learn vs teach

learn teach

Definitions

  • 1) To improve, maybe used in an order.
  • 2) To come to know; to become informed of; to find out.
  • 3) To make use of a bad experience.
  • 4) To be studying.
  • 5) To attend a course or other educational activity.
  • 6) To teach.
  • 7) To acquire, or attempt to acquire knowledge or an ability to do something.
  • 8) be a student of a certain subject
  • 9) gain knowledge or skills
  • 10) impart skills or knowledge to
  • 11) commit to memory; learn by heart
  • 12) find out, learn, or determine with certainty, usually by making an inquiry or other effort
  • 13) get to know or become aware of, usually accidentally
  • 14) Toteach.
  • 15) Nonstandard To cause to acquire knowledge; teach.
  • 16) To gain knowledge of or skill in through study, instruction, or experience.
  • 17) To gain knowledge, information, comprehension, or skill.
  • 18) To fix in the mind or memory; memorize.
  • 19) To become aware or informed of; find out: synonym: discover.
  • 20) Obsolete To give information to.
  • 21) to memorize by repetition without exercise of the understanding.
  • 22) See By heart, under Heart.
  • 23) To acquire knowledge or skill; to make progress in acquiring knowledge or skill; to receive information or instruction.
  • 24) obsolete To communicate knowledge to; to teach.
  • 25) To gain knowledge or information of; to ascertain by inquiry, study, or investigation; to receive instruction concerning; to fix in the mind; to acquire understanding of, or skill

Definitions

  • 1) A teacher.
  • 2) an English pirate who operated in the Caribbean and off the Atlantic coast of North America (died in 1718)
  • 3) Same as tache.
  • 4) obsolete, transitive To show (someone) the way; to guide, conduct.
  • 5) intransitive To pass on knowledge, especially as one's profession; to act as a teacher.
  • 6) transitive To pass on knowledge.
  • 7) accustom gradually to some action or attitude
  • 8) impart skills or knowledge to
  • 9) To give instruction, especially as an occupation.
  • 10) To carry on instruction on a regular basis in.
  • 11) To advocate or preach.
  • 12) To condition to a certain action or frame of mind.
  • 13) To provide knowledge of; instruct in.
  • 14) To impart knowledge or skill to.
  • 15) To cause to learn by example or experience.
  • 16) To give instruction; to follow the business, or to perform the duties, of a preceptor.
  • 17) To impart the knowledge of; to give intelligence concerning; to impart, as knowledge before unknown, or rules for practice; to inculcate as true or important; to exhibit impressively
  • 18) To direct, as an instructor; to manage, as a preceptor; to guide the studies of; to instruct; to inform; to conduct through a course of studies.
  • 19) To accustom; to guide; to show; to admonish.

Examples

  • 1) She said that there were important lessons to be learnt from the death of her husband.
  • 2) You have to learn the hard way.
  • 3) Two weeks to learn something like that?
  • 4) What have you learnt from experiences with past managers that could be of value to me?
  • 5) Me and my son had to learn the hard way.
  • 6) That is something we can learn from in our batting and bowling.
  • 7) What did she learn from the experience?
  • 8) They let you learn that way.
  • 9) In addition to having to learn to walk again, she suffered from posttraumatic stress syndrome.
  • 10) In 1996 he suffered a stroke and had to learn to speak again.
  • 11) The army veteran may have to learn to walk again.
  • 12) Some of them just take the risk and learn along the way.
  • 13) We learned by experience that we have to keep all three in mind.
  • 14) Youngsters with learning difficulties gain experience of the hotel trade.
  • 15) Your logical side impresses at work and learning something new goes smoothly.
  • 16) Do we have to learn that lesson again?
  • 17) Others see it as a way of learning about the past.
  • 18) They need to experience risk and learn how to deal with it when they get older.
  • 19) You need to put your time in to learning something properly before overseeing others.
  • 20) Perhaps she can learn from his experience and laidback manner.
  • 21) You are doing something like learning to dance and you are spending hours together.
  • 22) It remains one of the most entertaining ways you can learn a little bit of history.
  • 23) Managers learn from experience how to cope with routine problems.
  • 24) This means learning to cook again.
  • 25) Who can afford learning for learning 's sake?
  • 26) When did teaching to targets take over from learning for learning 's sake?
  • 27) The more you learn, the better you become at learning.
  • 28) We simply have to learn it all again, to think bigger.
  • 29) I was very sorry indeed to learn of his death.
  • 30) I learnt of her death in prison.
  • 31) There is much to be gained by learning to enjoy the cuisine of cultures other than one's own.
  • 32) In facing my own death I learnt about what really matters in life.
  • 33) He beat all Ireland in the Intermediate examinations, and when I met him in America years afterwards he said: ‘There is nothing I cannot learn and nothing that I want to learn’.534 Some instinct drew us together, it was to him I used to read my poems.
  • 34) Precious as are the words which drop from His lips, which are spirit and are life, His life itself is more than all His teachings; and it is when we learn, not _from_ Him, but when we _learn_ Him, that we see the Father.
  • 35) if you want to learn how to or get tips on design mixtape covers checkthis site out...mixtape covers design is the next big thing in hip hop and graphic design..learn something you dont know or contribute www.officialmixtapetutorials.com
  • 36) J-Lo thinks Caleb is cute, which we soon learn is code for "You're going to Hollywood."
  • 37) I'm glad to have had the opportunity to put this through the mill because it seems the only way to learn is to do.
  • 38) Basically, writers, the lesson to learn is to tie up your loose ends, and make sure that if you raise the stakes in your plot, you show how bad the devastation will be or what there is to lose, etc.
  • 39) They best way for me to learn is to engage in discussion and argument about the subject.
  • 40) If you're a scientist working in the proprietary labs of industry I've heard that the very first thing you have to learn is to UN-learn what you've been taught about the brick wall around causation.
  • 41) The easiest way to learn is to be taught by the actual master herself, Paula Kates from PJ's soaps.
  • 42) One perfectly valid way to learn is to put your thinking out there and let people comment on it.
  • 43) ‘Attitudes are learnt through observation of those in relative power or seniority.’
  • 44) ‘A child is learning unbelievable amounts of information.’
  • 45) ‘Neither does one want to waste time learning skills and information which will soon be as useless as hats for silt.’
  • 46) ‘You mentioned that you could not be aware while learning a foreign language.’
  • 47) ‘He adds that he is no longer a dreadful student, has letters after his name, and has learnt a useful lesson from his North Sea mishap.’
  • 48) ‘One way to tell a young soul from an old soul is to observe how quickly he learns karma's lessons in life.’
  • 49) ‘He also observed the students learning an aversion to investigating patients' social and psychological problems.’
  • 50) ‘I can't find a moral in the story, or a worth-while lesson to be learned of it.’
  • 51) ‘Ormond Square was my first training ground, where I learnt my craft and developed a love for the beautiful game that I still have.’
  • 52) ‘Their author has evolved into a prose sophisticate, and clearly learnt some important lessons along the way.’
  • 53) ‘The gifted apprentice attaches himself early to a wise teacher, learning the craft at his hands, six or eight hours a day, every day of the week.’
  • 54) ‘Everyone gets more or less that same elementary education, learning basic history and to read and to do basic math.’
  • 55) ‘She was learning American thought and culture without any criticism.’
  • 56) ‘On board were up to 130 cadets getting a general education as well as learning seamanship from the 20 staff.’
  • 57) ‘Here, a group of children are busy learning the basics of education these days through a theatre workshop.’
  • 58) ‘He had grown his intellectual ego, by learning the art of retrospection and sober second thought.’
  • 59) ‘For him, the key to settling successfully in a foreign culture is not just learning the language.’
  • 60) ‘And rather than trust the author to go on developing and learning her trade, they dumped her.’
  • 61) ‘You would think, after the first 11 years, that the wise guys might have learned their lesson and moved their operations somewhere else.’
  • 62) ‘One now asks whether cultural codes are learned in some language-like way.’
  • 63) ‘Your mind may contain stores of knowledge because you learn rapidly, and you retain what has been learned.’
  • 64) ‘Previous studies of bilingual memory have primarily used word lists as materials to be learned.’
  • 65) ‘I haven't, for instance, recommended memorising great swathes of sporting statistics, or learning the eight times tables.’
  • 66) ‘Many of the chants and songs I learned are soon to fade from campus memory.’
  • 67) ‘Well, I think part of the problem is that the students are not learning and retaining the material.’
  • 68) ‘It seems college instruction has moved or is moving back to memorization and rote learning.’
  • 69) ‘He learns bucket-loads of information, including the brazenly anti-union pitches made by the various nations.’
  • 70) ‘There is likely to be a real zest for learning facts and information.’
  • 71) ‘There is no information about where Ellen learned her tales or from whom.’
  • 72) ‘Name by name, she learned them so that she could remember them later on when riding.’
  • 73) ‘Just wait and see how mobiles companies will try to make us learn a numeric user name rather than an alphabetic one.’
  • 74) ‘You try to concentrate on learning pertinent facts and are aware that what is now in vogue will eventually become dated.’
  • 75) ‘We learned a large amount of information and did a mock theory test which has prepared us all for our theory test to get our provisional licences.’
  • 76) ‘She was in her early fifties and her death was learned of with great regret by all who knew her during her short stay.’
  • 77) ‘His passing last week was learned of with very deep and genuine regret within this community.’
  • 78) ‘The Leader of the House is saying that the Minister did not have enough time to discover on what date he learnt a piece of information.’
  • 79) ‘Despite Lynn being in Honors, she was a big slacker and the teacher had learned this bit of information a long time ago.’
  • 80) ‘She sighed when she thought about all the information that she had learned that night.’
  • 81) ‘He said he deleted the names when he learned the report would be made public, as he only had one witness.’
  • 82) ‘He learns his birth name as a teenager, but nothing more, and it is evident that this void has created a corresponding void in his soul.’
  • 83) ‘He learns that three other names have been suggested to go.’
  • 84) ‘Those were the same words a second-in-command had said when learning Jasmine's name three long years ago.’
  • 85) ‘It is from him that I learned that liberation movements, revolution, terrorism live in a world of their own and create their own etymology.’
  • 86) ‘He said he was shocked beyond belief when he learned that literacy students were having their course cut.’
  • 87) ‘Being younger than her I learned loads of things by simple observation.’
  • 88) ‘More can be learned of the conditions of prisoners in New Jersey than in either Connecticut or New York.’
  • 89) ‘As usual there was a small turn out for the meeting but those who did attend learned a great deal of new information.’
  • 90) ‘We first learned of its existence when she was eight years old and began having vision problems.’
  • 91) ‘I first learned of this incident more than 20 years ago.’
  • 92) ‘She only learned of her death when she returned for a home visit last week.’
  • 93) ‘Her family was not consulted, and only learned of her death a month later.’
  • 94) ‘I was unaware of the seriousness of her illness until I learned of her death.’
  • 95) ‘Their grandfather had come to rescue them when he learned of their existence.’
  • 96) ‘So the help you got has learned you to have faith in yourself.’

Examples

  • 1) What lessons will you teach your daughter about values and money?
  • 2) The old teach us more about what it is to be human.
  • 3) He taught himself about websites and as a result found a job at a fishing shop.
  • 4) Rowing was his sport and at secondary school he worked with a coach who improved his technique and taught him about life.
  • 5) teach them about cognitive bias.
  • 6) My grandmother, who taught me about courage, hard work and big dreams.
  • 7) They will know about it only if they've gone online and looked at websites, or been taught about it.
  • 8) He is also teaching her to paint.
  • 9) Yet teachers often lack the training to teach these subjects.
  • 10) Should we teach facts or learning skills?
  • 11) What rational teacher wants to teach a complex subject when they can teach exam criteria instead?
  • 12) He had to learn to teach mere mortals.
  • 13) This means that all pupils should be taught by subject specialists.
  • 14) What did that teach you about yourself?
  • 15) The problem is that very few teachers are qualified to teach the subject.
  • 16) She wants the subject to be taught in a more measured way.
  • 17) My business is to teach the subject so well that no one can take the job away from me.
  • 18) The report found that many teachers were not confident in teaching the subject and had little opportunity to improve their knowledge.
  • 19) You can put your ideas across in a clear and convincing way and you will discover a gift for learning and teaching.
  • 20) Everything they have been taught they learnt here but they haven't been taught very much.
  • 21) He came from a family of painters and decorators, and was taught how to paint in lettering by his father.
  • 22) You're either learning or teaching.
  • 23) The plaintiff was the only female to teach in the School of Theology.
  • 24) His father, who taught him to paint, was a fishmonger.
  • 25) Fellow-students, neighbors, and citizens teach by precept and by example; and especially do _school-houses teach_.
  • 26) You must teach, _teach_, teach these black hounds to know they are men, not brutes! "
  • 27) One meaning of the word teach is the concept of indoctrinate or train. and the other part is to provide information.
  • 28) And what the Senate did and Senator Brownback described is they encouraged what we call teach the controversy at Discovery Institute, and that just means teach the controversy over Darwin's theory of evolution specifically, the evidence for and against it, but don't require teaching intelligent design.
  • 29) I use the term teach advisedly, because it is often quite helpful for synopsis writers to think of the task as producing a course overview for the lesson that is the book’s content: how will this book help readers, and what kind of readers will it help?
  • 30) Jeez, this teach is far less elaborate than some noisy. visit New speak learn Books Zealand basic visiting Cd travel Dunedin talking languages Invercargill newzealand kiwi Taking audio yourself learning bestselling auckland book sale tape travelling nz AudioBook speaking Wellington language christchurch mp3 teach foreign AudioBooks discount The Law of Attraction Audio Book Esther & Jerry HICKS NEW CD – The Secret Darn, one licentious kiwi capriciously fed inside some tentative travel.
  • 31) The only thing schools teach is how to be subservient under a “one world government”.
  • 32) “What experience and history teach is this - that people and governments never have learned anything from history, or acted on principles deduced from it.”
  • 33) … Some of what we teach is going to be applicable in combination with other fields.
  • 34) However, you do need to take a teaching course TEFL CELTA or a pedagogical course somewhere. how to teach is the most important factor. maestra
  • 35) ‘The education system that would teach girls to read would also empower millions of illiterate boys.’
  • 36) ‘Traditional American Education models call for teaching a child to read between the ages of 7-9.’
  • 37) ‘The charity has taught women to read and helped people rebuild their lives after conflict.’
  • 38) ‘The choirmaster taught me how to read music and sing with discipline.’
  • 39) ‘In either case, it illustrates how teaching children to read in Spanish transcends the school grounds.’
  • 40) ‘A carpenter wrote his thanks to Weatherly for teaching him how to read instructions.’
  • 41) ‘Talking about adult education, he lauded India's innovative programme that teaches people to read in their mother tongue in just two to three hours.’
  • 42) ‘We have three training organizations prepared to teach workers how to install it.’
  • 43) ‘My mom started teaching me to read at age three.’
  • 44) ‘His mother taught him to read at age three, and ‘once I knew how to read, I was off on my own.’’
  • 45) ‘She taught herself to paint.’
  • 46) ‘His father and grandfather taught him to farm.’
  • 47) ‘We need to find imaginative ways to teach children how to cook.’
  • 48) ‘These tools and websites teach young people how to program.’
  • 49) ‘He taught me to play the piano.’
  • 50) ‘It's not just an education system about teaching literacy and numeracy.’
  • 51) ‘They had become self-taught sailors on the lake, teaching themselves the necessary skills and knots.’
  • 52) ‘While the children need to be supervised, the principal argues that it is an excellent way to teach a specialised subject area.’
  • 53) ‘Mountain safety boils down mainly to common sense; you can teach yourself the necessary skills, and there are many excellent books on the subject.’
  • 54) ‘I teach two AP subjects and have a lot of trouble fitting in all that I would like for the course.’
  • 55) ‘When she wants to ask a colleague's advice on how to teach her subject it is not just a case of popping into the staff room.’
  • 56) ‘European Studies is taught as a subject in the school and many students have entered EU organised competitions with great success.’
  • 57) ‘Unsurprisingly it has been found that subjects which are taught in a more innovative and interesting way get better results and better behaviour in those lessons.’
  • 58) ‘The subjects must be taught in depth at the school level.’
  • 59) ‘Workshops to teach the homeless new skills have been running for a year.’
  • 60) ‘Parenting is a job and the required skills can be taught.’
  • 61) ‘It is an excellent way to teach a specialised subject area.’
  • 62) ‘teachers have argued passionately for the opportunity to teach the subject they love.’
  • 63) ‘She teaches medical history at Duke University.’
  • 64) ‘For a time, he taught high school English.’
  • 65) ‘I teach art to inner-city school kids.’
  • 66) ‘You just can't start early enough teaching your kids music.’
  • 67) ‘She tried to teach me embroidery.’
  • 68) ‘Both of our teachers have taught in the public schools and consider this a much better situation.’
  • 69) ‘Many teachers are unqualified to teach according to local public school standards.’
  • 70) ‘The three professors whom I determined to have created the most spirit in their classes all taught at a community college.’
  • 71) ‘When I taught at a community college, one of my students was a forty-five-year-old mom who juggled two jobs and a full academic load.’
  • 72) ‘One faculty member acknowledged that it was the source of her motivation for teaching at a community college.’
  • 73) ‘Consider the fact that teachers almost universally discount their wages in order to teach in private schools.’
  • 74) ‘She has taught at the elementary school level and is currently a teacher educator.’
  • 75) ‘He became a secondary school teacher, teaching in schools at Tilberg and Breda.’
  • 76) ‘If they fail to keep up the GTC's standards, they will lose their licence to teach in state schools.’
  • 77) ‘To further complicate matters, teachers generally teach as if all students are at the same place in their learning development.’
  • 78) ‘I taught at the high school in the morning, and then went home to the hard work.’
  • 79) ‘The majority of these bilingual education teachers taught in transitional bilingual programs.’
  • 80) ‘One of the village's primary school teachers, who taught at the orphanage for two days last year, said he would not go back.’
  • 81) ‘He now teaches at Merivale High School, also in Nepean.’
  • 82) ‘She teaches at a homeschool high school.’
  • 83) ‘He taught in the USA before becoming professor of music at Leeds University.’
  • 84) ‘He currently teaches at New York University.’
  • 85) ‘Did I mention that I used to teach at Oxford?’
  • 86) ‘I retired from the classroom, having taught since 1962.’
  • 87) ‘In 1954, he came to Florida State and taught until 1974.’
  • 88) ‘The experience taught me how much it's possible to learn away from home in a new environment.’
  • 89) ‘Experience teaches us, however, that humility often departs when the remembrance of imperfections grows more distant.’
  • 90) ‘Experience teaches us that integrity may be compromised for convenience or to avoid unpleasant consequences.’
  • 91) ‘Experience teaches us that excess doesn't buy us happiness, that money can't insulate us from pain.’
  • 92) ‘Finally, experience teaches us that the fall of a government creates a security gap.’
  • 93) ‘Experience teaches us that if it happens in the United States, it will happen here, sooner rather than later.’
  • 94) ‘When things are going well, experience teaches us that turnouts are relatively lower.’
  • 95) ‘However, don't they always teach us to learn from our mistakes?’
  • 96) ‘He takes a deep breath: ‘But such experiences have taught me about human life.’’
  • 97) ‘Things haven't always been as happy for Mick, he has known his share of dark days but experience has taught him that life is precious and to be enjoyed.’
  • 98) ‘Experience has taught me that I should be worried if something is constructed using language and concepts which I can't understand.’
  • 99) ‘Experience taught him that art and words were inextricably bound with consciousness.’
  • 100) ‘My experience taught me that an owner should know every detail, from the cooking of the food up to its management, or he will be tricked by his workers.’
  • 101) ‘Years of bitter experience have taught me that if you don't blow your own trumpet, it's fairly rare that anyone else will do it on your behalf.’
  • 102) ‘I hope that this has taught me not to judge people.’
  • 103) ‘Experience taught me that there is usually light at the end of the tunnel.’
  • 104) ‘I hope that this book teaches everyone that there is no obstacle that you cannot overcome.’
  • 105) ‘Bitter experience had taught him never to answer these kinds of questions on live television.’
  • 106) ‘History has taught them that there are no easy answers.’
  • 107) ‘Parents are encouraged to teach life lessons with familiar objects and activities.’
  • 108) ‘Why not change a great part of that education to teach strength of character?’
  • 109) ‘Are we teaching them the philosophy and the mission, along with fiscal, staff, and program management skills?’
  • 110) ‘By now, someone reading this is angrily muttering, but it teaches the kids discipline!’
  • 111) ‘When I was a child, we were taught discipline both at home and at school.’
  • 112) ‘I think the sport teaches discipline.’
  • 113) ‘Like all attitudes, tolerance is often taught in subtle ways.’
  • 114) ‘We need to look to schools and parents to teach respect for other people.’
  • 115) ‘His music teaches the importance of forgiveness.’
  • 116) ‘That will teach you to mess with a town boy!’
  • 117) ‘‘I'll teach you to mess with him’ he said, pulling out a knife.’
  • 118) ‘That'll teach you to mess with my friend's shop.’
  • 119) ‘That'll teach me to forget the look-but-don't-touch rule.’
  • 120) ‘That'll teach me to leave cooking food unattended while I go to answer the phone.’
  • 121) ‘That'll teach you to laugh at me.’
  • 122) ‘I guess that'll teach me to eat too many cookies!’
  • 123) ‘I'll teach them to mock me.’
  • 124) ‘I entered the class interrupting the lecture the teach was giving.’
  • 125) ‘Everyone's eyes shift from the teach, Mrs. Stamos, to us.’
  • 126) ‘I suppose they got annoyed when they came in with a hangover and the teach kicked them out.’
  • 127) ‘Then we will attach bowling balls to the ceiling on the string and throw them at the teach.’
  • 128) ‘Guys, do you remember the time were read the Three Musketeers in class and the teach started to call us that?’
  • 129) ‘Of course, what is new about the teach is that she was sponsored by the City of Oakland and inflicted on public school students.’
  • 130) ‘I had never seen a teach shoot fire from her eyes before, but Miss Gulch looked as if she were only moments away from doing so.’
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