lion vs tiger

lion tiger

Definitions

  • 1) A famous person.
  • 2) An individual who shows strength and courage, attributes associated with the lion.
  • 3) A Chinese foo dog.
  • 4) A big cat, Panthera leo, native to Africa, India and formerly to much of Europe. The term may apply to the species as a whole, to individuals, or to male individuals. It also applies to related species like mountain lions.
  • 5) heraldry A stylized representation of a large cat, used on a coat of arms.
  • 6) A large carnivorous feline mammal (Panthera leo) of Africa and northwest India, having a short tawny coat, a tufted tail, and, in the male, a heavy mane around the neck and shoulders.
  • 7) A person regarded as fierce or savage.
  • 8) A noted person; a celebrity.
  • 9) A very brave person.
  • 10) A mountain lion.
  • 11) (Zoöl.) the basilisk.
  • 12) (Zoöl.) a fancy dog with a flowing mane, usually clipped to resemble a lion's mane.
  • 13) (Astron.) A sign and a constellation; Leo.
  • 14) Gustavus Adolphus (1594-1632), King of Sweden, the hero of the Protestant faith in the Thirty Years' War.
  • 15) a famous sculptured lion at Lucerne, Switzerland, designed by Thorwaldsen and dedicated in 1821 as a memorial to the Swiss Guards who fell defending Louis XVI. in the attack of the mob on the Tuileries, Aug. 10, 1792. The animal, which is hewn out of the face of a rock, is represented as transfixed with a broken spear and dying, but still trying to protect with its paw a shield bearing the fleur-de-lis of France.
  • 16) all, or nearly all; the best or largest part; -- from Æsop's fable of the lion hunting in company with certain smaller beasts, and appropriating to himself all the prey.
  • 17) (Zoöl.) the puma or cougar.
  • 18) (Zoöl.) the ant-lion.
  • 19) (Zoöl.) A large carnivorous feline mammal (Panthera leo, formerly Felis leo), found in Southern Asia and in most parts of Africa, distinct varieties occurring in the different countries. The adult male, in most varieties, has a thick mane of long shaggy hair that adds to his apparent size, which is less than that of the largest tigers. The length, however, is sometimes eleven feet to the base of the tail. The color is a tawny yellow or yellowish brown; the mane is darker, and the terminal tuft of the tail is black. In one variety, called the maneless lion, the male has only a slight mane.
  • 20) An object of interest and curiosity, especially a person who is so regarded.
  • 21) a winged lion, the emblem of the evangelist Mark, especially that of bronze surmounting a granite column in the Piazzetta at Venice, and holding in its fore paws an open book representing St. Mark's Gospel.
  • 22) (astrology) a person who is born while the sun is in Leo
  • 23) the fifth sign of the zodiac; the sun is in this sign from about July 23 to August 22
  • 24) a celebrity who is lionized (much sought after)
  • 25) large gregarious predatory feline of Africa and India having a tawny coat with a shaggy mane in the male
  • 26) A copper coin: same as hardhead, 2.
  • 27) Figuratively, a lion-like person; a man possessing the courage, fierceness, etc., of a lion.
  • 28) An object of interest and curiosity; especially, a celebrated or conspicuous person who is much sought by society or by the public in general: as, to visit the lions of the place; such a one is the lion of the day.
  • 29) A quadruped of the genus Felis, F. leo, the largest of all carnivorous animals, distinguished by its tawny or yellow color, a full flowing mane in the male, a tufted tail, and the disappearance of the feline markings in both sexes before they arrive at maturity.
  • 30) Any humble friend or follower who acts as a sycophant or foil to another.
  • 31) An imaginary danger, trumped up by cowardice or sloth.
  • 32) [capitalized] In astronomy, a constellation and sign of the zodiac. See Leo, 1.
  • 33) A silver and a gold coin of the Belgian provinces, struck in 1790. The value of the gold lion was about $6.50.
  • 34) A gold coin current in Scotland from the time of Robert III. to the reign of James VI.: so called from the lion on the obverse of the coin.
  • 35) In heraldry, a representation of a lion used as a bearing.
  • 36) (lion's share) The greatest or best part.

Definitions

  • 1) US, slang A person who is very athletic during intercourse.
  • 2) South Africa A leopard.
  • 3) A servant in livery, who rides with his master or mistress
  • 4) Panthera tigris, a large predatory mammal of the cat family, indigenous to Asia.
  • 5) A person regarded as aggressive, audacious, or fierce.
  • 6) Any of various similar wild felines, such as the jaguar, mountain lion, or lynx.
  • 7) A large carnivorous feline mammal (Panthera tigris) of Asia, having a tawny coat with transverse black stripes.
  • 8) A servant in livery, who rides with his master or mistress.
  • 9) (Zoöl.) the jaguar.
  • 10) (Bot.) a low East Indian fan palm (Chamærops Ritchieana). It is used in many ways by the natives.
  • 11) (Zoöl.) either of two very venomous snakes of Tasmania and Australia, Notechis scutatis and Notechis ater, which grow up to 5 feet in length.
  • 12) Colloq. U. S. A kind of growl or screech, after cheering.
  • 13) (Zoöl.) the spotted hyena (Hyæna crocuta).
  • 14) (Zoöl.) any one of numerous species of moths of the family Arctiadæ which are striped or barred with black and white or with other conspicuous colors. The larvæ are called woolly bears.
  • 15) (Bot.) an iridaceous plant of the genus Tigridia (as Tigridia conchiflora, Tigridia grandiflora, etc.) having showy flowers, spotted or streaked somewhat like the skin of a tiger.
  • 16) (Bot.) See under Lily.
  • 17) (Zoöl.) any one of numerous species of active carnivorous beetles of the family Cicindelidæ. They usually inhabit dry or sandy places, and fly rapidly.
  • 18) (Zoöl.) a large and conspicuously spotted cowrie (Cypræa tigris); -- so called from its fancied resemblance to a tiger in color and markings. Called also tiger cowrie.
  • 19) (Zoöl.) See Sun bittern, under Sun.
  • 20) A very large and powerful carnivore (Felis tigris) native of Southern Asia and the East Indies. Its back and sides are tawny or rufous yellow, transversely striped with black, the tail is ringed with black, the throat and belly are nearly white. When full grown, it equals or exceeds the lion in size and strength. Called also royal tiger, and Bengal tiger.
  • 21) (Zoöl.) a voracious shark (Galeocerdo tigrinus syn. Galeocerdo maculatus) more or less barred or spotted with yellow. It is found in both the Atlantic and Indian Ocean. Called also zebra shark.
  • 22) A pneumatic box or pan used in refining sugar.
  • 23) (Zoöl.) The jaguar.
  • 24) (Zoöl.) a handsome striped and spotted carnivore (Felis macrocelis or Felis marmorata) native of the East Indies and Southern Asia. Its body is about three and a half feet long, and its tail about three feet long. Its ground color is brownish gray, and the dark markings are irregular stripes, spots, and rings, but there are always two dark bands on the face, one extending back from the eye, and one from the angle of the mouth. Called also tortoise-shell tiger.
  • 25) Fig.: A ferocious, bloodthirsty person.
  • 26) the variegated heartwood of a tree (Machærium Schomburgkii) found in Guiana.
  • 27) (Zoöl.) any one of several species of wild cats of moderate size with dark transverse bars or stripes somewhat resembling those of the tiger.
  • 28) a fierce or audacious person
  • 29) large feline of forests in most of Asia having a tawny coat with black stripes; endangered
  • 30) An additional cheer; “one more” (often the word tiger): as, three cheers and a tiger.
  • 31) A bug of the family Tingitidæ: translating the French name.
  • 32) In sugarmanuf., a tank with a perforated bottom, through which the molasses escapes.
  • 33) In poker, a hand which is seven high and deuce low, without a pair, sequence, or flush. When played, it beats a straight and loses to a flush. Sometimes called a little dog.
  • 34) A dissolute swaggering dandy; a ruffling blade; a swaggerer; a hector; a bully; a mohawk.
  • 35) A person of a fierce, bloodthirsty disposition.
  • 36) A groom who goes out with the equipage of his master—that is, with the dog-cart, curricle, cab, or other vehicle driven by the master himself, his duty being to take care of the equipage when the master has left the box.
  • 37) A fabulous bird. See the extract.
  • 38) In Central and South America the jaguar, Felis onca, whoso black and yellow coat suggests the Asiatic tiger.
  • 39) A feline quadruped, Felis tigris or Tigris regalis, one of the two largest living cats (the other being the lion), of the family Felidæ.
  • 40) The thylacine dasyure, or tiger-wolf: so called from the stripes. See thylacine (with cut).

Examples

  • 1) All in the lion's den.
  • 2) Saudi Arabia is likely to shoulder the lion's share.
  • 3) National Grid wants to return the lion's share of the proceeds from the sale to investors and upgrade infrastructure.
  • 4) Bars around the lions den were said to have been missing and a probe has begun.
  • 5) The lions and tigers stayed in their wagons.
  • 6) She has swum with more dolphins and sea lions than you can shake a snorkel at.
  • 7) The lions hunt elephants because they have discovered that they can.
  • 8) This is a book about the real wild lives of lions.
  • 9) We turned quickly to witness a huge male lion dart across the track we had just crossed.
  • 10) Killing wild lions for export is a violation of international conventions.
  • 11) We saw prides of female and male lions.
  • 12) Swimming with seals or sea lions is undoubtedly the most fun you can have with a wild animal.
  • 13) The company will still pay the lion's share.
  • 14) Our spotter sees a pride of lion heading down the track, towards us.
  • 15) They were expected to go into the lion's den and have their heads snapped off.
  • 16) Taxpayers are expected to pay at least the lion's share of the money.
  • 17) lions, tigers and birds of prey were lying in wait.
  • 18) It was putting your head into the lion's mouth!
  • 19) Or as well as a lamb thrown into the lion's den could go.
  • 20) He turned up at training yesterday sporting a new hair style that looked like a lion's mane.
  • 21) A tiger and a lion met by a pool.
  • 22) US hunters can still import trophies if they can prove that the hunt would enhance the survival of lions in the wild.
  • 23) I do cook for the family but my wife does the lion's share.
  • 24) That image included an East Africa swarming with wealthy hunters after lion and elephant.
  • 25) Instead of lions and elephants being imported from Africa, it is the performers.
  • 26) Now I can understand why the Americans might want to stop people bringing lions into their country.
  • 27) In such a sentence as “That fierce lion who came here is dead, ” the class of “lion, ” which we may call the animal class, would be referred to by concording prefixes no less than six times, —with the demonstrative (“that”), the qualifying adjective, the noun itself, the relative pronoun, the subjective prefix to the verb of the relative clause, and the subjective prefix to the verb of the main clause (“is dead”).
  • 28) "Dandelion"; it used to be written _dent de lion_; that is, "tooth of a lion"; because its leaves are edged with sharp teeth, like a lion's jaw.
  • 29) *wayting pashuntlee in lion wayting payshuntlee in lion*
  • 30) This mountain lion is approaching a deer carcass cached the night before which I found not too far from my house, so I set up my deercam next to where the deer was buried under a large fir tree.
  • 31) The best thing to do if you get attacked by a mountain lion is to cut off your own arm and then beat the mountain lion down and then when you pass out from the blood loss hope that the mountain lion takes your arm and not your body and that someone comes by to save you during the time between you passing out and you dying of massive blood loss.
  • 32) The mountain lion is a animal finely tuned on hunting and such.
  • 33) A mountain lion is spotted running loose near a local neighborhood.
  • 34) MOOS: Comes in various colors and even IN what they call a lion trim.
  • 35) MOOS: Comes in various colors and even in what they call a lion trim.
  • 36) MOOS (voice-over): It comes in various colors and even in what they call a lion trim.
  • 37) ‘Three year-old male lions grow manes that vary in color from black to blond.’
  • 38) ‘Male lions develop thick woolly manes on the neck and shoulders, signifying maturity.’
  • 39) ‘For instance, by choosing to hunt at a different place or time, coyotes avoid wolves, cheetahs avoid lions, and leopards avoid tigers.’
  • 40) ‘Male lions use their manes to attract females, to scare competitors, to make them look bigger and to protect their head and neck during fights.’
  • 41) ‘In field experiments female lions tend to choose male partners with the darkest manes.’
  • 42) ‘There are springbok, wildebeest, red hartebeest, lion, leopard, cheetah and giraffe among others.’
  • 43) ‘Male African lions perform this maneuver when they consort with a receptive female, herding her in the desired direction.’
  • 44) ‘Wild African lions roam free within ten minutes drive of the center of Nairobi, Kenya.’
  • 45) ‘Female Asiatic lions live an average of 17 to 18 years, with a maximum of 21 years.’
  • 46) ‘The zoo had received its three Asiatic lions just two years ago as part of a European endangered species programme.’
  • 47) ‘A troupe of lion cubs nuzzle her hand and chew playfully on her shoelaces.’
  • 48) ‘Living with elephants and giraffes, and seeing lions hunt and kill, was fantastic.’
  • 49) ‘The river has chiselled the mountain face, making it resemble a lion's paw.’
  • 50) ‘A stone lion's head, which seems to float above a potted plant, drips water into the pool.’
  • 51) ‘She noticed an intricately carved, roaring lion's head was at the end of the banister.’
  • 52) ‘The crowd roars like a lion in a cage.’
  • 53) ‘Apparently they don't even have the delightful touch farm and lion enclosure anymore.’
  • 54) ‘At Babylon there is a famous basalt statue of a man being mauled by a lion.’
  • 55) ‘South Africa contributes about 30 percent of lions hunted in sub-Saharan Africa.’
  • 56) ‘However, they sometimes reached the pinnacle of honor by killing lions on their own.’
  • 57) ‘This design is blazoned as ‘Gules, three lions passant guardant in pale Or,’ and it is still the coat of arms of England today.’
  • 58) ‘I needn't see the heraldic lion on his clothes' front to know where he came from.’
  • 59) ‘He wanted a unique way to show his support for England and so he had the three lions emblem and St George's cross engraved on his false teeth.’
  • 60) ‘Four heraldic beasts - two stags, a lion and a griffin - stand guard at a stone staircase opposite the coffin.’
  • 61) ‘When the Scottish King James I came to the throne he ordered that the heraldic red lion of Scotland be displayed on all buildings of importance including pubs.’
  • 62) ‘On top of it, the blue banner with golden lion as heraldry of Central Kingdom flew.’
  • 63) ‘Above the doorway of the old hall was a carved escutcheon with a lion rampant, the Arms of the De Lacys.’
  • 64) ‘The sobriety of the streets is relieved by bridges with self-important towers or slightly pompous lions and griffins with gilded wings.’
  • 65) ‘Notice the maker's mark is missing and that the lion passant mark is eroded in a peculiar fashion not consistent with normal wear.’
  • 66) ‘There was a soiled and tawdry mirror above a massive metal and marble clock supported by a lion couchant on the mantelshelf.’
  • 67) ‘Heraldically, they derive from the Azure, the lion rampant or coat of arms of the Galician Volynian Prince Lev I.’
  • 68) ‘In the very few crannies left behind are fleurs-de-lis, rampant lions, unicorns, dogs, and vases of flowers.’
  • 69) ‘It is therefore important when examining a slaver on foot to see that it is struck with the obligatory lion passant or leopard's head erased mark.’
  • 70) ‘The ancient emblem for the nation was a lion holding a scimitar against a rising sun.’
  • 71) ‘The Sri Lankan flag with the trademark lion embossed in the middle is flying high around the ring and every time a Sri Lankan batsman hits a boundary the roar from the crowd gets louder.’
  • 72) ‘It was Italian, with a crest on it embroidered with three lions inside the shield with two more lions holding up the logo.’
  • 73) ‘In his 66 displays with the three lions proudly emblazoned on his chest he rarely put a foot wrong.’
  • 74) ‘Various Aokan emblems, such as the lion capital found on his pillars, have been adopted for official use by the modern state of India.’
  • 75) ‘People filed by the coffin covered with the Queen Mother's personal standard which mixed the Royal Arms with the bows and lions of her own Bowes Lyon family.’
  • 76) ‘They have two flags - the lion rampant and the saltire - but no national anthem.’
  • 77) ‘Maybe just the act of posting a novel in a forum where bored Babus can read it and slam it will be enough to awaken the sleeping literary lion in aspiring novelists.’
  • 78) ‘Even bigger if you add that he's working with a major publisher and that literary lion Kurt Vonnegut calls the book ‘… nothing less than the soul of an extremely interesting human being at war…‘’
  • 79) ‘Endre Farkas' invitation to celebrate literary lion Pablo Neruda's 100th birthday inspired a series of performative prose-poem vignettes, Proem Cards From Chile.’
  • 80) ‘The Advocate asked him to remember a fellow literary lion.’
  • 81) ‘Soon he was to move on to London and celebrity, becoming a literary lion of the metropolis of the Nineties.’
  • 82) ‘He's the son of ‘Black Jack’ Michelet, an overbearing literary lion on the scale of a Norman Mailer.’
  • 83) ‘Dutt actually looks plausible as the weather-beaten old literary lion, galled by his own unfashionability.’
  • 84) ‘It's the eagerly awaited second novel from the 28-year-old Foer, currently the hottest young literary lion around (he was the cover story of the Feb. 27 issue of the New York Times magazine).’
  • 85) ‘When he relates his one adult visit to her - he by then a rising literary lion, she a well-known poet - he recognizes her flat as the home of a religious woman but conveys little sense of what that might mean.’
  • 86) ‘Scott was 15 or so, and Burns was 28, but already a literary lion.’
  • 87) ‘His broadside against his critics seemed more like the rantings of a schoolboy than a literary lion.’
  • 88) ‘The literary lion offended the politically-correct crowd by denouncing her.’
  • 89) ‘A songwriter needn't be a literary lion but in this case, the lack of a back story, esoteric insight, charmed charisma, or soothsayer actualization renders them, more or less, a solid bar band with a great list of influences.’
  • 90) ‘He does not ignore the psychological complexities of Ellison, who was not the drab, neutered literary lion some critics made him out to be.’
  • 91) ‘J.D. Salinger had to wall himself away from the world and refuse to play the literary lion that the sales figures of his books easily enabled him to become.’
  • 92) ‘That particular party was full of literary lions and George was in his element.’
  • 93) ‘Tweedy Upper West Side literary lion teams up with Wall Street mogul to launch multimedia content ‘brand.’’
  • 94) ‘Authors sit in the green room waiting to go on, literary lions about to be eaten by library Christians.’
  • 95) ‘In his time, novelist-playwright Bulwer-Lytton was one of England's literary lions, but his reputation did not survive into the 20th century.’
  • 96) ‘Of Dawson's three literary lions, London has by far the greatest international reputation, especially among Europeans.’
  • 97) ‘But the former Wasps centre is not about to embark on a playing career in Australia - he has won a national competition to follow the British lions rugby union team on tour.’
  • 98) ‘A sensation in union with his hat-trick of tries against a 1955 British lions rugby union side, he delighted the crowds at Knowsley Road for 10 years in the 1950s and 1960s.’
  • 99) ‘‘Rob is a great player and it says everything that he was the first choice scrum-half on two British lions ' tours only for injury to get in the way,’ he said.’
  • 100) ‘There have been 10 official lions tours of New Zealand since.’
  • 101) ‘The next lions tour is to New Zealand, where I went with them in 1993.’

Examples

  • 1) A banquet of tiger prawn and lemon quinoa risotto.
  • 2) In this one, chunks of white crab meat and plump tiger prawns vie for your fork's attention.
  • 3) What was he supposed to do with tigers and leopards out there?
  • 4) The lions and tigers stayed in their wagons.
  • 5) Place a tiger prawn on top and garnish with a sprig of dill.
  • 6) And the wildlife doc gets an injection of real drama when the team rescue an orphaned tiger cub.
  • 7) This find is very important because it shows that there is at least one tiger family group in the mountains.
  • 8) India boasts the world's largest population of tigers in the wild.
  • 9) Can he bring a massive Bengal tiger to life?
  • 10) Some say the Chinese economy is a tiger.
  • 11) Lions and tigers and bears - oh my!
  • 12) There are also three Siberian tiger cubs.
  • 13) Ireland's tiger economy looked more than a little bedraggled.
  • 14) Highlights include grilled tiger prawns, and slowly braised veal.
  • 15) tiger demands diving Siberian tigers for one set.
  • 16) Lions, tigers and birds of prey were lying in wait.
  • 17) But for now these Siberian tiger cubs are still at the playful kitten stage.
  • 18) The next day they persuaded me and we pulled up in a Jeep to find a tiger about six feet away.
  • 19) We could be like Singapore as a centre for international business, a new economic tiger.
  • 20) The document specifies the trade and use of tiger and leopard skins'and their products '.
  • 21) He said that he had shot 13 tigers and 28 leopards.
  • 22) I am a Bengal tiger!
  • 23) And I wouldn't have been at all surprised to find a tiger in my bathroom the next morning.
  • 24) The profits for selling tiger bone wine to China\'s nouveau riche are so vast that now African lions are killed and smuggled into China in order to supply \ "mock tiger\" for the wineries.
  • 25) The definition of tiger does not tell us the meaning of the word ˜tiger™; it tells us what it is to be a tiger, what a tiger is said to be in respect of itself.
  • 26) When a man sees his friend in the grasp of a tiger, he does not drop his levelled gun on the plea of charity _to the tiger_.
  • 27) "Wow, Wendi Murdoch giving whole new meaning to the term tiger mother ... insanity!"
  • 28) New York Times columnist Nicholas Kristof tweeted, "I'm awed by Wendi Murdoch taking down Rupert's attacker," and former CBS news anchor Katie Couric tweeted that Deng gave a "whole new meaning to the term tiger mother."
  • 29) Once Parker used the word tiger in a surprising way: Each door we opened was crucial.
  • 30) ‘Boller estimates there may be as many as 400 to 500 lions, tigers, and other big cats in the Houston area alone.’
  • 31) ‘The burgeoning trade in bones and body parts for use in folk medicines threatens tigers and other big cats.’
  • 32) ‘Next door is the Night Safari where, between 7.30 pm and midnight, you can watch buffalo, deer, tigers and fishing cats as they come out to feed.’
  • 33) ‘The big cats you find outside Africa include tiger, jaguar, leopard, cougar and Iberian lynx.’
  • 34) ‘The reason that this can happen is that both the lion and the tiger are big cats.’
  • 35) ‘Passing tigers, rhinos, tapirs, deer and other animals triggered the shutter by tripping infrared sensors.’
  • 36) ‘Lions, tigers, jaguars, giraffes, orang-utans and emus were some of the other creatures we saw.’
  • 37) ‘Wild tigers mainly inhabit Asia, whereas the lion's current natural habitat is almost entirely in Africa.’
  • 38) ‘The forests supported tigers, elephants, wild boar, oxen, and deer, as well as wildfowl.’
  • 39) ‘Cambodia was once home to herds of elephants, possibly thousands of tigers, wild cattle, leopards, bears, barking deer and an array of other animals.’
  • 40) ‘Because the tiger had become so rare, it had become an extremely valuable commodity in the black markets of Asia.’
  • 41) ‘Weiler's survey found that the use of land mines to kill tigers, deer, wild cattle and other animals was widespread.’
  • 42) ‘And in India, Bengal tigers laze in forest branches.’
  • 43) ‘The most ferocious biters among mammals aren't lions, tigers, or wolves, but meat-eating marsupials, a new study says.’
  • 44) ‘And yet another is a mountain refuge for vultures, tigers, and wild water buffalo.’
  • 45) ‘Because the elephants aren't afraid of the tigers, the tigers aren't afraid of elephants.’
  • 46) ‘They were unlike tigers and all other living cats, which are solitary hunters.’
  • 47) ‘In India, once considered the greatest stronghold for tigers, recent reports show the big cats disappearing altogether from some core reserve areas.’
  • 48) ‘In 1971, it banned the hunting of tigers, the first tiger range state to do so.’
  • 49) ‘Entering the forest officer's house, he found the skins of 3 Bengal tigers and 50 leopards.’
  • 50) ‘As it happens, Cato is a fierce tiger when it comes to advocating for oppressed tobacco firms.’
  • 51) ‘She growled, like a fierce tiger about to rip its pray to smithereens.’
  • 52) ‘Angela stepped up now, as blunt and determined as a pacing tiger.’
  • 53) ‘Brandy was mad now, her eyes had turned to narrow slits and her ears were laid back on her head, she represented a fierce tiger and Millie trembled again.’
  • 54) ‘On reflection it seems that the sands of time are beginning to catch up on the ageing stars, while some of the young tigers seem to be finding it hard to assume the mantle of leaders.’
  • 55) ‘At the beginning of last season the young Rheban tigers raced off into a great lead at the head of the first division.’
  • 56) ‘He said he was still full of energy, though not like the young tiger of old, but still enough to fight.’
  • 57) ‘I would prefer to have the young tigers and tigresses volunteering at a level that made it unnecessary to have a draft.’
  • 58) ‘‘I have a son and four nephews involved, and they're young tigers that think out of the box,’ he said.’
  • 59) ‘Many of these young tigers are well-dressed and oblivious, yapping away into their mobile phones.’
  • 60) ‘But now the young tigers want to return to cap the final squeeze.’
  • 61) ‘The Malton pack fought like tigers against the heavier visiting eight and with the tackling in the backs of the highest order, West Park found difficulty in breaking out of their own half.’
  • 62) ‘But Liverpool fought like tigers and erupted in joy at the final whistle, with an all-English semi-final to look forward to.’
  • 63) ‘This wasn't just a flash in the pan, they fought back like tigers to win this match.’
  • 64) ‘Here, the players grappled like bears and fought like tigers to stay on their feet.’
  • 65) ‘My two year old was so tired she was falling down, but fought like a tiger not to have to go to bed.’
  • 66) ‘City fought like tigers all night and deserve all the credit.’
  • 67) ‘He tried to push me back, but I was fighting like a tiger.’
  • 68) ‘Eve fought like a tiger, and finally freed herself of him, pushing him away from her.’
  • 69) ‘He said you had the courage of a lion, the strength of an elephant, and you fought like a ferocious tiger!’
  • 70) ‘‘For an emergent tiger economy, the Philippines is back once more to being the sick man of Asia,’ she said.’
  • 71) ‘As with the two most important East Asian tigers, South Korea and Taiwan, state direction was used to build up basic industries while massive repression kept living standards down.’
  • 72) ‘When they were at the same stage of development as India is now, Asian tigers like South Korea, Taiwan, and China focused on elementary and secondary schools.’
  • 73) ‘The Asian financial crisis of the nineties exposed the frailty of the Asian tigers ' economic model.’
  • 74) ‘The rapid growth of Hong Kong, another of the East Asian tigers, wasn't accompanied by substantial investment in education.’
  • 75) ‘I must be a tiger for punishment, because I reread her speech.’
  • 76) ‘Butterflies including the tiger swallowtail and mourning cloak rely on the flowers of the red maple for their survival and reproduction.’
  • 77) ‘If you want tiger swallowtail butterflies, plant a willow tree.’
  • 78) ‘And I can see monarchs, painted ladies, tiger swallowtails, and listen to the songbirds.’
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