote about council housing, or rather the lack of it.’
  • 55) ‘But the planners do wonder if they really ought to be doing a job which used to be done by council housing departments.’
  • 56) ‘Dwindling demand for council housing means there are about 3,000 empty properties in the city.’
  • 57) ‘It may give them access to child allowance and similar benefits, and to help with council housing.’
  • 58) ‘Matters that have come to pass about council housing before and since transfer leave a lot be desired.’
  • 59) ‘As they cannot afford to buy, they will be forced into rented council housing.’
  • 60) ‘Part of the property could be used for council housing and social housing.’
  • 61) ‘On Sunday a rebel motion on council housing transfer policy was backed on a show of hands.’
  • 62) ‘Every council bungalow will have a security door fitted.’
  • 63) ‘Staffing for the new services will be provided from all seven council homes.’
  • 64) ‘They also want a restriction on the sale of council homes to buyers who want them only as holiday cottages.’
  • 65) ‘Before deciding to accept, he conferred with his synod council.’
  • 66) ‘So it seems the plenary council and synod proposals have been put on a back burner.’
  • 67) ‘Synod councils can send recommendations to the Church council before its April meeting.’
  • 68) ‘Most of the Reformed churches would accept the teachings of the ecumenical councils of the first millennium.’
  • 69) ‘This pattern continued in the early ecumenical councils, especially Nicaea.’
  • 70) ‘It does not contradict any ecumenical councils or definitions of the faith.’
  • 71) ‘It was decided that the text should be shown to the ecumenical observers at the council and that their reactions to it would be solicited.’
  • 72) ‘Prior to the council, the diaconate was generally a transitional office on the way to priestly ordination.’
  • 73) ‘The council could have communicated the polemical aspects of the Gospels and the facts of modern Scripture research.’
  • 74) ‘The council represents 19 denominations at the state capital, mostly on social issues.’
  • 75) ‘This is exactly the reason why the Jerusalem council was called or convened.’
  • 76) ‘The synod, like a general council, however, would have no authority over the pope and no right to reverse his decisions.’
  • 77) ‘Various ecumenical councils were convened where the bishops from different regions met and discussed liturgical and doctrinal matters.’
  • 78) ‘He knew how to use the papacy for his own ends, and was prepared to pay a price - though never to the extent of allowing any of his clergy to attend papal councils.’
  • 79) ‘Changes adopted by the council will be considered by the 2005 Churchwide Assembly.’
  • 80) ‘In 416 Augustine and his African bishops convened two diocesan councils to condemn him and Celestius, another Celt.’
  • 81) ‘It acquires the status of canon law in a series of three church councils in the sixth and seventh centuries.’
  • 82) ‘They may not want to create a visible and abrupt rupture from the changes put into motion by the council and Pope Paul VI.’
  • 83) ‘Begin with a 45-minute conversation with your congregational board or council.’
  • 84) ‘The council is the church's supreme court, a nine-member panel that at times has more power than the council of Bishops.’
  • 85) ‘She has no business in a family council only open to family members.’
  • 86) ‘Call a family council at some other time to work out such problems.’
  • 87) ‘Ordinarily, a family council is based on principles and processes set out in a family charter but this is not always the case.’
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