wry vs rye

wry rye

Definitions

  • 1) A twisting about, or out of shape or course; distortion; a distorting effect.
  • 2) Twisted, bent, crooked.
  • 3) Turned away, contorted (of the face or body).
  • 4) Dryly humorous; sardonic or ironic.
  • 5) Temporarily twisted in an expression of distaste or displeasure.
  • 6) Archaic Abnormally twisted or bent to one side; crooked.
  • 7) Funny in an understated, sarcastic, or ironic way.
  • 8) a distortion of the countenance indicating impatience, disgust, or discomfort; a grimace.
  • 9) Wrested; perverted.
  • 10) Turned to one side; twisted; distorted.
  • 11) Hence, deviating from the right direction; misdirected; out of place.
  • 12) bent to one side
  • 13) humorously sarcastic or mocking
  • 14) transitive, obsolete To cover; clothe; cover up; cloak; hide.
  • 15) transitive To twist or contort (the body, face etc.).
  • 16) obsolete, intransitive To turn (away); to swerve or deviate.
  • 17) obsolete, transitive To divert; to cause to turn away.
  • 18) Toturn;twistaside.
  • 19) To deviate from the right way; to go away or astray; to turn side; to swerve.
  • 20) To twist; to writhe; to bend or wind.
  • 21) To twist; to distort; to writhe; to wrest; to vex.

Definitions

  • 1) Ryegrass, any of the species of Lolium.
  • 2) Caraway (from the mistaken assumption that the whole seeds, often used to season rye bread, are the rye itself)
  • 3) The grain of this plant, ground into flour or used in making whiskey and for livestock feed.
  • 4) Rye bread.
  • 5) A cereal grass (Secale cereale) of cool climates, widely cultivated for its grain.
  • 6) Whiskey made from the grains of this plant.
  • 7) A Romani man.
  • 8) A disease in a hawk.
  • 9) (Bot.) A grain yielded by a hardy cereal grass (Secale cereale), closely allied to wheat; also, the plant itself. Rye constitutes a large portion of the breadstuff used by man.
  • 10) (Bot.) any plant of the genus Elymus, tall grasses with much the appearance of rye.
  • 11) (Bot.) See under Grass. See also Ray grass, and Darnel.
  • 12) whiskey distilled from rye or rye and malt
  • 13) the seed of the cereal grass
  • 14) hardy annual cereal grass widely cultivated in northern Europe where its grain is the chief ingredient of black bread and in North America for forage and soil improvement
  • 15) Whisky made from rye. [Colloq., U. S.]
  • 16) In heraldry, a bearing representing a stalk of grain with the ear bending downward, thus distinguished from wheat, in which the ear is erect.
  • 17) A disease in hawks which causes the head to swell.
  • 18) The cereal plant Sccale cerealc, or its seeds.
  • 19) A gentleman; a superior person: as, a Rommany rye.

Examples

  • 1) He has a wry sense of his own flaws.
  • 2) Packed full of witty and wry observations and some extremely pertinent advice.
  • 3) He has a wry sense of humour and an astonishing smile.
  • 4) All at once she shook her head and smiled with a wry twist of her mouth.
  • 5) He has a wry sense of humour and seems to be bursting with ideas.
  • 6) There is a wry smile at the memory.
  • 7) It was also not without wry comedy.
  • 8) She told the tale with wry amusement.
  • 9) The comic and actor takes a wry look at parenthood.
  • 10) It was meant as a wry observation about health and safety.
  • 11) He had a wry sense of humour and a twinkle in his eye.
  • 12) He had a wry sense of humour.
  • 13) Press reaction has not been without a wry smile.
  • 14) It is a cautionary tale with wry observations about our decadent society entwined around a mournful melody.
  • 15) Cue a wry smile and a mopped brow.
  • 16) She viewed them with wry amusement.
  • 17) She was mistress of the wry, speaking glance.
  • 18) The presenter takes a wry look at what's been going on in media and politics.
  • 19) He was kind to all who knew him and possessed a wry, intellectual sense of humour.
  • 20) In both Mountain remained a great stylist and emerged as a man of wry but gentle observation.
  • 21) I treat it with wry amusement and infinite gratitude.
  • 22) There is wry humour too.
  • 23) This wry little documentary looks at the modern phenomenon of mobility scooters, sales of which have quadrupled in the past five years.
  • 24) The ingredients, one might think, for a wry comedy.
  • 25) Here she is engaging, wry, humorous and as good a writer as she was a photographer.
  • 26) In the meantime— He smiled again, the expression wry this time.
  • 27) -- The term wry-neck or torticollis is applied to a condition in which the head assumes an abnormal attitude, which is usually one of combined lateral flexion and rotation.
  • 28) "No, it did not," G'dath said, his expression wry.
  • 29) That allusive, indirect style Westlake assigns to himself gives him plenty of room and time to wander away from his plot and work in wry but dead-on descriptions of people and how they live, the work they do, the things they surround themselves with, the places they go, their eccentricities and vanities and various insanities.
  • 30) It has all the great Howard Hawks things: every dame a dish, every night foggy and filled with mystery; but the real thing that keeps me watching, that thrills me to discover another nuance every time I see it, is the joyful tongue in wry cheek that Bogey and Bacall play in every scene together.
  • 31) With so many differences that separate and divide us, I find it a treat to connect with smart, passionate, talented bloggers who offer their experiences in wry or poignant, frank or even silly on-line content in their blog.
  • 32) Morgan Freeman and Michael Caine turn in wry, effective performances as Lucius Fox and Alfred the Butler, respectively.
  • 33) Agency, The Sunday Philosophy Club abounds in wry humor and sharp observations of human nature.
  • 34) The edition more than once refers, in wry self-defence, to the description of the character in 1984 who 'was engaged in producing garbled versions - definitive texts, they were called'.
  • 35) ‘She gave a wry smile at the comment on breakfast.’
  • 36) ‘Director Peter Evans highlights the play's wry humour and latent evil with a low-key, ironic spin.’
  • 37) ‘Levy's wry sort of humour and the ironic use of an English woman's perspective to describe the problems confronted by the immigrants is both clever and sensitive.’
  • 38) ‘Chekhov's wry humour and dead-on powers of observation are a perfect fit with the clown-inspired style of Toronto's Theatre Smith-Gilmour.’
  • 39) ‘On stage, the duo really shine, with heartfelt songs delivered with evident passion, while the between song banter shows a wry sense of humour, which also infuses their music.’
  • 40) ‘Bursting with frantic energy, wry humour and a multitude of voices, it might be best described as a romantic comedy-thriller, but even this fails to capture its sparkling originality.’
  • 41) ‘Born in August 31, 1928, he was the 14th of 16 children and always showed a wry sense of humour often referring to his home as the house of sin.’
  • 42) ‘Shot in four weeks for a modest $4m, it is also a triumph of minute observation, bittersweet pathos and wry culture-clash humour over brash Hollywood excess.’
  • 43) ‘Mancunians claim that theirs is the world's first industrial city, and they certainly have a wry sense of humour, forged from years of hardship, that many Scots will identify with.’
  • 44) ‘I've not known Bill for very long of course, though I'm glad to have been acquainted with a quiet, dignified man, with a wry sense of humour and a Granddad's twinkle in his eye.’
  • 45) ‘And though it slowly got darker and darker outside, the peppy discussion, interspersed with slices of wry humour, just kept going.’
  • 46) ‘Never hurtful or judgmental, this wry sense of humour was never far below the surface, evidencing itself in a shy smile - but those eyes twinkled.’
  • 47) ‘As such, it would make a marvelous companion to Blackboard Jungle as a double feature for the cinema buff with a wry sense of humor.’
  • 48) ‘Australian Dance Theatre's new work, Birdbrain, will inject a modern, wry twist into the ever-enduring dance text of Swan Lake.’
  • 49) ‘One of Calysta's eyebrows was up, and the wry twist on her lips was certainly comical.’
  • 50) ‘‘It's funny to have a heartbeat’ he commented, his face twisting into one of wry humor.’
  • 51) ‘In fact, there was a wry humor about his features - a sort of elegance and a sparkling intellect - that made me want to emulate him immediately.’
  • 52) ‘Despite his virtuosity, Sonny Rollins always managed to express an underlying, wry sense of humor in his playing.’
  • 53) ‘Instead, the writers present new twists on parenting with liberal doses of wry humor that even singletons will enjoy.’
  • 54) ‘Anger, bitterness and disappointment course through Schmidt, but the film is wry and melancholic rather than mean-spirited.’
  • 55) ‘Aliette made a wry face, and turned away disbelieving.’
  • 56) ‘Cecil made a wry face, though inwardly he was relieved.’
  • 57) ‘The two men exchanged questioning glances behind her back as she came out of the garden and closed the gate, then Penniworth gave a shrug and made a wry face of amusement.’
  • 58) ‘He pulled a wry face as he swallowed, setting the cup down on the table again.’
  • 59) ‘Jac picked up a fork and poked at the greens, making a wry face and glancing with envy at her plate.’
  • 60) ‘Alan shook his head, an expression of wry confusion on his face.’
  • 61) ‘‘Thank you,’ Gale said, but she gave Julien a wry expression that the photographer did not catch.’
  • 62) ‘His mouth had a wry twist to it as if he took everything with a heavy dose of sarcasm.’
  • 63) ‘A myriad of emotions plays over his boyish face - wry amusement, disbelief, disgust, and smugness.’
  • 64) ‘There was no disapproval in his expression, only a slight wry lifting of his lips.’
  • 65) ‘Robbie Neilson can only offer a wry grin as he admits that the twists and turns in the script and the highs and lows would probably render it all too unbelievable were it pitched to Hollywood.’
  • 66) ‘Despite the disappointments so far, there is a wry optimism among some UK firms.’
  • 67) ‘Changing his dour expression, Alain pulled a wry grin.’
  • 68) ‘He had his arms akimbo and was directing at them a wry gaze of mixed amusement and disgust.’
  • 69) ‘‘You can only choose from these four Slab pizza flavours,’ the man behind the counter explained with a wry grin.’
  • 70) ‘As Grant moved through his week of mea culpa, he gradually adopted a position of wry humility.’
  • 71) ‘Every time he refers to you as ‘Mr. Zwinge’ I cannot help but picture him with a wry smirk on his face, as if he's put you in your place.’
  • 72) ‘‘That's the second time I've saved your life then, lady’ Duck thought, a wry grin crossing his face.’
  • 73) ‘Deuce managed to keep a wry grimace from his face, just barely.’
  • 74) ‘I gave him a wry smile and commented, ‘Well, now you've gone and ruined their fun.’’
  • 75) ‘Elizabeth styled him her pygmy; his enemies delighted in vilifying his "wry neck," "crooked back" and "splay foot," and in Bacon's essay "On Deformity," it was said, "the world takes notice that he paints out his little cousin to the life."’
  • 76) ‘During the last twenty years as a rabbit breeder I have seen a great variety of ailments, injuries and mysteries appear throughout my herd and those of friends but the most challenging and perplexing certainly must be wry neck.’

Examples

  • 1) The leftover crème fraîche can be spread over rye toast with a piece of smoked salmon or added to a bowl of soup.
  • 2) It is found in wheat, but also barley, rye and other grains.
  • 3) Serve with 2 poached eggs and 1 slice of rye toast.
  • 4) Now stadium officials have decided to turf out the rye grass surface and lay a fresh pitch.
  • 5) Experiments on mixing rye grass with clover were showing this could work.
  • 6) Stir in the rye flakes and oats.
  • 7) Serve with two poached eggs and slice of sourdough or rye toast.
  • 8) Serve with a small slice of rye toast.
  • 9) Pile it all onto your rye toast and top it off with a generous dollop of sour cream.
  • 10) We are 100 per cent perennial rye grass.
  • 11) No oats here, only wheat or rye flour.
  • 12) It is worth remembering that rye flour contains gluten, so is not suitable for people avoiding this.
  • 13) The animals would have provided milk and meat, while oats and rye were grown in surrounding fields.
  • 14) Its spelt sourdough combines wheat, rye and spelt for a thick crisp crust with an exceptional flavour.
  • 15) A handful of the grain rye is found in his pocket.
  • 16) A small bowl of muesli or porridge is ideal, as is poached eggs on rye or granary toast.
  • 17) Try Whole wheat, grain or rye.
  • 18) Another common grass, perennial rye grass, is much more popular as fodder and is very nutritious.
  • 19) A good grain to test early is rice, as it is less likely to cause symptoms than wheat or rye.
  • 20) I asked for rye toast.
  • 21) You can still eat rice and potatoes but must swap all wheat, barley and rye for gluten-free alternatives.
  • 22) There's no need to miss out if you have to steer clear of foods containing wheat, barley and rye.
  • 23) Made from pure rye flour, or a rye and wheat flour mix, this is a dark dense loaf with a heavy texture.
  • 24) We should eat more leafy vegetables and avoid gluten, a protein found in grains such as wheat, rye and barley and in processed foods.
  • 25) Made with rye and wholegrain wheat, these are high in fibre with the sourdough making them slower to digest, so keeping you full for longer.
  • 26) Steve: the corned beef sandwich on rye is well worth breaking the rules. great fries too!
  • 27) It was during his work on the ergot fungus, which grows in rye kernels, that he stumbled on LSD, accidentally ingesting a trace of the compound one Friday afternoon in April 1943.
  • 28) I confess I am not a big fan of caraway in rye bread but this seems altogether different and definitely worth a try!
  • 29) Rather like the idea of the caraway (I love it in rye bread).
  • 30) So as a price spike in rye led to a price spike in beer, there was less beer consumed — which in turn led to fewer assaults and murders.
  • 31) I actually prefer a seeded rye, but the plain rye tasted just fine ….
  • 32) Their formula (the midtown deli) sucks, but their BLT with avocado on rye is a weekly necessity.
  • 33) Did you know that you can make a bread starter from tepache and whole grain rye flour?
  • 34) ‘Cereals include wheat, rice, barley, oats, rye, maize, millet, and sorghum, all of which have been used as food since prehistoric times, and cultivated since antiquity.’
  • 35) ‘Monotony came from the self-sufficiency of small farms; since bread was the staple food, most farms grew wheat, along with other cereals like rye, oat, buckwheat, maize and barley.’
  • 36) ‘Wheat, barley, rice, rye, oats, millet and corn are the world's top food crops.’
  • 37) ‘Greenbugs feed on a variety of grass crops, including wheat, oats, barley, rye and sorghum.’
  • 38) ‘Avoid barley, corn, oats, rye, and wheat; many people experience congestion, poor digestion, and other symptoms when they eat these grains.’
  • 39) ‘This usually entails lifelong avoidance of all cereals containing gluten, including wheat, oats, rye and barley.’
  • 40) ‘Annual cover crops such as vetch, triticale, rye, winter wheat or Austrian winter peas should be sown in mid-September.’
  • 41) ‘Although the thought of grass conjures up notions of farm food and lawn mowing, cereal grasses such as wheat, barley, oat, rye and kamut are non-toxic and likely the healthiest foods on earth.’
  • 42) ‘The developing grain head on all small grains (winter wheat, rye, triticale, barley) is located just above the highest stem node of the plant.’
  • 43) ‘We know that they grew wheat, rye, oats and barley.’
  • 44) ‘Bread made from rye flour with all the bran removed is pale grey.’
  • 45) ‘The product is whole grain if the first ingredient is whole grain, whole wheat or rye (plain wheat flour is not whole grain).’
  • 46) ‘The basis of the Mordvin economy was cereal agriculture, and the staples of the Mordvin diet were bread made from rye flour, as well as oats and barley.’
  • 47) ‘There is evidence from 4000 BC in the Swiss lake habitations that the people made it from barley and rye flour.’
  • 48) ‘For example, multi-grain bagels, rye crackers, brown rice and oatmeal fuel muscles and protect against cancer, diabetes and heart disease.’
  • 49) ‘Meanwhile, the WWI recipe substitutes equal amounts corn and rye flour for wheat products.’
  • 50) ‘In a large bowl, combine the plain white and rye flours with the soda and soft brown sugar.’
  • 51) ‘Look for oatmeal, barley, brown rice, rye flakes and wheat germ.’
  • 52) ‘It certainly lends itself more to toasting than the close-textured rye breads, staple food in much of northern Europe.’
  • 53) ‘But people eat seven-grain bread with wheat and rye in it every day.’
  • 54) ‘Ruth orders four rounds of quadruple ryes, Faulkner orders four rounds of moonshine.’
  • 55) ‘Spirits such as whisky, bourbon, Cognac, Armagnac and rye derive virtually all their colour from the time they spend in oak barrels - they would be clear as water otherwise.’
  • 56) ‘Heaven Hill markets more than 50 labels of bourbon, rye, scotch, vodka, gin, tequila, rum, cognac, wines and cordials.’
  • 57) ‘Good old boys drink whisky and rye, but what's the tipple of a famous drag queen?’
  • 58) ‘Your four food groups are beer, vodka, rye, and rum.’
  • 59) ‘Freer admitted downing half a bottle of vodka and half a bottle of Canadian rye before the assault.’
  • 60) ‘The coffin was open, and someone had placed a pint bottle of rye and several blues harps next to the late Junior, who lay there looking stately in a powder-blue suit and derby.’
  • 61) ‘If his teammates are to be believed, he was capable of draining a bathtub full of beer and two bottles of rye in a single sitting.’
  • 62) ‘Two bars offer brisk service, and the bartenders will occasionally let you order up to four tiny drinks at a time, with rum, gin, vodka and rye on the menu.’
  • 63) ‘If my memory serves, he had ruined his stomach with rotgut whiskey, and had taken to drinking his rye with milk.’
  • 64) ‘The secret, he tells me, is to use decent bourbon rather than the more traditional rye, and he garnishes the drink with a twist of lemon and a fresh blackberry.’
  • 65) ‘He ordered an Irish coffee and I ordered a shot of rye, straight up.’
  • 66) ‘Sometimes I'll make furtive pilgrimages to the Carnegie Deli to dine on that whopper classic, the hot pastrami on rye.’
  • 67) ‘Before he passed away a few years ago, he gave me his hoard of recipes, including authentic New York cheesecake, bagels, rye, pumpernickel, challah, cole slaw and many others.’
  • 68) ‘Titus was getting almost weepy about this when Patrice limped in with the lunch and spread it out on the marble table: hot pastrami on rye, big pickles, pastries and coffee in white cardboard tubs.’
  • 69) ‘Perfectly preserved, just as the top carried its distinct markings, just like the pattern of pricks in the round loaf of rye at Burgstrom's Bakery.’
  • 70) ‘And earlier this year, New York shops introduced their first menu item not originated in London: that hometown staple, pastrami on rye.’
  • 71) ‘‘Hot pastrami on rye with mustard,’ she screams to the entire deli, although the meat slicer is only a few feet behind her.’
  • 72) ‘We filled up on the requisite minimum daily requirement of pastrami on seeded rye with deli brown mustard.’
  • 73) ‘He kept talking with his mouth full of pastrami and rye.’
  • 74) ‘Jewish delis sell your basic beef (corned beef, roast beef, pastrami) hot on rye.’
  • 75) ‘The pastrami sandwiches on rye with mustard and coleslaw that Daddy brought home from his job didn't delight me like they used to.’
  • 76) ‘I think it's too soon to bake your calling card into a loaf of rye.’
  • 77) ‘And beside every platter of overcooked meat, she placed a golden loaf of seedless rye.’
  • 78) ‘As a heads up, buns and rolls normally go first - Italian bread, most whites - and keep an eye on the rye and pumpernickel.’
  • 79) ‘Preferably on a nice, light rye with spicy mustard and a little horseradish?’
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