offense vs offence

offense offence

Definitions

  • 1) team sports (often IPA: /ˈɒ fɛns/) The portion of a team dedicated to scoring when in position to do so; contrasted with defense.
  • 2) The act of offending; a crime or sin; an affront or injury.
  • 3) The state of being offended or displeased; anger; displeasure.
  • 4) team sports (often IPA: /ˈɒ fɛns/) A strategy and tactics employed when in position to score; contrasted with defense.
  • 5) Something that outrages moral sensibilities.
  • 6) The team in possession of the ball or puck, or those players whose primary duty is to attempt to score.
  • 7) Scoring ability or potential.
  • 8) The act of attacking or assaulting.
  • 9) The state of being offended.
  • 10) The means or tactics used in attempting to score.
  • 11) A violation or infraction of a moral or social code; a transgression or sin.
  • 12) A transgression of law; a crime.
  • 13) The act of causing anger, resentment, displeasure, or affront.
  • 14) to feel, or assume to be, injured or affronted; to become angry or hostile.
  • 15) The act of offending in any sense; esp., a crime or a sin, an affront or an injury.
  • 16) obsolete A cause or occasion of stumbling or of sin.
  • 17) those which are used in attack, in distinction from those of defense, which are used to repel.
  • 18) In any contest, the act or process of attacking as contrasted with the act of defending; the offensive.
  • 19) (Sports) The members of a team who have the primary responsibility to score goals, in contrast to those who have the responsibility to defend, i.e. to prevent the opposing team from scoring goal.
  • 20) a lack of politeness; a failure to show regard for others; wounding the feelings or others
  • 21) (criminal law) an act punishable by law; usually considered an evil act
  • 22) the team that has the ball (or puck) and is trying to score
  • 23) Affront; insult; injustice; wrong; that which wounds the feelings and causes displeasure or resentment.
  • 24) Displeasure; annoyance; mortification; umbrage; anger.
  • 25) Specifically, in law: A crime or misdemeanor; a transgression of law. It implies a violation of law for which the public authorities may prosecute, not merely one which gives rise to a private cause of action only. More specifically
  • 26) Transgression; sin; fault; wrong.
  • 27) Assault; attack: as, weapons or arms of offense.
  • 28) Harm; hurt; injury.
  • 29) Synonyms Misdeed, fault, delinquency, indignity, trespass. Referring to the comparison under crime, it may be added that offense is a very indefinite word, covering the whole range of the others, while misdemeanor is a specific word, applying to an act which is cognizable by civil, school, family, or other authority, and does not appear in the aspect of an offense against anything but law or rules.
  • 30) Indignation, resentment.
  • 31) A misdemeanor or transgression of the law which is not indictable, but is punishable summarily or by the forfeiture of a penalty.

Definitions

  • 1) team sports The portion of a team dedicated to scoring when in position to do so; contrasted with defence.
  • 2) team sports A strategy and tactics employed when in position to score; contrasted with defence.
  • 3) See offense.
  • 4) etc. See offense, etc.

Examples

  • 1) He began to boil his water, tried to refuse invitations without causing offense, and religiously took the prescribed medicines.
  • 2) He took no offense at being exploited in this fashion, however scandalous the work or scurrilous the part.
  • 3) It was fortunate that the turning year brought the farm much more work; it enabled me to keep away without remark or offense.
  • 4) You nearly killed me with your first `car bomb", and yet I have taken no personal offense.
  • 5) ‘It held such crimes to be offences against the law of nations, much as was the traditional crime of piracy.’
  • 6) ‘It is also clear that the charge of assault against the second applicant is an offence under the criminal law as well as under the Prison Rules.’
  • 7) ‘It is the essence of offences against the person that what is done is done unlawfully.’
  • 8) ‘In that case the applicant had been convicted of offences of indecent assault.’
  • 9) ‘In this way the defendant consumed the criminal offence of premeditated murder.’
  • 10) ‘What about offences against the state and against the administration of justice?’
  • 11) ‘An offence of indecent assault, since 1985, carries a maximum sentence of 10 years.’
  • 12) ‘These, in the main, are young people committing offences against other young people.’
  • 13) ‘Offences against the laws governing political parties are not punishable as a criminal offence, but can incur painful financial sanctions.’
  • 14) ‘Police may call it the fineable offence of contravening traffic rules, but it is the order of the day among minibus drivers.’
  • 15) ‘Both women were convicted of minor nonviolent drug offenses.’
  • 16) ‘The nation's legal nightmare around non-violent drug offenses is the primary cross he bears.’
  • 17) ‘The skewness of the perceived severity distribution for each felony drug offense was examined.’
  • 18) ‘But the case was abandoned Thursday after magistrates found he had not committed a criminal offense.’
  • 19) ‘Another 1995 law made the laundering of money from drug trafficking a serious criminal offense.’
  • 20) ‘The number of juveniles arrested for drug-related offenses has increased 80 percent in the last seven years.’
  • 21) ‘Both stand accused of plunder, an offense punishable by death.’
  • 22) ‘Singapore still considers graffiti an offense punishable by flogging.’
  • 23) ‘Beginning in 2009, adults arrested for any felony offense are subject to DNA collection.’
  • 24) ‘The original version of the bill would have made an immigration violation a felony offense.’
  • 25) ‘The scorning of the tribes is an offense to the natural order in the minds of many there.’
  • 26) ‘In those buried and bygone days, it was an affront and an offense to join with separatists to defeat a corrupt government.’
  • 27) ‘To try to impose on others by violent means what we consider to be the truth is an offence against human dignity.’
  • 28) ‘War is a crime against humanity and an offence against God.’
  • 29) ‘Paramilitary flags or slogans and monuments do give offence to visitors and to different sectors of society.’
  • 30) ‘‘The argument then was that to allow this element would give offence to people of other faiths,’ wrote Torrance.’
  • 31) ‘Carolingian rule and culture were familiar in many ways; it was its flavour of high-handedness and moral urgency that might give offence to the inhabitants of Italy.’
  • 32) ‘I have taken offence to the statement that a lie was told, and I ask for it to be withdrawn and apologised for.’
  • 33) ‘I ask the Minister to stand and withdraw that remark about the point that the member has taken offence to.’
  • 34) ‘A demonstration may annoy or give offence to persons opposed to the ideas of claims that it is seeking to promote.’
  • 35) ‘Instead of sounding out ideas in order to judge them critically, academics seem only too happy to silence debate in case it causes insult or offence to individuals.’
  • 36) ‘For language, I'd almost always leave it in, unless it was something that would clearly give offense.’
  • 37) ‘I saw the person who is alleged to have taken offense on the tram a few days later, and she seemed fine.’
  • 38) ‘I wanted to put all your minds at rest - my wife reads my article each week and has not taken offence (so far, anyway).’
  • 39) ‘This guy heard what I said and must have taken offence.’
  • 40) ‘He's also painfully anxious not to give offence, and you wonder if he's almost too nice for his own good.’
  • 41) ‘As a middle-aged freedom fighter, I've always taken offense at this notion.’
  • 42) ‘Workers will have to think twice before telling insensitive jokes or expressing intolerant views which may give offence.’
  • 43) ‘Look, if it caused any anger or upset and in some way got the candidate off-message for the past couple of days of the campaign, I meant no offense.’
  • 44) ‘Video game developers counter that no offense is intended.’
  • 45) ‘And when I say that, please understand I mean no offense to the ghost of the 70s comedian.’
  • 46) ‘We can assure you that no offense was ever intended.’
  • 47) ‘They were not amused by the spoof - and McDonald's finished up saying it meant no offense.’
  • 48) ‘Last time Clark commented on Tamihere she said that he meant no offense.’
  • 49) ‘Is the make of car he drives likely to cause offence?’
  • 50) ‘The doctor had skipped bail on sex offence charges and Melville nabbed him while on port watch for the Special Branch in Le Havre.’
  • 51) ‘On Tuesday a bench warrant was issued for his arrest at Limerick District Court when he failed to appear to face two public order offence charges.’
  • 52) ‘She said Seamus was known to police in Middleton and Rochdale and had been due to appear in court to face motor offence charges.’
  • 53) ‘He had been facing sex offence charges against young girls at the time Rory disappeared last month.’
  • 54) ‘Convictions for both groups were coded using New Zealand Police offence codes.’
  • 55) ‘But for every feint that was ignored, for every offense move that was countered, Tiana dealt equally.’
  • 56) ‘It is more of a defense and offense attack combined.’
  • 57) ‘Three of the staff, two women and a man, were arrested and given a police caution for offence - which means they admitted their guilt.’
  • 58) ‘As the offense team monitored the threat rings we were flying through, the copilot saw a missile at our 4 o'clock.’
  • 59) ‘And these are the offense football teams that quickly do damage to anything and everything in their path.’
  • 60) ‘The rest of the players on offense had to adjust to the change in personality under center.’
  • 61) ‘Saban will miss quarterback Matt Mauck and the other playmakers on offense who graduated.’
  • 62) ‘That doesn't bode well for a team whose offense is predicated on running with George.’
  • 63) ‘First, it brings back a productive player on a young offense that needs playmakers.’
  • 64) ‘The Chargers would like another big run stuffer on defense and a versatile player on offense.’
  • 65) ‘They are so bad their offense has 18 false-start penalties in six games.’
  • 66) ‘The team will need contributions from some of its younger players on offense.’
  • 67) ‘He is as automatic as it gets in the league and as much of a weapon as any player on offense.’
  • 68) ‘On the other hand, the Colts are a much-improved team with a very potent offense.’
  • 69) ‘The problem with Tampa Bay's offense is it lacks the team speed to be effective.’
  • 70) ‘If the Eagles keep both of their second-round picks, they could go for skill players on offense.’
  • 71) ‘Wayne will bring adequate size and a polished game to one of the league's most potent offenses.’
  • 72) ‘But he remains an integral part of one of the NFL's most potent offenses.’
  • 73) ‘They'll have to be to keep Florida's dangerous offense off the field.’
  • 74) ‘Most importantly, they kept the high-octane Kansas City offense off the field.’
  • 75) ‘The offense struggled to sustain drives last year and must get better on third down.’
  • 76) ‘The game started with both offenses moving the ball well only to have field goal attempts sail wide.’
  • 77) ‘A first down is achieved when the offense has moved the ball ten yards from its previous spot.’
  • 78) ‘Michael, being wide receiver of the offense, had scored four touchdowns.’
  • 79) ‘In the second half of the game the New England offense had the ball for over 21 of the 30 minutes in the second half.’
  • 80) ‘Ewen was under no illusions regarding the areas that need work - the speed of ball movement when the team is on the offense and the organisation of offensive play.’
  • 81) ‘Amidst strong winds and in front of a large Hamline homecoming crowd, the Scots struggled on offense, turning the ball over five times.’
  • 82) ‘Neither team did a good job taking care of the ball on offense as Redbank Valley had three fumbles, lost one and two Jason Smith interceptions.’
  • 83) ‘While its blitz-happy schemes will result in some big plays, they will leave the team vulnerable against big-play offenses.’
  • 84) ‘I get a chance to run teams through plays and offenses and feedback with the coaches.’
  • 85) ‘Practice sessions are needed to fine-tune parts of your game, working on team offenses and defenses.’
  • 86) ‘On key fourth-quarter possessions, Finley often got the ball in a spread offense.’
  • 87) ‘After studying last season's offense and the offenses of other teams, the staff concluded the Cardinals were trying to be too exotic in their running game.’
  • 88) ‘Against the Colts in the divisional round, they relied heavily on a ball-control offense and kept the ball for more than 37 minutes.’
  • 89) ‘If Georgetown does create a slower tempo, Florida will need sophomore point guard Taurean Green to score in a half-court offense.’
  • 90) ‘He's the point guard who best combines scoring and running the offense.’
  • 91) ‘Lavender proved he can score and run an offense at Oklahoma, but he sometimes needs to be encouraged to share the ball.’
  • 92) ‘He was happy to run the offense, distribute the ball, and shut down the other team's best players.’
  • 93) ‘In this mode you are rewarded for doing things like passing for a first down and QB sacks, so you can score during both offense and defense.’
  • 94) ‘He is a leader who controls the offense and defends the ball as well as anyone.’
  • 95) ‘In his second start, he showed great control of the offense and spread the ball around.’
  • 96) ‘Also, Longley significantly contributed to three Bulls' championships by meticulously executing the triangle offense.’
  • 97) ‘In a triangle offense, shooting and passing skills are must-haves for the center.’
  • 98) ‘Stay cool and poised, as David Duke did, and play offense by pushing Russert's toughest questions back at him.’
  • 99) ‘Those clubs played some serious offense en route to winning their Super Bowl titles.’

Examples

  • 1) Selling snowdrops taken from the wild is a criminal offence.
  • 2) No details of the offences were given at court.
  • 3) Her husband had admitted the same offence earlier.
  • 4) We have reached a good balance between offence and defence.
  • 5) These offences carry a maximum penalty of two years in prison.
  • 6) MPs said that the public had a right to know the identities of those convicted of the most serious offences.
  • 7) She said that the extra powers being considered would be to deal with common offences including using a mobile telephone at the wheel and speeding.
  • 8) The journal suggested that she had benefited from a fictitious post, which is an offence under French law.
  • 9) The maximum penalty for the offence is life imprisonment.
  • 10) Will the clampdown on minor speeding offences reduce road deaths?
  • 11) My language was poorly chosen and has caused a great deal of offence.
  • 12) She admitted committing the offence but insisted that she simply forgot about the tests.
  • 13) People who committed offences younger are continuing on into their old age.
  • 14) The law is clear that to do so would be a criminal offence.
  • 15) The club were found not guilty of alleged offences over payments to two other players.
  • 16) The force classified the offences as antisocial behaviour rather than as a crime.
  • 17) There is no time between offence and defence.
  • 18) The move will halt all trials for offences carrying a maximum sentence of ten years or less.
  • 19) We have long argued that sentences for serious offences should be more consistent and rigorous.
  • 20) The current law limits offences to drivers whose performance is impaired by the use of illegal drugs.
  • 21) We are sorry if this suggestion caused any offence.
  • 22) Many are repeat offenders whose second offence would not have been committed if their resettlement after the first had been effective.
  • 23) An offence under the Act makes it a crime to carry on a business with a seriously misleading name.
  • 24) The main offence is under s15A of the Theft Act 1968, a section repealed by the Fraud Act 2006.
  • 25) The seriousness of the offence is always taken into account when a young person is sentenced to a DTO. on September 8, 2009 at 1: 32 pm inspectorgadget
  • 26) Yes! and the offence is aggravated when you consider that it was someone else's folly.
  • 27) As for those in the other side of the equasion, no offence is implied or intended.
  • 28) While always setting the record straight, I make it clear that I know that no offence is intended and none is taken, and that I simply want all to be aware that we're Canadians, and not gringos.
  • 29) The basis for the offence is ss. 142 (4) of the Highway Traffic Act,
  • 30) The purpose of this offence is to protect young people between 16 and 18 years of age.
  • 31) But now that every offence is arrestable, and that (due to RIPA, it seems) an officer must arrest a member of the public before they can ask them any questions, any contact with the police leads to an entry in the DNA and fingerprint databases.
  • 32) Much more commonly, the Crown will proceed by way of summary conviction, in which case the offence is punishable by up to 18 months in jail.
  • 33) The need to avoid offence is now seen as overriding any concept of privacy.
  • 34) ‘It held such crimes to be offences against the law of nations, much as was the traditional crime of piracy.’
  • 35) ‘It is also clear that the charge of assault against the second applicant is an offence under the criminal law as well as under the Prison Rules.’
  • 36) ‘It is the essence of offences against the person that what is done is done unlawfully.’
  • 37) ‘In that case the applicant had been convicted of offences of indecent assault.’
  • 38) ‘In this way the defendant consumed the criminal offence of premeditated murder.’
  • 39) ‘What about offences against the state and against the administration of justice?’
  • 40) ‘An offence of indecent assault, since 1985, carries a maximum sentence of 10 years.’
  • 41) ‘These, in the main, are young people committing offences against other young people.’
  • 42) ‘offences against the laws governing political parties are not punishable as a criminal offence, but can incur painful financial sanctions.’
  • 43) ‘Police may call it the fineable offence of contravening traffic rules, but it is the order of the day among minibus drivers.’
  • 44) ‘Both women were convicted of minor nonviolent drug offenses.’
  • 45) ‘The nation's legal nightmare around non-violent drug offenses is the primary cross he bears.’
  • 46) ‘The skewness of the perceived severity distribution for each felony drug offense was examined.’
  • 47) ‘But the case was abandoned Thursday after magistrates found he had not committed a criminal offense.’
  • 48) ‘Another 1995 law made the laundering of money from drug trafficking a serious criminal offense.’
  • 49) ‘The number of juveniles arrested for drug-related offenses has increased 80 percent in the last seven years.’
  • 50) ‘Both stand accused of plunder, an offense punishable by death.’
  • 51) ‘Singapore still considers graffiti an offense punishable by flogging.’
  • 52) ‘Beginning in 2009, adults arrested for any felony offense are subject to DNA collection.’
  • 53) ‘The original version of the bill would have made an immigration violation a felony offense.’
  • 54) ‘The scorning of the tribes is an offense to the natural order in the minds of many there.’
  • 55) ‘In those buried and bygone days, it was an affront and an offense to join with separatists to defeat a corrupt government.’
  • 56) ‘To try to impose on others by violent means what we consider to be the truth is an offence against human dignity.’
  • 57) ‘War is a crime against humanity and an offence against God.’
  • 58) ‘Paramilitary flags or slogans and monuments do give offence to visitors and to different sectors of society.’
  • 59) ‘‘The argument then was that to allow this element would give offence to people of other faiths,’ wrote Torrance.’
  • 60) ‘Carolingian rule and culture were familiar in many ways; it was its flavour of high-handedness and moral urgency that might give offence to the inhabitants of Italy.’
  • 61) ‘I have taken offence to the statement that a lie was told, and I ask for it to be withdrawn and apologised for.’
  • 62) ‘I ask the Minister to stand and withdraw that remark about the point that the member has taken offence to.’
  • 63) ‘A demonstration may annoy or give offence to persons opposed to the ideas of claims that it is seeking to promote.’
  • 64) ‘Instead of sounding out ideas in order to judge them critically, academics seem only too happy to silence debate in case it causes insult or offence to individuals.’
  • 65) ‘For language, I'd almost always leave it in, unless it was something that would clearly give offense.’
  • 66) ‘I saw the person who is alleged to have taken offense on the tram a few days later, and she seemed fine.’
  • 67) ‘I wanted to put all your minds at rest - my wife reads my article each week and has not taken offence (so far, anyway).’
  • 68) ‘This guy heard what I said and must have taken offence.’
  • 69) ‘He's also painfully anxious not to give offence, and you wonder if he's almost too nice for his own good.’
  • 70) ‘As a middle-aged freedom fighter, I've always taken offense at this notion.’
  • 71) ‘Workers will have to think twice before telling insensitive jokes or expressing intolerant views which may give offence.’
  • 72) ‘Look, if it caused any anger or upset and in some way got the candidate off-message for the past couple of days of the campaign, I meant no offense.’
  • 73) ‘Video game developers counter that no offense is intended.’
  • 74) ‘And when I say that, please understand I mean no offense to the ghost of the 70s comedian.’
  • 75) ‘We can assure you that no offense was ever intended.’
  • 76) ‘They were not amused by the spoof - and McDonald's finished up saying it meant no offense.’
  • 77) ‘Last time Clark commented on Tamihere she said that he meant no offense.’
  • 78) ‘Is the make of car he drives likely to cause offence?’
  • 79) ‘The doctor had skipped bail on sex offence charges and Melville nabbed him while on port watch for the Special Branch in Le Havre.’
  • 80) ‘On Tuesday a bench warrant was issued for his arrest at Limerick District Court when he failed to appear to face two public order offence charges.’
  • 81) ‘She said Seamus was known to police in Middleton and Rochdale and had been due to appear in court to face motor offence charges.’
  • 82) ‘He had been facing sex offence charges against young girls at the time Rory disappeared last month.’
  • 83) ‘Convictions for both groups were coded using New Zealand Police offence codes.’
  • 84) ‘But for every feint that was ignored, for every offense move that was countered, Tiana dealt equally.’
  • 85) ‘It is more of a defense and offense attack combined.’
  • 86) ‘Three of the staff, two women and a man, were arrested and given a police caution for offence - which means they admitted their guilt.’
  • 87) ‘As the offense team monitored the threat rings we were flying through, the copilot saw a missile at our 4 o'clock.’
  • 88) ‘And these are the offense football teams that quickly do damage to anything and everything in their path.’
  • 89) ‘The rest of the players on offense had to adjust to the change in personality under center.’
  • 90) ‘Saban will miss quarterback Matt Mauck and the other playmakers on offense who graduated.’
  • 91) ‘That doesn't bode well for a team whose offense is predicated on running with George.’
  • 92) ‘First, it brings back a productive player on a young offense that needs playmakers.’
  • 93) ‘The Chargers would like another big run stuffer on defense and a versatile player on offense.’
  • 94) ‘They are so bad their offense has 18 false-start penalties in six games.’
  • 95) ‘The team will need contributions from some of its younger players on offense.’
  • 96) ‘He is as automatic as it gets in the league and as much of a weapon as any player on offense.’
  • 97) ‘On the other hand, the Colts are a much-improved team with a very potent offense.’
  • 98) ‘The problem with Tampa Bay's offense is it lacks the team speed to be effective.’
  • 99) ‘If the Eagles keep both of their second-round picks, they could go for skill players on offense.’
  • 100) ‘Wayne will bring adequate size and a polished game to one of the league's most potent offenses.’
  • 101) ‘But he remains an integral part of one of the NFL's most potent offenses.’
  • 102) ‘They'll have to be to keep Florida's dangerous offense off the field.’
  • 103) ‘Most importantly, they kept the high-octane Kansas City offense off the field.’
  • 104) ‘The offense struggled to sustain drives last year and must get better on third down.’
  • 105) ‘The game started with both offenses moving the ball well only to have field goal attempts sail wide.’
  • 106) ‘A first down is achieved when the offense has moved the ball ten yards from its previous spot.’
  • 107) ‘Michael, being wide receiver of the offense, had scored four touchdowns.’
  • 108) ‘In the second half of the game the New England offense had the ball for over 21 of the 30 minutes in the second half.’
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