hurdle vs hurtle

hurdle hurtle

Definitions

  • 1) UK, obsolete A sled or crate on which criminals were formerly drawn to the place of execution.
  • 2) A movable frame of wattled twigs, osiers, or withes and stakes, or sometimes of iron, used for enclosing land, for folding sheep and cattle, for gates, etc.; also, in fortification, used as revetments, and for other purposes.
  • 3) An artificial barrier, variously constructed, over which men or horses jump in a race.
  • 4) A perceived obstacle.
  • 5) A race in which a series of such barriers must be jumped without the competitors' breaking their stride.
  • 6) Chiefly British A frame or sledge on which condemned persons were dragged to execution.
  • 7) An obstacle or difficulty to be overcome.
  • 8) Chiefly British A portable framework made of intertwined branches or wattle and used for temporary fencing.
  • 9) A leaping step made off one foot as means of maximizing spring at the end of an approach, as to a dive.
  • 10) A light portable barrier over which competitors must leap in certain races.
  • 11) In England, a sled or crate on which criminals were formerly drawn to the place of execution.
  • 12) a race in which artificial barriers in the form of hurdles, fences, etc., must be leaped.
  • 13) A movable frame of wattled twigs, osiers, or withes and stakes, or sometimes of iron, used for inclosing land, for folding sheep and cattle, for gates, etc.; also, in fortification, used as revetments, and for other purposes.
  • 14) An artificial barrier, variously constructed, over which men or horses leap in a race.
  • 15) an obstacle that you are expected to overcome
  • 16) a light movable barrier that competitors must leap over in certain races
  • 17) the act of jumping over an obstacle
  • 18) Specifically— A sledge or frame on which criminals were formerly drawn to the place of execution.
  • 19) A kind of permanent mattress of willow or other branches, built on a river-bank and fastened down with short sticks, to prevent the wearing away of the bank by the current of the stream.
  • 20) In fortification, a collection of twigs or sticks interwoven closely and sustained by long stakes, made usually of a rectangular shape, 5 or 6 feet by 3½ feet, and serving to render works firm or to cover traverses and lodgments for the defense of workmen against fireworks or stones.
  • 21) A movable frame made of interlaced twigs or sticks, or of bars, rods, or narrow boards, crossing each other.
  • 22) A space inclosed by hurdles: a fold.
  • 23) In hat-making, a grid or frame of wood or wire, in which a mass of felting-hair is placed to be bowed.
  • 24) In agriculture: A frame usually made of wood, but sometimes of iron, for the purpose of forming temporary fences. When a fence is to be formed of hurdles, they are put down end to end, and fastened to the ground and to one another.
  • 25) In racing, a bar or frame placed across a race-course at a certain height, in semblance of a fence, to be cleared by the contesting men or horses.
  • 26) To overcome an obstacle.
  • 27) To hedge, cover, make, or enclose with hurdles.
  • 28) To jump over something while running.
  • 29) To compete in the track and field events of hurdles (e.g. high hurdles).
  • 30) jump a hurdle
  • 31) To make, hedge, cover, or close with hurdles.
  • 32) To jump over a hurdle, as in a hurdle-race; hence, to jump over anything as if it were a hurdle.
  • 33) To leap over a barrier or other obstacle.
  • 34) To leap over (a barrier) in or as if in a race.
  • 35) To overcome or deal with successfully; surmount.
  • 36) To hedge, cover, make, or inclose with hurdles.

Definitions

  • 1) A fast movement in literal or figurative sense.
  • 2) A clattering sound.
  • 3) A pimple or wart.
  • 4) intransitive, archaic To meet with violence or shock; to clash; to jostle.
  • 5) intransitive To move rapidly, violently, or without control.
  • 6) transitive To hurl or fling; to throw hard or violently.
  • 7) intransitive, archaic To make a threatening sound, like the clash of arms; to make a sound as of confused clashing or confusion; to resound.
  • 8) intransitive, archaic To push; to jostle; to hurl.
  • 9) throw forcefully
  • 10) move with or as if with a rushing sound
  • 11) To move about with violence or impetuosity; whirl round; brandish.
  • 12) To dash, push, or knock violently; throw or hurl.
  • 13) To rush violently and noisily; move rapidly and impetuously; go swiftly with a whirring, clashing, or clattering sound.
  • 14) To fling with great force; hurl.
  • 15) To move with or as if with great speed.
  • 16) To move rapidly; to wheel or rush suddenly or with violence; to whirl round rapidly; to skirmish.
  • 17) To meet with violence or shock; to clash; to jostle.
  • 18) To make a threatening sound, like the clash of arms; to make a sound as of confused clashing or confusion; to resound.
  • 19) obsolete To move with violence or impetuosity; to whirl; to brandish.
  • 20) To push; to jostle; to hurl.

Examples

  • 1) This is actually quite a big hurdle for me to get over.
  • 2) Lay the hoops flat for jumping exercises or stand them up as hurdles or obstacles.
  • 3) So this was a good hurdle to overcome.
  • 4) He went close on his first try at hurdling over track and trip last month.
  • 5) He probably needed that first run over hurdles.
  • 6) For they each overcome enormous hurdles.
  • 7) That's the biggest hurdle for him.
  • 8) But having overcome all the hurdles that have stood in their way, the pair literally dance up the aisle.
  • 9) It took him a little while to get the hang of jumping hurdles but it all clicked when he won back at Wincanton in the spring.
  • 10) Extra endorphins would help endurance athletes to hurdle the pain barrier.
  • 11) There are six flights of hurdles and nine fences per circuit.
  • 12) The biggest hurdle he faces may be apathy.
  • 13) What are the biggest hurdles lawyers face when attempting to crack the brutal business world?
  • 14) Two of the others had to overcome one major hurdle before getting together.
  • 15) Then he jumped a hurdle while still standing and he did it again?
  • 16) You can go into almost any business and have no hurdles to leap.
  • 17) This impressive bumper winner should have opened his account over hurdles here last time.
  • 18) We have overcome so many hurdles and now understand who each other is.
  • 19) So many people throw in the towel at the first hurdle.
  • 20) He has been schooling brilliantly and he actually jumps fences better than hurdles.
  • 21) The biggest hurdle of all is not the science.
  • 22) In the meantime you can help him to jump small hurdles one at a time.
  • 23) Once you have jumped that hurdle you should set an easily achievable savings goal.
  • 24) He won a couple of times over hurdles last season after previously splitting two smart rivals.
  • 25) There are still hurdles to leap.
  • 26) The 100m hurdles has long been the barometer of her confidence and overall performance.
  • 27) The winner of a record 18 straight hurdle races has injured a tendon.
  • 28) Otherwise, the only potential hurdle may be a bat survey!
  • 29) There are obstacles and hurdles.
  • 30) It's just another hurdle, another obstacle.
  • 31) Ironically, both injuries were sustained in hurdle races, rather than chases.
  • 32) JA: The main hurdle is the competition and a shrinking market for short fiction.
  • 33) The main hurdle is how to make Hydrogen storage cost effective.
  • 34) Andrew, the main hurdle is not how to make hydrogen storage cost effective.
  • 35) For the users, the main hurdle is no longer registration but rather it is adding a game to MOG.
  • 36) The other hurdle is the change of mental state for what was once a hobby now becomes work.
  • 37) Another hurdle is the trouble buyers are having finding financing for vacation homes.
  • 38) Great idea, of course, like Simeon Rex, but the hurdle is the cost to produce a demo (much more an actual pilot).
  • 39) Raw materials were not an issue, he says: "The real hurdle is how you put together organic compounds into a living system."
  • 40) ‘The hoarding, the structure on which an ad is placed, is related to the hurdle over which athletes jump.’
  • 41) ‘She jumped a series of hurdles for what seemed like the thousandth time, and then looked up at the wall in front of her.’
  • 42) ‘She tore cartilage in her knee on August 6 as she did a routine jump over the hurdle during warm-up for her last pre-Olympic race in Zurich.’
  • 43) ‘The nine-year-old, a previous winner over this course and distance, ran a nice race in sixth on his seasonal comeback at Wetherby three weeks ago in a hurdle race.’
  • 44) ‘Pittman injured herself during a warm-up before her Zurich race, landing awkwardly after clearing a hurdle.’
  • 45) ‘A chase involves larger, rigid fences while a hurdle race is run over shorter, more flexible obstacles.’
  • 46) ‘The athletes form a line behind the cone hurdles and must run to each hurdle, stop dead in front of it, then with both feet together, jump over the hurdle, landing on the toes.’
  • 47) ‘Leaping over a pile of pale, loose terracotta bricks that stood in their way like a race hurdle, the two skidded to a sudden halt when Ronnie stopped at the edge of her own private dock.’
  • 48) ‘He has already had an outing over hurdles this season and may yet continue over the smaller obstacles and return to the Flat.’
  • 49) ‘The youngest age at which a horse can run over hurdles is three, for fences it is four.’
  • 50) ‘There were hurdles and obstacles all about the course.’
  • 51) ‘In this sport, though, the owner will run alongside the dog encouraging it over the hurdles and other obstacles.’
  • 52) ‘The Steeplechase event is a two-mile run around a track, which includes four hurdles and a water obstacle.’
  • 53) ‘You can't question his form, but he is not the most fluent jumper of hurdles and might not be suited by the tough scrap that this race often turns into.’
  • 54) ‘If Holmes recovers she could also land a medal in the 1500m, while Trafford's Chris Rawlinson is among the fancied runners for the 400m hurdles on Thursday.’
  • 55) ‘He won the English schools 200 yards hurdles and even raced for England.’
  • 56) ‘He will be involved in a gruelling schedule of 60 metres hurdles, high jump, long jump, shot and 1,000 metres.’
  • 57) ‘She opened the proceedings with a tidy 100 metres hurdles, then set the stadium in flames with her performance in the high jump.’
  • 58) ‘Despite the heat, it was over 100 degrees in the stadium, he won the bronze medal in the 300 metres hurdles in the 65-69 years age group.’
  • 59) ‘At sixteen she continued her excellence by winning first place in the high jump, the hurdles and the 800-meter race.’
  • 60) ‘Stephen won the Under 14 60m sprint, 60m hurdles, high jump and under 15 relay.’
  • 61) ‘The British pair will get their heptathlon challenge underway in the 100m hurdles, the high jump, the shot and the 200m on Friday.’
  • 62) ‘His main events are high jump, long jump, hurdles and multi events.’
  • 63) ‘Her weekend began in the best possible way with personal bests in her two weakest events, the 80m hurdles and the high jump.’
  • 64) ‘Children who would like to participate in sprints, hurdles and relay races please attend.’
  • 65) ‘It was told with such passion and energy that it was difficult imagining a hurdle they could not overcome together.’
  • 66) ‘Many believe nuclear-powered spacecraft can and should be built, but first many technical problems and other hurdles must be overcome.’
  • 67) ‘This aside, the list of hurdles he must overcome is still formidable.’
  • 68) ‘In attempting to recruit candidates abroad, we have had difficulties overcoming the immigration hurdles involved in bringing foreign nationals to work in Ireland.’
  • 69) ‘There are a number of difficult hurdles to overcome.’
  • 70) ‘Yet before that can happen, a host of hurdles must be overcome.’
  • 71) ‘At nearly every step, the team must overcome complex technical hurdles, most of which have never before been faced.’
  • 72) ‘Yet could the company's plans still falter and what hurdles must be overcome?’
  • 73) ‘Arguably, he has overcome the first hurdle with excellence.’
  • 74) ‘When you can't show how, when, where it all occurred, you have a major hurdle to overcome.’
  • 75) ‘A York couple who overcame the hurdle of cancer are now tackling another challenge in aid of a cerebral palsy charity.’
  • 76) ‘One hurdle to overcome would regard who actually owned the ground.’
  • 77) ‘The first hurdle to be overcome was to avoid major civilian casualties.’
  • 78) ‘The knee injury that kept her away from the courts for more than eight months was a huge hurdle to overcome.’
  • 79) ‘I'm trying to be patient, but my confidence is low and that is a hard hurdle to overcome.’
  • 80) ‘As with anything innovative and new, there are hurdles that must be overcome.’
  • 81) ‘Even after clearing the practical hurdles to implementing congestion pricing, other obstacles hamper its acceptance.’
  • 82) ‘The same hurdles have been found in many individual countries.’
  • 83) ‘Executives say holdups due to regulatory hurdles could hurt their stock prices.’
  • 84) ‘A policy decided in Brussels faces several hurdles before it can be successfully executed on the ground.’
  • 85) ‘Now with Sue Smith he has already improved to win a handicap hurdle at Wetherby.’
  • 86) ‘‘He's a six year old who won on the flat at the Curragh in June and he won a handicap hurdle for me at Cheltenham last November ’, says the handler.’
  • 87) ‘The six-year-old proved that staying was his game at Wetherby in May when he won a handicap hurdle over almost three miles by a neck from the favourite Garnett.’
  • 88) ‘Intercounty, whose only previous win was in a handicap hurdle on this track, doubled the total in the Beginners Chase.’
  • 89) ‘Four months later he brought a team of horses to the Festival and landed the new juvenile handicap hurdle with Dabiroun.’
  • 90) ‘I hadn't sat on him before but it was clear that he has taken well to hurdling.’
  • 91) ‘Flat horses who do not hit the heights are often sent hurdling at four or five.’
  • 92) ‘The stamps celebrate cycling, sprinting, javelin, swimming and hurdling as well as a race involving athletes with a disability in lightning-fast wheelchairs.’
  • 93) ‘She runs, she chucks large, heavy balls, she sprints, she hurdles, she pole vaults, she's got a baby boy and her body still looks that good.’
  • 94) ‘An able staying handicapper on the flat, the five-year-old has taken well to hurdling and has won his last two races in pleasing style.’
  • 95) ‘They say he can hurdle as well - and run a decent 200m.’
  • 96) ‘But he had unusually good, natural rhythm for hurdling and improved by leaps and bounds.’
  • 97) ‘His versatile gelding showed an aptitude for hurdling by winning last season.’
  • 98) ‘The cause is usually forcible contraction of the hamstrings, as in sports such as sprinting and hurdling.’
  • 99) ‘For vaulting, they will learn hurdling and landing skills on matting blocks.’
  • 100) ‘For the women it has been curling, swimming, hurdling, track cycling, floor gymnastics and tonight the finale ends with the hammer and 100m sprint.’
  • 101) ‘In his time with the Army, he was also a sportsman, taking part in hurdling, football, running and boxing.’
  • 102) ‘If he wins that I will send him to France for a Group Three race and, if he doesn't, he will go hurdling.’
  • 103) ‘In my experience using it to school, I don't see why it shouldn't be just as suitable for chases as it is for hurdling.’
  • 104) ‘A former useful handicapper on the Flat with Sir Mark Prescott, Inglis Drever has taken to hurdling like the proverbial duck to water and has won all his three races in the style of a high-class recruit.’
  • 105) ‘The three-year-old, who has been hurdling recently, was a winner over tomorrow's distance of two miles on the Flat in mid-summer and is not one to underestimate in a poor race.’
  • 106) ‘I got into the English schools championships in hurdling and had to choose between dance and sport, although dance is obviously much more demanding on the body.’
  • 107) ‘The gelding looked a useful recruit to hurdling when making a triumphant debut at Newcastle last month.’
  • 108) ‘Clearly in excellent form, she looks an exciting recruit to hurdling and I fancy that she can continue her winning run.’
  • 109) ‘Fit from hurdling, the five-year-old should have a better chance than most in what looks a wide-open race.’
  • 110) ‘I circled around and tried to block them by knocking over chairs and lamps in their path, but they easily hurdled the obstacles and cornered me in the living room, ready to do horrible things to me like they did the cook.’
  • 111) ‘The commander's intent was to hurdle obstacles, crawl beneath objects, ascend and descend obstacles, and jump from objects.’
  • 112) ‘The cheetah hurdled the gate without even breaking stride, a feat which the wolf didn't even think about emulating.’
  • 113) ‘He ran across the road, hurdled the dividing railing, and raced to Vishy and shook his hand.’
  • 114) ‘Eyewitnesses say that he hurdled the ticket barrier and then ran down the platform to get onto the train.’
  • 115) ‘Kyle hurdled the backyard fence with the dog under one arm, pulled Misty up, and then gracefully fell to the other side.’
  • 116) ‘If you're walking along and spot a snake, fear propels you to run with blazing speed and hurdle the fence like an Olympian.’
  • 117) ‘The prisoner leapt from the dock, jumped over the shoulders of barristers and hurdled the bar where the judge was sitting.’
  • 118) ‘I can see how witnesses can get garments wrong, make assailants taller, and so on, but I really don't see how several witnesses can confuse going through the barrier with a ticket and hurdling it.’
  • 119) ‘He also is good at hurdling defenders who attempt to tackle him low.’
  • 120) ‘He also gets yards after the catch, even if it means hurdling a defender as he did against Tennessee.’
  • 121) ‘Any temporary discomfort is vastly outweighed by the delight of leaping over hurdles you wouldn't even have approached before.’
  • 122) ‘Chasing after him, Ana hurdled the hole as well, then pressed her hands against the floor to block the corridor again.’
  • 123) ‘I body checked the third on my way by, driving my right shoulder and elbow into his gut as I hurdled the overturned table.’
  • 124) ‘He and his staff had been making special arrangements to handle the sale with the minimum of delay: extra straw had been got in, portions of the market have been hurdled off and permission had been given to close Paragon Street.’

Examples

  • 1) This year is hurtling past at a terrifying speed.
  • 2) Cars and vans hurtle through narrow lanes and high streets.
  • 3) They came hurtling back by playing rugby.
  • 4) The situation is not helped by motorists stuck in traffic jams seeing bicycles hurtle past.
  • 5) It was so interesting we had to hurtle back to change in time for the dance.
  • 6) It was horrible to see him going to bed on a busy road with traffic hurtling past.
  • 7) Instead it is a springboard upon which to hurtle back downwards at approaching the speed of light.
  • 8) But then it came hurtling back centre stage.
  • 9) We had lain naked in hot tubs out in the snow and been pulled by hurtling dog teams along a vast frozen river.
  • 10) There is another way for those who don't want the scenery hurtling past.
  • 11) Then the police car came hurtling past at about 140mph.
  • 12) Take mountain bikes up on ski lifts and hurtle back down, or ride easier special trails.
  • 13) I waited for them to leap over the desk and send me hurtling back into the street.
  • 14) It was a new experience being pummelled and shaken at the same time, as the train hurtled along.
  • 15) Cars and lorries hurtle past him on roads that have no pavements, often coming within inches of knocking him into oblivion.
  • 16) How horrible it must be to play against him, to see your clean winners come hurtling back with mustard on them.
  • 17) The airliner amazingly reached the runway threshold, but hurtling along at 100 miles an hour above its landing speed.
  • 18) We had a grandstand view as bikes and cars hurtled past, and did we get our money's worth.
  • 19) When I mention how scary it must be to hurtle along roads at speed she looks at me with the merest whiff of contempt.
  • 20) The news hurtled around the web, UFO chat rooms buzzed with excitement.
  • 21) Experience has taught the long-suffering Arsenal star that any light at the end of a tunnel is usually an express train hurtling towards his hopes of glory.
  • 22) Our next hurtle is getting H. Res 111 out of the Rules committee.
  • 23) Rocketman on Jun 7, 2008 what's a "hurtle"? christian on Jun 7, 2008
  • 24) It really is a miracle of engineering that anything so huge, so luxurious, so fantastically adapted to the health and comfort of human beings, should be able to "hurtle" (pardon the word) through space.
  • 25) Even grown dogs might hurtle him backward or sideways with the impact of their heavy bodies; and backward or sideways he would go, in the air or sliding on the ground, but always with his legs under him and his feet downward to the mother earth.
  • 26) Now, with issue #10, things are racing towards a dramatic conclusion as the events of the past 9 issues hurtle the crew towards what is now know as the “cylon apocalypse” (as seen in the re-imagined mini-series) and the reasons for the decommissioning of the Galactica are about to be revealed!
  • 27) The two young protagonists are from politically active families on opposite sides of the divide, but are childhood friends and hurtle to a tragic conclusion.
  • 28) They speed down one narrow side street, turn abruptly, then hurtle down another, but these maneuvers are not enough for them to elude her pursuers; she can see their headlights in the side-view mirrors, vanishing as they round a corner, only to reappear a split second later.
  • 29) Most fatal accidents in Delhi occur in the small hours, when fast cars driven by young, wealthy and often drunk men hurtle across the city.
  • 30) Bodies hurtle, armor clanks, force fields spark, vortexes swirl, oceans roil, warriors freeze and defrost, and none of it conveys a scintilla of feeling.
  • 31) ‘The road was little-trafficked, though cars tended to hurtle past at alarming speeds.’
  • 32) ‘I stopped within 12 inches of the car in front only to check my rear view to see another car hurtling toward me from the back.’
  • 33) ‘I was putting my grandson into the car, when a car came hurtling towards us so fast I thought it was going to hit us.’
  • 34) ‘Children playing along a Swindon road feared for their lives when a car came hurtling towards them.’
  • 35) ‘Would you ignore a truck hurtling towards you as you crossed the road?’
  • 36) ‘As she said her name aloud, a bolt of lightening hurtled towards the earth and struck it with a loud boom.’
  • 37) ‘Forget the track and the horses hurtling by at breakneck speed; the real beasts were here in the stands.’
  • 38) ‘Meanwhile I quite often see other drivers hurtling past at speeds above 30 mph.’
  • 39) ‘As he did so he caught sight of an object hurtling towards him in a rapid manner.’
  • 40) ‘After a few more minutes of trudging alone I saw Nick's car hurtling along the road at breakneck speed.’
  • 41) ‘An arctic hare the size of a collie hurtled toward me.’
  • 42) ‘Men hurtling towards a mid-life crisis have an unfortunate habit of opting either for a mistress or a motorcycle.’
  • 43) ‘It had crossed the 5000 mark just a little while ago and was hurtling on all cylinders towards the 6000 mark.’
  • 44) ‘George is hurtling towards me with a silver pepper pot.’
  • 45) ‘It comes to a rather steep halt, sending my - thankfully empty - coffee cup hurtling towards my lap.’
  • 46) ‘But only after he saw a giant mass of water hurtling towards the boat did he sense danger.’
  • 47) ‘An investigation has been launched after two trains ended up hurtling towards each other on the same track.’
  • 48) ‘When Mr Smith opened the door, he saw a wall of water hurtling towards him.’
  • 49) ‘A car was hurtling down the street the wrong way, and someone was just about to pull in to the road.’
  • 50) ‘I am fed up hearing cars hurtling past on that road and nothing being done about it.’
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