hole vs whole

hole whole

Definitions

  • 1) Physics A vacant position in an atom left by the absence of a valence electron, especially a position in a semiconductor that acts as a carrier of positive electric charge.
  • 2) The small pit lined with a cup into which a golf ball must be hit.
  • 3) An awkward situation; a predicament.
  • 4) One of the divisions of a golf course, from tee to cup.
  • 5) Sports An opening in a defensive formation, such as the area of a baseball infield between two adjacent fielders.
  • 6) An ugly, squalid, or depressing dwelling.
  • 7) A fault or flaw.
  • 8) An animal's hollowed-out habitation, such as a burrow.
  • 9) A deep or isolated place of confinement; a dungeon.
  • 10) An opening or perforation.
  • 11) A hollowed place in something solid; a cavity or pit.
  • 12) A deep place in a body of water.
  • 13) (Fives) At Eton College, England, that part of the floor of the court between the step and the pepperbox.
  • 14) A small cavity used in some games, usually one into which a marble or ball is to be played or driven; hence, a score made by playing a marble or ball into such a hole, as in golf.
  • 15) A hollow place or cavity; an excavation; a pit; an opening in or through a solid body, a fabric, etc.; a perforation; a rent; a fissure.
  • 16) [Colloq.] clandestine, underhand.
  • 17) An excavation in the ground, made by an animal to live in, or a natural cavity inhabited by an animal; hence, a low, narrow, or dark lodging or place; a mean habitation.
  • 18) A level grassy area surrounded by mountains: a word formerly much in use and still current in the northern parts of the Rocky Mountains.
  • 19) A puzzling situation; a scrape; a fix.
  • 20) Hence A narrow, dark, or obscure lodging or place; especially, an obscure lodging for one in hiding, or a secret room for a prohibited or disreputable business, as for counterfeiting, unlicensed printing, liquor-selling, etc.: as, a rum-hole.
  • 21) A hollow place or cavity in a solid body; a perforation, orifice, aperture, pit, rent, or crevice.
  • 22) The excavated habitation of certain wild animals, as the fox, the badger, etc.; a burrow.
  • 23) Synonyms Opening, cave, cavity, excavation, hollow.
  • 24) An indentation in the coast; a cove, or small harbor, as Holmes's Hole in Martha's Vineyard, and Wood's Hole on the coast opposite; a narrow passage or waterway between two islands, as Robinson's Hole, in the same region.
  • 25) Den, kennel, hovel.
  • 26) The hollow interior of a ship: now called, by corruption, the hold. See hold.
  • 27) obsolete Whole.
  • 28) In billiards, to win by pocketing. Some billiard games of mixed pockets and caroms require the final shot to be a carom; others insist upon a pocket.
  • 29) Specifically, to retire into a den or burrow for the winter: said of a hibernating animal.
  • 30) To go into a hole, as an animal into its den or burrow.
  • 31) Todriveintoahole.
  • 32) A simplified (and the earlier) spelling of whole.
  • 33) In coal-mining, to undercut the coal, or pick away the lower part of the seam, so that that which is above can be thrown down by means of wedges or by the use of powder.
  • 34) The former and more correct spelling of whole.
  • 35) Hollow; deep; concave.
  • 36) Hollow; hungry.
  • 37) In mining: To connect two workings with each other.
  • 38) Hollow;deep;concave.
  • 39) Hollow;hungry.
  • 40) To cut, dig, or make a hole or holes in: as, to hole a post for the insertion of rails or bars; to hole a flute.
  • 41) To drive into a hole.
  • 42) To put a hole in.
  • 43) To make a hole in something.
  • 44) To put or propel into a hole.
  • 45) (in the hole) In debt.
  • 46) (in the hole) Having a score below zero.
  • 47) (in the hole) At a disadvantage.

Definitions

  • 1) An entirety.
  • 2) Something complete, without any parts missing.
  • 3) A number, group, set, or thing lacking no part or element; a complete thing.
  • 4) An entity or system made up of interrelated parts.
  • 5) considering all things; taking everything into account; in view of all the circumstances or conditions.
  • 6) See under Committee.
  • 7) A regular combination of parts; a system.
  • 8) The entire thing; the entire assemblage of parts; totality; all of a thing, without defect or exception; a thing complete in itself.
  • 9) an assemblage of parts that is regarded as a single entity
  • 10) An entire thing; a thing complete in itself; the entire or total assemblage of parts; all of a thing without defect or exception.
  • 11) Synonyms Total, totality, entirety, amount, aggregate, gross, sum.
  • 12) A complete system; a regular combination of parts; an organic unity.
  • 13) of food From which none of its constituents has been removed.
  • 14) sound, uninjured, healthy.
  • 15) entire.
  • 16) Having been restored; healed.
  • 17) Not wounded, injured, or impaired; sound or unhurt.
  • 18) Constituting the full amount, extent, or duration.
  • 19) Containing all components; complete.
  • 20) Not divided or disjoined; in one unit.
  • 21) Having the same parents.
  • 22) (Law of Descent) See under Blood, n., 2.
  • 23) Complete; entire; not defective or imperfect; not broken or fractured; unimpaired; uninjured; integral
  • 24) (Zoöl.), [Prov. Eng.] the common snipe, as distinguished from the smaller jacksnipe.
  • 25) (Mus.) the note which represents a note of longest duration in common use; a semibreve.
  • 26) (Math.) a number which is not a fraction or mixed number; an integer.
  • 27) Possessing, or being in a state of, heath and soundness; healthy; sound; well.
  • 28) Containing the total amount, number, etc.; comprising all the parts; free from deficiency; all; total; entire
  • 29) including all components without exception; being one unit or constituting the full amount or extent or duration; complete
  • 30) not injured
  • 31) acting together as a single undiversified whole
  • 32) exhibiting or restored to vigorous good health
  • 33) colloquial in entirety; entirely; wholly
  • 34) Entirely; wholly.
  • 35) Wholly;entirely.
  • 36) (on the whole) Considering everything.
  • 37) (on the whole) In most instances or cases; as a rule.
  • 38) (as a whole) All parts or aspects considered; altogether.

Examples

  • 1) Yet what did he expect when his own story was full of holes.
  • 2) Cut a small hole in each one and stuff with half an olive for the pupil.
  • 3) They no longer have last year's hole in their head.
  • 4) Eight birdies in four holes was gilt-edged golf.
  • 5) You'll have to find your own rabbit hole.
  • 6) It's not difficult to pick holes in the proposals.
  • 7) He also had birdie putts on the 17th and 18th holes as he finished eight under par.
  • 8) The 7th is the only hole on the course that really makes use of Hazeltine lake.
  • 9) If using festive pastry shapes instead, you won't need to make any holes in the pastry.
  • 10) They need acquisition complexity like a hole in the head.
  • 11) Or the perfect bolt hole for a golfing weekend?
  • 12) The main hole in this theory is that there is not one shred of evidence.
  • 13) They used to make holes in the skirting boards and come out and look at you.
  • 14) What can one do when one finds that one only fits into one hole?
  • 15) This is the hardest hole on the course.
  • 16) They decided to play another nine holes.
  • 17) The head rolled down a rabbit hole.
  • 18) Try not to pick holes in yourself.
  • 19) The pitch is full of rabbit holes and cuts up too easily.
  • 20) There is a kind of owl that makes holes to live in like moles.
  • 21) It was pointed out that playing nine holes of golf on the morning of the match was not entirely the best preparation.
  • 22) How did he make a double bogey from the fairway on the 18th hole?
  • 23) She nearly made a hole in my head just now, but we must not get discouraged.
  • 24) He holed a bunker shot to pick up a birdie on the 16th.
  • 25) With the new back tees this hole is much more like it used to be 20 years ago.
  • 26) A bogey on the opening hole led to a grimace and prolonged whispering from the galleries.
  • 27) It was obvious other people had hit the hole, as there were five or six wheel trims in the hedge.
  • 28) Just ask the three women in Yorkshire who had a miraculous escape when their car landed upside down after hitting a hole.
  • 29) "The hole is more than just an opening in the ground, but also includes me -- a rather bold assertion and some first class thinking _outside the hole_."
  • 30) Chaucer has hole, hool, and hoolich; and Wiclif, _hole_ and _hool_.
  • 31) R&R Taqueria The term "hole in the wall" applies here, the wall being at a working Shell Station south of Baltimore.
  • 32) I was then transferred to what they call the hole, which is not exactly segregation.
  • 33) Mr. AUSTAN GOOLSBEE (Chairman, President's Council of Economic Advisers): Everybody knows this hole is the deepest since 1929, and I think that just confirms what people knew.
  • 34) As I am not up for juvenile exchanges the hole is the appropriate place for your comment.
  • 35) And the hole is the center of one of the nastiest, meanest three-hole finishing stretches in golf.
  • 36) The peat bogs of northern England and Scotland will provide sufficient protection to the environment if the hole is at least 1.47 meters deep.
  • 37) ‘Transplant the seedlings in the normal manner by making a small hole through the surface mulch/manure and plant them into it.’
  • 38) ‘Jay mounded flour, made a hole in it, and dumped in a pinch of salt and then an egg.’
  • 39) ‘He's been out in the car park for the last couple of weeks, digging a big hole in the ground.’
  • 40) ‘The cheapest and most ecologically sound way to build a swimming pool is simply to hollow a hole in the ground.’
  • 41) ‘After almost an hour, rescuers took his body from the hole, and paramedics declared him dead at the scene.’
  • 42) ‘He dug a small hole in the ground and placed the seed in it.’
  • 43) ‘I headed out for the backyard where I proceeded to dig about a zillion holes in the ground searching for gold doubloons.’
  • 44) ‘Just two weeks ago the bridge was temporarily closed while city officials repaired a gaping hole in its deteriorating surface.’
  • 45) ‘It took forever but soon they had dug three holes and placed the bodies inside before covering them back up.’
  • 46) ‘For instance there were certain stones to be found in fields or graveyards with a hole or hollow which at times was full of water.’
  • 47) ‘There were large holes in the playing surface on one side of the pitch.’
  • 48) ‘And, as many cyclists would testify, smooth roads without pitted surfaces and random holes would be a good start.’
  • 49) ‘‘I saw women and children having to dig deep holes in the ground, often over eight metres, and climb down into them to find water,’ he said.’
  • 50) ‘Using a pencil, tease out the young plant from the seed tray and make a hole in the compost deep enough to take the roots of the seedling.’
  • 51) ‘The crash occurred when the truck, driving at a high speed, failed to avoid large holes in the surface of the road.’
  • 52) ‘It came to rest just below the surface, leaving a hole 18 inches in diameter and sending up a large white cloud.’
  • 53) ‘He said some of the holes in the road surface were as deep as eight inches.’
  • 54) ‘Returning to the garbage bag, he began to dig a large hole in the ground, into which he dumped the sack.’
  • 55) ‘The new pictures show that most of the moon is dark, but impacts have blasted holes in the surface to reveal much brighter material underneath, which is probably a mixture of ices.’
  • 56) ‘They feed by probing, and leave bands of holes along a beach where they have stuck their beaks into the sand probing for food.’
  • 57) ‘Take a large sewing needle to puncture evenly spaced holes around the top and bottom of the shade.’
  • 58) ‘We worked along the steel wall passing large circular holes where the heavy brass portholes had once been.’
  • 59) ‘The roof is leaking, there are holes in the floor, the sewage pipes are broken, the heating doesn't work - there is no money in the kitty.’
  • 60) ‘The government initially said the submarine had found 14 cracks or holes through which oil was leaking.’
  • 61) ‘I also discovered that most of his socks have holes in them.’
  • 62) ‘Has it ever occurred to you that maybe I want holes in my socks?’
  • 63) ‘The majority of schools need some form of restoration because of crumbling walls, bullet holes, broken windows and leaking roofs.’
  • 64) ‘Gaping holes puncture the walls, leaving glimpses of lifeless interiors through jagged brickwork and shattered windows.’
  • 65) ‘Choose a leather strap in pink, blue, white or black and then customize it by punching out the perforated holes to get your message across.’
  • 66) ‘Shattered glass on the bus seats greeted the first driver to arrive for work, who discovered that vandals had broken in through a hole in the fence.’
  • 67) ‘As the letter was carried from the FBI to the Army lab, some powder leaked from a hole in the envelope into the plastic bag containing it.’
  • 68) ‘The window pane of the restaurant was broken, leaving a hole 30 centimetres in diameter.’
  • 69) ‘Someone had broken a hole in a meshed railing and people came through it and across the railway track to the Quay.’
  • 70) ‘Suction occurs when there is a hole or fissure in the dam wall on the upstream side, and it means death for divers.’
  • 71) ‘At the centre of the dome is an oculus, a circular hole, which is the only source of light.’
  • 72) ‘I made a hole in a black bin bag and put my head through it like some sort of black, plastic tabard.’
  • 73) ‘Mr Stoff said he did not find anything inside the store, but the vandals had made a hole in its window.’
  • 74) ‘Mr Tincombe has tried various traps and boarded up holes the rats have got through, but says they are attracted by a compost bin next door.’
  • 75) ‘Throw a towel or jacket over the bird, put it in a box or container with air holes and take it to the nearest animal shelter or wildlife rehabilitation center.’
  • 76) ‘Each acorn was cleaned, weighed, and examined for insect larvae exit holes, splits in the shell, and protruding radicles.’
  • 77) ‘Cut a cross-shaped hole out of the back of your t-shirt and go get sunburnt.’
  • 78) ‘Steve Ryser and Mike Franklin sunk a long putt each on holes nine and eighteen respectively.’
  • 79) ‘Lytham is a classic seaside links, nine flattish holes out, nine flattish holes in.’
  • 80) ‘This usually occurs on short putts as golfers try to steer the ball toward the hole.’
  • 81) ‘Your eyes can follow the ball to the hole, but your spine angle stays the same.’
  • 82) ‘When your putting goes sour in the middle of a round, here's how to get the ball rolling into the hole.’
  • 83) ‘So when I turned pro, one of my gimmicks was to throw my hat over the hole so the ball wouldn't pop out.’
  • 84) ‘You may face a longer putt by not being able to work the ball closer to the hole, but you will be safely on the green.’
  • 85) ‘Instead of trying to just hit the green, you're trying to get the ball close to the hole.’
  • 86) ‘I tried to focus on the speed and knew my adrenaline would get the ball to the hole.’
  • 87) ‘Base your decision on pace depending on what will happen to the ball after the hole.’
  • 88) ‘He'd just pick the ball out of the hole, hand me the putter and beeline for the next tee.’
  • 89) ‘As a result, they hit it, and the ball breaks across the hole and below it, and it never has a chance to go in.’
  • 90) ‘The big talking point was the speed of the greens and many a golfer paid the price of leaving the ball above the hole with four putts as a reward.’
  • 91) ‘I thought if I could hit my lob wedge and stop the ball below the hole, I had a shot at par.’
  • 92) ‘And if they hit the green, they hope the ball stays below the hole; anything putted from above will likely run off.’
  • 93) ‘On the putting surface, the track of the ball to the hole is in their mind's eye as exact as the lines on a graph.’
  • 94) ‘Unfortunately, the Dingle man managed to get his ball just nine metres from the hole but it was a very credible attempt for someone unused to the tee.’
  • 95) ‘There is an air of anticipation among golfers in the wake of the green light for the extension of the course to eighteen holes.’
  • 96) ‘I made eagle on the same hole last year and albatross this year: I'm going to struggle to keep that going next year.’
  • 97) ‘Although his personal tussle with partner Lyle fizzled out, Jacobson admitted he had been nervous and uncomfortable in the opening holes.’
  • 98) ‘They completed 72 holes at four golf courses in one day to raise more than £10,000 for Cancer Research.’
  • 99) ‘The extent of my golf experience comes down to 18 holes on the miniature golf course at Nifty Fifty's.’
  • 100) ‘Top lawyers to play 18 holes at 18 golf courses in 12 hours to raise funds for meningitis research’
  • 101) ‘No less of an authority than Jack Nicklaus called it the hardest hole in tournament golf.’
  • 102) ‘Going back a few years, 36 holes a day was a standard in major championships.’
  • 103) ‘Because of this the tournament was reduced to a 36 hole event.’
  • 104) ‘So torrential was the downpour, that the fourth round, which had already started - it was 36 holes a day - was abandoned.’
  • 105) ‘It can be found, I think, on the golf course, when four friends gather for their weekly nine or eighteen holes.’
  • 106) ‘I knew I was playing pretty well when we stopped after nine holes to have lunch.’
  • 107) ‘I went back last year and it costs $5 to play nine holes and they do 50,000 rounds a year.’
  • 108) ‘I decided to play nine holes on the Notre Dame golf course early, before she met me at my dorm.’
  • 109) ‘Despite the better ball format it took the Americans nine holes to produce a birdie, which was only good enough for a half.’
  • 110) ‘Harrington, who withdrew from the Open, was four under after nine holes but came home in 38 for a two under 70.’
  • 111) ‘Parkin was two holes up after nine holes, scoring a birdie at the fourth and eagling the ninth to score 33.’
  • 112) ‘Yesterday, although refusing to buckle under the pressure, Montgomerie was undone by a poor putting performance over the opening nine holes.’
  • 113) ‘Hoey found himself two down after the opening two holes but he had turned that deficit into a one hole advantage by lunch time.’
  • 114) ‘He once walked off the course after only a few holes of his opening practice round and withdrew from the upcoming Wales Open.’
  • 115) ‘Woods found the rough with an iron at the first, thereby setting the tone for his concession of two strokes in his opening three holes.’
  • 116) ‘Garrido's round was achieved without the use of his driver, which he broke at the second hole on Friday.’
  • 117) ‘The Ulsterman made 32 plodding pars in his opening 36 holes.’
  • 118) ‘While walking this earth he commented that foxes had holes and birds had nests in which to live, but he had ‘nowhere to lay his head’.’
  • 119) ‘Hounds that have successfully tracked a fox are trained to pull it or dig it out of its hole, and the fox is killed.’
  • 120) ‘From holes, burrows, and crevices, the creatures of the desert night crawled.’
  • 121) ‘Other holes have been burrowed to accommodate the reef's larger residents, which give it its popular name, Conger Alley.’
  • 122) ‘They were slippery with mud, filled with rabbit burrows and gopher holes and rather high up.’
  • 123) ‘How convenient it was that all the prey species were excavating holes and hollows and leafy chambers.’
  • 124) ‘Except when you find the foxhole and the dogs go in, there's not a fox, but a weasel cowering in the corner of the hole.’
  • 125) ‘Tonight's report takes us to the Grand Teton National Park, in Jackson hole, Wyoming.’
  • 126) ‘This process leaves the top and bottom surfaces with an excess of charge which attracts mobile electrons or holes.’
  • 127) ‘Electrons are not the only charge carriers; holes, or open spaces in bonding sites can also be used in conduction.’
  • 128) ‘Irradiating such quantum dots with ultraviolet light creates excited electrons and the positive holes they leave behind.’
  • 129) ‘When an electron and a hole interact in a polymer, quantum mechanics tells us that their spins can combine in four different ways.’
  • 130) ‘And if the gate voltage is set just right, equal numbers of electrons and holes can flow through the tube in opposite directions at the same time.’
  • 131) ‘In an emotional message days after Ivan's death, Mr Cameron told of the "hole" left in his life by the youngster's death.’
  • 132) ‘Good on the surface, but as many have pointed out, all the plot holes and problems show up when you think about it for more than 10 seconds.’
  • 133) ‘One insider said the reason for the explosion of counterfeiting was the hole still existing in the law.’
  • 134) ‘Within 24 hr of the announcement, wily business pilots had figured out the plan was full of holes.’
  • 135) ‘Did anyone else find the logic holes problematic?’
  • 136) ‘Now, it doesn't take a genius to spot the glaring hole here.’
  • 137) ‘I don't believe that you can build a conclusive argument either for or against a ban, as there are inevitably going to be serious holes in both arguments.’
  • 138) ‘Like too many of this government's initiatives, as soon as you start to examine the details gaping holes emerge.’
  • 139) ‘It's not fact, it's a theory, with holes you can drive a truck through.’
  • 140) ‘It's totally daft and has plot holes you can drive a bus through.’
  • 141) ‘This leaves a hole where its positive agenda should be.’
  • 142) ‘Is he afraid we will expose the huge holes in these fatally flawed proposals?’
  • 143) ‘On one hand, the film is a terrible mess of plot holes, ridiculous premises, and overacting.’
  • 144) ‘It looks like the full report is not out until Monday, but I think I have already spotted the enormous hole in it.’
  • 145) ‘We need not only to discover what went wrong with the police - and why - but also how the CPS failed to spot the gaping holes in the evidence.’
  • 146) ‘The agenda is interesting, but with glaring holes where the problems of the world are.’
  • 147) ‘That's mainly because I love the experience of going to see a film and think that that makes up for any plot holes you may encounter.’
  • 148) ‘That first budget would expose the holes in their plans: how to cut tax, while maintaining spending levels on public services and levering more money out of the private sector.’
  • 149) ‘People in the industry will spot holes in this legislation in all sorts of directions, and I am afraid that they have already spotted some.’
  • 150) ‘In recent research, atmospheric scientists have been filling in holes in their basic knowledge about the ways that nature affects the chemistry of the atmosphere.’
  • 151) ‘The hole in Jim's argument is that, before WWI, they said that capitalism wouldn't allow it.’
  • 152) ‘Her sudden idea to bring Ryan with her, to the hole of a town she originated from, had not been discussed with him.’
  • 153) ‘Students were aggrieved at the possibility of being ‘stuck renting a hole in Cowley’ as Jessop put it.’
  • 154) ‘Four more fights in this hole before we get the hell out of here.’
  • 155) ‘You have no rights, only criminals and important people have rights in this hole of a country.’
  • 156) ‘This place is a hole, the waiters are rude, the food expensive.’
  • 157) ‘The stage was huge - the World Cup - his team was in a hole, and the situation was certainly death or glory.’
  • 158) ‘The criticism of the state companies has surfaced at a time when they appear to be climbing out of the financial holes into which they stumbled in the 1990s.’
  • 159) ‘It took us 20 years to get in this hole and it's going to take us 20 years to get out.’
  • 160) ‘The police are incapable of satisfying all these demands, so we're in a hole.’
  • 161) ‘When you're in a hole, like we are, the challenge of leadership is a lot harder.’
  • 162) ‘He pulled the club out of a big hole, but he is a businessman and he made his money back.’
  • 163) ‘But with the electoral countdown ticking away, his government badly needs to pull itself out of a hole.’
  • 164) ‘Two days later it was holed and drifting landwards with oil gushing out of its tanks.’
  • 165) ‘Casualties were light but they lost one of their ships when it hit a rock and was holed.’
  • 166) ‘The vessel was holed in numerous tanks with loss of crude and resultant pollution.’
  • 167) ‘This attack only managed to hole her above the waterline and set her alight.’
  • 168) ‘There was a tiny hut with a corrugated roof which was thoughtfully holed in several places to permit stargazing.’
  • 169) ‘Pumps were put on the vessel, which was holed, to keep it afloat so that boats could try and tow it from the rocks.’
  • 170) ‘Daly, the boat is holed and fills with water at high tide.’
  • 171) ‘The slick close to Spain's shores was bigger than the 5,000 tons of fuel oil spilled when the Prestige was holed off the Galician coast on November 13.’
  • 172) ‘The slick is estimated to contain some 11,000 tonnes of fuel oil - far bigger than the initial oil spill produced when one of the Prestige's tanks was holed, on November 13.’
  • 173) ‘The Alliance went to Bonhomme's rescue but managed to do more harm than good, holing the Bonhomme so badly that she was eventually to sink after a fierce three-and-a-half-hour battle.’
  • 174) ‘The harbourmaster assessed the wreck, which was extensively holed, as unsalvageable.’
  • 175) ‘The tourists spoke of the moment their cruise in Antarctica turned into a real-life adventure after their liner was holed below the water line.’
  • 176) ‘Magnificently, he holed the shot and allowed himself to smile again.’
  • 177) ‘I'm swinging the club the way I want to, the putter is okay too, it's just that I'm holing nothing.’
  • 178) ‘I wasn't at the green when he holed the putt and punched the air four or five times, but it remains one of my strongest memories, even now.’
  • 179) ‘He was one of five in a play-off for three places at Princes and went through in considerable style by holing a chip from seventy feet at the first tie hole.’
  • 180) ‘But a bad drive down the 17th led to only a par and when he pulled his approach to the last 45 feet wide he needed to hole it to win or three-putt to lose.’
  • 181) ‘I holed a 10-footer on the last and was sure it was going to get me in, but it didn't and it's disappointing I've not had another chance.’
  • 182) ‘I holed a good number of putts all day, including a useful eighteen footer on my last green.’
  • 183) ‘Having missed the green with his approach and left with a bunker between himself and the pin, he holed the chip for a birdie to finish in 76 for a total of 152, ten over par.’
  • 184) ‘I cut a driver into the wind to about 12 feet and although I didn't hole it for eagle, it was a birdie and a change of fortunes in the tournament.’
  • 185) ‘Webb made birdie from a greenside bunker, but Sorenstam duly holed for eagle.’
  • 186) ‘Then he holed for his par and the title.’
  • 187) ‘Malton and Norton GC 20-handicapper Mike Punchard holed in one for the first time in 15 years of playing the game on the 169-yard 17th hole.’
  • 188) ‘It looked as though it might affect him, but he said it did not and in practice on Monday he had holed in one on the 16th, admittedly with his third attempt.’
  • 189) ‘I had to sit in the clubhouse and nervously watch as Michael holed about a 40-foot putt on No.17 for par to stay within one shot of me.’
  • 190) ‘Jason Horner holed in one at the fifth in Saturday's club four-ball.’
  • 191) ‘After he holed that putt he stayed calm, kept his gum working and just raised one finger.’
  • 192) ‘I holed about a 40-footer for birdie on the first hole, and Mr. McKay jumped up and high-fived me.’
  • 193) ‘While I was there, Nicklaus holed a birdie on the 16th.’
  • 194) ‘What was impressive was, so shortly after holing the winning putt, just seconds after his moment of glory, Payne was thinking of my situation.’
  • 195) ‘Until the last putt is holed on 18, it doesn't matter.’

Examples

  • 1) The whole town can be an open forum for thousands of activities.
  • 2) For how long do we keep dismissing the whole body as unfit for purpose?
  • 3) IT'S a whole different story this season.
  • 4) Products and whole businesses can become obsolete as tomorrow leaves them behind.
  • 5) We are trying to lead not just for this city but for the whole country.
  • 6) It makes the whole car feel more alert and alive.
  • 7) Her eyes were down the whole time.
  • 8) We have the whole year with great festivals and nice races to win.
  • 9) We ended up spending the whole week together.
  • 10) When you're in a restaurant a whole table of people are all on their phones.
  • 11) whole floors of people are being wiped out and a generation of bankers lost.
  • 12) Within the space of a single lap the whole course had been turned to a quagmire.
  • 13) It has been about the whole squad all year.
  • 14) This app will give you stats for a whole bunch of scenarios.
  • 15) Then it will be whole different experience.
  • 16) Your son feels pushed aside and the whole situation probably makes him squirm.
  • 17) whole milk is also lower in sugar.
  • 18) Singing from the same hymn sheet makes the whole process a lot smoother.
  • 19) Working with a cosmetic dentist opened my eyes to a whole new world.
  • 20) Another good exercise is to allow the whole of your body to collapse.
  • 21) The whole of the business in that country from beginning to end was scandalous and disgraceful.
  • 22) The result is a more coherent whole than their previous efforts.
  • 23) Your information will only be used for the alternative to prize in whole or in part.
  • 24) You can be in an accident and your whole world can change.
  • 25) There were wakes weeks holidays at that time and the whole town would shut down.
  • 26) We do it around the whole country.
  • 27) Throw the two together and the whole reputation can change.
  • 28) He was being very circumspect about the whole thing.
  • 29) Why should he get away with it the whole time?
  • 30) They eat a variety of fish which they swallow whole.
  • 31) We played our style and the whole side worked together.
  • 32) We should see them as whole people.
  • 33) The whole island has seen an average increase of 100%.
  • 34) The error of the opposite argument, is in assuming one thing, which, being denied, the whole fails; that is, it assumes that the _whole_ labor of the United States would be profitably employed without manufactures.
  • 35) The Law secured to them the _whole of every seventh year; _ Lev.xxv. 3-6; thus giving to those who were servants during the entire period between the jubilees, _eight whole years, _ including the jubilee year, of unbroken rest.
  • 36) This principle is as follows: _government, as the representative of the will of the whole people, should in general, attempt the regulation, or control, of industrial matters only to benefit the people as a whole_.
  • 37) Rule, it being but _two whole Notes_ from the next _half Note_ to it; the reason is this, the _Ninth_ is one _whole Note_ below the _Eighth_, therefore the 2 must be a _whole Note_ below the _Treble_, otherwise they would not be a true _Eighth_, therefore the _half Note_ is put between 2 and 3.
  • 38) According to metaphysic, the perception of matter is not the whole given fact with which we have to deal in working out this problem -- (it is not the whole given fact; for, as we have said, our apprehension of, or participation in, the perception of matter -- this is the whole given fact); -- but the perception of matter is the _whole objective_ part of the given fact.
  • 39) The great thing in this war is to see the whole thing in proportion -- the _whole_ thing.
  • 40) I used to think about dancing-school, and birthday parties, and rigging up, and summer fashions, and how many diamonds I'd have when I was married, and all that, the whole of the time, Peace — the _whole_ of it; then I got mad when my dresses didn't fit, and I used to strike Therése and Kate, if you'll believe it — when I was real angry that was.
  • 41) It was a "mean old night" to the whole house; and when I say the _whole_ house, I mean both halves of it.
  • 42) But it was unoccupied that he might fill a higher seat prepared, waiting for, and needing, not the undying part but the everlasting whole; for we are not _whole_ till we drop our dust!
  • 43) ‘I am afraid that a whole country, an entire people, will be destroyed for nothing.’
  • 44) ‘Projecting growth over a whole century for the entire planet is just plain silly.’
  • 45) ‘The whole idea that the entire country took to arms with pitchforks and scythes is also a fallacy.’
  • 46) ‘Both of these might have elements of truth, but they can hardly be the whole truth.’
  • 47) ‘The hard questions are: what do we need, how much do we need, and are the ads telling the whole truth?’
  • 48) ‘Surely that is their job, to be independent, fearless, and tell the whole truth.’
  • 49) ‘In truth the whole evening was testimony to the benefits that can be accrued from Transition Year.’
  • 50) ‘I don't think the whole truth has come out and I don't think it ever will.’
  • 51) ‘He had not told me the whole truth about what the relationship was.’
  • 52) ‘The truth is that the whole system will be bankrupt if we pay for any medication for the elderly.’
  • 53) ‘Then he sized up the two Irish reporters, figured they could take it, and told the whole truth.’
  • 54) ‘You may walk the whole way to Monatore bridge and back, a distance of just over two miles, or else do a shorter walk.’
  • 55) ‘It includes a whole host of guided walks that will help people understand and enjoy some wonderful local attractions.’
  • 56) ‘I quickly joked that if he spent whole day walking around flapping his arms, he would not be fat either.’
  • 57) ‘The whole process from walking through the door takes five and a half minutes, without even a hint of a rush.’
  • 58) ‘This means having a train station in Shawfair town centre within easy walking distance of the whole population.’
  • 59) ‘We walked and spent the whole evening last night nattering about him.’
  • 60) ‘Networks are easy to set up, thanks to improved software that walks you through the whole process with wizards.’
  • 61) ‘After a while we began a gentle ascent of the Little Homer Saddle, the only climb in the whole walk.’
  • 62) ‘Height, weight, hair colour, the way they walk plus a whole host of other factors allow you to identify them.’
  • 63) ‘There are concerns about bench-marking and substitution and a whole lot of issues.’
  • 64) ‘Instead, we just got a lecture about a whole lot of other issues that were not relevant.’
  • 65) ‘An atheist will always be asking questions about a whole lot of issues, not only religion.’
  • 66) ‘But above all else, the emphasis is on maximum participation and a whole lot of fun!’
  • 67) ‘As you know, he got himself into a whole lot of trouble with folks in New York City.’
  • 68) ‘This generation depends on a whole lot of people who live outside the United States.’
  • 69) ‘Even in one season at Rangers he packed in a whole lot of drama.’
  • 70) ‘There were tears and shouting and generally a whole lot of upset.’
  • 71) ‘I wrote an argument against that point of view but I'm not sure I convinced a whole lot of people.’
  • 72) ‘These spiritual concepts lead onto a whole lot of other spiritual concepts.’
  • 73) ‘Alamara Margaret Khan says that college life teaches a person a whole lot of things’
  • 74) ‘My daughter lives in Winnipeg with her children, and I live in Ottawa, and there are a whole lot of us.’
  • 75) ‘He added that the centre would now be able to undertake a whole lot of other activities with the new space outdoors.’
  • 76) ‘A whole lot of channels sprang up during these years, keen to milk the cash cow that TV became.’
  • 77) ‘This way, the participants get to see a whole lot of India, which they would never have otherwise.’
  • 78) ‘Meanwhile, I've heard a whole lot of people demand their fair share of fair treatment.’
  • 79) ‘Within that tightly compressed time, you are expected to convey a whole lot of information.’
  • 80) ‘So we're bracing for a whole lot of damage in this area if the storm stays on track.’
  • 81) ‘What this actually amounts to is a whole lot of talk and very little action.’
  • 82) ‘He says he doesn't earn a whole lot of money himself and rarely works less than 60 hours a week.’
  • 83) ‘The bread contains nibbly, whole pieces of grain which have the reputation of damaging fillings.’
  • 84) ‘When you've done the sums, the rainforest is actually worth more whole than in pieces.’
  • 85) ‘A whole piece of chicken may frighten them away but a chicken wing keeps them content.’
  • 86) ‘Stir in the squash and lightly mash with the back of a fork, leaving some pieces whole.’
  • 87) ‘Close attention is needed to piece together a whole, but it's worth it for the the range of writing.’
  • 88) ‘It includes whole scenes, footage, music and assorted bits and pieces left out of the original.’
  • 89) ‘Don't have a whole chocolate bar, stick to a couple of pieces and an apple to fill you up.’
  • 90) ‘The animals are then served whole in coconut milk and are consumed in their entirety.’
  • 91) ‘Ethylene evolution was determined in whole leaves, and thereafter in wounded discs.’
  • 92) ‘Save these dairy products for special occasions - they have even more fat than whole milk.’
  • 93) ‘A good natural fungicide can be made from whole milk, bicarb soda and canola oil.’
  • 94) ‘As for mashed potatoes, always ask if they're made with skim milk or whole milk.’
  • 95) ‘Then we tried to wean Tessa onto whole milk, and she refused to sleep until we gave her back her formula.’
  • 96) ‘Smooth eyelids and erase wrinkles by applying whole milk to the area and letting it remain there all day.’
  • 97) ‘She gulped it down, then took a sip of the new gallon of whole milk her dad bought for her yesterday.’
  • 98) ‘They would let whole milk stand for several hours until the lighter cream rose to the top.’
  • 99) ‘A simple thick mixture of rosewater, whole milk and oatmeal is a natural facial cleanser.’
  • 100) ‘After your child is two years old, it is safe to give him or her skim milk instead of whole milk.’
  • 101) ‘We defined high fat dairy food as whole milk, ice cream, hard cheese, butter, and sour cream.’
  • 102) ‘Marshall identified whole milk as one of the main sources of saturated fat in the diet.’
  • 103) ‘About 45 percent of the calories in whole milk comes from saturated fat.’
  • 104) ‘To be healthy is to be whole, and without unification of the mind, body and spirit, a person will fall ill.’
  • 105) ‘You express and share feelings, also help others to feel healthy and whole around you.’
  • 106) ‘Discover your true, whole, healthy self!’
  • 107) ‘Similarly, multiculturalism teaches students to see all cultural outlooks as self-contained wholes.’
  • 108) ‘All ritual systems, from the most ‘primitive’ to the most ‘advanced,’ are coherent wholes in which the human body stands for and symbolizes the social body.’
  • 109) ‘For another, frequent guest contributions by Sinead O'Conner and Peter Gabriel made the albums seem less like complete wholes and more like fragmented compilations.’
  • 110) ‘Treating societies as wholes or as entities runs the risk of losing sight of these differences and the dynamic they generate in behavioral change.’
  • 111) ‘Other works combine sculptural and electronic, old-fashioned and New Age elements into synthetic wholes.’
  • 112) ‘They do not lend themselves, as entities or wholes, to scientific hypothesis testing.’
  • 113) ‘One is to say that when we are thinking of our lives as wholes, we should think in terms of flourishing or welfare or well-being rather than happiness.’
  • 114) ‘When one looks at Nature as a whole, there are multitudinous diversities contained within it, and many wholes that exist within it.’
  • 115) ‘Holism is the theory that certain wholes must be regarded as greater than the sum of their parts.’
  • 116) ‘Memories might better be thought of as a collage or a jigsaw puzzle than as ‘tape recordings,’ ‘pictures’ or ‘video clips’ stored as wholes.’
  • 117) ‘Entire organs such as the kidneys, heart, and brain are capable of continuing their functions, as quasi-independent wholes, when isolated from the organism and supplied with the proper nutrients.’
  • 118) ‘Rarely can any director's reputation have been so much at variance between his peers - to whom Richardson was brilliant, passionate, mercurial - and his reviewers, for whom his films rarely cohered as unified wholes.’
  • 119) ‘Intuitively, some wholes have a natural division that takes precedence over others; a sentence, for example, is divided into words, syllables, and letters, in precisely that order.’
  • 120) ‘Zero and fractions were interesting to examine for different reasons: zero because it is an abstract notion meaning absence, and fractions because they are technical computations derived from wholes.’
  • 121) ‘The exhibition, which travels later this year to the USA and Europe under the auspices of the Dutch embassy, is described by Verwey as comprising two halves that actually belong to different wholes.’
  • 122) ‘While there is nothing wrong with this in theory, it flies in the face of Brubaker's otherwise convincingly argued claim that the miniatures were often conceived as complex visual wholes.’
  • 123) ‘In previous exhibitions, her canvases always struck me as beautifully painted but excessively whimsical, full of details that seemed more interesting than the wholes.’
  • 124) ‘It describes wholes in terms of parts, the higher in terms of the lower, and matter and mechanism as somehow more ‘real’ than the mind that investigates them.’
  • 125) ‘But only a few of the tracks cohere into solid wholes; the rest leave the impression that they're on the threshold of greatness, but still skewed a few degrees in the wrong direction.’
  • 126) ‘Foer's interest in doubles, in halves that must become wholes, in intertwining the fictional and the ‘real,’ is more than just a gimmick.’
  • 127) ‘The head teacher says that their entire budget for the whole of last year amounted to $16.’
  • 128) ‘Only seventy odd years ago the whole of humanity thought that the entire universe verse was just our own Milky Way.’
  • 129) ‘Finally, the assertion that everything happens by necessity seems to leave the whole of morality in doubt.’
  • 130) ‘You'll see more brawls on a British high street in one night than you will in the whole of Italy in an entire year.’
  • 131) ‘The whole previous tradition of dance has been to emphasize dance as the joy of moving to the music itself.’
  • 132) ‘Often the whole high street becomes gridlocked, meanwhile half the street is blocked by cars parked illegally.’
  • 133) ‘A hand shake is exciting by it's closeness and novelty, but hongi or a hug is a whole different level.’
  • 134) ‘This gave rise to a whole new style of English glassware quite distinct from intricate Venetian fashions.’
  • 135) ‘I just got off the phone with him, and I think he senses that this is a whole new ballgame now.’
  • 136) ‘The designers have to wake up and realize that the clothes they create can influence a whole new generation.’
  • 137) ‘But now we can talk to sponsors about a whole new set-up, with nine games in Scotland in this league alone.’
  • 138) ‘You need a whole other level of proficiency, to be able to film close to real time and to be consistent.’
  • 139) ‘And 17 years on, Soft Cell are back, with an album to influence a whole new generation.’
  • 140) ‘She also lent me a couple of Ben Elton books which were good, but not as good for relaxing as they have a whole dark seedy side.’
  • 141) ‘‘It only takes one small piece to start a whole new infestation somewhere else,’ he said.’
  • 142) ‘This sounds a whole lot more possible, a little like a vastly more sophisticated version of Sim City, with us as the Sims.’
  • 143) ‘Don't get me wrong, they still play the same two songs over and over, they just sound a whole lot better.’
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