prove vs proof

prove proof

Definitions

  • 1) An obsolete form of proof.
  • 2) intransitive To turn out; to manifest.
  • 3) copulative To turn out to be.
  • 4) transitive To put to the test, to make trial of.
  • 5) archaic To experience
  • 6) Simple past of proove.
  • 7) transitive To demonstrate that something is true or viable; to give proof for.
  • 8) increase in volume
  • 9) prove formally; demonstrate by a mathematical, formal proof
  • 10) obtain probate of
  • 11) cause to puff up with a leaven
  • 12) Tomaketrial;essay.
  • 13) HenceTobecome;be.
  • 14) Archaic To find out or learn (something) through experience.
  • 15) To verify (the result of a calculation).
  • 16) Printing To make a sample impression of (type); proof.
  • 17) To show (oneself) to be what is specified or to have a certain characteristic.
  • 18) To demonstrate the validity of (a hypothesis or proposition).
  • 19) To establish the truth or validity of (something) by the presentation of argument or evidence.
  • 20) To be shown to be such; turn out.
  • 21) To establish by the required amount of evidence.
  • 22) To establish the authenticity of (a will).
  • 23) To demonstrate the reality of (something).
  • 24) To subject (a gun, for instance) to a test.
  • 25) obsolete To succeed; to turn out as expected.
  • 26) To be found by experience, trial, or result; to turn out to be
  • 27) To make trial; to essay.
  • 28) To try or to ascertain by an experiment, or by a test or standard; to test
  • 29) To gain experience of the good or evil of; to know by trial; to experience; to suffer.
  • 30) (Arith.) To test, evince, ascertain, or verify, as the correctness of any operation or result; thus, in subtraction, if the difference between two numbers, added to the lesser number, makes a sum equal to the greater, the correctness of the subtraction is proved.
  • 31) To evince, establish, or ascertain, as truth, reality, or fact, by argument, testimony, or other evidence.
  • 32) (Printing) To take a trial impression of; to take a proof of.
  • 33) To ascertain or establish the genuineness or validity of; to verify.

Definitions

  • 1) The establishment of the truth or falsity of an allegation by evidence.
  • 2) The evidence offered in support of or in contravention of an allegation.
  • 3) A trial impression of a plate, stone, or block taken at any of various stages in engraving.
  • 4) A trial photographic print.
  • 5) The alcoholic strength of a liquor, expressed by a number that is twice the percentage by volume of alcohol present.
  • 6) The validation of a proposition by application of specified rules, as of induction or deduction, to assumptions, axioms, and sequentially derived conclusions.
  • 7) A trial sheet of printed material that is made to be checked and corrected.
  • 8) The evidence or argument that compels the mind to accept an assertion as true.
  • 9) A statement or argument used in such a validation.
  • 10) Archaic Proven impenetrability.
  • 11) Convincing or persuasive demonstration.
  • 12) Determination of the quality of something by testing; trial.
  • 13) Any of a limited number of newly minted coins or medals struck as specimens and for collectors from a new die on a polished planchet.
  • 14) The state of being convinced or persuaded by consideration of evidence.
  • 15) In law: The convincing effect of evidence; the manifestation of the truth of a proposition by presenting the reasons for assenting to it; such an array of evidence as should determine the judgment of the tribunal in regard to a matter of fact.
  • 16) plural In equity practice, the instruments of evidence in their documentary form, as depositions, deeds, etc., received in a cause.
  • 17) In numismatics, any early impression struck at the mint from a coin-die used for producing the current coins of the realm.
  • 18) The state of having been tested and approved; firmness, hardness, or impenetrability: specifically applied to arms or armor of defense, to note that they have been duly tested and are impenetrable.
  • 19) In arithmetic, an operation serving to check the accuracy of the calculation.
  • 20) In engraving and etching, an impression taken from an engraved plate to show its state during the progress of executing it; also, an early and superior impression, or one of a limited number, taken before the title or inscription is engraved on the plate, and known as proof before letter.
  • 21) In bookbinding, the rough uncut edges of the shorter leaves of a trimmed book, which prove that the book has not been cut down too much.
  • 22) In Scots law, the taking of evidence by a judge upon an issue framed in pleading.
  • 23) Evidence and argumentation putting the conclusion beyond reasonable doubt; demonstration, perfect or imperfect.
  • 24) A thing proved or tried; truth or knowledge gathered by experience; experience.
  • 25) In printing, a trial impression from composed type, taken for correction.
  • 26) A test applied to manufactured articles or to natural substances prepared for use; hence, the state of that which has undergone this test, or is capable of undergoing it satisfactorily. Compare armor of proof.
  • 27) 7. In alcoholic liquors, the degree of strength which gives a specific gravity of 0.920. See II., 2.
  • 28) Proof independent of experience.
  • 29) In photography, a trial print from a negative.
  • 30) The presentation of sufficient evidence: as, the burden of proof lies with the plaintiff.
  • 31) Any effort, act, or operation made for the purpose of ascertaining any truth or fact; a test; a trial: as, to make proof of a person's trustworthiness or courage.
  • 32) An assay of a bullion of known composition placed in the muffle with the other assays in order to determine the difference in weight due to the loss of silver by volatilization and absorption by the cupel.
  • 33) Fully or successfully resistant; impervious. Often used in combination.
  • 34) Used to proofread or correct typeset copy.
  • 35) Of standard alcoholic strength.
  • 36) To activate (dormant dry yeast) by adding water.
  • 37) To become properly light for cooking.
  • 38) To proofread (copy).
  • 39) To make a trial impression of (printed or engraved matter).
  • 40) To treat so as to make resistant.
  • 41) To work (dough) into proper lightness.
  • 42) Printing To proofread.

Examples

  • 1) The team emphasised that their study could not prove that anxiety caused heart disease.
  • 2) That was a difficult proposition to prove.
  • 3) French presidential pardons often prove controversial.
  • 4) This is a weaker race and he can prove too good for Aso.
  • 5) Everything that was outlined during the meeting in America has proved true.
  • 6) Your own show proves it.
  • 7) The dressings proved so good that they are now available on prescription through the NHS.
  • 8) People like to share, though, and the growth of social networks over the past decade has proved that younger generations like to share more than any other.
  • 9) The grey area lies in proving your ability to drive is impaired.
  • 10) The best pieces have proved a good investment.
  • 11) Why is it often difficult to prove that a disease or condition resulted from workplace exposure?
  • 12) This may explain why the show is already proving hugely popular.
  • 13) Leicester have spent all season proving many of the things we hold true to be badly wrong.
  • 14) We have proved highly adept at using technology to stress ourselves.
  • 15) The past proves the richer area of study.
  • 16) Yet it might prove the richest source of recruitment.
  • 17) The video evidence from our experiment proves just how bad men are at taking a sneaky peek.
  • 18) We will soon see whether this proves to be true.
  • 19) When cigarettes are proven to cause lung cancer we can bring in a smoking ban.
  • 20) It has been about proving my ability and helping the team.
  • 21) But it could be an unexpected arrival that proves so good for the family.
  • 22) So this show proved to be a bit of a departure.
  • 23) The careful historian soon learns that juicy stories often have to be jettisoned when sources prove unreliable.
  • 24) The top tips and facts are crucial and explain what the experiments prove.
  • 25) But in the wider human context the opposite has generally proved true.
  • 26) The researchers acknowledged that the study did not prove cause and effect.
  • 27) This would have proved a difficult operation by other processes.
  • 28) He said that the party had proved its ability to do well without mounting a conventional campaign.
  • 29) They write letters to prove that they "don't count," and they _prove it_. '
  • 30) It is said of kings and rulers, they must prove that they have a heart, and it may also be said of the man who has no religion, that _he must prove_ that he has a _conscience.
  • 31) The word prove is usually reserved for mathematics: “to verify the correctness or validity of by mathematical demonstration or arithmetical proof” Random House Unabridged Dictionary.
  • 32) Beck, Limpballs and Malkin prove just how evil and cold blooded they are.
  • 33) What im saying isnt to give up on this now, but to freakin prove me wrong.
  • 34) When people use the words “Smoot-Hawley” today, they usually mean them as a warning that any interference with trade, especially by the United States, could again prove disastrous.
  • 35) The voyage is long and dreary — let us hope the boat will not again prove leaky — if so — Lithe not Styx — be the River for me.
  • 36) ‘Illuminating reality without recourse to truth is proving a difficult proposition.’
  • 37) ‘It emphasised that ‘the courts are not the place to prove new medical truths’.’
  • 38) ‘An indictment is far from a conviction but as Martin Kramer points out, this refusal to recognise inconvenient truths is also proving an indictment on their claims of expertise.’
  • 39) ‘Finally, we are not content with a mere definition of truth; we seek a method of establishing the truth and proving its correctness.’
  • 40) ‘Truth is established by proving theory through observation and then having the results confirmed by peers.’
  • 41) ‘The person said that telling lies will get us nowhere and we're better off telling the truth and proving it.’
  • 42) ‘The scenes are intended to prove the soundness and truth of what has been previously said.’
  • 43) ‘How I got in is not something I'm willing to disclose, but I have the documentary evidence to prove it.’
  • 44) ‘Bonnet used Codazzi's formulas to prove the existence theorem in the theory of surfaces.’
  • 45) ‘He believes he has proven his strength and ability to be an independent voice on the Council.’
  • 46) ‘Andrew McLoughlin proved his dead-ball abilities with a cross from the right which fell to McTiernan on the near post.’
  • 47) ‘In the face of war and mass slaughter, he has proved it retains the ability to shock us with the sheer frivolity of its efforts in futility.’
  • 48) ‘Barrett proved his dead-eye shooting ability as he sunk score after score for his side.’
  • 49) ‘The Authority said it is very difficult to prove the existence of a cartel and pledged to monitor the situation in the town.’
  • 50) ‘He even produced a document proving it, though no one else knew of its existence.’
  • 51) ‘But every inductive argument that proves its conclusion presupposes the truth of the law of causation.’
  • 52) ‘Nonetheless he had proven his leadership ability and his political skill in ending the civil war.’
  • 53) ‘The French working class has repeatedly proved its readiness and ability to fight for its democratic and social rights in the past.’
  • 54) ‘With highlife, African music had proved its resilience and ability to absorb and synthesise foreign influences.’
  • 55) ‘The ability to deliver and prove high levels of performance is no longer just a competitive advantage.’
  • 56) ‘I've always thought that Scott's innocent until he's proven guilty and I'm going to stick with that.’
  • 57) ‘And the last I checked, in the United States, you are innocent until you're proven guilty.’
  • 58) ‘In Indiana you are guilty until you are proven innocent, and with that in mind you can keep the skater out of the streets but you cannot keep the street out of the skater.’
  • 59) ‘Of course, the accused man is assumed to be innocent until the prosecution can prove him guilty.’
  • 60) ‘Drugs testing policy usually prevents disclosure of a player's identity until he is proven guilty and a punishment has been decided.’
  • 61) ‘And if there is a mitochondrial DNA match - I'm a firm believer in DNA, if it proves you guilty or innocent.’
  • 62) ‘I'm convinced to this point, and I am a firm believer in DNA, whether it proves you guilty or innocent.’
  • 63) ‘He's, of course, innocent until proven guilty.’
  • 64) ‘Of course, remembering that everyone is innocent until proven guilty, perhaps the answer to my questions is that Libby was not stupid and was not lying to the Grand Jury.’
  • 65) ‘We have to remember that this man is innocent until proven guilty but if he did kill Caroline we have to make sure he doesn't kill anyone else.’
  • 66) ‘Completeness, however, is an elusive goal and proves quite difficult to achieve in the arena of electronic state government information.’
  • 67) ‘Optimism proved short-lived, though, as Sheffield scored twice more to earn a convincing victory.’
  • 68) ‘But he was determined to prove he could achieve success somehow - and eventually he did.’
  • 69) ‘The 150 original settlement master plans proved difficult to get hold of.’
  • 70) ‘Root-and-branch reform of the NHS, and education, is proving difficult to achieve.’
  • 71) ‘The big striker, who moves with intent rather than rather than noticeable impetus, said afterwards that his second goal had proved crucial.’
  • 72) ‘An own goal from Nigel Wright proved costly as Duncombe Park lost 2-1 to Amotherby and Swinton in division two.’
  • 73) ‘In the return leg at the Tatran Stadium another Nixon goal proved insufficient as a Vladislav Zvara brace took the Slovakians through.’
  • 74) ‘If the scheme proves to be successful, and householders who are given the brown bins use them for their garden waste, there is a chance the scheme will be extended when it is reviewed after three years.’
  • 75) ‘If the scheme proves successful the police hope to run surgeries at the town's other secondary schools.’
  • 76) ‘In the final analysis that lone goal proved to be the all important score of a game that was hard fought but which only produced moderate fare throughout.’
  • 77) ‘Nevertheless, tight glycaemic control has proved difficult to achieve in clinical practice.’
  • 78) ‘At this stage, the rehabilitation plan proved to be successful and the patient was found fit to undergo plastic surgery.’
  • 79) ‘The maintenance of downwards accountability to local communities by the NHS has generally proved difficult to achieve.’
  • 80) ‘Killarney Celtic, have been impressive, with some fine performances and they don't concede too many goals and are proving difficult to breach.’
  • 81) ‘This is the third year of the book scheme and it has proved very successful as it greatly reduces the financial burden on parents.’
  • 82) ‘Employees may be able to complain to the pensions ombudsman that the scheme was maladministered, but this may be difficult to prove.’
  • 83) ‘The parking is fully supervised and if the scheme proves successful the feasibility of a more permanent facility will be investigated.’
  • 84) ‘While massive amounts of US air power could bring tactical victories, achieving strategic victory proved to be more difficult.’
  • 85) ‘If that bid and their offer to take over the football club proves successful, their plan would see City continuing to play at Bootham Crescent until a new home is built.’
  • 86) ‘He says the Executive and SE are right to concentrate on specific business areas, such as life sciences, in which the country has proved itself to have some ability.’
  • 87) ‘The intelligence agencies, humiliated by their failure to forestall the attacks, are desperate to prove themselves.’
  • 88) ‘He is desperate to prove himself, but may have to wait until later in the season to get the chance.’
  • 89) ‘His batting ability is well known, but he has also proved himself an excellent one-day bowler, and has a shrewd tactical brain.’
  • 90) ‘Gavin has proved himself a man of great ability and potential.’
  • 91) ‘You may find yourself in circumstances where you need to prove yourself, and you may end up feeling that your ability to cope is being tested at times.’
  • 92) ‘In this dire situation, she proves herself to be a courageous and determined fighter.’
  • 93) ‘He's so desperate to prove himself and make his own way in the world that he lashes out at everyone.’
  • 94) ‘It has seemed like an eternity as I've been desperate to get out on to that track and prove myself again at world level.’
  • 95) ‘He was rather amazed at her abilities to have such power without really having to prove herself.’
  • 96) ‘Once academic scientific studies were established they rejected and ridiculed anything spiritual or metaphysical if it could not be proven by a mathematical formula.’
  • 97) ‘What no one is yet prepared to do is go on record as saying he has proved the Poincare Conjecture.’
  • 98) ‘She proves a well known (to mathematicians!) theorem of homological algebra.’
  • 99) ‘There is a theorem proved by Kurt Godel in 1931, which is the Incompleteness Theorem for mathematics.’
  • 100) ‘In 1925 he proved the Krull-Schmidt theorem for decomposing abelian groups of operators.’
  • 101) ‘Place the dough in a lightly oiled bowl, cover with clingfilm and leave to prove for about two hours in a warm area.’
  • 102) ‘When making bread with the fermented dough, the dough must be removed from the fridge at least 2 hours in advance, to allow it to prove.’
  • 103) ‘prove dough for 60-90 minutes until dough passes the finger-tip test.’
  • 104) ‘Proof marks indicate the soundness of the gun when it was last proved, but the gun may have been so altered that it is unproved in its present state.’
  • 105) ‘Each gun is thoroughly proved before it leaves the factory.’

Examples

  • 1) The numbers alone are proof of that.
  • 2) The tricky bit is that you will need proof of purchase.
  • 3) Promoter reserves the right to demand proof of consumer purchase from retailer.
  • 4) You will need proof of purchase.
  • 5) Accept it graciously If you receive an item as a gift you will need proof of purchase and sometimes the card that was used to pay.
  • 6) The very absence of evidence is proof, in the minds of many, that it must exist.
  • 7) Answers in the negative are not necessarily an indictment of the police, just as they are not necessarily proof of the accused's innocence.
  • 8) Promoter reserves the right to request proof of purchase or refuse payment against incorrectly deemed coupons.
  • 9) Family courts have a lower standard of proof than criminal courts.
  • 10) Tell him you have text proof this was not a gift.
  • 11) The first to provide proof of its existence will be rewarded with riches by the king.
  • 12) But it is not proof or evidence that corruption has taken place.
  • 13) You will also need proof of your identity and address.
  • 14) This superb book is proof of that.
  • 15) The real proof of the pudding is in the payday.
  • 16) proof of permanent residence of winner will be required.
  • 17) That they stayed together was proof of the strength of their unorthodox bond.
  • 18) His problem was that finding proof of the dodgy beef was impossible.
  • 19) What they condemned was his teaching his hypotheses as facts without proof.
  • 20) You want conclusive proof that this study is hokum?
  • 21) Make sure you keep records of valuations and proof of purchase.
  • 22) Rather than preaching from favorite proof texts or purely thematic sermons.
  • 23) proof that a man should always marry his second wife first.
  • 24) No one appears to have read the book in proof.
  • 25) Perhaps a canny printer pulled a proof from the Heidelberg and stowed it till now.
  • 26) First, his colleagues set out to establish whether the proofs he posted were correct.
  • 27) Still, this was all circumstantial evidence rather than proof.
  • 28) It seemed proof of a number of things, the least important of which being that leather has come of age.
  • 29) You will also need to show photo ID and proof of address before you can bid.
  • 30) He then sent the proof copy to her and I think this tells us he was still thinking about her.
  • 31) That is so funny about your selecting the squirrel proof feeder, and I can agree, some are more *proof* than others!
  • 32) However, when it comes to attempting to understand the deep structure of classical proof systems (and in particular, when two derivations that differ in some superficial syntactic way are really different ways to represent the one underlying ˜proof™) it is enlightening to think of classical logic as formed by a basic substructural logic, in which extra structural rules are imposed as additions.
  • 33) ‡ An apparently intact hymen is valued in some cultures as proof of virginity in a bride; this “proof, ” however, is not accurate.
  • 34) A proof taken of the whole galley at once is called a _galley proof_.
  • 35) Here, then, we are told that proof of the occasional transmission of mutilations would be sufficient to establish the fact, but on p. 267 we find that no single fact is known which really proves that acquired characters can be transmitted, "_for the ascertained facts which seem to point to the transmission of artificially produced diseases cannot be considered as proof_" [Italics mine.]
  • 36) But I say, by authority of the Master, that _the highest proof, the absolute proof, the perfect proof_, of the FACTS as to _who God is, and what he does_, and the
  • 37) The strength of spirit stronger than _proof_ or _over proof_, as it is termed by the revenue officers, is indicated by the bulk of water necessary to reduce a given volume of it, to the legal standard spirit, denominated _proof_ -- namely; if one gallon of water be required to bring twenty gallons of brandy, rum, or any other spirit, to proof, that spirit is said to be _1 to 20 over proof_.
  • 38) No experimental proof has hitherto been obtained that stimulation of the cerebral organs lying above the vaso-motor centre, and which include those possessing the function of thought, ever paralyzes this centre; but, as it is only by such paralysis that cerebral conditions can induce dilatation of blood-vessels, it must follow that no _experimental proof_ at present exists that stimulation of the brain ever does cause such dilatation -- that is, ever does become a cause of hæmorrhage.
  • 39) The proof of this lies in the words _ex ou_ just below; not _ex ôn_ (_ouranôn_) but _ex ou_ (_politeumatos_): I can find _no proof_ of the assertion (Moulton's
  • 40) I. i.217 (15,1) in strong proof] In chastity _of proof_, as we say in armour _of proof_.
  • 41) ‘That's completely absurd and there's no proof to validate that statement.’
  • 42) ‘It is too easy to find fault, to point a finger, without any facts or proof.’
  • 43) ‘Always check the seller's identity by asking for proof of name and address and be wary of sellers who want to meet you anywhere other than their home.’
  • 44) ‘That statement is proof of my existence, for how can you make nothing?’
  • 45) ‘One of the most important properties I'm interested in when I'm looking for arguments or evidence or proofs or persuasive cases is strength and the ability to bear a lot of weight.’
  • 46) ‘The critics will point to this as irrefutable proof of their argument that vouchers undermine the public school system.’
  • 47) ‘No story describing a problem or social phenomenon was complete without a few meaningless statistics passed off as hard fact or proof of some assertion.’
  • 48) ‘However, these customers would also have to provide documentary proof of their claims.’
  • 49) ‘They are based on the false assumption that the substantive offence requires proof of a fact that life is endangered.’
  • 50) ‘Therefore, a total ban on private use of the lagoon requires concrete scientific proof of negative influences.’
  • 51) ‘The author finally attempts to provide conclusive proof of Germany's decline in chapter 7.’
  • 52) ‘Many atheists demand a scientific proof for the existence of God.’
  • 53) ‘A little while later he emailed me with irrefutable proof of my guilt.’
  • 54) ‘The government had no definitive proof of ownership, so therefore everyone was guilty.’
  • 55) ‘A retrospective glance at the 2000-2001 regular season offers ample proof of blatant mismatches.’
  • 56) ‘The numbers themselves do not constitute definitive proof.’
  • 57) ‘You will need proof of your identity and the address where you are living on election day.’
  • 58) ‘His silence is a matter which is neutral in terms of providing positive proof of his guilt.’
  • 59) ‘There was, after all, too much proof to the contrary.’
  • 60) ‘If there is a variation, you may need to supply proof of identity.’
  • 61) ‘Counsel set out parts of the appellant's proof of evidence available at the trial.’
  • 62) ‘Until the evidentiary threshold of proof beyond a reasonable doubt is reached, the judge and the Constitution order the jury to acquit.’
  • 63) ‘In a criminal case you need to have proof beyond a reasonable doubt.’
  • 64) ‘The burden of proof on the balance of probabilities lies on the defendant.’
  • 65) ‘The laws of evidence and proof are aimed at establishing beyond a doubt which individual is guilty.’
  • 66) ‘As a result, it seemed to them that the objectivity of scientific knowledge was no longer capable of proof.’
  • 67) ‘An argument becomes a proof when the mathematical community agrees it is such.’
  • 68) ‘Mathematical proofs of conjectures, however, require more than overwhelming numerical evidence.’
  • 69) ‘His main work involved applying philosophy to mathematics, the philosophy taking precedence over rigorous mathematical proofs.’
  • 70) ‘From such a viewpoint, it would seem possible to arrange mathematical proofs into strata characterized by their degree of simplicity.’
  • 71) ‘This faith in the indubitable certainty of mathematical proofs was sadly shaken around 1900 by the discovery of the antinomies or paradoxes of set theory.’
  • 72) ‘Nguyen's work is one manifestation of her longstanding love for rigorous and creative mathematical proofs.’
  • 73) ‘His publications include a biography of Leonhard Euler and a booklet on mathematical proofs.’
  • 74) ‘On the other hand he had only a vague idea of what constitutes a mathematical proof.’
  • 75) ‘The only thing that's missing is perhaps a very solid idea of what it means to do a mathematical proof.’
  • 76) ‘Mathematicians later found proofs for other special cases.’
  • 77) ‘For example, in proofs about sets, Venn diagrams provided a useful part of a concept image in some cases.’
  • 78) ‘How many proofs do mathematicians publish each year?’
  • 79) ‘Euclid changed the proofs of several theorems in this book so that they fitted the new definition of proportion given by Eudoxus.’
  • 80) ‘It gives a proof that every whole number has a Fibonacci number for which it is a factor.’
  • 81) ‘Fermat subsequently died, leaving mathematicians to search for 350 years for a proof of the theorem.’
  • 82) ‘So, in the absence of a mathematical proof deciding this question, none of us has any a priori knowledge about this question in either direction.’
  • 83) ‘We wish to expound in detail some of the many proofs of this theorem.’
  • 84) ‘In a nutshell, it asks for the simplest proof of any theorem.’
  • 85) ‘The proof of this theorem makes essential use of free choice sequences.’
  • 86) ‘I shall carry out such a consistency proof for elementary number theory.’
  • 87) ‘I was scheduled to spend much of the day correcting the final proofs of my forthcoming biography, Nehru: The Invention of India.’
  • 88) ‘I turned the pages and noted all the red correction marks on my proofs, cradling my pounding head in my hands.’
  • 89) ‘I had before me a stack of final proofs to approve, but under the circumstances it was nearly impossible to read them; every word seemed trivial in comparison to the horrific tragedy.’
  • 90) ‘Stuart had completed all of his editing and writing for volume 7 before his death and was looking forward to reading the final proofs.’
  • 91) ‘Their intention has been to wait for the final proofs of their articles before correcting the intentional misstatements.’
  • 92) ‘The trial proofs were rejected, and the finished photographs never made.’
  • 93) ‘About 6000 of Robert's negatives and picture proofs are held by the Alexander Turnbull Library in Wellington.’
  • 94) ‘I found your article on the value of so-called artist's proofs extremely interesting.’
  • 95) ‘Artist's proofs can be numbered, but often they are not.’
  • 96) ‘He owned eight paintings and fourteen drawings, nine etchings on Japanese paper, fifty-nine separate proofs and an almost complete set of his prints.’
  • 97) ‘Oscar Marshall may also have offered a limited number of hand-signed proofs.’
  • 98) ‘Dürer published quite large numbers of his woodcut series in proofs before text on the reverse of the sheet.’
  • 99) ‘This exhibition - including so many large prints, so many of their proofs and their matrices - demands a lot of wall space.’
  • 100) ‘Sometimes artist's proofs are used to hide the real number of an edition.’
  • 101) ‘Your liver processes alcohol out of your system at an average rate of about 1.5 ounces of 80 proof alcohol an hour.’
  • 102) ‘Before aging, bourbon's proof must be lowered to no higher than 125 proof using distilled water.’
  • 103) ‘This hand-selected whiskey was bottled at 94 proof in elegantly sculpted decanters.’
  • 104) ‘Inclinations towards freedom, however, are not proof against systematic countermeasures.’
  • 105) ‘Maybe it's just as well that we have these idiot-proof tills, because without them the numerically challenged would be all but unemployable and we'd have to support them through a lifetime on the dole.’
  • 106) ‘Work has protected wildlife along the route, including measures to keep a colony of protected great crested newts safe, badger tunnels and deer-proof fencing.’
  • 107) ‘We need proper sanitation and proper rat-proof construction.’
  • 108) ‘She explained that 12 staff joined colleagues from across the county to update their training in the use of the chemical-proof suits.’
  • 109) ‘Beat the mixture lightly and pour it into individual oven-proof pots.’
  • 110) ‘Then a set of proof prints is sent to the artist to review.’
  • 111) ‘Having been sent an early proof copy, I have already been using it for some months.’
  • 112) ‘Accompanying the CD-R is a set of proof pages that the printer can use to make sure that the magazine that is being printed matches the sample pages.’
  • 113) ‘A proof print is an example taken when the work is incomplete or not ready for publication.’
  • 114) ‘I read this short novel a few months ago, in a proof copy, knowing nothing about the author.’
  • 115) ‘Then the printer stepped in, rubbed ink on the raised lines and made several proof copies from the relief block.’
  • 116) ‘No, I don't mind people buying proof copies, but I'd advise against buying them to collect.’
  • 117) ‘I am always impressed with accurate proof reading.’
  • 118) ‘Keynes was asked to comment on the proof copy of the work.’
  • 119) ‘Students helped enter more than 800,000 entries, and helped with proof reading.’
  • 120) ‘I am continuing to work on my book, proof reading and such.’
  • 121) ‘Next came the bound proof copies, incorporating quite long extracts from these letters.’
  • 122) ‘You know, I don't really mind people selling proof copies on e-bay.’
  • 123) ‘The following categories of nationalistic blessing and their proof texts indicate they do.’
  • 124) ‘You can spray the line with silicone line float (or I use the silicone sprays used for proofing nylon tents).’
  • 125) ‘When their concepts were finalized, students made a working model by proofing their work in black and white on the artroom's laser printer.’
  • 126) ‘So sketches were sketched, proofs were proofed, copies were bound.’
  • 127) ‘As they become available from Weblications, the company scanning and proofing them, they will be put up for readers to consult.’
  • 128) ‘Together we evolved a monthly theme, subbed, rewrote and proofed the magazine.’
  • 129) ‘If you are not the best at proofing your own documents, have an eagle-eyed assistant or colleague on hand to review them for you.’
  • 130) ‘Her mother was already at the table proofing the documents she would need that day for her board meeting.’
  • 131) ‘She also has had all contact with authors, edited and tagged the journal pages, and proofed them.’
  • 132) ‘I don't even know what the job is, but I'll proof milk cartons at this point.’
  • 133) ‘He was asking me to proof something I'd already proofed, saying they'd made more changes.’
  • 134) ‘Vitally, this interval permitted the whole paper to be proofed before printing.’
  • 135) ‘Please also keep in mind that my beta reader hasn't proofed this yet.’
  • 136) ‘This morning's recipe was the first he'd found that called for proofing the yeast with warm water and sugar; previous methods had called, somewhat illogically, for the yeast to be added dry to the flour.’
  • 137) ‘If you're proofing at higher temperatures, your dough will rise faster, so you'll need to keep an eye on it.’
  • 138) ‘Brush lightly with egg wash, cover with a damp cloth, and set aside to proof until double in volume, about 30 minutes.’
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