[ UK /hˈə‍ʊl/ ]
[ US /ˈhoʊɫ/ ]
ADJECTIVE
  1. (of siblings) having the same parents
    whole brothers and sisters
  2. not injured or harmed
  3. including all components without exception; being one unit or constituting the full amount or extent or duration; complete
    a whole wardrobe for the tropics
    a whole week
    gave his whole attention
    a whole loaf of bread
    the baby cried the whole trip home
    the whole hog
  4. exhibiting or restored to vigorous good health
    hale and hearty
    a whole person again
    whole in mind and body
  5. acting together as a single undiversified whole
    a solid voting bloc
NOUN
  1. all of something including all its component elements or parts
    Europe considered as a whole
    the whole of American literature
  2. an assemblage of parts that is regarded as a single entity
    the team is a unit
    how big is that part compared to the whole?
ADVERB
  1. to a complete degree or to the full or entire extent (`whole' is often used informally for `wholly')
    he was wholly convinced
    the directions were all wrong
    she felt right at home
    it was not altogether her fault
    an altogether new approach
    he fell right into the trap
    entirely satisfied with the meal
    a whole new idea
    it was completely different from what we expected
    a totally new situation
    was completely at fault
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How To Use whole In A Sentence

  • But then on the other hand, the whole cosmos or universe is based on this love or compassion.
  • For the wholehearted follower of Francis (`I am your breviary ! RIDDLE ME THIS
  • It has been about the whole squad all year. Times, Sunday Times
  • There were gobs of fat and sinewy bits throughout the whole rib cut - it was soooo wrong.
  • The two-hour show was televised on the national network so the whole country could watch.
  • So spake he, and Athene was mightily angered at heart, and chid Odysseus in wrathful words: ‘Odysseus, thou hast no more steadfast might nor any prowess, as when for nine whole years continually thou didst battle with the Trojans for high born Helen, of the white arms, and many men thou slewest in terrible warfare, and by thy device the wide-wayed city of Priam was taken. Book XXII
  • Regardless of the outcome of the trial, the whole episode has been a huge embarrassment to English football.
  • The pills should be swallowed whole.
  • There's a strangeness about the whole image, as though a story lurks untold. The Times Literary Supplement
  • Also, thankfully, Neil Diamond's Cherry Cherry Christmas includes a version of "The Chanukah Song" that should give that mensch Adam Sandler a whole lot of nachas. David Wild: The Perfect Semitic Storm: Five Reasons Everybody Should Buy the New Christmas Albums by Neil Diamond, Bob Dylan And Barry Manilow This Season
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