reel vs real

reel real

Definitions

  • 1) The music for one of these dances.
  • 2) The quantity of wire, film, or other material wound on one reel.
  • 3) A cylindrical device attached to a fishing rod to let out or wind up the line.
  • 4) A moderately fast dance of Scottish origin.
  • 5) A staggering, swaying, or whirling movement.
  • 6) A handheld hammer used in a quarry for shaping granite blocks.
  • 7) The Virginia reel.
  • 8) A set of curved lawn-mower blades that rotate around a bar parallel to the ground, cutting grass while moving against a stationary straight blade.
  • 9) A device, such as a cylinder, spool, or frame, that turns on an axis and is used for winding and storing rope, tape, film, or other flexible materials.
  • 10) the common name throughout the United States for the old English “country dance,” or contradance (contredanse).
  • 11) A machine on which yarn is wound and measured into lays and hanks, -- for cotton or linen it is fifty-four inches in circuit; for worsted, thirty inches.
  • 12) A frame with radial arms, or a kind of spool, turning on an axis, on which yarn, threads, lines, or the like, are wound.
  • 13) A lively dance of the Highlanders of Scotland; also, the music to the dance; -- often called Scotch reel.
  • 14) Music for such a dance or in its rhythm, which is duple (or rarely sextuple), and characterized by notes of equal length.
  • 15) Anything prepared for winding thread upon, as an open framework turning on a pivot at each end, upon which thread is wound as it is spun, or when a skein is opened for use.
  • 16) A windlass for hoisting oyster-dredges.
  • 17) A winch used by English and Scotch whalemen for regaining the tow-line. It is not employed by Americans.
  • 18) (The attendant … carries off Lepidus [drunk].)… Eno, Drink thou; increase the reels.
  • 19) The revolving frame upon which silk-fiber is wound from the cocoon.
  • 20) In baking, a cylindrical frame carrying bread-pans suspended from the horizontal arms of the frame. It is used in a form of oven called a reel oven.
  • 21) In rope-making, the frame on which the spun-yarns are wound as each length is twisted, previous to tarring or laying up into strands.
  • 22) In agriculture, a cylinder formed of light slats and radial arms, used with a reaper to gather the grain into convenient position for the knives to operate on it, and to direct its fall on the platform.
  • 23) A hose-carriage.
  • 24) A device used in angling, attached to the rod, for winding the line, consisting of a cylinder revolving on an axis moved by a small crank or spring. The salmon-reel is about four inches, and the trout-reel about two inches in diameter; the length is about two inches. In angling the reel plays an important part, its use and action requiring to be in perfect accord or correspondence with the play of the rod and line. To meet these requirements, clicks and multipliers are employed. The click checks the line from running out too freely, and the multiplier gathers in the slack with increased speed.
  • 25) A cylinder or frame turning on an axis, on which thread, yarn, string, rope, etc, are wound.
  • 26) A machine on which yarn is wound to form it into hanks, skeins, etc.
  • 27) A lively dance, danced by two or three couples, and consisting of various circliug or intertwining figures. it is very popular in Scotland.
  • 28) In telegraphy, a barrel on which the strip of paper for receiving the message is wound in a recording telegraph.
  • 29) In milling, the drum on which the bolting cloth is placed.
  • 30) Nautical, a revolving frame varying in size, used for winding up hawsers, hose, lead-line, loglines, etc.
  • 31) A staggering motion, as that of a drunken man; giddiness.
  • 32) To cause to reel.
  • 33) To go round and round in a whirling motion.
  • 34) To stagger, lurch, or sway, as from drunkenness.
  • 35) To be thrown off balance or fall back.
  • 36) To feel dizzy.
  • 37) To wind on or let out from a reel.
  • 38) To recover by winding on a reel.

Definitions

  • 1) mathematics A real number.
  • 2) A unit of currency used in Portugal and its colonies from 1430 until 1911, and in Brazil from 1790 until 1942
  • 3) Former unit of currency of Spain and Spain's colonies.
  • 4) A unit of currency used in Brazil since 1994. Symbol: R$
  • 5) A coin worth one real.
  • 6) A commodity; see reality.
  • 7) grammar One of the three genders that the common gender can be separated into in the Scandinavian languages.
  • 8) obsolete A realist.
  • 9) A former small Spanish silver coin; also, a denomination of money of account, formerly the unit of the Spanish monetary system.
  • 10) A realist.
  • 11) A subsidiary silver coin and money of account in Spain and Spanish-American countries.
  • 12) In mathematics, a real number.
  • 13) The big-eyed herring, or saury, Elops sauras.
  • 14) That which is real; a real existence or object; a reality.
  • 15) The current real of Spain (real de vellon) is one quarter of the peseta or franc, and worth about 5 United States cents. The Mexican real, corresponding to the old Spanish real de plata, is one eighth of a dollar (Mexican peso), and reckoned at 12½ cents The latter coin, both Spanish and Mexican, circulated largely in the United States down to about 1850, being called a Spanish or Mexican shilling in New York, a levy (see levy, 1) in the South, etc.
  • 16) The real thing; the genuine article.
  • 17) (Alg.) Having an assignable arithmetical or numerical value or meaning; not imaginary.
  • 18) (Law) Pertaining to things fixed, permanent, or immovable, as to lands and tenements.
  • 19) lands, tenements, and hereditaments; freehold interests in landed property; property in houses and land.
  • 20) obsolete Royal; regal; kingly.
  • 21) (Law) such chattels as are annexed to, or savor of, the realty, as terms for years of land. See Chattel.
  • 22) (Eccl. Law) an agreement made between the owner of lands and the parson or vicar, with consent of the ordinary, that such lands shall be discharged from payment of tithes, in consequence of other land or recompense given to the parson in lieu and satisfaction thereof.
  • 23) obsolete Relating to things, not to persons.
  • 24) (R. C. Ch.) the actual presence of the body and blood of Christ in the eucharist, or the conversion of the substance of the bread and wine into the real body and blood of Christ; transubstantiation. In other churches there is a belief in a form of real presence, not however in the sense of transubstantiation.
  • 25) True; genuine; not artificial, counterfeit, or factitious; often opposed to ostensible
  • 26) (Law) lands or real estate in the hands of the heir, chargeable with the debts of the ancestor.
  • 27) Actually being or existing; not fictitious or imaginary.
  • 28) (Law) an action for the recovery of real property.
  • 29) (Civil Law) a burden imposed upon one estate in favor of another estate of another proprietor.

Examples

  • 1) Taking up a reel of aluminium wire is far better than an entire store cupboard.
  • 2) Use the reel wire to secure small bundles of greenery, securing the stems.
  • 3) The concern, of course, is that they will be so reeling from the blows that they will have had the confidence knocked out of them too.
  • 4) We are all still reeling from the shock of it all.
  • 5) How my mind reeled with these perceptions!
  • 6) He keeps dumping you and then reeling you back in.
  • 7) It was a thought to make my brain reel.
  • 8) This movie keeps you guessing right up until the final reel.
  • 9) He must have had dozens of reels of film.
  • 10) Pass the other end of the band through the cotton reel.
  • 11) The family still reels from the shock.
  • 12) At first you reel back in horror.
  • 13) This goes unexplained until the film circles back in the final reel.
  • 14) The final reels included a number of impromptu outbursts and genuine screaming.
  • 15) West pinched the reel of cotton after prison shirts were delivered to his cell in laundry bags for him to repair.
  • 16) To his left, an input tape reels in.
  • 17) Then, fly fishing reels and ice makers.
  • 18) My brain seemed to reel, as if my mind would swing from its pivot.
  • 19) No longer are cinemas restricted to projecting reels of 35mm film.
  • 20) Yesterday the 55-year-old was still reeling in shock from his change of fortune.
  • 21) She reeled about, and he reached a hand out to try to help her regain her balance.
  • 22) I want to ask a question, but my mind is reeling.
  • 23) This would be the worst performance since 2009, when the country was reeling from the banking crash.
  • 24) Give him a moment to cast about and reel his thoughts back in, and what's he caught?
  • 25) It shocked a country still reeling from the arrest of a TV crime show host for allegedly arranging killings to boost ratings.
  • 26) And as fans reeled at the blow to our Cup hopes, some experts made the gloomy prediction that his football career may be over for good.
  • 27) Innovation - It appears to me to not have any innovative features and this reel is almost identical to all the others in its price range.
  • 28) Value - This reel is a great buy, especially for this price.
  • 29) If your reel is already spooled you can take twist out by letting all your line out the back of your boat, when you wins in the weightless line it will be twist free.
  • 30) ‘‘I have to keep rolling the thread reels which keeps my elbows moving,’ he said.’
  • 31) ‘She was given a button, a needle, a cotton reel and a choice of private places she could use to sew a button on in school.’
  • 32) ‘One is quite tempted to ask the projectionist if he keeps switching reels from different films.’
  • 33) ‘Toy cotton reels or buttons can be sorted by colour or threaded on to laces, while plastic pegs can be used for pattern-making and counting.’
  • 34) ‘A cinema enthusiast is giving moviegoers a blast from the past in aid of charity by screening a rare film using a traditional reel and projector.’
  • 35) ‘Filler rods and wire reels, when not in use, must be kept in closed packets and containers and stored in a dry place at a uniform temperature.’
  • 36) ‘Wires are placed in a wire holder or a reel is suspended from the worker's belt for accessibility.’
  • 37) ‘The new sign also reflects the industrial history of the area, showing cotton mills, looms and cotton reels.’
  • 38) ‘If there's more than one tray, place four cotton reels strategically so that you can stack one tray on top of another.’
  • 39) ‘In 1994 it was alleged that he had hoaxed the picture using a cotton reel and a button.’
  • 40) ‘Thus it is that welfare recipients and those on fixed incomes are first attracted to and then hooked by the spinning reels and flashing lights of the VLT.’
  • 41) ‘Greg got up and looked at the film reel in the projector.’
  • 42) ‘I raced over to the NFT where projectionists were hauling yards of shredded film out of the reels.’
  • 43) ‘The myriad types of storage media included reels, chips, strips, cylinders, and sheets of tape or film.’
  • 44) ‘Watching Mackenzie change reels, control the projectors, and add and remove gels is fascinating - he is the wizard behind the curtain revealed, the magician whose tricks are laid bare.’
  • 45) ‘Behind me, in a half-filled screening room, the sound of a projector hums as its reels turn.’
  • 46) ‘The spinning reels of the tapes, so carefully observed, are further spinning wheels in Harry's circular downfall.’
  • 47) ‘While the reels were being changed everyone would join in a sing song.’
  • 48) ‘The film reels used for the transfer are in decent shape, but little to no cleanup seems to have been done.’
  • 49) ‘One shows the globe morphing into a film reel to show how Hollywood relies on the network.’
  • 50) ‘A reel of release paper is loaded onto the machinery at 26 and is led through a variety of stages at which, one by one, the various layers of the leaflet/label are fed onto or cut in situ onto it.’
  • 51) ‘Says Schellhorn: ‘People are calling to see if they can buy a reel of the ad.’’
  • 52) ‘The tide of questions washed over the whines, rumbles and screams of the chain and gave him no chance to answer as the Lab coat looped a belt around his waist and hung a reel of string from his stomach.’
  • 53) ‘Lacey turned around and darted for the coffee table and grasped a reel of duct tape, holding it up in her hand.’
  • 54) ‘Surely they can stretch to a reel of fibre or at least a hub and some cat 5!’
  • 55) ‘Acres of print, reels and reels of Videotape have been expended on Beslan.’
  • 56) ‘He had a large reel of cable in the loft and pulled a length through the hole to wire up the lighting rose.’
  • 57) ‘If you scaled up the thickness of the DNA chain to that of ordinary sewing thread, you would need a 4 kilometer reel to represent the length in an average human chromosome.’
  • 58) ‘Now, we could waste a lot of time with lawyers, witnesses and reels of videotape working out who pushed who and who was provoked, who conned the referee and who was really in the wrong.’
  • 59) ‘I filled the first two reels of film and as I took the last photo the bell blasted us all.’
  • 60) ‘In 1991, the bulk of the Newton manuscripts were released on forty-three reels of microfilm.’
  • 61) ‘Dusenbery specialised in machines which unwind, slit and rewind large reels of material, foil and paper making them suitable for further processing or consumer use.’
  • 62) ‘The store was an Aladdin's cave, filled with boxes of buttons, and bolts of cloth, and reels of thread in every conceivable colour and shade.’
  • 63) ‘But gone are the days when you had to drive big metal or wooden posts into hard, rocky ground and wrestle with heavy reels of stiff wire that always wanted to go anywhere but where you wanted them to go.’
  • 64) ‘The film is composed of selections from one family's collection of 25 reels of home movies, shot on 8mm.’
  • 65) ‘This presents a major problem for film historians, as improperly stored reels of nitrate film are in danger of disintegrating, or even exploding.’
  • 66) ‘Physically, they are usually simple: a reel of film, a CD, a computer disk, a sheet of printed-paper.’
  • 67) ‘Some two reels of this material were shot, but later scrapped by the producers who felt that it delayed the heart of the story in the New England town.’
  • 68) ‘In B & Q I gave way to my evil instincts and sneaked a shot of Graham sifting through reels of electrical cable.’
  • 69) ‘While the companies were agreeable to continuing the program, they wanted to retain the reels of magnetic tape.’
  • 70) ‘Loose ends still abound in the final reel, leaving the film with a less than satisfying conclusion.’
  • 71) ‘Despite noticeable speckles, nicks and the odd scratch, the first reel of the film looks quite good with excellent contrast and sharp images.’
  • 72) ‘The eventual question is, to what lengths of madness will the obsessive Murnau go to complete the final reel of his masterwork?’
  • 73) ‘He remains ever likeable, as his efforts in matchmaking in the final reel testify, but the true star of the movie is Maura, whose scenes are the most involving and interesting.’
  • 74) ‘Too often in these films, characters do things in the final reel that are in no way justified by their behavior for the previous seventy minutes or so.’
  • 75) ‘With the neighbourhood getting persistently more aggressive in its campaign against the Samuels, and David finding a place on his school cricket team, the stage is set for a dramatic final few reels.’
  • 76) ‘It's technically very proficient, and revealing about contemporary life in Russia, though it does tend to fizzle out in the final reel.’
  • 77) ‘Animal Factory should keep you guessing until the final reel.’
  • 78) ‘And, of course, we suspect that one gunman will assuredly die by the final reel while the other will get the girl.’
  • 79) ‘And so by the last reel of the film we're waiting patiently for the two main characters to meet for some major bloodletting.’
  • 80) ‘He then escaped on a bicycle with a reel of the film under his arm.’
  • 81) ‘By reel three, the film has become a creature feature, as they are picked off one by one by a stealthy hunter.’
  • 82) ‘There's normally a moment in the first or second reel of most films when you are provided with final incontrovertible proof that it's either a masterpiece, a stinker or a kind of apathetic blah.’
  • 83) ‘What starts well deteriorates in the last reels of the movie.’
  • 84) ‘That also gave Hitch the opportunity to create one of the most exciting last reels of his movie career.’
  • 85) ‘Beyond that, where are the bloopers, gag reels, and other fun material?’
  • 86) ‘Perhaps my favorite extra feature was the outtake reel, which lasts about 8 minutes.’
  • 87) ‘I thought I was watching the last reel of a Halloween or Friday the 13th movie.’
  • 88) ‘By the final reel, she has mysteriously morphed into Jennifer Jason Leigh.’
  • 89) ‘What's more, sexual outlaws must always get their comeuppance by the final reel.’
  • 90) ‘Mac reached around to the box and pulled out a metal rod, then a smaller reel and assembled the fishing line.’
  • 91) ‘The boat tows the lure, the fish eats, the boat carries on, line comes off the reel and the fish is hooked.’
  • 92) ‘A reel should be fully loaded if the fish are large enough and fast enough to empty the reel of all the line.’
  • 93) ‘Yet it is true to say that most anglers leave their line on a reel for far too long.’
  • 94) ‘With Scierra stocking the house with a full range of all of their rods, reels and lines, I had the opportunity of testing many of them.’
  • 95) ‘When I go back later this month I will be taking some extra rods, reels, lines and flies for the locals to use.’
  • 96) ‘This was all brought home to me when I saw the speed at which the Tuna pulled the fly line off the reels and the heat that was generated by the friction.’
  • 97) ‘Gone are the days of aching arms from pulling hundreds of yards of used line from reels.’
  • 98) ‘The right reel and line are as important to fishing as the right bait.’
  • 99) ‘At one time I had perhaps no more than a dozen turns of line left on the reel.’
  • 100) ‘For several minutes the fish was boss, as it slowly and powerfully took line from the reel.’
  • 101) ‘Realise that no spearfish on earth pulls line off a reel like that and stop the boat instantly.’
  • 102) ‘Shimano also manufactures fishing rods and reels, snowboard boots and bindings, and golf clubs.’
  • 103) ‘No longer would you have to put a sticker on the reel to identify the line, which quickly becomes lost.’
  • 104) ‘The society sponsored fishing rods and reels for fifteen students chosen from St. Edward's, St. John's and the Mercy National School, all in Sligo town.’
  • 105) ‘I set up with 13 ft Shakespeare match rod and a fixed spool reel loaded with 21b line.’
  • 106) ‘If you have a costly fly reel, I suggest you take it in your partner's handbag.’
  • 107) ‘From Sweden we have the Loop range of fly reels.’
  • 108) ‘If you're planning to fish in saltwater then my advice is purchase a saltwater model reel.’
  • 109) ‘I shall assume that you hold the rod in your right hand and wind the reel with your left.’
  • 110) ‘As a young officer in the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders, he became adept at reels, strathspeys and sword dances.’
  • 111) ‘Also on hand to entertain were young Irish dancers who performed reels, jigs and hornpipes.’
  • 112) ‘Suzanne and her sister Ann-Marie danced jogs, reels and hornpipes, to the delight of everyone present.’
  • 113) ‘After they arrived in Louisiana, Anglo-American immigrants to Louisiana contributed new fiddle tunes and dances, such as reels, jigs, and hoedowns.’
  • 114) ‘Forget all about rowdy post-wedding dances where an eightsome is an excuse to throw women around, reels are danced energetically but correctly.’
  • 115) ‘‘You do not dance any reels, Grace,’ Frank said, and he came to stand by her and placed gentle hands on her shoulders.’
  • 116) ‘The jig is the first solo dance that children are taught, then usually the reel, both of which are done in soft shoes.’
  • 117) ‘This one was a reel, and Peter was convinced that there was not a girl in the world he'd rather dance a reel with than Laura Hope.’
  • 118) ‘She also danced an old reel which she got from Johnny Kelly of Bekan and that was specially in memory of Dominic Stenson, a great old style step dancer who had been laid to rest in Achadh Mor the day before.’
  • 119) ‘When told by his factor some years ago that sex and dancing reels might go hand in glove, an elderly Highland laird was much moved by the nobility of the concept for he was a devotee of both activities.’
  • 120) ‘She did herself and her teachers proud as she danced reels and slip-jigs in her wonderful costume.’
  • 121) ‘During a jolly visit to the island, Johnson and Boswell danced a reel on the flat top of Dun Caan and discovered a prehistoric souterrain near Raasay House.’
  • 122) ‘Meanwhile, Rathbone picked up a few tips on how to dance reels, how to negotiate her way around country-house bureaucracy and how to reconstruct a walled vegetable garden.’
  • 123) ‘Songs were sung, jigs and reels danced out and some excellent poetry was recited.’
  • 124) ‘Sylvia O'Donovan's display of Irish dancing was a big hit as were the reels and hornpipes of cousins Deirdre Bonham and Gillian Reilly from the Mary Gohery school of dancing.’
  • 125) ‘In the reel, each step consists of eight counts of four, done on the right side and then repeated on the left side.’
  • 126) ‘The orchestra whoops, lets out war cries, and dances a demented reel.’
  • 127) ‘Everyone can dance the reels and such, but I know Miss Alberta loves to waltz.’
  • 128) ‘The children of Brendan and Theresa Walsh of Rhue, Lisa and Alan danced jigs and reels to the music from the tin whistle of Nicola Walpole.’
  • 129) ‘Meanwhile Grainne, competing against one hundred and twenty dancers got seventh place for her reel and was placed tenth in the Championships.’
  • 130) ‘A special cabaret night is in store as The Bridies give us a taste of some electrifying traditional music with funky reels from their debt album on Thursday, June 30.’
  • 131) ‘Exhilarating and highly infectious, this young Canadian folk six-piece present an anthology of Quebecois dance tunes, Celtic reels and world music.’
  • 132) ‘Later in Europe bones provided the rhythm to jigs and reels normally played on violin.’
  • 133) ‘The 17-track album features jigs, reels, songs, waltzes, hornpipes, polkas, a two step, slow air, highland fling and recitation.’
  • 134) ‘The off-key singing of the congregations at Church and the reels and jigs of the Connecticut fiddle players enchanted him.’
  • 135) ‘At the climax of ‘La Londe’, he breaks out into a spirited reel, completely changing the direction of this Baka children's song.’
  • 136) ‘The floorboards of the Linenhall hall gently rocked as the both the audience and musicians tapped the various rhythms of jigs, reels, polkas, to name but a few!’
  • 137) ‘Marrianne Carney Knight played a superb selection of Phil Cunningham reels and sang two songs including a beautiful version of ‘From Galway to Graceland’.’
  • 138) ‘Ireland has a rich folk music tradition, and ancient jigs and reels can be heard at local festivals and during informal performances at neighborhood pubs.’
  • 139) ‘Visiting Scandinavians apologised for the behaviour of Vikings - all to the exhilarating accompaniment of lively Irish reels!’
  • 140) ‘From early morning until late afternoon the lounge vibrated to the sound of lively jigs, reels, polkas and hornpipes played with tremendous enthusiasm by the participants.’
  • 141) ‘Along with a group performance, the concert highlighted some great solo and duet musicians as they played a selection of lively traditional jigs, reels and polkas.’
  • 142) ‘He's more of a serial songwriter whose infatuations run from classic pedal-steel weepers to fuzz-rock stomps and wild Irish reels - sometimes on a single album.’
  • 143) ‘But above the hubbub, the unfamiliar strains of Scottish reels and jigs were rising on the warm air.’
  • 144) ‘They had the audience clapping along to their lively jigs and reels.’
  • 145) ‘This was followed by some lively jigs and reels in which there was much tapping of feet amongst the audience.’
  • 146) ‘Guest artist Robert Thorn and his band played a rousing selection of Scottish marches, airs and reels, and Irish and continental music.’
  • 147) ‘Irish accordion player Sharon Shannon was part of O'Connor's tour band, and O'Connor repays the compliment by singing on Shannon's latest album of diverse collaborations and Irish reels.’
  • 148) ‘Traditional Irish reels were played at relevant intervals during the Mass.’
  • 149) ‘Having started out as a piper himself, Jock loves to languish in the tunes of glory, the marches and reels of the standard Scottish songbook.’
  • 150) ‘That's his hand holding my spent target, after I emptied a round in it and reeled it in.’
  • 151) ‘Coming back in the rider raised his sword and brought it down on the stiff wire, shearing it through to prevent the bandits from reeling it in to fire at him a second time.’
  • 152) ‘Then Mr Dilworth began the painstaking task of reeling them in.’
  • 153) ‘Gritting his teeth, he reeled the line back in and threw it out again.’
  • 154) ‘He reels it in while his young daughter, obviously familiar with this occurrence, runs downstairs to the water's edge and neatly lands the fish with her net.’
  • 155) ‘‘Did everything go okay? ‘she inquired, reeling her line in a little.’’
  • 156) ‘Shrugging to himself, the boy proceeded to reel his line in.’
  • 157) ‘Jim laughed a little as he continued to reel the line in.’
  • 158) ‘Frantically, he reeled it in, hoping to snare the fish that had just tugged on it.’
  • 159) ‘I sort of ‘pull backwards’ so the cord is reeled in and I'm drawn back into my body in a flash.’
  • 160) ‘Before he knew it, a fish was tugging on the line, and he reeled it in.’
  • 161) ‘At the same time the other anglers on the boat will need to reel their baits in to give the hooked-up angler room to fight the fish and eliminate the chance of tangling lines.’
  • 162) ‘The tension in it was greatly reduced and he was slowly reeling the fish in.’
  • 163) ‘He reeled the fish in (not without getting a ton of moss stuck on the line, of course) quickly.’
  • 164) ‘He would catch the clients and reel them in like fish.’
  • 165) ‘The problem with using baited feathers is that invariably the fish will spin as you reel them in, especially if you pick up an occasional pouting as well.’
  • 166) ‘Then, all you have do is reel it in, lift your prize aloft, smile and get your photograph taken.’
  • 167) ‘I reeled it in, took it off my line, tossed it back in, re-baited my line, tossed it back in too, and promptly fell asleep again.’
  • 168) ‘The fish can bite your line all day, but if you can't reel them in, you're in trouble.’
  • 169) ‘As he was reeling his prospective dinner in the rope began to jerk from side to side.’
  • 170) ‘She was reeling it in when she said, ‘Sam, I need some help!’’
  • 171) ‘He reeled it in and had a two foot long bass in the hook.’
  • 172) ‘But, inexorably, he reeled it in, thrashing and squirming.’
  • 173) ‘I reeled it in, and with a flick of my wrist, I tossed my catch onboard.’
  • 174) ‘When the wind blows, the fly fisherman keeps on casting and reeling them in!’
  • 175) ‘Mackerel are making an appearance along the western coastline and holiday markers and locals are out in force reeling them in on all kinds of tackle.’
  • 176) ‘Anglers often have long rods and when they have caught something take up the whole path reeling something in.’
  • 177) ‘I had caught a fish (I, not they), and I was reeling it in (I, not they), and they would be eating it tonight (they, not I. Again, I don't like fish.)’
  • 178) ‘I'm trying to reel them in and throw them squiggling into the boat.’
  • 179) ‘It's good to read essays whose writer doesn't feel they have to be sold, to have hooks to reel a reader in or to immediately distill or even necessarily imply their main thrust.’
  • 180) ‘The violent clash sent Quinton reeling.’
  • 181) ‘An explosion of pain blinded me as I reeled and staggered, trying vainly to catch my balance.’
  • 182) ‘The Royalists set to and the Scots reeled and staggered but they held out and were joined by the Scots' second line and the Royalists fell back.’
  • 183) ‘Robert stumbled back, reeling from what he had just seen.’
  • 184) ‘Conner stumbled backwards, reeling from the blow to his face.’
  • 185) ‘And he does it all with a smile while you're still reeling and stumbling around with no clue of what's going on.’
  • 186) ‘I scrambled, panting and reeling, past the rock and onto a gravel shelf.’
  • 187) ‘The little man reeled, stumbled, got to his feet again, one callused hand pressed against his face.’
  • 188) ‘Aidis shook his head violently as he leaned forward again, reeling from the sudden attacks.’
  • 189) ‘Our swaggering demon is resolute until agile Laksman climbs on his foe's bent thigh to deliver a walloping strike that sends Intorachit reeling.’
  • 190) ‘He was reeling from a heavy blow and staggered back holding his face.’
  • 191) ‘Laetan reeled in agony giving out a violent scream of pain.’
  • 192) ‘He burst across the line and staggered to a halt, eyesight blurry, reeling as people surrounded him.’
  • 193) ‘His long hair was a filthy tangle, the left side of his face was bruised black and he swayed a little on the stool as he sat, reeling with pain and exhaustion.’
  • 194) ‘I stared blankly at both officers and stumbled back a few steps, literally reeling with the news.’
  • 195) ‘The prison guard reeled back, staggering a few steps and struggling to reach for his saber.’
  • 196) ‘He reeled backwards, losing his footing, stumbling behind one of the buildings.’
  • 197) ‘He went reeling backwards, stumbling back into his room.’
  • 198) ‘The man reeled back, stumbling over a chair and falling flat on his rear.’
  • 199) ‘Thrust off balance, Ikeda reeled backwards, shocked and aghast.’
  • 200) ‘‘It is humiliating to see people reeling around dead drunk on a Friday or Saturday night,’ she says.’
  • 201) ‘Diners are discreetly shielded from the gaze of drinkers reeling past outside by the kind of blinds you often find on Greek or Italian restaurants.’
  • 202) ‘Danny was downbeat and self-absorbed, reeling from one personal incident to the next like a ship without a compass, and his friends were a mixed bunch of dipsomaniacs and egotists.’
  • 203) ‘Olga Knipper-Chekhova reeled back in shock and collapsed behind the curtain in confusion and terror.’
  • 204) ‘The man exclaimed in shock and pain, reeling out of the bush.’
  • 205) ‘The cat reeled backwards violently, clamping the collar of Maryn's tunic in its jaw.’
  • 206) ‘The shot caught me low at the side of my back and I staggered with the impact, reeling into the wall as pain almost immobilized me.’
  • 207) ‘He shouted as the man reeled away from Rubiss, staggering to one knee under the force of the blow.’
  • 208) ‘He reeled away from me, a string of violent curses flying from his mouth.’
  • 209) ‘He reeled away with the force of the impact, before staggering slightly and regaining balance.’
  • 210) ‘‘At the moment people are reeling from the shock, but soon I think they're going to start considering the future,’ said Mr Palmer.’
  • 211) ‘Senator Higgins said the community was still obviously reeling in shock at how such a gruesome tragedy should happen in the midst of a tight knit community and nobody was aware of it.’
  • 212) ‘Farmers are reeling from the latest shock to hit their industry, as a devastating livestock disease made its first appearance in Britain for 20 years.’
  • 213) ‘By the time the others went to find her, she was on her way to the airport and a flight to London, leaving her unsuspecting bandmates reeling with shock and anger.’
  • 214) ‘It is not just the supporters of York City Football Club who have been left reeling by the shock announcement that the club is up for sale.’
  • 215) ‘Jubilant residents are still reeling in shock after an sudden announcement that plans for a youth jail in Brentwood have been scrapped.’
  • 216) ‘Shoppers and traders are reeling after a shock announcement that one of the New Forest's most popular markets is to close next week.’
  • 217) ‘Unprecedented grassroots activism by civic groups has sent political circles reeling from shock.’
  • 218) ‘I cannot believe that another attack can be right - however justified it may seem to a nation reeling with shock and anger.’
  • 219) ‘His family said they were still reeling in shock, but expressed their deepest gratitude to all the people who tried to save him.’
  • 220) ‘She was still reeling from the shock of hearing Lily's confession, and now this.’
  • 221) ‘But even when I smiled, I found the tears threatening to invade my smile. My heart bleeds inside and my head reels.’
  • 222) ‘I mean, Dobson alone is bad enough, but a Dobson armed with nuclear weapons - the mind reels.’
  • 223) ‘The Bruins are reeling, having lost six of seven.’
  • 224) ‘Vanzie is still reeling from losing his latest bid to win back the British lightweight title he held for nearly five years.’
  • 225) ‘They are still reeling from recently losing one of their own teenage daughters.’
  • 226) ‘The mind reels at the possibilities such a truly balanced ticket would offer.’
  • 227) ‘Although figures are unavailable, many of the New Orleans city workers losing their jobs are still reeling from the loss of their homes as a result of the Katrina disaster.’
  • 228) ‘Armagh were still reeling from the hammer-blow of losing their influential captain Kieran McGeeney before the throw-in.’
  • 229) ‘Angry East Sheen residents determined to prevent the demolition of an Edwardian house were left reeling this week after amendments were made to a planning application on the site.’

Examples

  • 1) Now there is a real energy about the club as well.
  • 2) The way you conducted yourself did cause actual and real distress.
  • 3) Sprint races take that real tough endurance element out.
  • 4) There is a real danger that the grammar proposals would simply undermine them instead.
  • 5) Companies from time to time must take a real hard look at their cost structure.
  • 6) Smart meters show exactly how much electricity and gas households are using in real time.
  • 7) She is less good at this in real life.
  • 8) The tragedy is that her worst nonsense devalued the nuggets of real value in her campaigns.
  • 9) These are real things that are happening.
  • 10) Those around the table were too nervous to have their real names or those of their companies in print.
  • 11) What about fashion for real women leading modern lives?
  • 12) The real reason for slow adoption is fragmentation.
  • 13) We need to see some real hard villains on our screens again.
  • 14) The civil servants certainly know how tough the real world is at the moment.
  • 15) These are not the real things though.
  • 16) There is a real danger of waiting too long.
  • 17) The real life of a spy is terrible.
  • 18) We are expecting to hear from it real soon.
  • 19) What would you see as having real value?
  • 20) This man seems to think we are real persons.
  • 21) To give them the real thing is unnecessary.
  • 22) There seems to be a real chance the club could now go into administration.
  • 23) The use of energy needs to be made real and important.
  • 24) The church must have something real and vibrant to offer people who come.
  • 25) And none of them uses their real name.
  • 26) You prefer drama that tells you something about the real world.
  • 27) So the risk is now significantly lower in real terms.
  • 28) The real problem is not that farmers are not paid enough.
  • 29) This will be about the real royal family.
  • 30) It looked like slow motion in real time.
  • 31) It is much harder than with real animals.
  • 32) real documents detailing actual cash transfers.
  • 33) She probably won't get a medal here but is a real name for the future.
  • 34) And one real silver lining - great summer weather is guaranteed.
  • 35) Anyway, none of those names was real.
  • 36) But the underlying conceptualization is still Keynesian, meaning that consumption and investment functions are real, except for some randomness, and not based directly and explicitly on individual actors' decisions based on *perceived* wealth -- which may be very different from *real* wealth because of a lack of proper asset pricing models stabilizing asset valuations around equilibrium market prices.
  • 37) It really hit me that these are * real* people, not the faux populists dished up by the GOP - real people of intelligence and substance.
  • 38) Thus a detailed study of works of literature and their represented objects could serve to explicate the purely intentional mode of being, with a view to contrasting this with the real mode of being and ultimately demonstrating that it is impossible to reduce the ˜real world™ to the status of a purely intentional creation.
  • 39) Thus the realism/idealism controversy can be reconfigured as the controversy over whether the so-called ˜real world™ has the real or purely intentional mode of being.
  • 40) Of course the strategy of the novel is that it makes the northern fantasy land much more real, more detailed and more interesting, than the �realreality of the American college town where the action takes place.
  • 41) And success in real life is often much, much more satisfying, because it relies on *real* ability.
  • 42) You are very much a _man_, my Conway; a real, _real_ man, and I love you!
  • 43) There was not the slightest doubt that all its shirring was of real, _real_ silk!
  • 44) You must realize that you -- the _real_ You -- are not only existent, and real, but that you are in touch with all else that is real, and that the roots of your being are grounded in the Absolute itself.
  • 45) And, as a fact, we do not know that real musicians, _real_ Master Hugues of Saxe-Gotha and
  • 46) ‘It seems far-fetched but most of the things that happened in the first series were actually based on real events.’
  • 47) ‘A problem does not exist in splendid isolation as a concrete fact in the real world.’
  • 48) ‘Sometimes I do this thing where I imagine that I'm reporting the events that aren't real.’
  • 49) ‘The scene from the bank ‘falsely portrayed’ is in fact an accurate portrayal of real events.’
  • 50) ‘The only real difference I suppose is that the Russians had longer to prepare.’
  • 51) ‘The real problem was the fact that no intelligent debate on organised crime had taken place, he said.’
  • 52) ‘I suppose real macaroni pie uses this kind, but I was never able to find it in the United States.’
  • 53) ‘In fact, the only real effect of his advancing age on his music has been to make him work with even greater concentration.’
  • 54) ‘I don't think I've ever had to work under any real pressure, either real or imagined.’
  • 55) ‘Young Miller was, in fact, the only real striking prospect Scotland had seen in some time.’
  • 56) ‘They make a big point on their site of assuring the viewer that the tank is in fact, not real.’
  • 57) ‘It is also the most imaginative, least dated, and actually has some real Gaelic.’
  • 58) ‘So if Cold Fusion is real, I imagine some major physics needs a rethink.’
  • 59) ‘He could hear an odd rushing sound, but he couldn't tell if it was real or imagined.’
  • 60) ‘He was awed with the fact that they were real, but realized that she needed help quickly.’
  • 61) ‘That could affect their opinion before they hear the facts in a real trial.’
  • 62) ‘In this decision, I am not jettisoning all case law developed by judicial decision on the facts of real cases.’
  • 63) ‘This may sound strange and unbelievable to you, but it is real and true.’
  • 64) ‘The first setup reflects the situation in which a real data set is under scrutiny.’
  • 65) ‘Why do you attack them without bothering to do any real investigation of the situation?’
  • 66) ‘Mr Shean felt that there were very real dangers in this situation with a fragmenting relationship.’
  • 67) ‘It is important to emphasize the real differences which exist between them.’
  • 68) ‘There is real concern that the situation in Darfur could derail the north-south peace deal.’
  • 69) ‘Naturally, there are real and significant human costs of modernisation.’
  • 70) ‘In this film, I play a biker out to woo someone, which is indeed a very real situation for me.’
  • 71) ‘When is something going to be done about this very real and sad situation?’
  • 72) ‘What he had to say will have real significance for the future of the devolution experiment.’
  • 73) ‘The label nuisance or negligence is treated as being of no real significance.’
  • 74) ‘If we fail to do so, we will inevitably fail to gauge the real significance of the changes which are occurring.’
  • 75) ‘The word may eventually cease to have any real significance, except in a historical context.’
  • 76) ‘There were only two or three companies with any real significance trying to tap into the same market.’
  • 77) ‘Lord Cooke said that the label nuisance or negligence was of no real significance.’
  • 78) ‘Making their job a real chore is the fact that he keeps showing up in Trish's shadow, so smitten is he.’
  • 79) ‘In fact, there are real questions about the viability and sustainability of this project.’
  • 80) ‘I imagine he's having real trouble with the up-keep of his sprawling country estate at the moment.’
  • 81) ‘But this applies only where the court is left in real doubt about the true meaning.’
  • 82) ‘We may think that in these passages there is no real distancing; what Socrates says is just what Plato thinks.’
  • 83) ‘It is especially true for America, as well, because we are a country with very real isolationist tendencies.’
  • 84) ‘I think there is a very real possibility, however, that you are an idiot.’
  • 85) ‘Strangely I'm proud to be where I'm from but I'd have a real problem defining British.’
  • 86) ‘The chances of a stock overhang negatively skewing the UK market good and proper are very real.’
  • 87) ‘By formal essence Spinoza means the real and independent nature of God.’
  • 88) ‘Only knowledge of real essence, which we don't have and are unlikely to get, would provide that.’
  • 89) ‘Phenomenology involves a radical change in all such positings of real existence.’
  • 90) ‘Most generally, Locke had argued famously that real essences are unknowable.’
  • 91) ‘Things like Money, Love, Countries are extended fictions that are very much part of our world but not real.’
  • 92) ‘He paid tribute to the bravery of the police involved in making the arrests, as they had not known whether the gun was real or imitation.’
  • 93) ‘She said she would today lay both artificial and real flowers, but she was not being disrespectful in any way.’
  • 94) ‘She slipped a tiny elastic banding ring over the long metal pin which connects my real leg to the artificial one.’
  • 95) ‘He said that in many incidents police did not know if a weapon was real or imitation unless it was recovered later.’
  • 96) ‘In the past they've also had genuine stag and real ivory, both of which are now very hard to come by.’
  • 97) ‘Long and shaggy, in real or imitation fur, Yeti coats are ideal partners against the cold.’
  • 98) ‘Anyway, this year the whole family were gathered round so it was time to buy a real, genuine Christmas tree.’
  • 99) ‘I want to be able to go over to Brick Lane in the East End to eat a real, genuine London bagel.’
  • 100) ‘Is that his real hair colour?’
  • 101) ‘Then I got into pre-ground real coffee, and I guess I stuck at that for years.’
  • 102) ‘A quick bite of the card was taken just to check just how real the gold was.’
  • 103) ‘Trying to find anything up there is like trying to guess my real hair colour.’
  • 104) ‘But real coffee, roasted and ground and turned to seductive liquid, is a true pleasure.’
  • 105) ‘He realised that the answer to his business problems was to provide machines that made real coffee with fresh milk.’
  • 106) ‘I was a bit disappointed that he had questioned whether my hair was real.’
  • 107) ‘The Buddha sculptures and even the bricks on the ground are carved with real gold.’
  • 108) ‘This lightly scented gel contains particles of real gold to enhance the face or décolletage.’
  • 109) ‘We learned the most expensive tea ware is made from a kind of purple clay flecked with real gold.’
  • 110) ‘Try it, however, and a uniformed attendant will inform you it is art and that it is plated in real gold.’
  • 111) ‘The possession of guns, both real and imitation, lies predominantly with young people.’
  • 112) ‘If we take all of these criticisms as true, then the real blame belongs to the White House.’
  • 113) ‘But the point is that it is true, and the real question is the character of the candidate who tried to conceal his past.’
  • 114) ‘This is true, but the real crisis in legitimacy is caused by differential abstention rates.’
  • 115) ‘I hope I can show and tell you the real, true Japan that cannot be seen in other mas media.’
  • 116) ‘In fact, submerging your real identity even as you fake sincerity seems to be positively encouraged.’
  • 117) ‘It seems that the state and central governments have been hiding the real facts.’
  • 118) ‘This view has taken hold even despite the fact that the real dynamic of progress is currently unremarkable.’
  • 119) ‘In fact, the real shift that is taking place is very different from this.’
  • 120) ‘Now, in all fairness - we have not verified that this post was in fact penned by the real Miss Simpson.’
  • 121) ‘The fact that real terrorists tend not to send letters before they plant bombs seemed not to occur to officials.’
  • 122) ‘Yes, it was a thoroughly enjoyable and fun night and real stars did in fact emerge.’
  • 123) ‘Rather than trying to sue Americans into submission, imagine a real solution for the problem.’
  • 124) ‘The real glory was the fact that most of the postings were not from members.’
  • 125) ‘I would guess that most people watching this sort of news item do not sit there and imagine the real horror.’
  • 126) ‘I suppose the real test is what happens over the next few months and how we keep the friendship going.’
  • 127) ‘These hard facts indicate real motives behind enactment of this draconian law.’
  • 128) ‘Jeff takes them to the ruined house where the last lot disappeared and where the real witch was supposed to have been murdered.’
  • 129) ‘The person sitting in front of the fire was shocked that the facts of the real story had been so misconstrued.’
  • 130) ‘The real significance of publications such as this are often only really treasured years later.’
  • 131) ‘It has come out of the real situation that I see around me, where marriages are failing.’
  • 132) ‘It's so nice to be at a proper keyboard with a real mouse instead of those stupid touch pad things.’
  • 133) ‘If you take June as your real friend, then you shouldn't say that about her!’
  • 134) ‘Or if you want to be a real friend invite them along now for the ride.’
  • 135) ‘Living this way is a good way to determine who your real friends are.’
  • 136) ‘The theory that there are no real enemies and friends in the film world, as in politics, is highlighted.’
  • 137) ‘If you don't want to tell an adult, you can tell a friend - but my real advice is to just chill.’
  • 138) ‘And now he says he wants everyone to know who their real friends and enemies were.’
  • 139) ‘Back in the days between leaving college and finding a real job, my friends and I drank like the proverbial fishes.’
  • 140) ‘If war is when leaders discover themselves, it is also when parties discover who, in fact, their real leaders are.’
  • 141) ‘My day here has been a complete waste of time, as it is most days in fact - a real waste of petrol.’
  • 142) ‘He dared to be honest and have integrity and do what a real journalist is supposed to do.’
  • 143) ‘In fact, a real network culture developed only in the 1840s and this is studied by Caron in the second part of his book.’
  • 144) ‘There was in fact no real commitment from the Account Holder at all.’
  • 145) ‘The only real anti-climax is the fact that it is all over way too soon.’
  • 146) ‘So there is no real tension on the facts of this case between the judges of the Family Court on that issue.’
  • 147) ‘All agreed he is a true genius and a real perfectionist with timing and sound.’
  • 148) ‘Little did I realize that this first political activity would lead me to a life of devotion to true justice and real freedom.’
  • 149) ‘This is the beginning of the real and true economics of information.’
  • 150) ‘One critic has rightly described them as our real National Theatre.’
  • 151) ‘Everyone will be thinking about what type of real man uses something artificial to get a tan.’
  • 152) ‘What happened next, he explains could lead to a real disaster in the future.’
  • 153) ‘Most Zambian roads and what are called bridges especially in rural areas, are a real disaster.’
  • 154) ‘Yet the real disaster will be if Pyongyang continues on its present road to nowhere.’
  • 155) ‘So their reactions were similar to what would be found at the scene of a real disaster.’
  • 156) ‘If they don't take on the role of guardians there is going to be a real disaster.’
  • 157) ‘I think most people in this country see it's beginning to be a real disaster.’
  • 158) ‘You'd never forget as you go through the film what real disaster has happened here.’
  • 159) ‘It paints a picture of real disasters on a global scale, in a set order and with attendant statistics.’
  • 160) ‘He remembers his time there with real fondness and thoroughly enjoyed the experience.’
  • 161) ‘It was a perfect day, a real community occasion, and one which will long be remembered by everyone.’
  • 162) ‘The chassis inspires real confidence, feels perfectly balanced and even gets better as you push it harder.’
  • 163) ‘The latest result betrays a real inferiority complex within the Irish mindset.’
  • 164) ‘I get a real sense of completion, no matter how small the thing I am completing is.’
  • 165) ‘The chorus is a real grower, complete with excellent guitar flourishes.’
  • 166) ‘It would turn into a disaster for Tom as a problem made the car a real handful.’
  • 167) ‘The player's decision is a disaster for his club, a real kick in the teeth for his employers.’
  • 168) ‘We will maintain the value of welfare benefits in real terms plus economic growth - no more.’
  • 169) ‘Inflation also eats into the real value of the income from market returns received by farmers.’
  • 170) ‘This sounds a lot of money, but in real terms it will support just eight schemes.’
  • 171) ‘An unanticipated decline in the price level increases the value of firms' liabilities in real terms.’
  • 172) ‘Duisenberg did not comment on how much the prices increased in real terms.’
  • 173) ‘But high population growth means that this is a contraction in real terms.’
  • 174) ‘In real terms members are thus receiving less benefits for paying higher contributions.’
  • 175) ‘So today's prices are, in real terms, at little more than half their highest levels.’
  • 176) ‘Besides, the real value for money lies in the fact that paying a few pence more benefits so many.’
  • 177) ‘It is real savings and not money that fund and make possible the production of better tools and machinery.’
  • 178) ‘By the end of the decade, inflation had halved the real value of football payments.’
  • 179) ‘The cost of housing will fall in real terms if the CPI exceeds the rate of house price inflation.’
  • 180) ‘Figures suggest that the minimum amount of money needed for subsistence is on the rise in real terms.’
  • 181) ‘Only by demanding more cash balances and thus lowering prices can the dollars assume a higher real value.’
  • 182) ‘If anything, the average market value of a scientist seems to be going down in real terms.’
  • 183) ‘If that real value isn't there, then you should look at ways to introduce it or you shouldn't be there at all.’
  • 184) ‘A consultant needs to add real value to an organisation to justify a fee of hundreds a day.’
  • 185) ‘It only underscores my point that the real value of the Rand should be in that region.’
  • 186) ‘Funding for education is set to rise in real terms, over and above extra money for teachers' salary pay increases.’
  • 187) ‘In real terms, the study shows that household incomes have declined to 1989 levels.’
  • 188) ‘In this case, this is not a problem, since the domain of the sine function is all real numbers.’
  • 189) ‘What you're doing is making it stick out along the real number line twice as far away from the origin.’
  • 190) ‘Cardan was the first to realise that one could work with quantities more general than the real numbers.’
  • 191) ‘Some of the symbols written down will form the sequences of figures which is the decimal of the real number which is being computed.’
  • 192) ‘If we take two real numbers and multiply them together, we get another real number.’
  • 193) ‘We saw in the last section that a real image is formed by light moving through a convex lens.’
  • 194) ‘You don't see the real image formed by the camera lens, but you get a rough idea of what is in view.’
  • 195) ‘The only thing which would lead you to believe that these are not real images are the colours are simply too vivid and the imagery too sharp.’
  • 196) ‘It is easiest to observe real images when projected on an opaque screen.’
  • 197) ‘real images occur when objects are placed outside the focal length of a converging lens or outside the focal length of a converging mirror.’
  • 198) ‘All I know is my head hurt real bad during that time and then it was gone after a while.’
  • 199) ‘If you take a picture, it just happens to look real nice if you show a little more than two thirds sky.’
  • 200) ‘We actually work in a room with no windows, but we decorated it real nice for Christmas.’
  • 201) ‘They can be real nice to you when you are the passenger, but when you are a fellow motorist, they will terrorize you.’
  • 202) ‘It is a real nice setup that works to help out beginners but doesn't annoy veterans.’
  • 203) ‘For a while, his brain was swollen so he hung his head like someone with a real bad headache.’
  • 204) ‘Whilst on the subject of friends I have met some real nice and interesting people in my few months here.’
  • 205) ‘He had a real homely and jolly down to earth manner that endeared him to all.’
  • 206) ‘You have to say it real fast and furious while you assume the correct position with your palms.’
  • 207) ‘It has been too warm lately and with long hair the dog gets real warm.’
  • 208) ‘Plus, currencies in these markets have strengthened, meaning returns in Hungarian forints or Brazilian reals get a boost when rendered in dollars.’
  • 209) ‘The real has stabilized at its June 2002 level of less than 3 reals to the dollar, and investors are once again looking south.’
  • 210) ‘Soon she was being paid 3,000 Brazilian reals a month to entertain spectators by ball-juggling during half-time.’
  • 211) ‘We've benefited in fact because a large percentage of our development costs are in Brazilian reals.’
  • 212) ‘Part of the money will be available for buying reals.’
  • 213) ‘My senses were all confused as within my sight was a king's ransom - Spanish gold doubloons and shining silver reals, gold pieces of eight, old English milled gold guineas, crowns, minted silver shillings.’
  • 214) ‘These coins were legal tender in the USA until 1857, as the young USA had few coins and many merchants preferred the Spanish reals to USA coinage.’
  • 215) ‘Silver minted as Spanish reals or dollars, and in the 19th century as Mexican dollars, reached Asia via the London silver market.’
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